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Preparation of Reagents

& Aseptic Techniques

By Group 4: Oracion, Sanchez, Lim, Candelasa, Donoso, Ortiz

What are reagents?


Areagentis

a substance or
compound that is added to a
system in order to bring
about a chemical reaction,
or added to see if a reaction
occurs.

Aseptic Technique

Aseptic technique is a procedure used by medical staff to


prevent the spread of infection. The goal is to
reachasepsis, which means an environment that is free of
harmful microorganisms. Each healthcare setting has its
own set of practices for achieving asepsis. Common
examples include surgery rooms, clinics, and outpatient
care centers.

What is Aseptic Technique used for?

Aseptic technique is used in various clinical settings to prevent the


spread of pathogens. Like another antimicrobial process calledclean
technique, the primary goal of this process is to prevent harmful
organisms from spreading and causing infection. The difference is aseptic
technique reduces the risks of infection in the patient directly at the
source. Clean technique is more focused on preventing the further
spread of pathogens between other people and places.

Aseptic technique is commonly used in:


- surgery equipment

- urinary catheters

- vaginal labor

- dialysis

- Intravenous (IV) lines

- other draining devices

Types of Aseptic Technique

Clean equipment is a primary form of aseptic technique.


Certain equipment, such as needles, should always be
disposed of between patients. Reusing needles and other
disposable equipment can lead to a host of issues. Other
types of equipment must be cleaned properly through
aseptic techniques for safety. Sterilization methods
include:
- electric or gas heat
- chemical treatments
- radiation

Types of Aseptic Technique

Simple hand washing is another important form of aseptic technique.


Ensuring that all medical staff washes their hands before and after
any procedure helps to prevent the spread of pathogens that can
cause infections in patients.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers other
basic rules for infection prevention:
- better staff training on aseptic techniques
- use of chlorhexidine (an antiseptic) for post-catheter care
- antimicrobial ointment to be used on IV line exits
- proper bandaging post-operation

- wearing masks to prevent germs from spreading from the


mouth
through the air

Aseptic Technique Benefits

Anytime your skin is opened, youre vulnerable to


infection. This is why prompt treatment for burns and
wounds is so critical. If the exposure is intentional, such
as in surgery, then the risk for infection still exists. The
way aseptic techniques are employed can determine
whether or not you will develop an infection from your
procedure.

Preparation of Aseptic
Technique

Sterile Work Area

The simplest and most economical way to reduce contamination


from airborne particles and aerosols (e.g., dust, spores, shed skin,
sneezing) is to use a cell culture hood.

The cell culture hood should be properly set up and be located in an


area that is restricted to cell culture that is free from drafts from
doors, windows, and other equipment, and with no through traffic.

The work surface should be uncluttered and contain only items


required for a particular procedure; it should not be used as a
storage area.

Before and after use, the work surface should be disinfected


thoroughly, and the surrounding areas and equipment should be
cleaned routinely.

Sterile Work Area

For routine cleaning, wipe the work surface with 70%


ethanol before and during work, especially after any
spillage.

You may use ultraviolet light to sterilize the air and exposed
work surfaces in the cell culture hood between uses.

Using a Bunsen burner for flaming is not necessary nor is it


recommended in a cell culture hood.

Leave the cell culture hood running at all times, turning it


off only when they will not be used for extended periods of
time.

Good Personal Hygiene


Wash

your hands before and after working with cell


cultures.

In

addition to protecting you from hazardous


materials, wearing personal protective equipment
also reduces the probability of contamination from
shed skin as well as dirt and dust from your clothes.

Sterile Reagents & Media


Commercial

reagents and media undergo strict


quality control to ensure their sterility, but they
can become contaminated while handling. Follow
the guidelines below for sterile handling to avoid
contaminating them. Always sterilize any reagents,
media, or solutions prepared in the laboratory using
the appropriate sterilization procedure (e.g.,
autoclave, sterile filter).

Sterile Handling

Always wipe your hands and your work area with 70% ethanol.

Wipe the outside of the containers, flasks, plates, and dishes with
70% ethanol before placing them in the cell culture hood.

Avoid pouring media and reagents directly from bottles or flasks.

Use sterile glass or disposable plastic pipettes and a pipette or to


work with liquids, and use each pipette only once to avoid cross
contamination. Do not unwrap sterile pipettes until they are to be
used. Keep your pipettes at your work area.

Always cap the bottles and flasks after use and seal multi-well plates
with tape or place them in resealable bags to prevent
microorganisms and airborn contaminants from gaining entry

Sterile Handling

Never uncover a sterile flask, bottle, petri dish, etc. until the
instant you are ready to use it and never leave it open to the
environment. Return the cover as soon as you are finished.

If you remove a cap or cover, and have to put it down on the


work surface, place the cap with opening facing down.

Use only sterile glassware and other equipment.

Be careful not to talk, sing, or whistle when you are


performing sterile procedures.

Perform your experiments as rapidly as possible to minimize


contamination.

Aseptic Technique Outcome


The

outcome of aseptic technique depends on


whether all procedures are thoroughly followed.
Medical professionals are responsible for following
all processes leading to asepsis. If you notice that a
healthcare provider fails to wash hands or sterilize
equipment, dont be afraid to speak up. Doing so
can help save you or a loved one from potentially
fatal side effects.

TEST QUESTIONS

1.

2.

3.

It is a substance or compound that is added to a system in order to bring


about a chemical reaction, or added to see if a reaction occurs.
a)

Reagent

b)

Asepsis

c)

Clean Equipment

d)

Sterile Work Area

It is a procedure used by medical staff to prevent the spread of infection.


a)

Sterile Work Area

b)

Aseptic Technique

c)

Reagent

d)

Clean Equipment

It is a primary form of aseptic technique.


a)

Asepsis

b)

Sterile Work Area

c)

Reagent

d)

Clean Equipment

4.

5.

6.

It means an environment that is free of harmful microorganisms.


a)

Clean Technique

b)

Reagent

c)

Asepsis

d)

Sterile Work Area

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers other basic rules for
infection prevention except:
a)

better staff training on aseptic techniques

b)

improper bandaging post-operation

c)

use of chlorhexidine (an antiseptic) for post-catheter care

d)

wearing masks to prevent germs from spreading from the mouth through the air

It is like another antimicrobial process. The primary goal of this process is to prevent
harmful organisms from spreading and causing infection.
a)

Clean Technique

b)

Asepsis

c)

Sterile Work Area

d)

Reagent

7.

8.

For the Sterile Work Area, you should do the following except:
a)

For routine cleaning, wipe the work surface with 70% ethanol before and during
work, especially after any spillage.

b)

You may use ultraviolet light to sterilize the air and exposed work surfaces in the
cell culture hood between uses.

c)

Using a Bunsen burner for flaming is necessary and is recommended in a cell


culture hood.

d)

Leave the cell culture hood running at all times, turning it off only when they will
not be used for extended periods of time.

In Sterile Handling, you should not do the following except:


a)

Always wipe your hands and your work area with 70% ethanol.

b)

Do not wipe the outside of the containers, flasks, plates, and dishes with 70%
ethanol before placing them in the cell culture hood.

c)

Do not avoid pouring media and reagents directly from bottles or flasks.

d)

Unwrap sterile pipettes until they are to be used. Keep your pipettes at your work
area. Always wipe your hands and your work area with 70% ethanol.

9.

It is used in various clinical settings to prevent the spread


of pathogens.
a)

Reagent

b)

Aseptic Technique

c)

Clean Equipment

d)

Sterile Work Area

10.Sterilization

methods include the following except:

a)

Electric or gas heat

b)

Radiation

c)

Washing

d)

Chemical Treatments

DONE.