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Enhancing a Culture of Quality, Safety & Respect: Addressing Disruptive Behavior

Preparation Noteslong version


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Enhancing a Culture of Safety: Addressing Disruptive Behavior


Presentation to: Add Your Unit/Department Name

Agenda

Disruptive Behavior defined Impact of Disruptive Behavior on workplace quality and safety Causes of Disruptive Behavior Content of revised UMHS Policy 04-06-047 Disruptive or Inappropriate Behaviors by UMHS Personnel Importance to Our Work Team Q &A

Objectives
After reviewing and discussing UMHS Policy 04-06-047 Disruptive or Inappropriate Behavior by a UMHS Employee or Faculty Member at the end of this session participants will:

Understand the potential negative impact of disruptive or inappropriate behavior on workplace quality and safety throughout the organizationin clinical and non-clinical areas Be able to provide examples of appropriate and inappropriate behavior Understand recommended guidelines for reacting in the moment to disruptive or inappropriate behavior Use paper or on-line reporting tools to report inappropriate behavior

Disruptive Behavior defined


Any conduct that interferes with the effective operation of UMHS or suggests a threat to UMHS personnel or to patient care . That a persons behavior is unusual, unorthodox, or different is not alone sufficient to classify it as disruptive behavior.

Lateral Violence defined


Inappropriate behavior, confrontation or conflict between coworkers that humiliates, degrades or otherwise indicates a lack of respect for the dignity and worth of an individual often caused by communication mishaps.

Disruptive Behavior Linked To


Medical errors & adverse outcomes Reduced staff performance, innovation Increased staff turnover Patient dissatisfaction Lack of information sharing Processing delays

Too Often, Often Unreported With Negative Consequences


Studies with similar findings across several Health Care organizations

> 90% have witnessed disruptive behavior by MDs 30% - knew nurses who left hospital as a result of disruptive
behavior

> 70 % of nurses witnessed disruptive behavior among nurses

14% aware of actual adverse consequences


serious problem within and across disciplines
Voluntary Hospital Association 2002, 2005 studies (Rosenstein)

But I Dont Work In Clinical Area.

Disruptive and Inappropriate behavior can negatively impact your work environment too. The policy applies to all UMHS personnel

UMHS Survey Measures Respect


UMHS asks questions about respect in our workplace in our Employee Engagement survey.

Q29We hold ourselves and others appropriately accountable if we fail to meet our commitments Q30We treat each other with mutual respect even when we have clear differences of opinion

We are making some improvements and have opportunity for more

What are our units survey results?

It Does Happen Here! Quotes on Inappropriate Behavior

The doctors can be disrespectful to the nurses who can be disrespectful to techs who are disrespectful to housekeepers, etc.) There are no consequences for these behaviors so you become demoralized and they just continue.

Surgeons are very belittlingthey call you names . . .


There is a director who screams at his supervisors all the time and no one does anything because they are afraid of him.

I would like to see people written uppeople dont take things seriously. Supervisors hate confronting people.
From 2007 UMHS Employee Engagement Focus Groups

Causes of Disruptive Behavior


Historical factors tolerance and indifference to disruptive behavior Individual factors high stakes high emotion personal problems fatigue substance abuse lack of interpersonal, coping or conflict-management skills lack of tolerance or understand of workplace diversity Leaders who fail to address unprofessional conduct through formal systems are indirectly promoting it.

Systemic factors increased productivity demands changes in shifts cost containment requirements rotations of interdepartmental support staff

We See It But We Dont Speak Up


Because: Thats the way its always been. Who will listen? I dont want to get in trouble. I can take it. We can overlook it because of the persons technical expertise, rank, etc.

UMHS Strategic Principles/Values


UMHS values include:
RESPECT, TRUST, INTEGRITY

Our Strategic Principles include: Integration, Collaboration & Team Work Taking Care of Our Own Cultural Competency Integrity and Trust

UMHS Policy 04-06-047--Disruptive or Inappropriate Behavior by UMHS Personnel

States UMHS commitment to addressing disruptive/ inappropriate behavior by UMHS personnel Expresses importance of collaboration, communication and collegiality to patient care, education, research & effective operation Acknowledges that reporting can be intimidating, therefore provides support and process
Outlines who to report to Allows for anonymous reporting

Identifies the procedure for reporting


Specifies outcomes, including potential consequence of formal corrective action

UMHS Policy 04-06-047--Disruptive or Inappropriate Behavior by UMHS Personnel


The policy also provides:

Definitions Examples of Appropriate and Inappropriate Conduct Policy Standards Procedures General Guidelines, including related policies Exhibits A. guidelines for reaction in the moment B. reporting form C. reporting process flowchart References used in creating the policy

Conduct

Appropriate Conduct Demonstrates clear, direct, honest and respectful communication Accepts and provides feedback in a constructive and civil manner

Inappropriate Conduct Threatening or abusive language (e.g. belittling, berating, screaming . . .) Derogatory comments (as opposed to constructive criticism) about the quality of care being provided by the Health System . . .

Excerpts from examples provided in UMHS Policy 04-06-047. See page 2 of policy

Exhibit A: Guidelines for Reacting in the Moment to Disruptive Behavior


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Address the situation at the time it occurs Redirect the focus onto the patients needs to depersonalize Move the conflict away from patient areasif needed closer to other staff If you witness verbal abuse, signal to co-workers to act as a witness If a violent act occurs (immediate assistance needed), contact a supervisor and dial 911

From Defusing Disruptive Behavior: A Workbook for Healthcare Leaders. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations Resources. 2007

Procedure

Encourages reporting at department level Strongly encourages individuals subjected to or witnessing disruptive behavior to report it Requires the reporters supervisor to act: Document Resolve May include involving the next administrative level and HR in the investigation/resolution

Reporting Options

Complete a Behavior Report Form or report verbally to the supervisor who will document the form
fax to Risk Management 734 763 5300 or on-line (in development) at 866 990-0111 or submit on-line to https://www.tnwinc.com/WebReport/

Call the University Compliance Hotline


If a violent act occurs or immediate assistance is needed, contact a supervisor or dial 911

Behavior Report Form


Strongly Encouraged to Report! 1) Print Page in Policy (Exhibit B) & Fax to Risk Management - or 2) Online submission

Behavior Form Follow Through


1) Risk Management forwards online reports

to appropriate department
2) Per Disruptive Behavior policy, the

reporters supervisor follows up:


a) Resolves with his/her own department

b) Relays report to disruptive persons supervisor 3) Per departmental policy, appropriate

action is determined at the local level


4) Data tracked through the RiskPro system.

Reports produced by:


a) Individual

b) Department c) Unit/Division

(Faxed forms are inputted by Risk Management)

Joint Commission Standard LD.03.01.01

Sentinel Event Alert #40 issued July 2008

The alert cites a national survey on intimidation that says 40 % of clinicians have kept quiet or remained passive during incidents. Most have witnessed disruptive behavior.

JC Standard LD .03.01.01

Leaders create and maintain a culture of safety and quality throughout the [organization].

UMHS Policy 04-06-047 Disruptive or Inappropriate Behaviors by UMHS Personnel

Importance to Our Work Area

Can I Avoid All Conflict?

No. Conflict can not always be avoided. Conflict is a normal and can be a healthy part of team interactions Conflict handled appropriately allows team members to:
Share ideas Voice concerns Improve team relationships
RESPECT

Managing conflict in a respectful manner is key.

Key Considerations

We (our patients and our co-workers) are worth the investment Intervention leads to insight which leads to changed behavior. The better the Patient Safety Culture, the better the Health System performance
Every health system employee has a role to play. Leadership engagement and oversight critical. Report your concerns to me.

Questions??

Manager Resources

The following slides are additional resources for supervisor/manager for use in preparing for the presentation.

Resources

(Place in Slide Show Mode and mouse over program name to view resources for each area.)

In addition to exploring resources in your own area, the following sources provide some or all of the following:

Consultation Assessment Intervention

Training Programs Referrals

Department Services, Books, Videos


Books & Articles Dutton, Jane. Energize Your Workplace: How To Create & Sustain high Quality Connections at Work. San Francisco. Jossey-Bass. 2003. Farber, June. Smart Nursing: How to Create a Positive Work Environment that Empowers and Retains Nurses . New York. Springer Series on Nursing Management and Leadership. 2005. Frederickson, Barbara. Positivity. Groundbreaking Research Reveals How to Embrace the Hidden Strength of Positive Emotions, Overcome negativity and Thrive. New York. Crown. 2009. Tarkan, Laurie. Arrogant, Abusive and Disruptive and a Doctor. New York Times. December 2, 2008. Rosenstein, A.H., ODaniel, M. Managing Disruptive Physician Behavior: Impact on Staff Relationships and Patient Care. Neurology. 70. 2008. 1564-1570. VideosSee Employee Resources-Audio/Visual Resource Inventory http://www.med.umich.edu/i/umhshr/avinventory.htm#Conflict MANAGING CONFLICT VIDEOS Self-Discipline and Emotional Control:How to Stay Calm and Productive Under Pressure, Volume 1 (Brief video description) Self-Discipline and Emotional Control:How to Stay Calm and Productive Under Pressure, Volume 2 (Brief video description) Dealing With Conflict (Brief video description)19 Min Communicating Non-Defensively (Brief video description)20 Min Managing Stress (Brief video description)26 Min Dealing With Conflict and Confrontation, Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (Brief video description)

From U-M Health System Policies and Procedures UMHS Policy 04-06-047, Disruptive or Inappropriate Behavior by UMHS Personnel Section IV. Examples of Conduct To aid in the clarity, examples of "appropriate" conduct, and "inappropriate or disruptive" conduct include, but are not limited to:

APPROPRIATE
Demonstrates clear, direct, honest and respectful communication Responds to pages in a timely, civil manner Responds to requests in a cooperative manner Demonstrates respect for patients, their family members and staff Clarifies points of agreement and seeks to partner to resolve points of disagreement in patient-care or other work-related matters Accepts and provides feedback in a constructive and civil manner Respects need for privacy Handles problems or dilemmas in a cooperative, respectful manner Chooses appropriate timing to bring up problems for discussion Offers appreciation and affirmation to peers-coworkers when they function well Accepts the inevitability of mistakes as a learning opportunity Reliably demonstrates patient care in adherence to agreed-upon standards

INAPPROPRIATE
Threatening or abusive language regardless of medium directed at patients, their guests, or UMHS personnel (e.g., belittling, berating, screaming and/or non-constructive criticism that intimidates, undermines confidence, or implies incompetence); Threatening or abusive behavior (e.g. throwing items, slamming doors); Degrading or demeaning comments or nonverbal communication regarding patients or their guests, UMHS personnel, or the Health System Profanity or similarly offensive language while on Health System sites and/or while speaking with UMHS patients, their guests or personnel; Physical contact with another individual that is or appears threatening or intimidating; Derogatory comments (as opposed to constructive criticism) about the quality of care being provided by the Health System, a medical staff member, or any other individual outside of appropriate medical staff and/or administrative channels; Medical record entries impugning the quality of care being provided by the Health System, medical staff members or any other individual; Imposing unreasonable requirements on fellow UMHS personnel; Refusal to abide by University of Michigan Policies, including UMHHC Medical Staff Bylaws, U-M Medical School Bylaws, Practices, Agreements and Policies (e.g. Hand Hygiene and Smoke-Free Environment).

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I avoid all conflict? What if I am afraid to report because I fear retaliation? What resources are available to me if I want more skills in handling difficult situationsso that my behavior is not viewed as inappropriate? My teammates always yell at eachthats how we get our work done. Thats okay, right? What if the person I want to report is my supervisor or another manager? Can I report a single occurrence of inappropriate or disruptive behavior?

Scenario Activity
Purpose: To practice effective ways of responding to offensive language and behavior in conjunction with Exhibit A of the policy. Exhibit A :Guidelines for Reacting in the Moment to Disruptive Behavior

Address the situation at the time it occurs Redirect the focus onto the patients needs to depersonalize Move the conflict away from patent areas if needed closer to other staff If you witness verbal abuse, signal to co-workers to act as a witness If a violent act occurs (immediate assistance needed), contact a supervisor and dial 911

Activity: In small groups discuss and then formulate a response to one of the 7 scenarios provided by responding to the questions at the end of the scenario. Be prepared to share your response with the larger group.

Debrief

Scenarios follow

Scenarios for Group Discussion Enhancing a Culture of Quality, Safety & Respect: Addressing Disruptive Behavior

Scenario I: Two Managers Scenario II: Outpatient Clinic Manager and Patient Assistant Scenario III: Faculty Nurse Technical Staff

Scenarios for Group Discussion Enhancing a Culture of Quality, Safety & Respect: Addressing Disruptive Behavior ~ contd

Scenario IV: Office Administrator and Environmental Services Staff Scenario V: Faculty Nurse

Scenario VI: Manager (Jane) & Outpatient Assistant (John)

Scenarios for Group Discussion Enhancing a Culture of Quality, Safety & Respect: Addressing Disruptive Behavior ~ contd

Scenario VII: Physician and Nurse Scenario VIII: Two office workers Scenario IX: Allied Health Professional Faculty

Resources

Nursing Health & Safety Committee Educational Services for Nursing Educational Plans for Management of Aggressive Behavior 734-615-9721

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Resources

UMHS Human Resource Services Human Resource Consultants Human Resources Organizational Effectiveness Consultants Mediations Services Fernando Caetano 734 647 5538

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Resources

Compliance Office Information: 734-615-4400

Compliance Questions or Concerns 24 hour Compliance Hotline:


866-990-0111

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Resources

Michigan Healthy Community Understanding U Website Assistance in Managing the Ups / Downs of Life Featuring tools, strategies, tutorials and resources
http://hr.umich.edu/mhealthy/programs/mental _emotional/understandingu/

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Resources

UMHS Employee Assistance Program Supervisory, Staff and Team Consultations 763-5409

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Resources

Health System Security Services Full 24-hour coverage Emergencies: 911 Non Emergencies: 936-7890

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Resources

Heather Wurster Policy Lead , Resource for Staff, and Medical School Point Person Maureen Naszradi - Medical Staff Peer Review Coordinator 232 - 1687

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