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PANELLING

Panelling is a wall covering constructed from rigid or semi-rigid components. These are
traditionally interlocking wood, but could be plastic or other materials.
Panelling was developed in antiquity to make rooms in stone buildings more
comfortable. The panels served to insulate the room from the cold stone. In more
modern buildings, such panelling is often installed for decorative purposes.

Wall panels serve many functions, from providing descriptions of exhibits in museums
and galleries to hiding away electronics such as stereo speakers. As a decor element,
wall panels are an excellent way to break up wall space. This can be achieved by
paneling the upper or lower half of the wall, installing wainscoting, creating a faux finish,
or one of several other methods.
In the business setting, there are portable or temporary wall panels that can be used to
divide a space into cubicles. Modular wall panels may be constructed of wood or metal
and are often covered with textured materials, fabrics, paneling or wallpaper to make
them more aesthetically pleasing. There are also acoustical and sound absorbing wall
panels that are perfect for the studio.

In the home, wall panels are usually used for visual appeal. If a homeowner prefers
something less extensive than paneling or wainscoting, faux finishes or even faux panels
may work well. A faux finish can be used to create the look of wood, stone or fabric
panels. Alternatively, trim can be added to a wall to create the look of inlaid panels.
Creating a line of faux wall panels and painting the molding to match the wall color
creates an architectural element that looks as if it has always been there.
DIFFERENT MATERIALS USED FOR PANNELLING-

WOODEN PANELS OR WOODEN PLY

LAMINATED BOARDS IN WOODEN FRAME

PVC BOARDING IN WOODEN FRAME OR ALLUMINIUM FRAME

ALLUMINIUM FRAME WITH LAMINATES, METAL SHEETS & EXPANDED

METAL

FABRICS IN WOODEN FRAME OR OVER PATICLE BOARDS


Installing panelling

Paneling is one of the easiest things you can do to change the look of a room. The 4 ft. x
8 ft. sheets come in many materials, textures, and colorsyou may find that choosing the
paneling is the toughest part of the job! Your retailer will be happy to help you.
The basics of panel installation are the same, even when the panel styles require a
slightly different method.
ESTIMATE YOUR NEEDS
To figure how much paneling you'll need, measure in feet the total width of the walls
you're covering, then divide by four. This will give you the number of 4' x 8' sheets
required. For walls higher than 8', divide the additional height measured in feet into 8
feet to see how many upper pieces can be cut from a single 4' x 8' sheet. Deduct half a
panel for each door, and a quarter panel for each window.
PREPARE THE WALLS
Paneling may be installed on three different types of walls (Fig. 1). Panels less than 1/4"
thick need a solid backingsuch as a level and flat plasterboard wall behind them for
support. Panels 1/4" and thicker can be installed directly over even framing members
studs or furring strips. All paneling may be put up with nails or with a combination of
panel adhesive and nails.
INSTALLING ON SOLID BACKING
First, locate the wall studs. Repair the old wall, ensuring that it is nailed tightly to its
framing. The framing behind walls usually runs vertically on 16" centers or sometimes
24" centers. When you find one stud, you can usually locate the others easily by
measuring. Or you can use a stud finder. Either way, mark the locations by snapping or
drawing vertical lines along the studs.

Remove all the trim. Take down all moldings in the room: ceiling, floor, and around all
openings. Take off the electrical receptacle and light switch covers, after you turn off the
electricity to them. (Use a neon test light to be sure it's off.). For safety, reinstall the
wirenuts or put tape around the exposed wires inside the junction box.
INSTALLING ON A
MASONRY WALL
First check the masonry
INSTALLING ON A FRAMED walls for excessive moisture.
WALL Walls with moisture must be
Check the studs to be sure completely waterproofed
they are vertical and on 16" or before they are paneled.
24" spacing. Also make sure Moisture can sometimes be
that backing is provided at all caused by condensation. If
corners, at the top and bottom this is the case, add a
of the wall and around any waterproof vapor barrier over
openings. the wall (below grade, do
this before furring it).
MEASURING AND CUTTING THE PANELS
If the panels contain a variable pattern, such as woodgrains, stand them against the wall
around the room. Then you can rearrange them or invert them for the most pleasing
pattern.

Begin putting up the panels in the first corner you see as you enter the room. Trim each
panel to 1/4" shorter than the ceiling height.

To keep from getting ragged edges on the faces


Snap plumb chalk lines at the of panels, they should be hand-sawn from the
center of all behind-the-wall finished side or saber-sawn from the backside.
framing.
PANELING WITH NAILS
Cover your hammer head with a rag to protect the face of your panels when nailing. Use
the nails recommended by the manufacturer of the paneling you purchased. If you're
nailing through an older wall, the nails need to be extra long (usually 1-5/8") to penetrate
into the framing. Place nails every 4 to 6 inches along the panel edges and every 8 to 12
inches throughout the rest of the panel on studs. Always begin nailing at one edge and
move across the panel to the other edge. Never nail opposite edges first, then the
middle of a panel.

The countersunk holes may be filled later with a matching colored putty stick. If you use
color-matched nails, countersinking and puttying will not be necessary
INSTALLING WITH ADHESIVE
To hold the panels firmly to the wall, apply 3" long 1/8" beads of a solvent-based panel
adhesive to the studs or solid-backed wall (Fig. 7). At the panel edges, apply a
continuous zigzag bead. If the wall has been papered, the wallpaper must be removed
before applying adhesive. (Consider simply nailing the paneling over the wallpaper.)

Place the panel in position on the adhesive and drive several nails loosely across the top
to hinge it in the proper position.

Then pull the panel about 10" from the wall at the bottom, resting it on a block of wood.
The adhesive will become tacky in 2 to 10 minutes
FITTING ELECTRICAL BOXES
Panel cutouts for switch and receptacle boxes can easily be made.

First, generously chalk the wall around the edges of box.

Then, hold the panel in position and tap it lightly against the chalked box. When the
panel is taken away, the box outline will have been transferred to the back of the panel
(Fig. 9). Remember that the outlet box itself should be adjusted outward to meet the
surface of the paneling.

Simply drill four holes at the corners of the chalk outline, insert a keyhole saw, and make
the cutout. Make it 1/4" larger than the cutline
INSTALLING AROUND DOORWAYS
To make cutouts for windows and doors, measure horizontally from the last panel
installed to the untrimmed opening where you want the edge of the panel to reach. Also
measure from the floor to the top of the door. Transferring these measurements onto the
face of the panel , saw out the rectangle of waste material. Saw to leave a 1/4" gap
between the edge of the panel and the opening.
FINISHING TOUCHES
Most trim, however, is installed with nails after the paneling. Cut your wood or plastic
moldings in a miter box using a fine-tooth saw. Nail it into position with small finishing
nails, countersinking the nails and filling the holes with putty stick. If the moldings are
prefinished, clean them with a dry cloth. Otherwise, apply paint or stain and a clear finish
to complete your paneling project.
WOODEN PANELLING
WITH LAMINATED
COVERING
Installation
U SECTION
HEAVY DUTY U-SECTION IS MADE OF 0.55
TH. GALVANISED STEEL.
TWO EQUAL FLANGES WITH 90 BEND AT

NECK &
SMALL LIPS FOR CONNECTING CLIP.
A WEB TO HOLD GYPBOARD.
SUSPENDEDTUBE SECTION
BY TUBE SECTION.
COLD ROLLED 0.8 TH. G.I. STEEL SHEET.
MAIN SUPPORTING MEMBER TO U
SECTION.
SUSPENDED FROM SOFFIT WITH RAWL PLUG,
CLEAT, MS FLAT.

WALL ANGLE
0.55 TH. GALVANISED STEEL SECTION.
TWO EQUAL LEGS.
PERIMETER ANGLE IN HEAVY DUTY CEILING SYST
FLOOR & CEILING CHANNEL
0.55 TH. G.I. STEEL
TWO EQUAL FLANGES.
USED AS FLOOR & CEILING CHANNEL IN
PARTITION SYSTEMS.
SCREW-FIXED TO FLOOR & CEILING / SOFFIT.

FIXING CHANNEL
0.914 TH. G.I. STEEL WITH EQUAL FLANGES & A
WEB.
FIXED AT HORIZONTAL JOINTS OF GYPBOARD
WHERE PARTITION HT. EXCEEDS LENGTH OF
GYPBOARD.
ALSO TO TAKE ON MEDIUM TO HEAVY FIXTURES
LIKE CUPBOARDS, WASH BASIN.
STUD
0.55 TH. G.I. STEEL.
VERTICAL MEMBER IN PARTITION SYSTEM.
TWO UNEQUAL FLANGES TO FORM BOX STUD
FOR GREATER HTS., FLANGES KNURLED FOR
BETTER SCREWING.
FIRE WALL
DESCRIPTION

The fire wall systems are of dry construction


incorporating metal stud components in
lightweight , non-load bearing constructions ,
providing up to four hours fire resistance. This is
required in industrial storage and other non-
residential buildings. Fire walls are fast and
simple to erect and weigh 100-128 kg/m2 when
completed . The 4 hour fire resistance system
comprises of two metal stud frame works
separated by a central core formed by two layers
of 15 mm fire line Gypboard.
Three layers of 15 mm fire line
Gypboard are fixed to each outer face. Studs are
positioned at 610 mm centers , with the studs in
the second framework . A flush finish is obtained
on both sides by using tapered edge fire line
gypboard . When these are joined in the
recommended manner , a smooth , seamless
surface is obtained which can be decorated with
most proprietary finishes .
SOUND WALL
DESCRIPTION
Gypboard twin framed , sound walls , with their combination of light weight metal framing ,
provide exceptional sound insulation and one to two hour fire resistance , whilst being fast to
erect. The twin framed sound wall is used to separate multiple use recreational facilities , multi-
screen cinemas , exhibition and conference centers. The walls are constructed of two independent
metal studs frames each incorporating 70 mm wide studs. The frames are spaced to give an
overall width of 300 mm. A 100 mm glass wool is mat suspended in the cavity.

Jointing and finishing


JOINTING AND
FINISHES

Finally the boards are to be


jointed and finished so as to
have a flush look which includes
filling and finishing the tapered
edgesboards with jointing
compound and joint paper tapes.
Two coats if dry wall top coat are
applied as a primer.