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Bridge Construction

Once you have designed your bridge on Bridge Builder,


you can make a VRML file to see it in 3-D. Go above
and below the deck to see how the trusses are joined

VRML 3-D Image of a student’s bridge


You have now completed the design of
your bridge. The most difficult part now
begins and that is the
construction of your bridge.

To build a bridge you must join


many separate pieces.
The stronger the joint,
the stronger the bridge.
We are going to view several methods
of joining your bridge together.
Butted Joint

A Butt joint is the weakest type of joint.


Two pieces of wood joined at the ends,
do not support each other.
All that holds them together is the glue.
Scarf Joint

Scarf joints do provide more support.


If a force were applied downward on
this joint, one piece of wood, would
press against another adding strength.
Lap Joint

The more two pieces of wood overlap,


the more they can help each other.
The dotted line represents a pin.
A pin prevents the two pieces of wood
from pulling apart.
Half-Lap Joint

This is one of the strongest types of joints.


Lamination

Lamination adds weight,


but can provide huge amounts of support.
Notched Joint

Notching locks pieces together


and adds strength.
Beveled Joint

Tight fitting beveled joints prevent


gaps and spaces that weaken the bridge.
Beveled pieces can be pinned also.
View the next few slides for construction
techniques used on a real bridge.

Can you determine the


construction technique they used?
Photo By: Doug Porter
This is a half-lap joint

Photo By: Doug Porter


Photo By: Doug Porter
This joint combines
a notch and a bevel

Photo By: Doug Porter


Photo By: Doug Porter
This joint show an excellent example of
lamination. Pins and bolts were used to
hold the boards together

Photo By: Doug Porter


Photo By: Doug Porter
Here is an example
of lap joints

Photo By: Doug Porter


Photo By: Doug Porter
These joints show a butted joint
and a notched joint side by side

Photo By: Doug Porter


Putting it all Together

Joining the trusses and adding the deck


Photo By: Doug Porter
Putting it all Together

Photo By: Doug Porter

Beveled and Notched Joints


Putting it all Together
Photo By: Doug Porter

Lap, Bevel and Notch Joints


Putting it all Together
Photo By: Doug Porter
Testing

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