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REVIEW OF LITERATURE

1. Consumer Behaviour in Tourism


Document Information: Title: Author(s): Citation: Keywords: Consumer Behaviour in Tourism Luiz Moutinho Luiz Moutinho, (1987) "Consumer Behaviour in Tourism", European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 21 Iss: 10, pp.5 - 44 Consumer Behaviour, Tourist Industry

Article type: Case study DOI: Publisher: Abstract: 10.1108/EUM0000000004718 (Permanent URL) MCB UP Ltd The analysis of consumer behaviour requires the consideration of various processes internal and external to the individual. To understand behaviour, it is necessary to examine the complex interaction of many influencing elements. This study deals with determinants of behaviour, culture and reference group influences, the relationships between individuals and their environments, perceived risks, and family decision processes. It concludes with an illustration of tourist behaviour modelling.

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The role of mixed emotions in consumer behaviour: Investigating ambivalence in consumers' experiences of approach-avoidance conflicts in online and offline settings
2. Document Information: Title: The role of mixed emotions in consumer behaviour: Investigating ambivalence in consumers' experiences of

approach-avoidance conflicts in online and offline settings Author(s): Elfriede Penz, (Wirtschaftsuniversitt (WU), Institute for International Marketing and Management, Vienna, Austria), Margaret K. Hogg, (Department of Marketing, Management School, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK) Elfriede Penz, Margaret K. Hogg, (2011) "The role of mixed emotions in consumer behaviour: Investigating ambivalence in consumers' experiences of approach-avoidance conflicts in online and offline settings", European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 45 Iss: 1/2, pp.104 - 132 Consumer behaviour, Internet shopping, Retailing Research paper 10.1108/03090561111095612 (Permanent URL) Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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Keywords: Article type: DOI: Publisher:

Acknowledgements: The authors would like to thank Christina Wastlbauer and Christina-Isidora Kyritsi who undertook the data collection for this study.The authors would also like to thank the Editors and the three reviewers for their helpful and insightful comments on earlier drafts of this paper. Abstract: Purpose Mixed emotions (i.e. consumer ambivalence) play a central role in approach-avoidance conflicts in retailing. In order to assess how consumer ambivalence impacts shopping behaviour, this paper seeks to conceptualize and investigate the multi-dimensional antecedents of approach-avoidance conflicts, experienced by shoppers in changing retail environments, and the importance of approach-avoidance conflicts for consumers' decision to stay and complete their purchase in that particular shopping channel. Design/methodology/approach Using a cross-country study, which compared online and offline consumers, the paper tested the influence of the situation, product, and reference group on shoppers' intentions; and identified how consumers' mixed emotions influenced approach-avoidance conflicts in different retail settings. Findings Whereas some distinctions could be drawn between online and offline contexts when examining the impact of market-related, product-related and social factors on consumers' decision to shop (H1, H2, H3 and H4), no clear distinction could be drawn between online and offline

channels in terms of mediating effects of mixed emotions (H5, H6and H7). Mixed emotions (ambivalence) did mediate the impact of certain product-related, market-related and personal factors on consumers' intention to purchase. Practical implications Retailers need to reduce the impact of consumers' emotional responses to the retail setting where mixed emotions are likely to lead to consumers leaving the stores. For online shops, those retailers are successful who are able to induce behavioural reactions that make consumers return and explore the web site and not use it for search only. Originality/value Responding to calls for further research on mixed emotions and their consequences, the paper captures the complex impact of consumers' mixed emotions on approach-avoidance conflicts, and thereby extends earlier work on consumer ambivalence.

Consumer behaviour towards honey products in Western Australia


3. Document Information: Title: Author(s): Consumer behaviour towards honey products in Western Australia Peter J. Batt, (Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia), Aijun Liu, (Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China) Peter J. Batt, Aijun Liu, (2012) "Consumer behaviour towards honey products in Western Australia", British Food Journal, Vol. 114 Iss: 2, pp.285 - 297 Asia, Australia, Cluster analysis, Consumer behaviour, Honey, Market segmentation

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Article type: Research paper DOI: Publisher: Abstract: 10.1108/00070701211202449 (Permanent URL) Emerald Group Publishing Limited Purpose This paper aims to explore the factors impacting and influencing the consumer's decision to purchase honey in a retail store. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from shopping mall intercepts in Perth, Western Australia, using a structured questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify the principal constructs which most influence the consumer's decision to

purchase. On the basis of the ways in which honey was consumed within the household, cluster analysis was utilised to group the respondents into meaningful segments. Findings In Perth, Western Australia, honey is primarily consumed as a spread or a sweetener on breakfast cereals and porridge. However, honey is also used as a marinade, in cakes and cookies and as a beverage. According to the way in which honey is consumed in the household, five clusters were identified. In purchasing honey from a retail store, exploratory factor analysis revealed three principal constructs which were most influential in the consumer's decision to purchase: brand reputation, origin and value for money. Ethnicity was found to have a significant influence on the way in which honey was consumed in the household and the importance of the three constructs extracted. Originality/value This is one of the few studies that find a significant difference between Anglo Saxon and Asian consumers of honey.

Consumer behaviour and sensory preference differences: implications for wine product marketing
4. Document Information: Title: Author(s): Consumer behaviour and sensory preference differences: implications for wine product marketing Johan Bruwer, (School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, Australia), Anthony Saliba, (School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, Australia),Bernadette Miller, (School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, Australia) Johan Bruwer, Anthony Saliba, Bernadette Miller, (2011) "Consumer behaviour and sensory preference differences: implications for wine product marketing", Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 28 Iss: 1, pp.5 - 18 Age groups, Australia, Consumer behaviour, Consumption, Gender, Wines

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Article type: Research paper DOI: Publisher: Abstract: 10.1108/07363761111101903 (Permanent URL) Emerald Group Publishing Limited Purpose Exploratory research was conducted in a well-known

Australian wine region to determine the differences in the behaviour dynamics and sensory preferences of consumer groups. The overall aim is to gain some insights into the product style preferences of consumers and what this means in practical terms to wine product marketing. Design/methodology/approach Information was obtained from a random sample of 150 visitors to ten wineries in the Yarra Valley wine region in Australia. Data were collected by means of selfadministration surveys using a highly structured questionnaire at each of the winery tasting room venues. Findings Specific differences exist in the wine consumption behaviour and sensory preferences of males and females and between generational cohorts, specifically Millennial and older consumers. Females drink less wine than males, spend less thereon but tend to compensate for this by buying higher priced wine per bottle, which could represent a risk-reduction strategy. Females are noticeably higher than their male counterparts in white wine consumption, showing a preference for a sweeter wine style at a young age, and reported a strong preference for medium body style wines over light and full-bodied wines. From a sensory preference viewpoint, fruit tastes and aromas are by far the most important, especially among females, as are vegetative characters, wood/oak, and mouth-feel characters. More males, on the other hand, preferred the aged characters of wine. Research limitations/implications It is possible to target wine consumers in accordance with their gender and lifecycle stage as far as the sensory and certain behavioural aspects of the product are concerned. However, this should not be oversimplified and drive product marketing strategies in the wrong direction. Originality/value This study is of value to academic researchers, wine industry practitioners and other wine distribution channel members alike, as it provides insights into consumer behaviour differences and one of the core tangible aspects of a wine product, namely the sensory preferences of consumers. 5. Green consumer behaviour: an experimental analysis of willingness to pay for
remanufactured products

Keywords:

sustainable consumption;

green products; consumer behaviour; experimental auctions; willingness to pay

Abstract
Products' end-of-life management has recently become a critical business issue. One of the possible end-of-life strategies is remanufacturing, which can provide competitive advantages through material and energy savings. Beyond industrial organization challenges, there is a question about the interest of developing a green marketing strategy for remanufactured products. Indeed, remanufactured products can be considered as green products since their industrial process has environmental benefits. Our paper asks whether consumers are willing to pay for remanufactured products, especially when they are informed that these products are green. We use experimental auctions to elicit consumers' WTP for specific characteristics of remanufactured products. Our study indicates that consumers tend to value the remanufactured product less than the conventional one unless they are informed about their respective environmental impacts. We find no evidence that consumers are willing to pay a premium for the green (i.e. remanufactured) product. However, providing environmental information to consumers has an effect on their WTP for the conventional product: they generally decrease significantly their WTP for the conventional (and thus most polluting) product. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

6. Design for Sustainable Behaviour: Using Products to Change

Consumer Behaviour
Authors: Bhamra, Tracy; Lilley, Debra; Tang, Tang Source: The Design Journal, Volume 14, Number 4, December 2011 , pp. 427-445(19) Publisher: Berg Publishers

Abstract: Sustainable design takes into account environmental, economic and social impacts enacted throughout the product lifecycle. Design for Sustainable Behaviour (DfSB) is an emerging activity under the banner of sustainable design which aims to reduce products' environmental and social impact by moderating how users interact with them. This paper presents the results of research investigating the application of Design for Sustainable Behaviour in two product case studies, one examining social impacts of mobile phones and the other environmental impacts of household refrigerators. It analyses selected behaviour models from social-psychological theories and highlights the barriers to sustainable consumption. A model is developed to illustrate the factors stimulating changes in behaviour, and design intervention strategies are highlighted and their application within Design for Sustainable Behaviour discussed. The two case studies are used to illustrate how Design for Sustainable Behaviour could be applied to enable users to adopt more sustainable patterns of use. Conclusions are drawn as to the potential for designers to change use behaviour; the appropriateness and acceptability of the strategies presented; and the ethical considerations related to their selection.

Keywords: DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABLE BEHAVIOUR; SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

7. Consumer behaviour analysis and social marketing practice

Abstract
From encouraging recycling to promoting safe sex, social marketing seeks to encourage changes in behaviour that benefit the individual, community, and society at large. To date, however, the discipline has generally been regarded as conceptually weak, relying upon the application of standard marketing management techniques at the expense of any substantive engagement with behavioural change theory. In an attempt to address this apparent gap in understanding, this paper explores the potential of consumer behaviour analysis as a possible theoretical basis for a more robust approach to social marketing practice, taking the behavioural perspective model (BPM) as its elected explanatory framework. Following the introduction of the key elements of the model and their rationale, the paper proceeds to apply the BPM to the interpretation of three broad areas of behavioural intervention: public health, environmental conservation, and neighbourhood crime. On the basis of the interpretive analysis developed, the authors draw some tentative conclusions as to the viability of an ecological approach to social marketing outlining potential directions for future research applying the BPM explanatory framework.

Keywords

social marketing, service industry, consumer behaviour analysis, psychology, social learning, behavioural economics

8.The

service quality and consumerbehaviour analysis in Taiwan


,

Yuan-Ho Chen

Graduate School of Business & Management, Lunghwa University of Science and Technology, Taiwan Available online 25 November 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2011.10.524, How to Cite or Link Using DOI Cited by in Scopus (3) Permissions & Reprints

Abstract

This paper focuses on shopping malls, thus this paper selects two high market share rate businesses from a pool for assessment according to the SERVQUAL (model of service quality assessment), in order to explore the large-scale integrated retail service quality standards, the pattern of performance differences between the service types. The results of this study provide (1) Service quality have gap, which is between service standard and consumer's expectation. (2)Safety facility is most impressed and have biggest service gap. (3) Shopping mall not only for shopping functions, but also has leisure function. This result provides the information on Taiwan's consumer expectation of service quality required. Moreover, the research also offers the indicators for service quality improvement, and serves as a reference to enhance the competitiveness of the enterprise itself.

Keywords
SERVQUAL scale; Service quality; service gap; shopping mall

An Empirical Study of Consumer Behaviour in Mobile Phone Market in Bhutan


9.
Dr. L. Shashikumar Sharma

Abstract
The mobile phone market is one of the dynamic markets that have been growing by leaps and bounds in the last decade. Although the manufacturers conduct a lot of market studies, their outcomes are not made available to the public. Therefore, consumer behaviour of mobile phone is an open area for study. The paper attempts to identify the factors that influence the purchase of mobile phones by the youth in Bhutan. It uses factor analysis as a tool to identify the factors that influence the consumer behaviour. This paper surveyed 254 Bhutanese consumers and looked at their motives to purchase new mobile phones. The outcome of the study identifies five accountable factors while making the purchase of a mobile phone by the youth community.

10. Portrait value questionnaire's (PVQ) usefulness in explaining quality food-related consumer behavior

Document Information: Title: Portrait value questionnaire's (PVQ) usefulness in explaining quality foodrelated consumer behavior Christos Fotopoulos, (Department of Business Administration of Food and Agricultural Enterprises, University of Ioannina, Agrinio, Greece), Athanasios Krystallis, (Department of Marketing and Statistics, Aarhus School of Business, Aarhus, Denmark), Pagiaslis Anastasios, (Department of Business Administration of Food and Agricultural Enterprises, University of Ioannina, Patras, Greece) Christos Fotopoulos, Athanasios Krystallis, Pagiaslis Anastasios, (2011) "Portrait value questionnaire's (PVQ) usefulness in explaining quality foodrelated consumer behavior", British Food Journal, Vol. 113 Iss: 2, pp.248 - 279 Consumer behaviour, Factor analysis, Food products, Greece, Questionnaires

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Article type: Research paper DOI: Publisher: Abstract: 10.1108/00070701111105330 (Permanent URL) Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Purpose Schwartz's portrait value questionnaire (PVQ) has extensively been used in personal values research. The present paper aims to validate the 40-item PVQ typology, using a nationally representative sample of 997 consumers. The main objective of the survey was to investigate whether higher-than-average regular purchasing of quality food products (i.e. organic and PDO labelled products) coincides with stronger identification with specific PVQ values. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire was distributed nationwide. Data were collected through personal interviews with 997 consumers. Confirmatory factor analysis and cluster analysis were the main analytical techniques used. Findings At the value-based segmentation level of the analysis, identification with the PVQ value domains decreased per cluster progressively and jointly for almost all value domains, a trend that led

to the identification of five distinctive national consumer segments. The trend of stronger identification with security, universalism and benevolence that appeared at the sample level re-emerged for the urban upper class, the countryside class I and the countryside class II, which accounted for two-thirds of the overall sample and were the clusters with the most dynamic quality food purchasing profile. Research limitations/implications Despite the emergence of a clear relation between consumers' self-transcendence and security value similarity and higher-than-average frequency of quality food purchasing, quality food consumers did not form a separate and clearly diversified cluster if the PVQ inventory functions as a basis for segmentation. Future models should incorporate values together with intermediate-level constructs (e.g. beliefs and/or attitudes) when attempting to predict consumer behaviour towards quality food products. Originality/value The paper shows that while values can be used to meaningfully segment quality food consumers, there is still much to learn regarding the direct and indirect determinants

11.

he service quality and consumerbehaviour analysis in Taiwan


,

Yuan-Ho Chen

Graduate School of Business & Management, Lunghwa University of Science and Technology, Taiwan Available online 25 November 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2011.10.524, How to Cite or Link Using DOI Cited by in Scopus (3) Permissions & Reprints

Abstract
This paper focuses on shopping malls, thus this paper selects two high market share rate businesses from a pool for assessment according to the SERVQUAL (model of service quality assessment), in order to explore the large-scale integrated retail service quality standards, the pattern of performance differences between the service types. The results of this study provide (1) Service quality have gap, which is between service standard and consumer's expectation. (2)Safety facility is most impressed and have biggest service gap. (3) Shopping mall not only for shopping functions, but also has leisure function. This result provides the information on Taiwan's consumer expectation of service quality required. Moreover, the research also offers the indicators for service quality improvement, and serves as a reference to enhance the competitiveness of the enterprise itself.

Keywords
SERVQUAL scale; Service quality; service gap; shopping mall

12.

Mall shopping behaviour of Indian small town consumers

Abstract
Rapid development of retailing in India has led to expansion of malls in smaller cities. The current research was directed towards small city consumers (n=276) to understand their mall shopping behaviour. Most people in small cities are unfamiliar with the concept of malls and their exposure to the organized retail has been limited in the past. Malls bring functional and experiential benefits to them and affect their shoppingbehaviour. The perceived benefits, however, may differ among consumer groups. This study specifically focuses on exploring the differences across age and gender groups. ANOVA test was used for the analyses. The results show that consumers gender and age play an important role in determining their attitude towards shopping in malls. The influence of mall attributes such as dcor, layout, services, variety of stores, and entertainment facilities must be considered while planning malls in smaller cities as they have an effect onconsumers buying behaviour. The mall shopping behaviour of metropolitan city shoppers should not be generalized with that of shoppers in smaller cities.

Keywords
Indian consumers; Malls; Shopping behaviour; Small towns; India

13. Religiosity and consumer behavior of older adults: A study of subcultural influences in

Malaysia

Abstract

Although differences in consumption patterns across countries are often inferred to be the result of different cultural values and religious orientations, they raise issues of validity because of the many countryspecific factors that may affect behavior. Furthermore, the effects of religiosity are confounded with those of

variables that are associated with religiosity such as age. This paper examines the effects of religiosity on well-being and changes in consumer preferences of 645 adults age 50 and older living in different regions of Malaysia who were surveyed via personal interviews. The results confirm the positive effects of religiosity on well-being but show differences across the three main ethnic subcultures of Malaysia (Malays, Indians, and Chinese), and they provide little support for the hypotheses that the consistency of consumer brand and store preferences is influenced by religious values. It is suggested that the relationship between religiosity and consumer behaviors warrants additional research, focusing also on variables that relate to religiosity, method of analysis, and on mechanisms that link religiosity to consumer behaviors.

14. Dependency on smartphone and the impact on purchase behaviour


Document Information: Title: Author(s): Dependency on smartphone and the impact on purchase behaviour Ding Hooi Ting, (Senior Lecturer at the School of Business, Monash University, Sunway Campus, Malaysia), Suet Fong Lim, (Research Student at the School of Business, Monash University, Sunway Campus, Malaysia), Tanusina Siuly Patanmacia, (Research Student at the School of Business, Monash University, Sunway Campus, Malaysia), Ca Gie Low, (Research Student at the School of Business, Monash University, Sunway Campus, Malaysia), Gay Chuan Ker, (Research Student at the School of Business, Monash University, Sunway Campus, Malaysia) Ding Hooi Ting, Suet Fong Lim, Tanusina Siuly Patanmacia, Ca Gie Low, Gay Chuan Ker, (2011) "Dependency on smartphone and the impact on purchase behaviour", Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers, Vol. 12 Iss: 3, pp.193 - 203 Convenience, Dependency, Influence, Malaysia, Mobile communication systems, Mobile technology, Purchase behaviour, Smartphones, Social needs, Students, University students Research paper

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DOI: Publisher:

10.1108/17473611111163250 (Permanent URL) Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Acknowledgements: Received: August 2010Revised: January 2011Accepted: February 2011 Abstract:

Purpose This study aims to investigate the effect of convenience, social needs and social influences on university students' dependency towards smartphones and the impact on future purchase behaviour in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach Hypotheses were tested with a random and judgemental sampling (students who use smartphones only) of 358 university students using a face-toface survey method. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses. Findings The results indicated that university students' dependency on smartphones is influenced by convenience, social needs and social influences and dependency is positively related with future purchase behaviour. Research limitations/implications Results of this study are limited by the absence of equal distribution across different races and culture of university students. Originality/value The domain of research, smartphones, is a new technology that is largely adopted and deserves investigation for future mobile market strategies. Although this research of smartphone dependency is limited to universities, this study contributes to the field by adding new investigation in this new target segment of smartphone users.

15. The role of brand image, product involvement, and knowledge in explaining consumer purchase behaviour of counterfeits: Direct and indirect effects
Document Information:

Title:

The role of brand image, product involvement, and knowledge in explaining consumer purchase behaviour of counterfeits: Direct and indirect effects Xuemei Bian, (Business School, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK),Luiz Moutinho, (Management Department, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK) Xuemei Bian, Luiz Moutinho, (2011) "The role of brand image, product involvement, and knowledge in explaining consumer purchase behaviour of counterfeits: Direct and indirect effects", European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 45 Iss: 1/2, pp.191 - 216 Brand image, Consumer behaviour, Counterfeiting, United Kingdom

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Article type: Research paper DOI: Publisher: Abstract: 10.1108/03090561111095658 (Permanent URL) Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Purpose Counterfeiting has become a significant economic phenomenon. Increased demand for counterfeit branded products (CBPs) makes the study of determinants of consumers CBPs purchase behaviour more worthwhile than ever before. Existing studies have largely neglected brand influence on consumer purchase behaviour of CBPs. This research seeks to examine the impact of perceived brand image, direct and indirect effects (mediator and moderator effects) of product involvement and product knowledge on consumer purchase intention of counterfeits in the context of non-deceptive counterfeiting. Design/methodology/approach The current study tests the conceptual model and hypotheses developed based on the existing literature. Four focus groups (ranging from six to eight participants in each group) are used to construct the research instrument. The conceptual model and hypothesis are tested using hierarchical regression analyses with survey data from 321 consumers in the UK. Findings This research is the first in the literature on counterfeits to establish that perceived brand personality plays a more dominant role in explaining consumers' purchase intention of CBP than other influential factors (e.g. benefit and product attribute). Involvement/knowledge has no significant influence on counterfeit purchase intention. Evidence of

involvement as a moderator does not exist. Brand image is not a mediator of the effects of involvement/knowledge on purchase intention. Research limitations/implications This research only investigates one brand of one product category (watches) in the context of non-deceptive counterfeiting, although this has not prevented the emergence of significant results. Practical implications The results of this study hold important implications for both practitioners and academics. They help to alert practitioners to the factors that truly affect consumer proneness of CBPs, for example, brand personality. For academics, they demonstrate that brand influence should not be further ignored in the study of consumer behaviour in relation to CBPs. Originality/value This research is one of the few which investigate CBP not only as a product but, more importantly, also as a brand a counterfeit brand.

16. Positive and negative cross-channel shopping behaviour


Document Information: Title: Author(s): Citation: Positive and negative cross-channel shopping behaviour Niall Piercy, (School of Management, University of Bath, Bath, UK) Niall Piercy, (2012) "Positive and negative cross-channel shopping behaviour", Marketing Intelligence & Planning, Vol. 30 Iss: 1, pp.83 - 104 Consumer behaviour, Cross-channel behaviour, Internet, Retailing

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Article type: Research paper DOI: Publisher: 10.1108/02634501211193930 (Permanent URL) Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Abstract:

Purpose Purchasing behaviour across traditional retail and internet routes to market is becoming increasingly integrated. The positive and negative consequences of such behaviour for multi-channel businesses have not been thoroughly examined while an offline retail presence may reassure customers purchasing from an online channel, poor service online may negatively influence customer usage of an offline channel. This paper aims to address this issue. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire survey of the online customers of four companies is employed and structural equation modelling used to investigate influences of demographic and behavioural variables (purchase involvement, loyalty, experience with the internet, company and product-type) on positive and negative crosschannel behaviour (CCB). Findings Strong evidence for both positive and negative customer CCB is found. Females, higher purchase involvement, higher loyalty and those with more experience of the company were more likely to display positive CCB; higher education, experience with the product type and online channel negatively influenced positive CCB. Increased age, education, occupation/class and purchase involvement lead to more negative CCB; product and company experience lead to reduced levels of negative CCB. Research limitations/implications As a first step towards understanding of customer CCB the research generates many insights; however, more research is required to explore in more depth each of the constructs discussed and measured. Practical implications Understanding how different customer groups display different tendencies for CCB can help companies shape fulfilment and delivery strategies across different channels to market. Originality/value The study makes contributions to customer crosschannel customer behaviour, developing implications for future research as well as management practice.

17. Transportation oil demand, consumer preferences and asymmetric prices


Document Information:

Title:

Transportation oil demand, consumer preferences and asymmetric prices David C. Broadstock, (Research Institute of Economics and Management (RIEM), Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, Chengdu, China and Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), Department of Economics, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK),Alan Collins, (Department of Economics, Portsmouth Business School, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK), Lester C. Hunt, (Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), Department of Economics, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK) David C. Broadstock, Alan Collins, Lester C. Hunt, (2011) "Transportation oil demand, consumer preferences and asymmetric prices", Journal of Economic Studies, Vol. 38 Iss: 5, pp.528 - 536 Asymmetry, Consumer behaviour, Diesel, Gasoline, Pricing, Underlying energy demand trend, United Kingdom Research paper 10.1108/01443581111161797 (Permanent URL) Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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Acknowledgements: The authors would like to acknowledge useful comments received from an anonymous referee on an earlier version of this paper. All errors and omissions remain the responsibility of the authors. Abstract:

Purpose The aim of this paper is to establish the role of asymmetric price decompositions in UK road transportation fuel demand, make explicit the impact of the underlying energy demand trend, and disaggregate the estimation for gasoline and diesel demand as separate commodities. Design/methodology/approach Dynamic UK transport oil demand functions are estimated using the Seemingly Unrelated Structural Time Series Model with decomposed prices to allow

for asymmetric price responses. Findings The importance of starting with a flexible modelling approach that incorporates both an underlying demand trend and asymmetric price response function is highlighted. Furthermore, these features can lead to different insights and policy implications than might arise from a model without them. As an example, a zero elasticity for a price-cut is found (for both gasoline and diesel), implying that price reductions do not induce demand for road transportation fuel in the UK. Originality/value The paper illustrates the importance of joint modelling of gasoline and diesel demand incorporating both asymmetric price responses and stochastic underlying energy demand trends.

18. Impact of Integrated Marketing Communication on Consumer

Behaviour: Effects on Consumer Decision Making Process


Camelia Mihart

Abstract
Integrated marketing communication (IMC) is one of the most controversial areas of research, the concept marking a constant progress from the simple coordinating of promotional tools to a complex strategic process. Further to the evolution of modern marketing, where IMC has become a major way of achievement the objectives of a company, there is a need to identify opportunities to increase its impact on consumer behaviour. Therefore, is of interest, the relatively recent approach found in the literature, according to which IMC works specifically through all the four classic elements of the marketing mix: product, price, placement and marketing communications. In this context, this paper intends to clarify some aspects regarding the effects of IMC on the consumer behaviour, materialized in the consumer decision- making process.

19.