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THE GAS PIPELINE

NETWORK IN TRINIDAD
AND TOBAGO
CONTENT

• NGC’s Business and how it relates to our Suppliers and


Consumers
• History of NGC and creation of the Gas Transmission &
Distribution Network
• Management & Maintenance of the pipeline Network by NGC
• Optimizing Existing gas supply
• Seeking new reserves
WHAT’S NGC’S BUSINESS?

• NGC’s Core Business is the PURCHASE, TRANSPORT and SALE of Natural Gas to the Local
Down Stream and Petrochemical gas based Industries
• The gas is transported via an extensive network of approximately 1000km of both Offshore &
Onshore pipelines with a current overall maximum installed transportation capacity of
5Bscf/d
• NGC’s traditional business of compressing, purchasing, transporting and selling natural gas to
industry provides over 75 per cent of its revenue stream.
• The Company’s customer base comprises power generation plants located at Cove-Tobago,
Point Lisas, Trinity-Couva, Union- La Brea, Penal and Port of Spain
WHO ARE THEIR SUPPLIERS?

• EOG
• SHELL (Formerly BG)
• BP
• Repsol
• BHP Billiton
WHO ARE THEIR CUSTOMERS?

• Local Petrochemical producers of : Ammonia, methanol, and oil refining


• Power Generation Facilities
• Metals/ Heavy Industry eg. Iron Ore Reduction Facilities (5%)
• Light industrial / commercial / CNG
• Export as LNG
NGC – EARLY HISTORY

• By the 1960s and early 1970s Trinidad had an embryonic natural gas pipeline network centered at the Penal
area.
• The government sought to encourage further exploration of the resource as well as to expand its utilization.
This it did by funding the creation of a natural gas industry received from the ‘oil boom’ surpluses of the 1973-
1975 period, which provided the revenues to develop a modern gas-based industrial estate and port at Point
Lisas in central Trinidad.

• 1975- The first imperative was that the country had to guarantee gas supplies to the prospective investor. This
necessitated upstream development so, Amoco, the existing producer, was given a contract for gas field
development in waters of approximately 200 feet. The second imperative was to create an entity that could
administer this contract, as well as transport and sell the gas commodity to the proposed plants. This entity
involved the creation of NGC as a state enterprise.
NGC – EARLY HISTORY

• NGC was established in 1975 and total gas sales for the first year was 370 mcf
• NGC took over operation and maintenance of T&TEC 16-inch pipeline from Penal to POS
• 1977- 24” land line from Beachfield to Picton valve station.
• 1978 - 24” Marine line was completed which expanded the country's transmission capacity to 400mmscf/d
• 1980’s – Continued to construct various lines
• 1981-1982 - NGC ‘Teak’ and ‘Poui’ were commissioned
• 13 miles of 20” line between Picton to Phoenix Park
• 35 miles of 30” cross country line from Beachfield to Phoenix Park Valve Station
• 30” marine line from Cassia offshore in anticipation of increasing demands for customers

• Over 180 MMscf of natural gas was being flared on a daily basis in the Teak and Poui marine fields located off the south east coast of Trinidad. In
July 1979, in an effort to stem this wastage of an increasingly valuable resource, NGC was mandated to implement the ‘Flare Gas Conservation
Project. Installation and commissioning of NGC ‘Teak’ and ‘Poui’ in 1981/1982- compressed gas from this project provided NGC with its cheapest
supply of natural gas allowing the Company to provide the country with subsidized fuel for its electricity needs.
NCG THEN TO NOW

• Increase in gas sales from 150MMscf/d in 1970 to 446MMscf/d in 1990


• In 990, NGC moved all its land-based personnel to the Point Lisas Industrial Estate
• The number of consumers increased from 3 to 10 large consumers at Point Lisas Industrial
Estate and 56 Light industries
• In 2000 gas sales crossed 1Bscf/d
• In 2005 Cross Island Pipeline was completed to deliver gas to Atlantic
• In 2007 Beachfield upgrade project was completed
• Expansion of customer base from 19 customers in 1975 to 33 large consumers & 113 Small
consumer
NGC THEN TO NOW

• NGC has refocused its energies as the sole transporter and merchant of natural gas. In 2004, NGC
transported and sold over 1.3 Bcf (excluding gas transported for LNG) to over 30 heavy consumers and over
100 small manufacturers. Today the share of natural gas in the total industrial energy demand in Trinidad and
Tobago is now in excess of 90 percent, and additional growth is anticipated in the future.

• The Cross-Island Pipeline Project (CIPP) and Beachfield Upstream Development Project (BUD) involved the
construction of 56-inch and 36-inch-diameter lines on land and in the marine environments respectively, which
on completion will increase the network by 143 km to 767 km, as well as increase capacity to 2.4 Bcf/d.
• In 1975, it is hard to understand that NGC started business life with very marginal profits of
TT$19,000.00. However after strength to strength, and many challenges, both from within and out, in 2011,
NGC’s profit is TT$6.4billion and gas sales have risen to TT$ 19billion which is a horrendous increase from the
revenue of TT$180,000 recorded in 1976.
NGC’S MAJOR TRANSMISSION PIPELINES
Tobago Pipeline project

NEO:36’’North-Eastern Offshore pipeline

Union Pipeline

Beachfleld Upstream Development Pipeline

56” Cross Island Pipe

36” Pipeline from Beachfield to Pt.Lisas- “Project 2000”

36” Diameter Pipeline from Beachfield to Point Fortin


NGC’S MAJOR TRANSMISSION PIPELINES

30 “ Pipeline from Beachfield to Pt.Lisas

20/24” Offshore/Onshore Pipeline

16” Penal to Point Fortin Pipeline

NGC’S Distribution Network: ranges from 2” to 14 “ diameter


pipelines
ABOVE GROUND INSTALLATIONS

• BeachField Operations
• Beachfeild Launcher Station
• The Abyssinia 30-inch Slug Catcher
• 30-inch Mayaro Regulator Station
• Galeota 24-inch Slug Catcher
• Phoenix Park Valve Station
• Tobago Natural Gas Receiving Facility
OFFSHORE TO
INLAND PIPEWORK
NETWOK
DISTRIBUTION
SUPPLIERS

• Contractual agreement exists between NGC & the offshore suppliers who are
committed to providing a defined volume of gas
• NGC is obligated to take gas from the suppliers and pay for same
• The gas sold must be delivered at the operating pressure of the buyers pipeline up to a
max. pressure of 1000psig (typically 850 psig)
• Supplier shall deliver and buyer shall accept the gas sold at the Delivery Point (Measuring
skid)
SUPPLIERS - GAS QUALITY

• Reasonably free from dust, gum, gum-forming constituents and other deleterious & liquid
matter
• Contain no free water in the liquid state
• Be at a temperature not to exceed 120F
• Contain no more than 0.005 molecules percent free oxygen
• Contain not more than 5% by volume of carbon dioxide and othes non-hydrocarbon gas
BEACHFIELD UPSTREAM
DEVELOPMENT (BUD) PIPELINE
• The 36-inch-diameter BUD marine line was constructed in
2004. It served as the catalyst for NGC to deepen and expand
its operations at Beachfield. The capacity of NGC’s pipeline
system increased from 1.4 Bcf to 2 Bcf in anticipation of
higher demands by new gas-based customers.
• In 2005, NGC established a new department, Beachfield
Operations within the Pipeline Operations Division to
manage and maintain its expanded and upgraded facilities in
the Beachfield area (including the older facilities at Abyssinia,
Mayaro and Galeota
TOBAGO PIPELINE PROJECT

• The Tobago pipeline is a 12-inch line which can carry up to


119 mmscf/d from the BHP Billiton offshore field to the Cove
Eco-Industrial Business Parkland in Lowlands, Tobago. The first
gas was received in November 2012 and the pipeline now
supplies natural gas to the T&TEC power generation plant
located at Cove. It will also supply natural gas to the
prospective light industrial users at the estate. In addition, the
pipeline also creates the potential to supply other areas of
Tobago, and can facilitate the transportation of natural gas to
the Eastern Caribbean
56-INCH CROSS-ISLAND PIPELINE

• The 56–inch diameter Cross-Island pipeline was commissioned in


2005. It transports natural gas on behalf of LNG shippers, including
bpTT, BGTT and NGC for the Atlantic LNG Train IV in Point Fortin
and also supplies industrial estates at Union and La Brea in
southwest Trinidad.
• The pipeline is 76.5 kilometres long with a design capacity of 2.4
BCF and an inlet pressure of 950 psi; with compression, its capacity
can increase to 3 BCF. At the time of its completion, it was the
largest diameter natural gas pipeline in the western hemisphere and
its first use on November 25th 2005 heralded the successful
commissioning of the US$260 million pipeline project on schedule
and within budget.
36-INCH NORTH-EASTERN
OFFSHORE PIPELINE (NEO)
• The North-Eastern Offshore Pipeline (NEO) was commissioned
in 2011. The 94 km, 36-inch-diameter pipeline runs from the BHP
Billiton Gas Export Platform (GEP) in the Angostura field, located
off the north-east coast of Trinidad, to Mayaro Bay. The line
continues on land to NGC’s new accumulator station at its
Beachfield facility.
• First gas delivered in May 2011
• NEO delivers 220 MMscf/d
CRITICAL POINT AT THE
GATHERING SITE
• This is the area where all the process gas from the offshore facilities arrive on-land and enter
the on-land pipelines to be transported to the consumers. Consists of Liquid collection
Check meters Pressure monitoring and ESD
• New Abyssinia Accumulator Station (NAAS) receives gas from suppliers through 30”, 24” and
36” Beachfield Upstream Development (BUD) and 36” North Eastern Offshore (NEO)
offshore pipelines. This gas is distributed via a 48” to the launcher Beachfield Central
Launcher Station to NGC 24/20” , 30” & 36” transmission pipelines to Pheonix Park Valve
Station (PPVS)
• CIP (Cross Island Pipeline) Beachfield – this site receives gas from BP and Shell/BG Beachfield
facilities for transmission to Atlantic
• 840 MMscf/d from BP
• 23 MMscf/d from Shell/BG
• Beachfiled condensate station – any liquid removed from the gas is collected here for sale to
Petrotrin
INLAND PIPEWORK
NETWORK
DISTRIBUTION
LARGE CONSUMER STATIONS

• Each consumer station is designed to give NGC the capability to:


• Monitor the volume of the gas consumed
• Monitor gas supply pressured
• Regulate gas supply
• Final point for liquid separation and liquid collection
• Gas Consumption by large consumers range between 12MMscf/d to 150MMscf/d
• Stations are automated and connected to SCADA
• Orifice Meters are used to measure gas volumes
• Meter size range from 6” to 16”
• Average supply pressure is 350psi
VALVE STATIONS

• Primary functions:
• Measure & Monitor
• ESD (Emergency Shutdown)
• Condensate Collection

• Some sites however facilitate CRITICAL control to ensure proper balancing of the gas supply
to the customer:
• Picton
• PPVS capacity 1.4 Bscf/d (Upgrade in process to 2Bsfc/d)
• UVS capacity 200MMscf/d
THE PHOENIX PARK VALVE STATION

• The Phoenix Park Valve Station (PPVS), located at Savonetta


adjacent to the Point Lisas Industrial Estate, is owned and
operated by NGC.
• It is a highly critical facility in NGC’s pipeline system as it
serves to remove liquids from the gas flow before it is
transported to Phoenix Park Gas Processors Limited (PPGPL)
via a 48-inch diameter pipeline. PPGPL removes the heavier
gases and the dry (residue) gas is then returned to the PPVS.
From there, the dry (residue) gas is distributed to NGC’s
customers in Point Lisas and across the country.
SMALL CONSUMERS

• Gas consumption by small consumers range between 0.5MMscf/d to 2.5MMscf/d


• Small consumer stations are not automated
• PD Meters are used to measure gas volumes
• Average line size is 2”
• Average supply pressure is <175 psi
HOW DOES NGC MANAGE THE NETWORK

• SCADA- Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition


• Elements of the SCADA system
• RTU and associated hardware (inputs/outputs)
• HMI associated hardware (IT/Software)
• Communication system
RIGHT OF WAY (ROW)

• NGC is guided by the US DOT (Department of Transportation) Standard


for the Transmission and Distribution of Natural Gas in pipelines.
• The ROW is often recognizable as a corridor, clear of trees , buildings and
other structures. Pipeline markers, painted stencils and title markers are
methods used to identify ROW
• Why are they maintained?
• It enables NGC to gain easy access for inspection maintenance e, testing and
responding to emergencies
• It maintains a clear and open It identifies an area that restrict certain activities
in order to protect the landowner and communities through which the
pipeline passes and to maintain the integrity of the pipeline itself.
CORROSION MITIGATION AT NGC

• External corrosion control


• Coating , Fusion bonded epoxy coating or FBE coating
• Cathodic Protection systems: Impressed Current Cathodic protection (ICCP) systems, Sacrificial
Cathodic Protection
• Direct and Indirect assessments Surveys (CIS and DCVG-Direct current voltage gradient surveys)

• Internal Corrosion mitigation:


• Biocides- an additive used to kill or control bacterial
• Corrosion inhibitors – a chemical substance or combination of substances when present in the
proper concetrations in the environment, reduces corrosion
NATURAL GAS SUPPLY OUTLOOK
FOR 2017 AND BEYOND
OPTIMIZING EXISTING GAS SUPPLY

SEEKING NEW RESERVES


OPTIMIZING EXISTING GAS SUPPLY

WORKING WITH SUPPLIERS


OPTIMIZING EXISTING GAS SUPPLY

Identify reduce eliminate

Bottle neck in the Where unplanned


upstream supply outages are of
system concern
OPTIMIZING
EXISTING GAS
SUPPLY WORKING
WITH SUPPLIERS
OPTIMIZING EXISTING GAS SUPPLY
WORKING WITH SUPPLIERS

• TROC project undertaken by BPTT in optimizing upstream gas delivery.


• Expected to be online in 2017
• Expected to deliver approximately 200 MMSCF/d.
• Owned by bpTT, but Atlantic LNG will serve as its operator.
• Project was sanctioned in July 2016
SEEKING NEW RESERVES
IN THE SHORT TERM
• Mandate: bring new reserves into production to meet existing upstream contractual
obligations and to cover depletion.
• Two initiatives:
• Development of the Sercan field and Juniper Project.
BHP Billiton increase output from the Angostura Phase III, estimated to be 500 bscf of
recoverable natural gas.
SEEKING NEW RESERVES
IN THE MEDIUM TERM
• Developing small and marginal fields
• NGC will concomitantly :
• Partnership with MOE & DeNovo Energy Limited
• DeNovo acquired 80% ownership of Blocks 1a and 1b.
• 20% of blocks 1a and 1b is currently owned by Petrorin which NGC was finalizing the
agreement to acquire Petrorin’s share in the blocks.
SEEKING NEW RESERVES
IN THE LONG TERM
• NGC partnership with our Venezuelan neighbor PDVSA ( the Venezuelan state oil and
gas company.
• SHELL was also invited in this joint venture.
• Agreement was finalized in December 2016 for the development of the Dragon field to create
natural gas supply for Trinidad.
• Loran – Manatee field straddles the maritime boarder of T&T and Venezuela
NATURAL GAS
SUPPLY
OUTLOOK FOR
2017 AND
BEYOND
NATURAL GAS
SUPPLY
OUTLOOK FOR
2017 AND
BEYOND
NATURAL GAS
SUPPLY
OUTLOOK FOR
2017 AND
BEYOND
REFERENCES

• https://www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/media/press-releases/bp-trinidad-and-tobago-
starts-up-trinidad-onshore-compression-project.html
• http://ngc.co.tt/