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AeroMINS

Group Dynamics
By : Madhurima
15054993

Purpose

I will talk about Group Dynamics and Team


Development.

[Source: http://www.inc.com/dave-kerpen/15-quotes-to-inspire-greatteam-work.html]

Key topics covered

Definitions
Team organization
Roles and responsibilities in the project
Evolvement as a group
Critical reflection #1
Evaluation 1
Critical reflection #2
Evaluation 2
Conclusions (Key findings)
References

Definitions

Kurt Lewin, a social psychologist and change management


expert, is credited with coining the term "group dynamics" in
the early 1940s.
A group is a collection of people who interact with one
another; accept rights and obligations as members and who
share a common identity.
Group dynamics deals with the attitudes and behavioural
patterns of a group. Group dynamics concern how groups are
formed, what is their structure and which processes are
followed in their functioning. Thus, it is concerned with the
interactions and forces operating between groups.
The most common framework for examining the "how" of
group formation was developed by Bruce Tuckman in
the 1960s.

Source:
https://www.pinterest.com/csbp/cooperatio
n/

Team Organization - AeroMINS

Group
Leader

Team
Members

Roles and Responsibilities in the project

Manu Emotional Intelligence.


Muz Leadership.
Kenny Communication.
Jane Cultural Diversity.
Me (Maddy) Group Dynamics.

Evolvement as a group AeroMINS

We as a team have different complementary


skills and are committed and are equally and
mutually accountable.
We are having most of the advantages that a
group effort requires. We all have different
backgrounds, work experience, diverse ideas
and creative thinking.

Critical reflection #1

During client report submission:

Hardly any motivation.

Lack of leadership.

I interact informally only with Manu and Muz. There was only

formal interaction with Kenny and Jane.

Able to traverse only two stages forming and conforming of

team development (Tuckman 1977), that too not satisfactorily.

Client report was very poor and felt highly disappointed.

With mentors guidance and Manus leadership,


all team members united to prove themselves .

Evaluation 1

The roles of leader and follower are fundamental ones in many groups,
but other rolesinformation seeker, information giver, elaborator,
procedural technician, encourager, compromiser, harmonizermay
emerge in any group (Benne & Sheats, 1948).
Research on leadership suggests that individuals can be influenced by
leaders depending on the situation (Bales 1958). If an individual is in a
situation where they do not know what to do, they will look for a
leader.
In situations where a group is formed to accomplish a task, an
individual is more likely to be influence by a task-oriented leader, and
situations where a group is formed to increase social relations, an
individual is more likely to be influenced by a socially-oriented leader.
An individual, no matter the situation, is more likely to be influenced
by a leader that possess both task and social leadership (Fiedler 1971).

Critical reflection #2

Working on group project- self reflection.

More communication in the group.

Leaders guidance and command.

Helping and evaluating each others work (previously no one reviewed each
others client report).

More cohesiveness.

I can see a more bonding between Kenny and Me.

Jane started interacting and now more involved in the group.

All individual work was passed on to atleast two other members of group for
feedback and improvement.

Evolved as a more bonded and cohesive group.


Can see new relationships and enthusiasm in the group.

It seems we are able to traverse on to all the stages of team development:


Forming, conforming, storming, norming, reforming and performing
(Tuckman 1977).

Evaluation 2

There were two problems faced by the group:


Lack of leadership: The lack of motivation or poor motivation;
most often will cripple a groups ability to succeed and or hinder
its progress. Research on leadership suggests that individuals can
be influenced by leaders depending on the situation (Bales 1958).
If an individual is in a situation where they do not know what to
do, they will look for a leader.
Or
Self- motivation missing: The group itself is unwilling to be
motivated. Typically this will mean that either their desires are
elsewhere or they no longer have faith in what they are doing
(Rheinberg et al 2000).

Conclusions (Key findings)

Personally I felt, a strong leader is required to lead a team


successfully in the right direction (which can be seen eventually in
Manu).
I can also see myself as more expressive and interactive (which,
initially I was not as I was a bit conservative with different
nationalities team members).
Without proper motivation, groups may not achieve their full
potential or accomplish the goals that they set.
Quality of work must be taken into consideration.

Improvements
Maintain quality in whatever task assigned.
Self motivation must come within.
Dont wait for others to come forward, take the lead if its not happening.

References

http://
www.referenceforbusiness.com/management/Gr-Int/Group-Dynami
cs.html#ixzz3yGqVeHC7
Benne, K.D. and Sheats, P., 1948. Functional roles of group
members.
Tuckman, B.W. and Jensen, M.A.C., 1977. Stages of small-group
development revisited. Group & Organization Management, 2(4),
pp.419-427.
Bales, R.F., 1958. Task roles and social roles in problem-solving
groups.Readings in social psychology, 3, p.43.
Fiedler, F.E., 1971. Validation and extension of the contingency
model of leadership effectiveness: A review of empirical
findings. Psychological bulletin, 76(2), p.128.
Rheinberg, F., Vollmeyer, R. and Rollett, W., 2000. Motivation and
action in self-regulated learning.

MANAGING
PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT

AeroMINS GROUP
COMMUNICATION
By : Kenny

KEY INDICATORS

DEFINITION
THEORY 1
CRITICAL INCIDENCE 1
THEORY 2
CRITICAL INCIDENCE 2
FEELINGS
CONCLUSION
ACTION PLAN
REFERENCE

COMMUNICATION

Watzlawick et al. (1967) simply state,


One cannot not communicate (P.51).

WHAT IS COMMUNICATION?

Communication is the process of transmitting


information ( encoding and decoding) and
sharing meaning with common understanding
from one person to another (keyton, 2011).
Communication describes what is necessary for
an act of communication to take place.

The communication process Shannon


and weaver (1949)

Shannon-Weavers model

Also called as the mathematical model of


communication.
According to them, communication includes:
1. Source 2. Transmitter (Encoder) 3. Signal
4. Receiver (Decoder) 5. Destination
The source is the speaker, the signal is the speech and
the destination is the audience, it transmits which
sends out the source message and a receiver which
catches the message for the destination. Noise is any
unwanted additions to the signal which causes error
in transmission.

CHANNEL

Critical Incidence

This is about a critical incidence that is relating to our


communication using the social media; whatsapp. The
problem relating to group members not responding
immediately, so there was a delay in communication.
This is described in a more detailed in figure 1 below. *
screen shot it was about one member of the group,
mano who wanted an opinion on a particular subject
matter and just a few of us replied and there was a
delay in concluding for that day.
This can be pinned as a semantic noise, using the
Shannon-weaver model of communication model
(Shannon-weaver, 1949).

AeroMINS Critical Incidence

Adams closed loop theory

Closed loop theory

In this theory, we see here that the sender


transmits the message, the receiver
acknowledges the message and provides
feedback confirmation, then the sender
verifies that the message is interpreted
correctly and Closed Loop Communication is
achieved.

Close Loop Model

Salawu, I.O., Taiwo, A., and Aremu, G.B. (1994)

Critical Incidence

This process started towards the completion of


group work after getting a feedback from
Monica concerning our employability report
which was poorly researched.
The critical incidence here was the group
significant immediate approach to
communicating as group members on the
social media platform; whatsapp. Feedback
was prompt, where there is need to assist each
other assisted.

FEELINGS

I was expecting more being my first group


participation that everyone will be interested
in chatting. So I was surprised, disappointed
at my group mates for not responding
promptly and myself also for not being more
assertive about the group functioning. The
WhatsApp group chat was boring initially,
and there was little or no communication due
to the first report not been assessed.

ACTION PLAN

Points for improvement, is to improve on


using more than one medium of
communication among group members.
Primarily, the basics of the group are not just
for getting good grades, but team building but
also gaining knowledge from research topic
and team development. Working with the
Gantt chart is a necessity that must be
imbibed when next I am participating in
teamwork.

CONCLUSION

In the interest of good communication,


semantic noise (gestures, nodding, grin) needs
to be worked. The social media communication;
whatsapp is not enough for a good
communication a group chat and should involve
visual channels, vocal channels to enhance a
more cooperative orientation that is sufficient to
produce trust and rapport, and team leadership
should be effective from the initial stage.

REFERENCE

Keyton, J. (2011). Communication and organizational culture: A key to


understanding work experience. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
Salawu, I.O., Taiwo, A., and Aremu, G.B. (1994). An introduction to
Educational Technology, Afolabi Press Limited, p. 20.
Shannon, C. (1949). Communication theory of secrecy systems. Bell System
Technical Journal, 28, 656715.

Watzlawick, P., Beavin, J.H. and Jackson, D.D. (1967), Pragmatics of Human
Communication, W.W. Norton & Company, New York, NY.

Weaver, W. (1949). Recent contributions to the mathematical theory of


communication. In C. Shannon & W. Weaver, The mathematical theory of
communication (pp. 116). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.

Salawu, I.O., Taiwo, A., and Aremu, G.B. (1994)

Emotional Intelligence
Manuel Diaz Sola 15047199

Key topics to be covered


Definition
Case study # 1
Evaluation
Analysis
Conclusion Case study # 1
Case study # 2
Evaluation four branch model
Analysis four branch model in Case study # 1
and Case study # 2
Conclusion Case study # 2
Conclusions (Key findings)
Improvements

Definition

EI is the ability to detect and comprehend


correctly the inner and others emotions in
order to use them constructively to meet
personal purposes
Mayer, Salovey and Caruso (2008, p. 503)

Case study #1

Lack of expressivity
in the group

Formal language

Inexpressive faces

Deep voices

Emotions
Ridiculous
Powerless

Joy feelings shown firstly by


the girls

Evaluation:

positive emotions evoke openness and


creativity.
Schneider, Lyons and Khazon (2013, p. 912)
emotion culture: how an individual
understands other people gestures, translate
them into received emotions and manage his
own feelings and reactions within a culture
Sloan (2012, p. 371)

Evaluation
Men and women have similar intensity of
feelings regardless the gender
Sloan (2012, p. 372)
Women are more expressive than men
Sloan (2012, p. 384)

Analysis

Gender + Culture
Formality as a cultural fact
Womens expression regardless culture

Conclusion Case Study #1

Balance between culture and gender

Formality

Improvement

Patience
Emotions self-control
The utility of formal communication

Case study #2

Communication
problems

Losing the rhythm of the


group

Not understanding the


objectives

Not understanding the task

Emotions
1. Angry
2. Stressed
3. Comprehensive

Evaluation
Anger depends more on the job position than the gender
(Sloan, 2012, p. 387)

Emotions enables us to react to stimuli and get the most out of


them
Schneider, Lyons and Khazon (2013, p. 910)

Emotional Intelligence VS Rational


Intelligence

Evaluation: Four-Branch Model


1.

2.

3.

4.

The ability to recognize the emotions of me and others


Use these emotions to improve my knowledge of the
situation
Understand better what is happening about emotions,
emotional language and signals
Manage the emotions in order to achieve the objectives
Mayer, Salovey and Caruso (2008, p. 506)

Analysis: Four-Branch Model in Case


Study #1 and #2

Case study #1

Case study #2

Lack of trust

Stress and angriness

Cultural and gender


differences

Language barrier
Anxious, embarrassed

No hostile behaviour
Patience

Calm and
comprehensiveness

Conclusion Case Study #2

Four-Branch Model

Recognition
Improve Knowledge
Better understanding of emotions and the situation
Improvement

Improvement

Benefits of emotional thinking


Develop communication techniques

Conclusions (key findings)

Culture determines how emotions are understood and communicated


Women are more expressive than men. Although, the feelings are the
same

Four-Branch Model in EI

Recognition
Improve Knowledge
Better understanding of emotions and the situation
Improvement

Improvements

Patience

Emotions expression self-control

Utility of formal communication

Utility of emotional thinking

Communication skills development