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COMBAT LIFE SAVER(CLS)

A Combat Lifesaver (CLS) is non-medic


soldier with moderate emergency medical
training to provide care at the point of
wounding.
Battlefield deaths
massive trauma/ mutilating blast trauma
massive head injuries
massive haemorrhage
tension pneumothorax
airway obstruction
Terminology
Casualty: soldier who is injured
Rescuer: another soldier attempting to aid
casualty
Self aid: treatment that casualty gives to himself
Medical treatment facilities
collection point: sites to which combat casualties
are delivered.
Terminology contd..

CASEVAC: non-medical transport


MEDEVAC: medical transport

Haemorrhage
Dressing
Bandage
Torniquet
Phases of combat casualty care

Care under fire


Tactical field care
Tactical evacuation care
Care under fire
Use torniquet to controll massive haemorrhage
in extremity.

Moving casualty to safety.

(supressing the enemy fire may be more important for


casualty survival)
Moving the casualty to safety
Moving the casualty to safety
Moving the casualty to safety
Moving the casualty to safety
Moving the casualty to safety
Tactical field care

Assessment of patient

CABC
cervical spine
airway
breathing
circulation
MARCH

Massive haemorrhage
Airway
Respiration
Circulation
Hypothermia/Head injury
Circulation
examine pulse
radial
carotid
Assessment of spine injuries

pain and tenderness


paraesthesia, numbness
inability to use limb
Limb fracture
quick assessment of limbs
pain
inability to use
deformity
MANAGEMENT
Airway
clear the airway
Breathing
mouth to mouth breathing if required
Circulation
controll of massive haemorrhage
elevate the limbs to improve brain
circulation
IV fluid( normal saline, hemaccel) if
reqiuired and feasible
CPR (cardio-pulmonary resuscitation)

if
patient is unresponsive
no palpable pulse
not breathing
CPR
30 chest compressions
2 mouth to mouth breathing

chest compression
hard and fast
100/min
continue CPR till patient survives/ medic arrives/
or you become really exahusted.
CPR
TENTION PNEUMOTHORAX
SYMPTOMS AND SIGN
Casualty of penetrating chest wound with
severe respiratory distress

dyspnoea, tachypnoea, hypotention


distended neck veins

diminished or absent breath sound


TREATMENT
emergency
wide bore needle in second
intercostal space
Spinal injuries
imobilize the cervical spine
place the casualty in hard wodden board

Limb fracture
immobilization with splint
TRANSPORT
TRANSPORT
TRANSPORT
TRANSPORT