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Planning and Designing the Multimedia Application

Objectives

Explain how the planning process and documents are important to the design phase Describe the design strategy Identify the factors that should be considered in developing a design strategy for a multimedia application List some of the questions that should be answered in defining the purpose of the multimedia application List some of the questions that should be answered when defining the potential audience of the multimedia application

More Objectives

Describe some of the hardware limitations that must be considered when designing a multimedia application List and describe the design factors that apply to text, graphics, animation, sound and video List and describe the design principles that should be incorporated into Web-based multimedia applications Describe the process and importance of testing and delivering a multimedia application Explain how copyright laws apply to the elements used in an multimedia application

Planning and Designing


the planning phase is the most important phase in designing and developing any multimedia application storyboards, flowcharts, and scripts serve as the foundation for the design of the project

The Design Strategy (1)

Purpose
How will users be using this application? Why will users be using this application? What will users gain from this application? What medium and platform will users use to access this application? What types of features will be most useful to the users of this application?

The Design Strategy (1)

Audience
Who is the audience? What is the age range of the audience? What gender is the audience? How computer literate is the audience? What particular interests, beliefs, and values does the audience have in common?

The Design Strategy (2)

Method of Distribution
User Platform
hybrid CD

Processor Bandwidth Memory Storage

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Text
useful and viable less is usually better; small bits of information six-by-six rule
six points per screen six words per point

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Text
readable
avoid all-caps only use a couple of typefaces use sans serif fonts for callouts, pull quotes, titles and heading use serif fonts for large bodies of text ensure that type contrasts with background use variable, but readable sizes wrap text around one side or underneath images

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Graphics
speak to nonverbal, intuitive side of the brain complement text and other multimedia elements consider how images work together select high quality and compatible images crop images clean up scanned images use a variety of image sizes

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Graphics
use interesting borders create interesting special effects create backgrounds that reinforce the appearance of the other graphic elements design for the lowest common denominator of 216 colors use white space around graphics

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Graphics
consider incorporating some analog or traditional pieces within your multimedia application don't use big, slow graphics on web-based multimedia applications. Delay is unacceptable!

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Animation
make sure the animation adds to the project animations should impact, not detract from the ideas presented. make sure the animation is appropriate to the mood and content of the application determine how much animation to use, what objects should be animated, and how long the animation should run

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Animation
imagine where the animation will play realize that moving objects draw attention; make sure you animate what you want your users to tune into dont use too many animated objects per screen realize that animation that does the same thing over and over and over can be annoying; keep the animation changing or limit the animation

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Animation
use transitions and special effects that help communicate your message, but dont get overzealous and add too many on the Web, make sure your animation loads quickly

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Sound
use high quality, appropriate, consistent sound if different music files are used, they should be the same style of music it is best to use the same voice for narration and voice-overs, but different voices for different characters if different characters are used, the voices for each should be distinct

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Sound
coordinate your sound files with the other graphic, animation, and video elements used in your multimedia application in Web-based multimedia applications, consider using MIDI files clearly label the size and type of audio files when you embed downloadable sound files on Web pages

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Video
record and capture clean, high-quality video keep the video quality consistent keep the audience and mode of delivery in mind if possible, use external video files make sure the sound or music and the video complement one another

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Video
use high-quality video footage that lends credibility and a professional feel to your multimedia application use different characters to add interest to the application, but dont use so many that your users get lost coordinate video files to complement the application and the other multimedia elements

Designing the Media Elements (2)

Video
dont overuse transitions trim video clips of footage that is excessive, boring, or inconsistent with your application properly place and time video clips so that they are consistent with the content included in the other multimedia elements

Storyboards (3)
diagram that describes the content and sequence of each screen extremely important planning document anticipate potential problems

Storyboards (3)

Include:
sketch description of the elements time allotted for each element screen number transitions tools to be used budget information method of navigation comments

Scripts (3)
complete blueprints of a multimedia application contain all of the text and narration for a project details the scenes, screen conditions, transitions, and interactions among characters

Flowcharts (3)
illustrate the decision making process that results as users make choices assist team as they prepare for the multitude of possibilities that often exist within a multimedia application

Testing the Multimedia Application


throughout the development process upon completion multimedia project team

design, content, multimedia elements, programming code, user interface, method of navigation, and interactivity goals and objectives are being met project is progressing as scheduled and budgeted all licenses and releases have been obtained

Testing the Multimedia Application


incorporate client suggestions/comments get recommendations and feedback from a selected group of potential users

feelings about the overall program, user interface, way the program is executed, multimedia elements and design suggestions on features and changes in design that would improve the application positive feedback - what do they really like?

Storing the Multimedia Application


planning, development, and testing stages sometimes take years; the moment of truth is RTM (Release to Manufacturer) multimedia applications must be stored on magnetic tape, magnetic disks, magnetooptical disks, CD-ROM, DVD, laser disk, or a combination of these storage devices. multimedia applications may also be stored on a Web server

Delivering the Multimedia Application


development of special boxes and containers to be shipped to retail stores adding a link to a Web site professional and consistent with the application and the way it is stored include licensing information, documentation, instructions and phone numbers for technical support

Copyright Issues

Copyright
dont take chances always get permission carefully read agreements

Using Content
Working with content
Content is what the project is all about Content must be made or acquired

Using Content
Working with content Using content created by others
Content may come from a variety of sources Carefully read licensing agreements

Using Content
Working with content Using content created by others Copyrights
Original material is owned by the creator
Copyright is implied Owning a copy of a work does not allow reproduction

Using Content
Working with content Using content created by others Copyrights Obtaining rights
License work before planning to use it Make agreements in writing

Using Content
Working with content Using content created by others Copyrights Obtaining rights Derivative works

Derivative works

Using Content
Working with content Using content created by others Copyrights Obtaining rights Derivative works Using content created for a project

Summary

Review