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NPR
6 min read
Society

The Women Behind The 'Alt-Right'

Last weekend, when white nationalists descended on Charlottesville to protest, it was clear that almost exclusively white, young males comprised the so-called alt-right movement — there were women, but very few. So where were the white women — over half of whom put Trump in the White House — who weren't out protesting in the streets? For the most part, journalist Seyward Darby discovered, they're online. "It wasn't easy" seeking out the women of the alt-right, Darby tells NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro. "I spent a lot of time in the underbelly of the Internet — Twitter, YouTube, Reddit, 4chan, plac
NPR
3 min read
Society

On The Internet, Everyone Knows 'You're A Racist': Twitter Account IDs Marchers

They didn't wear hoods as they chanted "Jews will not replace us." They weren't hiding their faces as they waved Confederate flags, racist signs and swastikas. They looked straight at a sea of cameras as they made the Nazi salute. As Matt Thompson wrote for The Atlantic, the white supremacist march and rally this past weekend wasn't a KKK rally: "It was a pride march." The bare-faced shamelessness was the point. But it was also an opening. On the Internet, some people are crowd-sourcing efforts to identify and shame the people participating in the rally. Most prominently, on Twitter, the accou
Newsweek
4 min read
Society

Breast Ironing Is Painful for Girls

She was just 28, already a grandmother, and her eldest of five daughters had gotten pregnant at 14. She was determined to keep her other girls from making the same mistake, So this past November, in a village near the city of Bafoussam in Cameroon, she brought her 10-year-old and her 7-year-old inside to flatten their breasts. She took a stone the size of her palm, normally used to smash herbs, and, one at a time, pressed it into the sides of the girls’ breasts and massaged it in circles for about 10 minutes as the other daughter looked on nervously. All the while, the woman’s twin toddlers we
Hillbilly Elegy
Alex P., Scribd Editor
From the Editors

Illuminating examination…

Even as the Vance family manages to achieve some semblance of ‘The American Dream,’ J.D. Vance shows how deeply the scars of poverty—and the familial and societal ills that it engendered—have compromised the health and happiness of each generation. A must-read for those interested in the ramifications of American social, economic, and political policy.