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ENERGY MANAGEMENT

TECHNIQUES

ABOUT THE PRESENTOR
ARMANDO R. DIAZ
Master of Science in Business Administration (MBA)
Registered ASEAN Engineer
Professional Electrical Engineer ( PEE )
Certified Plant Mechanic( CPM )
Accredited Pollution Control Officer
Licensed Professional Electrical Engineer with more than 35 years
experience in the field of building and facility design and consultancy,
construction, operations and maintenance involving various mechanical,
and electrical equipment and systems.
Awarded 1998 as Most Outstanding Practitioner in Industry of the Philippine
2009 IIEE Vice-President for External Affairs
Awarded 2006 as IIEE FELLOW
Member : Society of Philippine Accredited Consultant
Energy Efficient Practitioner Asso. of the Phil.
Recipient of Various Civic Awards : Rotary,REACT,YMCA,LOBSET and MARS
Energy Management
- is a process for reviewing and minimizing the
energy costs and consumption of a facility without
reducing productivity or levels of services

- it also offers opportunities when energy demand is
greater than the supply to maximize the energy
available to the customers
Energy management
Can be:
Informal
Decentralized, not centrally
coordinated or managed
Project-oriented, not program-oriented
Cyclical (i.e. in the support a company
gives)

Thus, many companies or
institutions:
Miss important savings opportunities
because they lack a means for
addressing energy use across the
organization.
Organizations achieving the greatest
results have:
A top-down commitment to energy management
A commitment to continuous improvement
Embraced an approach that integrates energy
management across all aspects of the business
Management systems in place
A system to regularly assess and track energy
performance
Set measurable performance goals
An effective reward system for energy
performance
An empowered energy staff
ENERGY MANAGEMENT
-refers to the planning , organizing
directing , controlling , problem solving ,
decision- making and evaluating of the
acquisition , transmission and actual utilization
of all energy based resource inputs to the
various productive processes for the purpose
of enhancing their efficiency and effectiveness
A common misconception
in industry is to consider
energy reduction as simply
an energy conservation
program
COMPONENTS OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT
PROGRAM- suggest a schedule or system under which
action is taken toward a desired goal
one time event

PROCESS implies a continuing operation marked by
gradual changes toward a particular result
an ongoing effort
4 GOALS MARK A
SUCCESSFUL ENERGY
MANAGEMENT PROCESSES
*maximize product efficiency
*minimize energy input
*maintain high energy load factor
*use energy most economically
ENERGY MANAGEMENT
The FIRST Law of energy management states that ,
plant utilities must always be adequate to meet
production/process demands
Ist slide
BARRIERS FOR EFFECTIVE
ENERGY MANAGEMENT

-Lack of readily available information
-The need to combine engineering, economics,
human and management practices to
achieve energy savings

BARRIERS
HUMAN FACTORS
- the way human use energy is highly
variable
- It is the most difficult to control


BARRIERS
ENGINEERING FACTORS
-Use of massive and sophisticated
machine or equipment for engineering
processes without people understand it
-Interaction between various energy
saving measures

BARRIERS
ECONOMIC FACTORS
- Investment in time and money must
meet economic criteria

BARRIERS
MANAGEMENT OF ENERGY
-Management style
-Attitude of senior management

STEPS IN PREPARATION OF
ENERGY MANAGEMENT
PROGRAM

1.Make someone responsible for
managing the organizations use of
energy
- Energy Manager

2. Identify how energy is being
used now
-energy audit

3. Allocate responsibility for energy use

4. Start implementing energy
management measures
-NO cost measures first

5.Start monitoring and targeting system

6. Implement low,medium,then capital
cost energy management measures








Appoint Energy
Officer
Energy Use
Identification
Energy Management
Opportunity Implementation
Implement Low Cost/ No Cost
Savings
Monitor Energy Use
And Cost
Investment in Energy
Management Measures
Continue with the Energy
Management Program
1.Make someone responsible for the managing
the organization use of energy either in - house or
consultant
2.Identify how energy is being used now (energy
audit) historical data collection
3.Determine Low Cost / No Cost opportunities
and allocate responsibility for energy use
4.Start implementing energy management
measu res , NO COST measures first
5.Start monitoring and targeting system
6.Implement LOW, MEDIUM then CAPITAL
COST (CAPEX) energy management measures
OVERALL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
9 Major Guidelines in a
well-structured approach
to the energy
management processes
1.Obtain total management
commitments
The support of the company president is usually the critical
step
2.Obtain employee cooperation
The cooperation of the operating people is vital to the success of any
management effort. Employees should be asked for their input.In energy
management , nothing is sacred.

ACTION PLAN
1.Integrated ENERCON on the orientation for new
employees
2. Conduct ENERCON for new employees
3.Organize Enercon Patrol Team
3. Conduct monthly Meeting with all Supervisors and
Managers

3.Make appropriate energy
surveys
Although this step sounds obvious,it is often
one to which little time and effort dedicated.
4.Analyze survey results
What should be done with all the data gathered?
Again, often little time is devoted to analyzing
where and why energy is used.
5.Set conservation goals
Although realistic goals may be difficult to set initially, they are
absolutely necessary.Without goals ,plants have nothing to strive for
and no method for measuring performance.
Average
Consumption
Cost Monthly Billing Todays
Cost
To Date
Billing

ELECTRICITY

kWHr

P/ kWhr

?

P___/
kWHr

?


BUNKER OIL


Liters



P / Liter


?


P---/
Liter


?


WATER


4,212.81
Cu.meter



-


-


-



-
6.Develop reporting format
Good communication is a vital to energy
management as it is to any other program.
Reports should be simple so that they do not
intimidate or confuse the reader
FUEL CONSUMPTION (BUNKER)
LITERS
92,183
72,806
96,320
63,079
36,366
58,199
0
20,000
40,000
60,000
80,000
100,000
120,000
Liters
Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan
Month
FUEL CONSUMPTION / MAIN LINE
OUTPUT
TARGET : 58.2 LITERS/MT OF ML OUTPUT
64.3
63.6
66.3
65.8
61.7
68.26
50.5
54.3
-5
5
15
25
35
45
55
65
75
Liter/Metric Ton of ML
Output
Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar
Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar
L1 (MT)
691.211 255.05 447.32 283.608 0 175.772 0 0
L2 (MT)
741.790 889.7 1,004.78 674.911 589.742 676.836 961.739 851.473
Total (MT)
1,433 1,144.75 1452.10 958.52 589.742 852.61 961.74 851.47
Bunker (L)
92,183 72,806 96,320 63,079 36,366 58,199 48,579 46,212
URC-PACKAGING DIVISION
SCHEDULE OF LIGHT & POWER USAGES
As of January 31, 2007
F.Y. 2006
Month KWHR Amount Unit Cost
Oct. 2005 2,439,851.78 14,607,592.92 5.99
Nov. 2005 1,667,047.31 10,549,564.68 6.33
Dec. 2005 1,307,947.35 7,896,997.32 6.04
Jan. 2006 1,854,743.70 10,287,152.68 5.55
Feb. 2006 1,948,709.21 11,224,946.77 5.76
March 2006 1,598,076.17 9,444,979.44 5.91
April 2006 1,230,255.19 7,061,011.87 5.74
May 2006 1,788,738.92 10,811,125.02 6.04
June 2006 1,950,063.18 10,744,434.49 5.51
July 2006 1,852,183.51 11,274,855.40 6.09
Aug. 2006 2,219,254.08 12,931,656.06 5.83
Sept. 2006 1,946,656.58 12,145,432.50 6.24
TOTAL 21,803,526.98 129,890,846.80 P 5.96 P
* Average unit cost per kwh. - P 5.96
F.Y. 2007
October 2006 2,253,155.11 12,537,156.16 5.56
November 2006 1,787,470.99 8,916,993.73 4.99
December 2006 1,210,297.54 6,223,001.87 5.14
January 2007 1,599,413.51 7,906,782.57 4.94
TOTAL 6,850,337.15 35,583,934.33 5.19 P
7.Implement engineering
changes
Activities on one end of the spectrum to the other should be
included ,whether it be disconnecting excess light fixtures or
adding computer-based enthalpy controls on air washers to
make use of outside air
8.Provide necessary equipment
Adequate equipment is important, but the urge
for overkill should be resisted.
A minicomputer to log kilowatt demand should
not be used when a simple data logger would
suffice at 10% the cost.
9.Monitor results
Situations tend to return to their original state unless they are monitored
continuously.A successful energy management process may fail in six
months, or even after several years, unless continuous monitoring is
monitored continuously.A successful energy management may fail in six
months, or even several years , unless continuous monitoring is maintained.

ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
FANS AND BLOWERS
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
LIGHTING
SIX BASIC RULES FOR GOOD
LIGHTING COUPLED with ENERGY
CONSERVATION
1. Use the most efficient light source practicable

2. Use the Lamp light output Efficiently.

3. Maintain Lighting Equipment in Good Order

4. Use Well-Designed Energy Effective Lighting Schemes

5. Control the Switching Operation and Usage of the Lighting Installation

6. Consider the Effect of Surrounding Decor
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
PRODUCTION MACHINES
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
BOILER
Go to both

1. Equipment Scheduling and Operating Practices
2. Boiler Plant Efficiency Measurement

3. Air-Fuel Ratio
4. Draft Control
5.Condensate, Feedwater, and Water Treatment
6. Fuel Oil Systems
7.Steam and Water Leakage
8.Conduction and Radiation Losses
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
CHILLERS
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
MOTORS
*Use of New Energy Efficient Motors

*Improved motor management practicesEnergy
savings from better management of currently
installed motors with improved repair practices, more
properly matching motor size to the driven load, and
the adoption of motor management best practices.

*Improved motor system optimizationEnergy
savings from overall system optimization from better
matching fluid handling devices (e.g., pumps) to the
load, and implementing more optimal control
strategies and technologies (adjustable speed drives)
to accommodate fluctuating loads.
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
AIR COMPRESSORS
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
BUILDING
ENERGY SAVINGS
OPPORTUNITIES
Arranging and organizing the building configuration and
massing to reduce loads.
Reducing cooling loads by eliminating undesirable solar
heat gain.
Using natural light as a substitute for (or complement
to) electrical lighting.
Using natural ventilation whenever possible.
Using more efficient cooling equipment to
satisfy reduced loads.
Using computerized building control systems.
UNNECESSARY POWER USE
* DUE TO HUMAN NEGLIGENCE
IGNORANCE
ATTITUDE
*DUE UNIT INEFFICIENCY
DESIGN
DEFECT
*SYSTEMIC
Recognize Achievements
Providing and seeking recognition for energy
management achievements is a proven step for
sustaining momentum and support for your
program.

Providing recognition to those who helped the
organization achieve these results motivates staff
and employees and brings positive exposure to the
energy management program.

Receiving recognition from outside sources validates
the importance of the energy management program
to both internal and external stakeholders, and
provides positive exposure for the organization as a
whole.

Providing Internal Recognition

Recognizing the accomplishments of individuals
and teams is key to sustaining support and
momentum for energy management initiatives.
Rewarding particular efforts sets the example
for what constitutes success and helps motivate
employees through increased job satisfaction.

Recognition can strengthen the
morale of everyone involved in energy
management.
Determine recognition levels

The decision about who should receive recognition in
your organization will likely be shaped by the
purpose for providing recognition and your
organizational culture. Common recognition levels
include:
Individual Acknowledges the contributions and
accomplishments of specific people.
Teams Recognizes the achievements of teams,
departments, and other distinct groups within the
organization.
Facility Rewards the accomplishments or
performance of an entire facility.

Establish recognition criteria

Create criteria for recognition and communicate
these criteria and any process eligibility
requirements.

Recognition criteria might include thresholds of
achievement such as:
*Offered the best energy savings ideas

*Achieved the greatest energy use reduction

*Increased savings by X amount

External Recognition
Good work deserves to be acknowledged. Recognition
from a third party can provide validation for an
organization's energy management program. Not only
does it provide satisfaction to those involved in earning
the recognition, but it can also enhance an organization's
public image. A solid reputation
contributes to your competitive advantage by making your
organization more attractive to customers, students,
current and potential employees, lenders, business
partners and other stakeholders.Before seeking
recognition from external groups, you may want to
determine the most appropriate avenues to pursue. A few
ways to gain recognition for your organization's energy
management efforts may be:

Partnership programs
Examples include:

Professional associations
Trade associations
Government Agencies
Non-profit organizations
Inter company energy programs
Socially responsible investment funds

The ENERGY that you SAVE today
could dictate your tomorrow
THANK YOU