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One of the oldest forms of speech is the oral interpretation of literature.

This performance is variously called oral reading, reading aloud or interpretative reading.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the oral performance of literature was known as elocution; today, it is referred to as expression.

Ancient literature, before the invention of printing was originally read aloud. Historians read their works, poets recited their poems during festivals, even going from town to town as bards. However, with the advent of printing, reading became silent.

Today, however, many believe that literature is meant to be heard and, given the right interpreter and the right audience, most literature will be appreciated when read aloud.

Interpretation is generally known as the reading aloud of written materials such as radio or television commercials, expository papers, news items, and announcements, but traditionally it is associated with the oral reading of literature.

to learn the techniques of delivery to communicate to an audience to know more about the writer to experience the beauty of the literary work

In oral interpretation, the interpreter must be concerned not only in using his voice, but also in delivering the message of the literary selection to an appreciative audience.

Interpretation is the study of literature through the oral performance of a speaker who creates and recreates the meaning and mood of the selection.
INTERPRETER REALIZES AND ACTUALIZES THE LITERARY WORK HE IS RECITING.

INTERPRETATION

PERFORMING ART

The

interpreter makes real the scenes, makes lifelike the characters, and renders natural and convincing the moods of the selection.
enables his listeners to see the scenes for themselves and actually feel the emotions in the literary piece.

This

O R I G I N A L

A U T H O R

PRINTED

POEM
PROSE PLAY

D E C O D E

O R A L

I N T E R P R E T E R

ENCODE

P E R F O R M A N C E

LISTENNG AUDIENCE

RECEIVER

SENDER

MESSAGE IN CHANNEL (VISUAL)

RECEIVER/ SENDER

MESSAGE IN CHANNEL (AUDITORY -VISUAL)

REMEMBER!

Reading aloud is NOT expressing the printed selection in a booming voice, a sudden outburst or in an overly distinct voice.

It is the process of reading orally for an audience, using the elements of voice and diction in order to convey the meaning and mood of the selection accurately.

It is not merely repeating words and reciting lines. It is internalizing the piece thinking, understanding and feeling the authors meaning and mood , using the proper quality, pitch, intensity, rate, including pausing, phrasing and bodily actions to actualize the mood intended by the writer.

INTERPRETER

READER

HE TRANSFORMS THE PRINTED SELECTION INTO LIVING SPEECH, RECREATING FOR HIS AUDIENCE THE THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS OF THE WRITER AS ACCURATELY AS HE CAN.

Good oral reading and interpretation entails good preparation the thorough understanding of the selection and the proper expression of the literary piece.

A.

Understand the selection. You must not only know the general content of the selection; you must have actually liked and enjoyed the piece.
1. Read the selection silently knowing

and understanding the meaning of each word and each sentence. Knowing the background of the story and consulting reliable sources for meaning will help.

2.

Consider the attitude, feelings, emotion or temperament of the person who wrote the selection because these give meaning to his words and point to the style of reading aloud you will use in your interpretation. Knowing the life of the author and the circumstances that led to the writing of the poem or story provides a clue to the emotional background of the selection.

3.

Identify words and ideas you need to emphasize. Recall your own experiences to help you in understanding the authors mood and guide you in recreating the authors feelings.

4.

B.

Express the selection. Now, translate these meanings and moods into action. Put your vocal skills into good use for you cannot interpret silently.
1. Emphasize the meaning. Read the

selection accurately without adding, subtracting or changing any word or phrase.

2.

Emphasize the mood. Your interpretation of the lines should be alive and the selection should be born again. Aim for the desire to create something of beauty or greatness, whether poetry or prose.

3.

Watch for the time limit. Sustain the appreciative listeners enthusiasm and attention by speaking well within a definite time limit. End your performance while you still hold the interest of the audience.

Closely related to rhythm and meaning is body movement. Interpretation must not be only vocal but also physical. The body must coordinate with the voice so that rhythm and bodily action act as one. All your actions must be sincere, spontaneous, fresh, forceful and convincing.

Make your reading alive not only through your voice but also with your body. However, suit your actions to the words and the intended meaning and mood without overdoing them for they might detract rather than enhance your oral interpretation.

To get your body started, pantomime each of the following situations with or without speech. Pantomime a long distance telephone conversation. 2. Be a repentant sinner pleading for forgiveness.
1.

You are the triumphant winner of a recent beauty contest; acknowledge the applause from your fans. 4. Be a student who comes very late to class carrying several books, two of which fall on the floor; make motions to pick them up. 5. Whisper a secret to an imaginary companion.
3.

Be a professional singer performing for a nightclub audience. 7. Be a dancer slightly swaying to the music. 8. Be a cheerleader of a basketball team; cheer for your favorite player. 9. Pantomime an oral interpretation of a poem. Grip the floor with your feet, straighten up and feel ten feet tall.
6.

10.

Say the following lines from Invictus. Hold your head up high and feel proud as you say: I am the master of my fate; I am the captain of my soul. - Henley -

Flores, Carmelita S. and Evelyn B. Lopez. Effective Speech Communication. 5th ed. Mandaluyong City: National Bookstore, 2008.