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ANTON WEBERN

Drei Kleine Stucke, Op. 11 No. I


Renz Eulric Adame
OVERVIEW
Biography
Background on the piece
Thesis & Summary
Analysis
SC(0145)
Subsets SC(014) and (015)
Contextual Inversion
Composing out

Conclusion
BIOGRAPHY
Austrian Composer and
Conductor
Born December 3 1883; died
September 15 1945
Studied with Arnold
Schoenberg
Along with Schoenberg and
Berg made up the core circle
of Second Viennese School
Known for his use of 12-tone
technique
Father requested him to
write a piece for cello
Played cello in a civic
orchestra in Klagenfurt in his
high school years
Drei Kleine Stucke,
Op. 11 No. 1
Written for Weberns
father
Started writing his
sonata and put it off to
write op. 11
Started it but didnt
finish it until after the
war
His most famous work for
cello, even more famous
than his sonata.
The whole work is quite
short, less than 3 minutes
Form: Peaceful Chaos
Peaceful
Also subtly inserted into
the first movement.
Thesis and Summary
Anton Webern creates links throughout the whole
movement through usage of SC(0145) and subsets
SC(014) and SC(015).
Overview of Analysis
SC (0145)
Numerical analysis of the piece and examples from the
cello part, the piano part and both together
Transposition and Inversion relation
Hexatonic scale relationship
Subsets SC(014) and (015)
Examples
Transposition and Inversion relation

Contextual Inversion
Examples

Composing out
Examples
3 LITTLE PIECES FOR CELLO AND
P I A N O, O P 1 1 N O 1
SC(0145)
Numerous pitch-class sets that belong to Set Class
(0145)
Most of the chords found that belongs to SC(0145)
is mainly in the first 6-7 bars of the movement

(0145) is a subset of a Hexatonic scale (HEX0,1


[014589])
Examples shown in the next slide
Subsets (014) and (015)
Subset of SC(0145) and Hexatonic scale HEX0,1

Found through out the cello and piano parts both


separately and together.
Most evident example of these subsets are found in
the last two bars.
Examples Shown in the next slide.
Contextual Inversion
Two kinds of contextual inversion

[E,F,G#,A] [E, E, G, G# ] (Example in next slide)

[E,E, G, G#] [B, C, E, E ] (Example in next slide)


Composing Out
The first 3 notes in the cello part (6,11,10) in the
beginning
Composed out to the beginning of the piece, the middle,
and the end
Separated by 4 bars and 9 notes across both the cello and
the piano part
***Theoretical***

Score analysis shown in the next slide.


CONCLUSION
We can quite evidently see that the piece is quite closely
connected through SC(0145) and through its subsets SC(014) and
SC(015)
There are also other elements that Webern used even only
within this movement that attests to the symmetry and
thoughtfulness put into the piece such as Contextual inversion
and Composing out
Even within such a short piece we see the genius in Weberns
writing.
THE END