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LONDON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & FINANCE IN COLLABORATION WITH

UNIVERSITY OF WALES

MBA
MASTER IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

APPLICATION FOR VALIDATION BY THE UNIVERSITY OF WALES

Content
Content...............................................................................................2 Common Modules...............................................................................3 Pathway Modules..............................................................................35 Part Two.........................................................................................153

Common Modules

MODULE DESCRIPTION (MBA TAUGHT)

Strategic Planning
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director 1.0 Introduction:
Managers need to understand how strategy is formulated in business and how it shapes the direction and activities of an organisation. This module introduces students to concepts, theories and frameworks that will aid their understanding of strategic decision-making and its impact on organisations. Application of these techniques will be on live organisations to ensure teaching and learning is current. The focus of this module is on the nature of competitive strategy in a global context. It examines how, in such a dynamic environment, competitive advantage might be developed through strongly differentiated positioning and exploited in a cost-effective manner. Its emphasis is on where and how the organisation competes and, in doing this, highlights the strategic marketing significance of brands, innovation, alliances and relationships and e-marketing. An important theme running through the unit is the development of the capability to develop innovative solutions that enhance an organisations competitive position in its chosen markets.

SP Strategic Planning 15, 7 John Bredican Dorota Bourne

1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of the module is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and competencies to interpret and develop marketing strategy in order to assist their organisation in the creation and capture of value as well as obtaining sustainable competitive advantage. Through this process, the learner will develop an understanding of the impact of contemporary issues on the development and implementation of strategy. 1.1.1 Key Aims
To develop the skills to analyse strategic problems and reach strategic decisions in the contemporary and international business context

To develop an understanding of the most important strategic issues confronting the marketing manager in the 21st century To acquire the capability of organising and participating in the strategic planning and control process within an organisation 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge & Understanding: Develop critical appreciation of current strategic management concepts Develop an in-depth understanding of the complexity of the environment and its applications on decision-making process Integrate and apply strategic approaches to practical situations in various types of organisations Assess current developments in the organisational environment and alternative responses related to strategy by using case studies Critically analyse and evaluate strategic marketing management practices in organisations in different sectors Resolve complex management problems in the area of strategic management by critical evaluate alternatives outcomes Industry Related / Transferable Skills: Develop and enhance skills to construct and present quantitative & qualitative data effectively by the application of IT skills and methodological techniques By the end of this module students will develop group-working skills that will enable them to improve team-working ability and interpersonal skills 2.1 Indicative Content A. Introduction to classic concepts of strategic planning process B. Corporate mission, vision value, and goal C. Business Economics: the macroeconomic environment and microeconomic choices D. Competitive strategies cost-led and differentiated strategies E. Organisational resources and competences F. Strategic development options and portfolio models G. Stakeholder analysis and the management of change H. Evaluating strategies and matching them to organisational capabilities I. The relationship between business ethics and business strategy J. Contemporary issues in strategic management K. Competitive advantage through innovation L. Strategic analysis of internal and external environment M. Contemporary issues in strategic business management

N. Critical evaluation of strategic planning process 5

O.Ethics and strategic planning P. Principles of Company Law


2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Methods of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above.

3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Coursework 80% 50% Examination 20% 50%

Outline details Business Investigation Open Book

Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment 1 Coursework Students will be expected to investigate the marketing strategy of an organisation identified by their tutor in order to determine the key components of its strategy and make critical recommendations for its improvement. Further details will follow in the assessment brief within the Student Study Guide. Assessment 2 Open Book Examination The open book exam will comprise of three essay questions from a selection of nine. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Johnson G and Scholes K (2005) Exploring Corporate Strategy, Prentice Hall, 7th ed

4.2 Recommended Reading: Ambrosini V (1998) Exploring Techniques of Analysis and Evaluation in Strategic Management, Prentice Hall Aaker D. (2007) Strategic Market Management Wiley; 8 edition Coulter M (2005) Strategic Management in Action, Prentice Hall, 3rd ed Chernev A. and Kotler P. (2008) Strategic Marketing Management, 3rd Edition Brightstar Media, Inc.; 3rd edition Chernev A. (2007) Strategic Marketing Analysis, 2nd Edition Brightstar Media, Inc.; 2 edition David FR (2001) Strategic Management, Prentice Hall, 8th ed De Wit R and Meyer R (1998) Strategy: Process, Content, Context An International Perspective, Thomson Dolan RJ (1992) Strategic Marketing Management (Practice of Management) Harvard Business School Press Doole, I. and Lowe, R. (2005) Strategic marketing decisions in global markets. London, Thomson Learning Finlay P (2000) Strategic Management, Prentice Hall Grant RM (2004) Contemporary Strategic Analysis, Blackwell, 5th ed Hamel G and Prahalad CK (1994) Competing for the Future, Harvard Business School Press Hooley, G. Saunders, J. Piercy, N. and Nicoulaud, B. (2007) Marketing Strategy and Competitive Positioning (4th Edition) South-Western College Pub; 4 edition Kay J (1995) Foundations of Corporate Success, O U P Kim, C. and Mauborgne, R. (2005) Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make Competition Irrelevant Harvard Business School Press; 1 edition Lambin, J, Chumpitaz, R and Schuiling, I (2007) Market-Driven Management: Strategic and Operational Marketing Palgrave Macmillan; 2nd edition Thompson JL (2005) Strategic Management, Thomson Learning, 5th ed Welch, P.J., and Welch, G.F.(2006) Economics: Theory and Practice Wiley; 8 edition 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: ABI/Inform global (journals) Osiris (companies) Datamonitor (market surveys, available via Osiris) Financial Times online Economist Times & Sunday Times Athens database 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great

care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. Strategic Planning Society http://www.sps.org.uk/ Strategic Planning Papers http://www.bitpipe.com/ The Institute for Learning and Research http://www.bized.co.uk Business Link DTI site for practical business advice http://www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/action/home

MODULE DESCRIPTION (MBA TAUGHT)

Marketing Management
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: The objective of the course is to give future managers an understanding of the key theories that underpin the study of Marketing, as well as an opportunity to analyse and evaluate the marketing strategies of successful and not-so-successful businesses. There will also be an opportunity to formulate a marketing strategy in response to case study material. Module focuses on the implementation stage of the strategy. This encompasses managing marketing teams, managing change, implementing strategy through marketing activities and working with other departments, and using measurement as the basis for improvement. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of the module is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and competencies to interpret and develop marketing strategies in order to assist their organisation in the creation and capture of value. Through this process, the learner will develop an understanding of the impact of contemporary issues on the development and implementation of a marketing strategy. 1.1.1 Key Aims Develop a managerial, rather than a descriptive, appreciation of issues related to marketing management. Examine critically advanced theoretical frameworks. Integrate the theoretical, conceptual and analytical considerations of marketing management. At the end of the course, you will have mastered a range of methods and techniques and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical foundations, range of relevance, applicability and limitations.

MM Marketing Management 15, 7 John Bredican Dorota Bourne

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module:

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On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge & Understanding Use appropriate marketing terminology, concepts, theories and models applied in a variety of marketing settings. Describe the inter-related nature of the basic marketing concept and the business environment. Analyse the elements of the marketing mix and the role of different elements in achieving marketing objectives. Demonstrate a critical appreciation of a variety of market research techniques. Appreciate the importance of the separate marketing functions, the management of these functions, and how each function affects other functions within and external to the marketing domain. Describe the components of a professional marketing plan. Appreciate the dynamic nature of marketing in a changing, global business environment. To think strategically about a given companys marketing approach in order to ensure the creation and capture of value Analyse a marketing strategy within a structured framework, incorporating market positioning, performance objectives and success factors Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory & practice Synthesise relevant literature from a diverse range of perspectives on specific aspects of marketing management, identify knowledge gaps and propose research through which the identified gaps could be addressed. Industry Related / Transferable Skills: Formulate/develop coherent strategies that are holistic in nature and internally congruent in terms of both conceptual and operational requirements of marketing management. Carry out independent study and research in the subject areas of the course Analyse the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas from the perspective of the marketing function Demonstrate how marketing could be organized and applied in a business context. Effectively communicate research findings

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Debate contested issues in the field 2.1 Indicative Content A. Principles of marketing; definition, aims and challenges B. Company and marketing strategy; relationship building and the marketing environment C. Markets and buyer behaviour; segmentation, targeting and positioning D. Product and service branding and pricing Strategies Distribution policy and channel management Implementing the business strategy through marketing activities G. Marketing planning H. Managing marketing mix I. Marketing specifics: 2B2, services, retail, e-commerce and non-profit marketing J. Marketing metrics: measurement and control K. Marketing in the global context L. Evolution of marketing, ethics and social responsibilities M. Managing marketing teams N. Aspects of consumer law 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Methods of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are

E.
F.

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interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Coursework 80% 50% Examination 20% 50% Outline details Marketing Plan Open Book Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment 1 Coursework Students will be expected to develop a commercially viable and coherently written marketing plan in response to a scenario set by their tutor. They will be expected to present the marketing plan in a mock Boardroom style setting in order to secure funds for the project. Assessment 2 Open Book Examination The open book exam will comprise of a case study response. The case study will be pre-seen by students. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return

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date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Kotler, P. and Keller, K. Marketing Management (13th Edition) Prentice Hall; 13 edition (2008) 4.2 Recommended Reading: Gilligan, C. and Wilson, R. Strategic Marketing Management, Third Edition: planning, implementation and control Butterworth-Heinemann; 3 edition (2005) Hooley, G. Saunders, J. Piercy, N. and Nicoulaud, B. Marketing Strategy and Competitive Positioning (4th Edition) South-Western College Pub; 4 edition (2007) Lambin, J., Chumpitaz, R. and Schuiling, I. Market-Driven Management, Second Edition: Strategic and Operational Marketing Palgrave Macmillan; 2nd edition (2007) Lehmann, D. Analysis for Marketing Planning McGraw-Hill/Irwin; 7 edition (2007) McDonald, M. (2007) Marketing plans: how to prepare them, how to use them. 6th edition. Oxford, Butterworth Heinemann 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Journal of Marketing Campaign European Journal of Marketing Marketing Week The Marketer (CIM) Precision Marketing (Haymarket) International Journal of Marketing Harvard Business Review 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by

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real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. www.cim.co.uk www.emarketer.com www.wisemarketer.com www.mad.co.uk www.marketingmagazine.co.uk

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MODULE DESCRIPTION (MBA TAUGHT)

Operations Management
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: Most postgraduate students on graduating join organisations in an operational capacity. It is therefore most important that postgraduate students have an understanding of the operations function, how it fits in the business environment and how operations contribute to the overall success of organisations. Given that the rate of change is continually increasing, it is imperative that postgraduate students understand the nature of change and how to develop strategies in response to changes in the environment. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of the module is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and competencies to operate effectively in the workplace. Through this process, the learner will develop an understanding of the way in which the operations function is critical to the success of an organisation. 1.1.1 Key Aims

OM Operations Management 15, 7 Geoff Payne Dorota Bourne

To provide an overview of Operations Management. The approach will be mainly qualitative but it will not ignore quantitative aspects where relevant To enable students to grasp the nature of operations management and the activities of operations managers To critically analyse ways in which the operations function contributes to the organisations' competitiveness and strategic direction To evaluate the main issues concerned with the design of products, services and processes To appreciate the nature and complexity of externalities and how to develop strategies to allow organisations to implement and manage change To develop practical managerial skills and group working skills in the context of delivering managerial change 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: On successful completion of the module the learner will have:

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Knowledge & Understanding Understand the function of operations in organisations Appreciate the nature, activities and process of operations Understand the way operations contribute to organisational competitiveness and strategic direction Gain in-depth knowledge of the key concepts of change management within organisations Applying theoretical concepts will be undertaken using the case study method Identify and analyse information needed to establish and implement effective operational decisions with particular reference to change management Critically analyse and evaluate both the concepts of operations strategies and also the issues raised with implementation in a fast changing environment Through case studies, identify management problems in the area of operations and critically evaluate alternative course of actions dependent on the resources available and the need to effectively manage change Understand the importance of people in the change management process. Industry Related / Transferable Skills: Enhanced ability to use and present quantitative & qualitative data, in suitable formats that increase understanding by the use of appropriate techniques and application of IT skills. Most of the case studies will require the management of data and information Improve and enhance verbal and written communication especially through the seminars. Students will need to provide both written reports and be engaged in discussions in seminars Throughout this module students will be able to work effectively in teams and have improved interpersonal skills. 2.1 Indicative Content A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. Operations context and strategy Operational functions in the provision of goods and services Plant and facilities management Processes: design, control and change management Planning and control issues Environmental issues Design of products, services and processes Improvements in operations through quality Understanding the nature of change and problems of implementation and control

J. Principles of Contract Law


2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment.

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2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Methods of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Coursework 80% 50% Examination 20% 50% Outline details Case Study Open Book Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment.

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Assessment 1 Coursework Students will be asked to evaluate, through a series of questions, a case study of an operations function in action. They will be required to apply their knowledge and understanding to develop a proposal to make recommendations for improvement. Assessment 2 Open Book Examination The examination will consist of a choice of three essay questions from a selection of nine. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Slack N, Chambers S, Johnston R & Betts A (2008), Operations and Process Management (2nd Ed), Pearson Education 4.2 Recommended Reading: Russell, R.S & Taylor, B.W (2000) Operations Management (3rd edition), Prentice Hall Heizer,J and Render, B (2001) Principles of Operations Management (4th edition) Prentice Hall Waters, D (1996) Operations Management Producing Goods and Services, Addison Wesley Pugh, D and Hickson, D (1997) Writers on Organisations (5th edition), Penquin Haksever, C et al (2000) Service Management and Operations (2nd edition), Prentice Hall

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Chase, RB, Aquilano, NJ and Jacobs, FR (1998) Production and Operations Management: Manufacturing and Services (8th edition), Unwin/McGraw-Hill Krajewski, L and Ritzman, L, (2001) Operations Management Strategy & Analysis (6th edition), Pentice Hall 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: ABI/Inform global (journals) Osiris (companies) Datamonitor (market surveys, available via Osiris) Financial Times online Economist Times & Sunday Times Athens database 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. http://www.globalreporting.org http://www.efqm.org http://www.LifeShirt.com http://www.boeing.com/commercial/news/feature http://www.oeeconsulting.com http://www.inst-mgt.org.uk http://www.jips.net http://www.dti.gov.uk http://www.cbi.org.uk

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Corporate Finance
Module Specification
Module Title: Corporate Finance Module Code: Level: M Credit: 15 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Skills module: None None No Pre-cursor: None Module Leader: Ahmed El-Masry Additional Tutors: Lawrence Wu

Excluded combinations (e.g skills modules): None University-wide option: No

Location of delivery: London School of Business and Finance Main aim(s) of the module:

The aim of Corporate Finance is to provide a basic understanding of corporate finance structure, including knowledge of the instruments used by companies to raise finance and manage financial risk. The primary goal of corporate finance is to maximize corporate value while reducing the firm's financial risks. Students will appreciate the techniques in both long-term and short-term financial decisions.

Main topics of studies: 1. Corporate Finance Theories: Key principles of finance including agency theory, theory of maximizing shareholder wealth will be demonstrated. Students will understand companies not only need to maximize shareholder wealth but also need to look after other stakeholders interests. Imperial research on the relationship between companies ethical awareness and companies performance in the modern world will be studies. 2. Investment appraisals:

Capital budgeting including the key techniques of ARR, payback period, NPV, IRR will be studied, along with the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. 3. Fundamental appraisals:

Valuing a firm by using fundamentals of price multiples as P/E, P/B, P/S, P/CF, will also be covered. Also, other concept as franchised P/E ratio and PEG ratio will be analysed. Source of Finance and cost of capital: The main source of finance in respect of equity and debt will be identified. The methods of calculating each type of cost of finance as CAPM, APT and the overall cost of capital WACC will be analysed. At the same time MMs theories of capital structure will be taught. Working capital Students will understand the importance of management of a firms work capital, the short-term finance. Students will also appreciate the ratio analysis in assessing a firms liquidity. The relationship between a firms short-term finance and its

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profitability will also be discovered here. Dividend policy Dividend is the rewards for shareholders investment. Students will understand how dividend policy will influence investors confidence and the theories of dividend policy and corporate value will be studied. Risk management Types of risks and the relationship between risks and rewards will be studied. Some technical risk measurement including standard deviation, variance, expected value will be covered here. Market efficiency hypothesis Market efficiency is a very important concept of investment. Three forms of efficiency, evidences of supporting each form, and types of test for each form will be discussed. Students will also have a good understanding the various forms for technical analysis and fundamental analysis. 4. Principles of regulation and compliance

Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1 Identify principles and trends in the corporate finance. 2 Determine and evaluate the nature of different source of finance. 3 Demonstrate deep and systemic knowledge in the sphere of corporate finance development. Thinking skills 4 Critically evaluate the economic benefit of various types of finance 5 Reflect on the roles, skills and responsibilities needed for effective management of corporate finance. 6 Discuss in context the linkage between current theory and practice and be able to organise appropriate evidence and reasoning to produce a balanced conclusion 7 Demonstrate problem solving and analytical approaches to facilitate effective financial decision-making Subject-based practical skills 8 Demonstrate effective approaches to analyzing corporate finance structure 9 Possess the ability to plan and implement tasks at professional level; make decisions in complex and unpredictable context of using rational decision-making approach Skills for life and work (general skills) 10 Present information and communicate effectively in written or oral form, at an appropriate level including the acknowledgement and referencing of sources and also capacity for independent and self managed learning 11 Contextualise the knowledge, competencies and practical skills from the module and apply this to the real world project contexts and activities

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Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module will be taught by lectures and understanding will be reinforced by the completion of individual and group exercises. It will also use case studies from blue chips companies, discussions and exercises. Intensive workshops will be used to ensure that all contents are appropriately covered within the taught component using the time available.

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the module: Assessment 1 Individual Report providing the current turmoil in the financial market, state the nature, interpret the reasons and recommend solutions. (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11) Open Examination 3 hours (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8)

Weighting: 50%

50%

Reading and resources for the module: Books Denzil Watson and Antony Head (2006), Corporate Finance: Principles and Practice, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall. Richard A Brealey, Stewart C Myers, and Franklin Allen, Principles of Corporate Finance: Pt. E, McGrawHill. Richard Pike and Bill Neale (2005), Corporate Finance and Investment: Decisions and Strategies, Prentice Hall. Richard A Bealey, Stewart C Myers, and Alan J. Marcus (2006), Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, McGraw-Hill. Stephen A. Ross,Randolph W Westerfield, and Jeffrey Jaffe (2004), Corporate Finance, McGraw-Hill. Zvi Bodie, Alex Kane, and Alan J. Marcus (2005), Investment, 6th edition, McGraw_Hill. Stephen Lumby and Chris Jones (2003), Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice, Thomson. Glen Arnold (2005), Corporate Financial Management, Prentice Hall. Other Resources Journal of Finance Journal of International Finance www.FT.co.uk www.afajof.org

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Organisational Behaviour
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director 1.0 Introduction:
Management and organisations are viewed in an environmental context rather than as isolated activities in a self-supporting system. To make effective business decisions, managers need to maintain a clear sense of the organisation in its environmental web and the interrelationships and interdependencies with which it operates. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of the module is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and competencies to operate effectively in a contemporary business organisation. Through this process, the learner will develop an understanding of the impact of the internal and external business environment upon the organisation.

OB Organisational Behaviour 15, 7 Dorota Bourne Dorota Bourne

1.1.1 Key Aims

To provide a critical appreciation for the manager's environment To understand the conceptual and practical dimensions of planning, organising, leading and controlling To consider the importance of individual and group behaviour, intergroup dynamics and management theory in practice To assess and apply the theory and practice of organisational theory, design and behaviour

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module:


On successful completion of the module the learner will have:

Knowledge & Understanding: 24

Appreciate key concepts in the area of organisational, culture, structure and behaviour Understand the roles that people assume within organisations Grasp the main approaches to, and functional areas of managing organisations Integrate and apply organisational concepts to particular organisational situations by using case studies Critically analyse organisational theories and practices in various environments Identify management problems in organisations and critically evaluate alternative responses to reflect the increasingly complex environment

Industry Related / Transferable Skills:


Enhanced ability to construct and present quantitative & qualitative data, by using appropriate methodologies and relevant IT capabilities By the end of this module, the student will be able to work effectively in a co-operative manner in group-working situations

2.1 Indicative Content


A. The organisational context: B. The international environment; C. The role of technology; D. Organisational structure, design and processes; E. Organisational theory; F. Introduction to Management and Leadership: G. The decision making process H. The role of power and politics and conflict I. Organisational change and challenges

2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities


The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment.

2.3 Teaching Ethos 25

The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career.

2.3.1 Methods of Delivery:


LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work.

3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment


The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above.

3.2 Methods of Assessment:


Assessment Title Coursework Examination Weight Pass towards final mark grade 80% 50% 20% 50% Outline details Case Study Analysis Open Book Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment.

26

Assessment 1 Coursework
This assessment accounts for 50% of the total marks for this module. Students will have the opportunity to discuss the coursework, and ensure that they understand what is required, during seminars.

Assessment 2 Open Book Examination


The open book exam will comprise of three essay questions from a selection of nine. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed.

Feedback Policy:
Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date.

3.3 Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only.

4.0 Source Material:


As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources;

4.1 Core Reading


Mullins L, (2004) Management & Organisational Behaviour, 7th Edition, Pearson Education

4.2 Recommended Reading:


Brooks I, (2003) Organisational Behaviour: Individuals, Groups and Organisation, 2nd edition, FT Prentice Hall Buchhanan D, Huczynski A, (2003) Organizational Behaviour; An Introductory Text 5th Edition, Pearson

27

McShane S, & Von Glinow M A, (2003), Organisational Behaviour: Emerging Realities for the Workplace Revolution, 2nd Edition, Mc Graw-Hill Frost P, Nord W,& Krefting L (2004), Managerial and Organizational Reality, Pearsons George J, Jones G, (2004), Understanding and Managing Organizational Behavior (International Edition) 4th Edition, Pearson Rollinson D, (2004) Organisational Behaviour and Analysis; An Integrated Approach, 3rd Edition, Pearson Haberberg A, Rieple Alison (2001) The Strategic Management of Organisations, Pearsons Mukerj , Robbins (1993), Managing Organisations: New Challenges and Perspectives, 2nd edition, Pearson Higher Education Mead R, (1998) International Management Cross-Cultural l Cooperation & Dimensions, Blackwell

4.3 Journals & Newspaper:


ABI/Inform global (journals) Osiris (companies) Datamonitor (market surveys, available via Osiris) Financial Times online Economist Times & Sunday Times Athens database

4.4 Other Sources:


Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. Industry news, views and publications: http://www.dragonbrands.com/dart/0001.htm

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The World's Only FREE Knowledge Database on Business, Advertising, Marketing, Image and the Brand http://www.personako.com/ The Institute for Learning and Research http://www.bized.co.uk

http://www.ukonlineforbusiness.gov.uk/cms/template/gatewayhome/310294.ht m

29

Managing Information
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: In the 21st century we are moving towards a global marketplace where increasingly the internet is opening up all kinds of business opportunities from sourcing to shopping on line. In order to compete in this environment, organizations must develop smart capabilities where organizational information systems, information requirements of different organizational functions and activities are managed to ensure optimal efficiency thus maintaining competitive advantage. Information management is also used to create value for customers, by utilizing improved business processes and innovative information design. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of the module is to increase learners understanding of information management issues facing the contemporary organization and how systems can be utilised to ensure organizational efficiency and effectiveness. 1.1.1 Key Aims: Define the objectives and scope of system requirements in a given organization Provide advice on the development, introduction and use of computer based information systems and e-business tools Highlight methodologies, tools and techniques applicable to managing contemporary information technology projects

MI Managing Information 15, 7 Nigel Bradley Dorota Bourne

At the end of the module, learners will have developed an understanding of how information systems can enhance organizational efficiencies that can ultimately support competitiveness. 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: At the end of this module learners will have: Knowledge & Understanding: Systematic understanding of the organization from an information perspective including an understanding of the implications of the global marketplace and the internet.

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Critical understanding of the competitive advantage versus necessary cost debate and HR and marketing issues in the organization and management of IT resources. Systematic understanding of the principles of knowledge management and how IT can be used to surface and capture tacit knowledge in international companies. Understanding of the structure and interpretation of balance sheets, profit and loss accounts, trading statements, calculation and interpretation of management ratios. Understanding of costing concepts and techniques: standard costing; budgets; cost benefit analysis; cash flow; cash budgets; and project appraisal in practice Understanding of statistical concepts Synthesize and evaluate complex information on IT related issues Identify and create alternative responses to problems and critically evaluate and discriminate between these alternatives exercising sound judgement in the absence of complete data Visualize complex issues that have not been directly experienced and find solutions to such issues Industry Related/Transferable Skills: Apply relevant knowledge, techniques and concepts systematically and creatively to IT related issues in a given organization 2.1 Indicative Content: A. The 21st century global marketplace and the internet, implications for the management of Information B. The organization from an information perspective e.g. types of organizational information systems; information requirements of different organizational functions and activities C. IT contributions to the attainment of competitive advantage D. Principles of knowledge management and how IT can be used to surface and capture tacit knowledge in international companies E. Marketing issues in the organization and management of IT resources F. Managing change in IT: determining business requirements, evaluating IT solutions, building a business case and successful implementation. G. Presentation of statistics; sources of data. H. Statistical concepts: frequency distributions; mean; standard deviation; index numbers; sampling; significance tests; correlation and regression; time series analysis; decision trees. I. Use of current software applications for computation of statistics. 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leaders will aim to combine lectures with seminar activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the learner to understand the module material through case studies, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The

31

main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.1 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Individual 80% 50% Assignment Open Book 20% 50% Examination Outline details Individual Assignment Open Book Examination Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Individual Assignment: The first piece of assessment for the module is derived from a case study. Learners will be provided with a case study on an organisation that has an existing IT system. Learners must identify the system capabilities, (strengths and weakness). A decision should then be made whether or not the existing system can simply be upgraded to cope with the organizations needs or whether or not a new system needs to purchased. The cost implications, supplier type and delivery implications should be highlighted as well as the disruption caused by down time. Finally, learners must indicate how they expect the upgraded or new

32

system enhance organizational efficiency and competitiveness. Assignment Two: The second piece of assessment for the module will be a three hour open book examination. Learners will be expected to draw upon the different theories covered in the module. Marks will be awarded for detail of insightful analysis and novelty of approach. Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. This assessment will be graded on the individual performance for the entire period of the module. The module leader will keep records of attendance and formative assessment comments. The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading: Laudon, K. and Laudon, J (2007) Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm (10th Edition) Harlow: Pearson Education 4.2 Recommended Reading: Keen, J, Digrius, B. (2002) Making Technology Investments Profitable: ROI Roadmap to Better Business Cases J. Wiley and Sons Schniederjans. M, Hamaker, J. Schniederjans, A (2004) Information Technology Investment: Decision-Making Methodology World Scientific Publishing Company 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: International Journal of Information Management Journal of Management Information Systems

33

The Economist The Financial Times 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

34

Pathway Modules

35

Project Management
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: There is an increasing orientation for corporate business process and organisation to revolve around projects. Companies strive to differentiate themselves and reduce delivery cycle time. The ability to successfully manage such projects ensuring their on time on budget completion is critical. The traditional, technical view of project management may not bring about the transformational change that increasingly organisations require. Learners within project-orientated organisations require an in depth understanding of organisational management and its relationship to successful project management. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of the module is to increase learners knowledge of project management. The module assists in learners understanding of the relationship between corporate and project strategy as well as general management principles and techniques. The module also aims to improve learners capacity for effective decision making in a project orientated environment and apply project management principles to business situations. Finally, the module aims to help learners attain self confidence as senior managers within project oriented organisations 1.1.1 Key Aims: Apply a variety of theoretical concepts and frameworks on which the project management knowledge systems is based Apply effective methodologies, tools and techniques applicable to managing contemporary projects Apply knowledge and understanding of traditional and emerging modes of application of project management philosophy in contemporary organizational environments

PM Project Management 15, 7 Roy Butcher Dorota Bourne

At the end of the module, learners will have developed an understanding of current project management methodology, will be able to make comparisons with their own experience in organizations will be able to compare and contrast different project environments as well as increase their understanding of commercial and behavioral issues in the management of projects.

36

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: At the end of this module learners will have: Knowledge & Understanding: Knowledge of the phenomenon of project life cycle and alternative approaches to management of projects An understanding of project management techniques Knowledge of project implementation and the project planning process A perspective on successful project delivery and post project outcomes Develop skills to critically analyze and evaluate current project management practices in organizations and offer competent suggestions for improvements of existing project management processes Identify and examine the criteria for measuring successful performance of a given project, and understand and respond to the critical success factors Develop skills to cope with pressures caused by limited power base, availability of resources and multi-objective nature of a project coalition Use appropriate approaches, tools and techniques to project planning, monitoring, control, evaluation, project risk analysis and risk management Industry Related/Transferable Skills: The ability to critically evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of available project management concepts, methodologies and techniques to problem solving and managerial decision making in a range of project environments 2.1 Indicative Content: A. The phenomenon of project life cycle and alternative approaches to management of projects; conventional and emerging criteria for project success B. Introduction to project management techniques; methods and processes, project selection, project proposal, project brief, tendering and bidding procedures, contracts and procurement strategies C. Organizational design for project management; project organization structure, project managers authority, responsibility and accountability D. Interpersonal dynamics; communication and culture, conflict management, negotiation techniques, project leadership and project team E. Dynamics of project life cycle; project planning process: the tools, techniques and their applications to a variety of project types;

37

F. Project implementation; project monitoring and control tools and techniques, configuration management, milestone-based control, activity based control, change management G. Variance and change; cost control: cost variance, earned-value analysis, S-curve project stakeholder management H. Uncertainty and decision making; types of project evaluation; project audit, project risk assessment and risk management I. Project success; a multiple perspective view and project deliverable / outcomes; project termination, organizational change projects, project management information systems. 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leaders will aim to combine lectures with seminar activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the learner to understand the module material through case studies, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills.

3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment


The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above.

38

3.1 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Individual Assignment Open Book Examination Weight Pass towards final mark grade 80% 50% 20% 50% Outline details Individual Assignment Open Book Examination Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Individual Assignment: The first piece of assessment for the module involves developing an individual detailed business case for a project and then the project plan itself. Assignment Two: The second piece of assessment for the module will be a three hour open book examination. Learners will be assigned a case to study and are to answer questions about the case drawing on the different theories covered in the module. Marks will be awarded for detail of insightful analysis and novelty of approach. Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. This assessment will be graded on the individual performance for the entire period of the module. The module leader will keep records of attendance and formative assessment comments. The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only.

39

4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading: Shtub, A., Bard, J. F. & Globerson, S. (2005). Project Management:Processes, Methodologies, and Economics, (2nd Edition) Prentice-Hall (ISBN: 0130413313). 4.2 Recommended Reading: Buttrick, R. (2005). The Project Workout (3rd Edition) Harlow: Pearson Education. Gray, C. F., Larson, E. W. (2006). Project Management: The Managerial Process, (3rd Edition), London : McGraw-Hill. Kerzner, H. (2006). Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling and Controlling. (9th Edition) London :John Wiley and Sons. Meredith J. R. and Mantel S. J. (2006). Project Management : A Managerial Approach. (6th Edition) London: John Wiley and Sons.

4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Publications by the Association for Project Management The International Journal of Project Management Harvard Business Review European Management Journal International Journal of Quality and Reliability Management The Economist The Financial Times 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

40

Virtual Teams Management


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director 1.0 Introduction:
This course will equip students with techniques for building, leading, managing, and motivating teams that reside in multiple locations. Students will understand and master the challenges of leading a virtual team with members in various geographical locations, including satellite and global offices and telecommuters. Students will analyse virtual team structure, effective multi-cultural communication, motivation and performance considerations, as well as knowledge sharing and knowledge management in a virtual, distributed team.

VTM Virtual Teams Management 15, 7 Geoff Payne Dorota Bourne

1.1Learning Aims of the Module:


To develop the necessary skills, capabilities and competencies to develop an

1.1.1Key Aims
A. B. C. D. Lead teams in distributed work settings Master the people skills required to manage from a distance Build virtual teams, and apply strategies for managing multiple locations Understand and master the group dynamics and social processes involved in leading teams at a distance E. Apply effective communication and structure for virtual teams F. Manage performance and motivation for virtual and global teams G. Enable knowledge sharing and management through team sharing approach and knowledge management tools

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module:


On successful completion of the module the learner will have:

Knowledge & Understanding


Discuss and critically assess the main approaches to virtual team management

41

Identify and analyse information needed to establish and implement effective virtual teams Critically analyse and evaluate team management practices employed by organisations in different industry sectors Identify potential problems in the area of virtual team management to enable the development of effective management strategies

Industry Related / Transferable Skills:


Enhanced ability to use and present qualitative data, in suitable formats that increase understanding by the use of appropriate techniques and application of IT skills At the end of this module, students will be able to work effectively in teams and have improved interpersonal skills

2.1 Indicative Content


A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. Principles of Managing Virtual and Global Teams Strategy, Structure and Practices of Virtual Teams Building a Strong Virtual Team, Establishing Trust Effective Multi-Cultural Communication, Building a Collaborative Culture, Managing a Collaborative Team Virtual Team Leadership Virtual Team Collaboration Tools and Assessments Pay Systems, Motivation and Performance of Virtual Teams; Virtual Team Business Case Knowledge and Information Sharing, Shared Understanding in Virtual Teams Knowledge Management Infrastructure; Tools and Technology Use in Global Virtual Teams Managing Global Product Development, Virtual Team Case Studies.

J.

2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities


The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment.

2.3 Teaching Ethos


The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the

42

learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career.

2.3.1 Methods of Delivery:


LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work.

3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment


The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above.

3.2 Methods of Assessment:


Assessment Title Coursework Examination Weight Pass towards final mark grade 80% 40% 20% 40% Outline details Individual Project Open Book Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment.

Assessment 1 Coursework

43

Students will be required to work in groups to develop an strategy for the construction of a virtual team across international boundaries within a multi-national organisation. They will be expected to demonstrate a critical approach to the related theory and demonstrate a clear understanding of the practical implications of the strategy.

Assessment 2 Open Book Examination


Students will be expected to respond to an un-seen case study illustrating one organisatIons attempts at the development of a virtual team. The response will be in the form of an evaluative report.

Feedback Policy:
Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date.

3.2 Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only.

4.0 Source Material:


As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources;

4.1 Core Reading


Thompson L (2008), Making the Team, (3rd Ed), Pearson Education

4.2 Recommended Reading:


Abramovici, M. (2000); A flexible Web-based PDM Approach to support virtual engineering cooperation, Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Hawaii International C Conference on System Sciences, 2000, p163. Albert, S. and Bradley, K. (1997): Managing Knowledge: Experts, Agencies and Organizations, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997

44

Almeida, P. (1996); Knowledge sourcing by foreign multinationals: Patent citation analysis in the U.S. semiconductor industry, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 17 (Winter Special Issue), p155-165. Badaracco, J. (1991): The Knowledge Link: How firms compete through strategic alliances, Harvard Business School Press, Boston, 1991 Bender, S. and Fish, A. (2000); The transfer of knowledge and the retention of expertise: the continuing need for global assignments, Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol. 4, No. 2, March, 2000, p125-137 Beranek, P.M. (2000); The impacts of relational and trust development training on virtual teams: An exploratory investigation, Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2000, p10 Carayannis, E.G. and Alexander, J. (1999); An empirical knowledge-based framework for analyzing government-university-industry strategic research partnerships, Proceedings of the Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering and Technology, Vol. 1, 1999, p49 Carstensen, P.H. and Snis, U. (1999); "Here is the knowledge-where should I put it?" Findings from a study of how knowledge spaces are used within a support group, Proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises, 1999, p223-231 Chen, Y.M., Liao, C.C. and Prasad, B. (1998); A systematic approach of virtual enterprising through knowledge management techniques, Concurrent Engineering: Research & Applications, Vol. 6, No. 3, September, 1998, p225-244. Chiesa, V. and Manzini, R. (1997); Virtual R&D organisations: lessons from the pharmaceutical industry, Proceedings of the Portland International Conference on Management and Technology, PICMET, 1997, p520-523 Polovina, S. and Veneziano, V. (2000); Adding knowledge to accounting systems for virtual enterprises, In D.G. Schwartz, M. Divitini, and T. Brasethvik (Eds.) Internetbased Organizational Memory and Knowledge Management, Hershey: Idea Group Publishing, 2000, p103-122 Georgakopoulos, D., Schuster, G., Cichocki, A. and Baker, D. (1999); Managing process and service fusion in virtual enterprises, Information Systems, Vol. 24, No. 6, 1999, p429-456 Hansen, M.T. (1997); The Search-Transfer Problem: The Role of Weak Ties in Sharing Knowledge Across Organisation Subunits, Working Paper, Harvard Business School, 1997 Havens, C. amd Knapp, E. (1999); Easing into Knowledge Management, Strategy & Leadership, March-April, 1999, p4-9

45 4

Inkpen, A.C. and Dinur, A. (1998); KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PROCESSES AND INTERNATIONAL JOINT VENTURES, Organization Science, Vol. 9, No. 4, July-August, 1998, p454-468 Jain, A., Aparico, M. and Singh, M. (1999); Agents for process coherence in virtual enterprises, Communications of the ACM, Vol. 42, No. 3, 1999, p62-69 Jennex, M. (2000); Using an Intranet to Manage Knowledge for a Virtual Project Team, In D.G. Schwartz, M. Divitini, and T. Brasethvik (Eds.) Internet-based Organizational Memory and Knowledge Management, Hershey: Idea Group Publishing, 2000, p241-259 Jones, P. and Jordan, J. (1998); Knowledge orientations and team effectiveness, I International Journal of Technology Management, Vol. 16, No. 1-3, 1998, p152-161.

4.3 Journals & Newspaper:


ABI/Inform global (journals) Osiris (companies) Datamonitor (market surveys, available via Osiris) Financial Times online Economist Times & Sunday Times Athens database Wall Street Journal Europe (daily business newspaper) Eurobusiness (monthly business magazine) Financial Times (daily business newspaper) Fortune (monthly business magazine) Business Week (weekly business magazine) Marketing Week (monthly marketing oriented magazine) Harvard Business Review

4.4 Other Sources:


Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without

46

support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

47

International Human Resources Management


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director 2.0 Introduction:
In a world that is constantly changing, the only constant is change. This module is intended to address the reality that, as the 21st century evolves; organisations will increasingly function on an international basis. It is necessary to critically assess the applicability of the HRM concept across varying cultures, and to investigate the various factors that come into play in the application of people strategies in an international context. Learners will look at variations in employee relations systems, practices and policy areas from country to country, and compare and contrast them.

IHRM International Human Recourses Management 15, 7 Dorota Bourne Dorota Bourne

1.1 Learning Aims of the Module:


To develop the necessary skills, capabilities and competencies to engage in an international context with the management of human resource.

1.1.1 Key Aims


To explore the philosophies, structural determinants, institutions, policies, processes and outcomes of employee relations systems in a selection of countries outside the UK To explore the nature and extent of internationalisation of HRM/employee relations and the extent of international regulation To develop the ability to analyse employee relations/HRM policies objectively through awareness of the application of different concepts and the operation of systems elsewhere

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module:


On successful completion of the module the learner will have:

48

Knowledge & Understanding


Understand the changing international context of contemporary business, and its implication for people strategies Demonstrate an awareness of cross-cultural and culture specific issues that influence the development of people strategies and employment relations systems Enhanced ability to understand the complex nature of this area of study, and the ability to translate theoretical knowledge into practical contexts Critically analyse and evaluate a wide range of different international perspectives on issues of people management, develop holistic thinking, to inform evaluation of alternatives in complex contexts Identify complex problems in the area of international employee relations/HRM, alternative courses of action, and provide appropriate solutions in a rapidly changing environment

Industry Related / Transferable Skills:


Enhanced ability to use and present quantitative and qualitative data by using appropriate methodologies and relevant IT capabilities Enhanced ability to deliver well structured presentations, and develop and articulate ideas and arguments with clarity of expression and appropriate terminology Contribute to team working with enhanced interpersonal skills, bringing into play the knowledge and experience of others, with an appreciation of the cultural diversity of the learning environment

2.1 Indicative Content


A. The HRM concept an international view B. Cultural issues in international HRM C. Management and employers associations the drivers of HRM? D. Trade unions a constraining influence on HRM? E. Government influences to intervene or not to intervene? F. Employee participation collectivism or individualism? G. International organisations (ILO, WTO, OECD) and labour standards H. Managing expatriate staff I. Review convergence or divergence?

49

2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities


The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment.

2.3 Teaching Ethos


The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career.

2.3.1 Methods of Delivery:


LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work.

3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment


The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above.

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3.2 Methods of Assessment:


Assessment Title Coursework Examination Weight Pass towards final mark grade 80% 50% 20% 50% Outline details Case Study Open Book Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment.

Assessment 1 Coursework
Students will be required to investigate the human resource management of a firm, details of which will be provided in a tutor designed case study. They may select a related conceptual area relevant to their work experience in order to apply the knowledge and understanding gained through the module.

Assessment 2 Open Book Examination


The examination will consist of a choice of three essay questions from a selection of nine. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed.

Feedback Policy:
Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date.

3.3 Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only.

4.0 Source Material:


As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources;

4.1 Core Reading 51

Rees C & Edwards T (2005), International Human Resource Management, Pearson Education

4.2 Recommended Reading:


Aaltio I and Mills A J (eds) (2002). Gender, Identity and the Culture of Organizations, Abingdon: Routledge Albrecht MH (ed.) (2001). International HRM Managing Diversity in the Workplace, Oxford: Blackwell Beaver G and Stewart J (eds) (2003). Human Resource Development in Small Organisations Research and Practice, Abingdon: Routledge Briscoe D R and Schuller, R S (2004). International Human Resource Management, 2nd edn, London: Routledge Budhwar P S, Debrah Y A (eds) (2004). Human Resource Management in Developing Countries, Abingdon: Routledge Budhwar P S. and, Bhatnagar J (eds) (2008). The Changing Face of People Management in India, Abingdon: Routledge Budhwar P S (ed) (2004). Managing Human Resources in Asia-Pacific, Abingdon: Routledge Budhwar PS and Mellahi K (Eds)( 2006). Managing Human Resources in the Middle-East , Abingdon: Routledge Cooke FL (2005). HRM, Work and Employment in China, Abingdon: Routledge Czarniawska B and Hopfl H (eds) (2002). The Production and Maintenance of Inequalities in Work Organizations, Abingdon: Routledge Debrah Y A and Smith I G (eds)(2001). Globalization, Employment and the Workplace Diverse Impacts, Abingdon: Routledge Dowling P J and Welch D E (2004). International Human Resource Management, 4th ed, London: Thomson Dundon and Rollinson D (2004). Employment Relations in Non-Union Firms, Abingdon: Routledge Eaton J (2000). Comparative Employment Relations: An Introduction, Oxford: Polity Press Elvira M and Davila A (eds) (2005) Managing Human Resources in Latin America An Agenda for International Leaders, Abingdon: Routledge

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Fairbrother P (2009). Unions and Globalization, Abingdon: Routledge Florkowski G W (2006). Managing Global Legal Systems International Employment Regulation and Competitive Advantage, Abingdon: Routledge Harris H, Brewster C & Sparrow P (2003). International Human Resource Management, London: CIPD Herriot P (2001). The Employment Relationship A Psychological Perspective, Abingdon: Routledge Jackson SE, Luo Y, Randall S and Schuler RS (200x). Managing Human Resources in Cross-Border Alliances, Abingdon: Routledge Jackson T (2004). Management and Change in Africa A Cross-Cultural Perspective, Abingdon: Routledge Kelly J (2001). Industrial Relations Critical Perspectives on Business and Management , Abingdon: Routledge Larsen HH and Mayrhofer W (eds) (2006). Managing Human Resources in Europe A Thematic Approach, Abingdon: Routledge Magala S (2005). Cross-Cultural Competence, Abingdon: Routledge Markey R et al. (2001). Models of Employee Participation in a Changing Global Environment; Diversity and Interaction, Aldershot: Gower Mendenhall M and Oddou G (2000). Readings and Cases in International Human Resource Management, 3rd ed, Cincinnati: Southwestern Mendenhall, M E, Oddou G R & Stahl G K (eds) (2006). Readings and Cases in International Human Resource Management, Abingdon: Routledge Morley M J, Gunnigle P & Collings D G (eds) (2006). Global Industrial Relations, Abingdon: Routledge Redman T and Wilkinson A (2006). Contemporary Human Resource Management Text and Cases, 2nd edn, Harlow: FT Prentice Hall Scholte JA (2005). Globalization: a Critical Introduction, 2nd ed, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Scullion H, David G. Collings DG (eds) (2006). Global Staffing, Abingdon: Routledge Sparrow P, Brewster C & Harris H (2004). Globalizing Human Resource Management, Abingdon: Routledge van Roozendaal G (2002). Trade Unions and Global Governance the Debate on a Social Clause, Abingdon: Routledge Werner, Steve (ed)(2007). Managing Human Resources in North America, Abingdon: Routledge

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4.3 Journals & Newspaper:


ABI/Inform global (journals) Osiris (companies) Datamonitor (market surveys, available via Osiris) Financial Times online Economist Times & Sunday Times Athens database Academy of Management Journal British Journal of Industrial Relations Employee Relations European Management Journal Human Resource Management Industrial Relations Journal International Journal of Human Resource Management Journal of Asia-Pacific Business Journal of Management Studies

4.4 Other Sources:


Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. Employment Conditions Abroad http://www.ec-international.com International Labour Organisation http://www.ilo.org OECD http://www.oecd.org

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Coaching and Mentoring for Leadership and Management


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director 1.0 Introduction:
The module will benefit those who wish to develop their understanding of and skills in coaching and mentoring. Increasingly there is a growing awareness that coaching and mentoring are important in the role of professional and managerial roles, which include responsibility for the support and development of others. The module will provide students with opportunities to develop an understanding of theoretical models, skills and frameworks to underpin coaching and mentoring practice.

CMLM Coaching and Mentoring for Leadership and Management 15, 7 Dorota Bourne Dorota Bourne

1.1Learning Aims of the Module:


To develop the necessary skills, capabilities and competencies to develop a strategy for coaching and mentoring within the context of the organisation.

1.1.1Key Aims
Develop a critical understanding of the theory and practice of coaching and mentoring and its relevance for a range of professional and managerial roles Demonstrate awareness, knowledge and understanding of theories and models that inform practice Develop a critical appreciation of issues of power, diversity and ethics within the coaching and mentoring relationship Develop insights into effective behaviours through processes of inquiry and reflection

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module:


On successful completion of the module the learner will have:

Knowledge & Understanding


Discuss and critically assess the main approaches to coaching and mentoring Identify and analyse information needed to establish and implement effective

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strategies for coaching and mentoring Identify potential barriers/issues related to the design and implementation of a strategy for coaching and mentoring Gain a critical appreciation of the requirements of an effective coaching and mentoring strategy

Industry Related / Transferable Skills:


Enhanced ability to use and present qualitative data, in suitable formats that increase understanding by the use of appropriate techniques and application of IT skills Students will have understood the skills required to develop an effective coaching and mentoring strategy

2.1 Indicative Content


A. B. C. D. E. Theories and models of coaching and mentoring Processes and skills Power, diversity and ethics in coaching and mentoring relationships Reflective learning and approaches to continuous self development Organisational strategies for coaching and mentoring

2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities


The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment.

2.3 Teaching Ethos


The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career.

2.3.1 Methods of Delivery:


LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively.

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SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work.

3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment


The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above.

3.2 Methods of Assessment:


Assessment Title Coursework Examination Weight Pass towards final mark grade 80% 50% 20% 50% Outline details Individual Project Open Book Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment.

Assessment 1 Coursework
Students will be required to work in groups to develop coaching and mentoring strategy for an organisation of their choice. The strategy will be presented to a mock Board of Directors meeting to achieve budgetary approval.

Assessment 2 Open Book Examination


The examination will consist of a choice of three essay questions from a selection of nine. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed.

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Feedback Policy:
Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date.

3.2 Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only.

4.0 Source Material:


As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources;

4.1 Core Reading


Starr J (2007), The Coaching Manual, (2nd Ed), Pearson Education

4.2 Recommended Reading:


Caplan, J. (2003) Coaching for the future. How smart companies use coaching and mentoring, CIPD Goldberger, N. Tarule, J., Clinchy, B and Belenky, M. (1996) Knowledge, Difference and Power, New York: Basic Books Fineman, S. (1993) Emotion in Organizations, London: Sage Publications Hall, D. T.; Otazo, K. L. & Hollenbeck, G. P. (1999) Behind Closed Doors: What Really Happens in Executive Coaching. Organizational Dynamics, Vol. 27 Issue 3, pp39-53. Peltier, B. (2001) The Psychology of Executive Coaching: Theory and Application, Brunner-Routledge

4.3 Journals & Newspaper: 58

ABI/Inform global (journals) Osiris (companies) Datamonitor (market surveys, available via Osiris) Financial Times online Economist Times & Sunday Times Athens database
Academy of Management Review Business Horizons Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice & Research Gender, Work and Organization Harvard Business Review Human Relations Journal of Leadership and Organizational Development Journal of Organizational Change Management Management Learning Organizational Dynamics

4.4 Other Sources:


Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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Strategic Planning for Hospitality Management


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: As tourism activity continues to grow, so does the expectations of tourists for high quality services and environments. Many destinations operate within highly competitive environments where customers have a wide range of choices even within a country or a region. The challenge is for destinations to develop a number of strategic skill sets, namely; a service culture, appropriate physical environment and a set of products that can satisfy not only first-time visitors but attract repeat visitors. This module will allow learners to express the rationale for visitor industry planning and enable learners to utilize and evaluate standard techniques and approaches to strategic visitor industry developments. Learners will also be able to apply the principles and practice of marketing at the strategic level and draw upon a range of approaches when formulating appropriate strategies. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The tourism and hospitality industry is facing new and complex changes during the 21st century. The objective of the module is assist learners in developing the analytical and conceptual skills sets to devise appropriate strategies for the international business of hospitality and tourism. A special focus will be placed upon encouraging debate on important current issues and strategic policy initiatives and practices pertinent to the industry. 1.1.1 Key Aims: To provide a thorough understanding of hospitality and tourism strategic policy-making within a global, an international and a national context To develop and apply innovative strategic planning approaches in response to corporate policies To develop monitoring mechanisms that help evaluate policy and business responses to issues and trends with a view to using such information within strategic planning paradigm

SPHM Strategic Planning for Hospitality Management 15, 7 TBC Dorota Bourne

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To create the necessary tools, procedures and competencies needed to analyze, define, plan for and manage change in a global context 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: Upon completion of the module, learners should possess a working knowledge of the practical skills and constraints associated with strategic planning for the tourism and hospitality industry in a mixed economy. Knowledge & Understanding: Have knowledge of the development of functional strategies to develop competitive strength within the tourism and hospitality sector Understand the nature of strategic management for firms engaged in the tourism and hospitality sector Show knowledge of various policy agendas for the industry at the national and international level Express and understanding of business strategy decision areas Express and understanding of the success factors in strategic implementation for firms engaged in hospitality and tourism development To think strategically about firms engaged in tourism and hospitality, their business situation, how they can gain sustainable competitive advantage and how such strategies can be planned, implemented and executed successfully Analyze business strategy within structured framework, incorporating product and strategic innovation, market positioning, performance objective targeting and business capabilities development Select appropriate elements from a diverse range of perspectives on strategy formulation for firms engaged in the tourism and hospitality business and understand the implementation of such strategies, plus their limitations Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory and practice relating to the high tech economy Industry Related/Transferable Skills: Be able to conduct a sectoral strategic analysis at both national and international levels Carry out independent study and research on issues that face firms in the sector

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Analyze the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas for strategy innovation and formulation Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field 2.1 Indicative Content:
A. Introduction to a range of approaches and tools available for strategic

planning, as well as understanding the relative strengths and weaknesses of differing approaches and tools. B. Create strategies for the industry both in the national and international markets C. Implementation of tourism and hospitality strategies in practice D. Regulatory reform and its impact on the sector 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leaders will aim to combine lectures with seminar activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the learner to understand the module material through case studies, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills.

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3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment


The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above.

3.2 Methods of Assessment:


Assessment Title Individual Presentation Individual Assignment Weight Pass towards final mark grade 80% 50% 20% 50% Outline details Individual Presentation Individual Assignment Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment One: Individual Presentation This assessment accounts for 50% of the total marks for this module and is based on a twenty minute individual presentation highlighting what the learner believes are the main issues facing to be the industry in the 21st Century. The learner should look at a broad range of issues such as competition, new market entrants, new destinations as well as regulatory and environmental issues. Assessment Two: Individual Assignment This is the second assessment for this course and accounts for 40% of the total marks for this module. Armed with the outcomes from the individual presentation, learners should develop a strategic plan for a firm that wishes to break either into a new segment of the tourism and hospitality market or that wishes to take its business into a new geographical market. Marks will be awarded for detail of insightful analysis and novelty of approach. Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated

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return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading

Hall C, Tourism Planning : Policies, Processes and Relationships (2nd Edition) London: Pearson ISBN10: 0132046520
4.2 Recommended Reading: Barney J.B. (2001) Gaining and Sustaining Competitive Advantage, London: Prentice Hall Brymer, R. and Hashimoto, K. (2007) Hospitality and Tourism (12th Edition), Kendall : Hunt Olsen M.,Ching E., Tse Y., West JJ., (2002) Strategic Management in the Hospitality Industry, New York: Van Rostrand Reinhold,

4.3 Journals & Newspaper: The Economist Cornell Restaurant and Hospitality Administration Quarterly International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources.

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Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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International Hospitality Management


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: The hospitality and tourism industries are now widely recognized amongst the largest and fastest growing in the world, with an estimated 4.5million people in the UK alone employed in this exciting and dynamic sector. International opportunities also continue to grow apace and the prospects for employment in this field are tremendous. This module is designed to develop and contextualize managerial skills and acumen to ensure prospective hospitality managers have the required understanding and insight to be able to contribute significantly to the employment of their choice within this field. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The objective of the module is to give the future managers an understanding of the nature of international hospitality management, by providing a comprehensive overview of relevant issues, both theoretical and practical, on the topic. The module aims to combine broad theoretical background of international hospitality management with practical implications to the way modern service companies, particularly hotels, are run. An important objective of the module is to provide learners with tangible strategic analysis, design, and implementation skills that they can readily put into practice. 1.1.1 Key Aims: To develop learners ability to understand the service industry, particularly within hotels and the key principles behind their marketing and operation. Allow learners to understand the international context of hospitality management Compare country analysis and identify national sectoral differences and similarities

IHM International Hospitality Management 15, 7 TBC Dorota Bourne

At the end of the module, learners should have mastered a range of concepts and

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techniques of international hospitality management and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical foundations, range of applicability, qualifications and limitations. 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: At the end of this module learners will have: Knowledge & Understanding The nature of hospitality and service industry The importance of the service ethic and quality assurance programs The nature, diversity and challenges of human resource management within the hotel industry in the UK and abroad Understanding of the unique marketing attributes of hotels and sources of business Models for hotel strategy implementation infrastructure from a internationally comparative perspective International considerations in effective hotel strategy formation and implementation To think strategically about the hospitality industry, its business situation, how hotels gain sustainable competitive advantage, and how its strategy can be implemented and executed successfully Analyze service marketing within a structured framework, incorporating market positioning, customer satisfaction and performance objectives Select and discuss appropriate elements from a diverse range of perspectives on international hospitality management Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory and practice to the sector Industry Related/Transferable Skills: Be able to conduct a hotels strategic analysis Carry out independent study and research in the subject areas of the course Analyze the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas within the organization for hotel strategy formulation Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field 2.1 Indicative Content: A. Introduction to Hospitality Management; the nature, definition, aims and challenges B. Strategic customer care; including the building and achieving sustainability of effective service cultures C. The management of effective service initiatives and quality control programs D. Strategic management and resource planning of human resources within the service industry E. Internal and external marketing including various distribution channels F. Effective leadership and innovation in hospitality including ethical considerations

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and corporate governance G. Operational management principles of food and beverage and accommodation departments H. Principles of financial control within hospitality operations 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leader will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities and discussion. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximizing their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that students can utilize their private study time more effectively. These lectures act as a guide to the students and are a focused route through out the syllabus. The basic ethic is to guide, explain and teach rather than to transmit factual material that can be readily obtained from the recommended texts through private study. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give students an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the students. This method of study gives the student an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the module leader and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. WORKSHOPS: These are an innovative form of student centred learning. This method of study involves the students to work in small groups with a difference. Here generally the student takes the lead and the module leader acts as a facilitator. The sessions consider problems and essay questions, case studies and tackle the conceptual challenging aspects of the subject. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable students to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyze the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This helps to test the students ability which will allow him to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they

68

have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work.

3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment


The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Individual report Open Book Exam Weight towards final grade 80% 20% Pass mark 50% 50% Outline details Individual report Open Book Exam Submission TBC TBC

Pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment One: Individual Report: In the individual report will be based upon a case study given to learners at the beginning of the term. Learners will have the opportunity to discuss the assignment, and ensure that they understand what is required in the report during class. The learners are required to answer a set of given questions based on the case study, and the knowledge delivered in the course should be applied to analyze each question. The coursework should be written in an essay format and around 3000 words. Assessment Two: Open Book Exam: This is the second assessment for this course. Learners are required to answer questions within three hours. The answers should reflect the theoretical aspect with relevant examples from corporate industry. The questions will explicitly test the learners ability to analyze and correlate the business strategies in a business activity. Marks will be awarded for detail of analysis, novelty of approach to the problem and, in particular, if you have a good idea. Due to current and developing nature of the topic marks will also be awarded for those who tackle current and planned developments in international business environment. Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff in the college aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on learner performance within fifteen working weeks of

69

submission. If there is a delay in the marking process we will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered unfair practice and is strictly forbidden and may be heavily penalized. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading(s) Holloway, C. and Taylor, N, (2006) The Business of Tourism (7th Edition) Prentice Hall, Financial Times ISBN 0-273-70161-4 4.2 Recommended Reading: Brymer, R. and Hashimoto, K. (2007) Hospitality and Tourism (12th Edition), Kendall : Hunt Goeldner, C. and Ritchie, J. R., (2006) Tourism; Principles, Practices, Philosophies (10th Edition), J Wiley & Sons Harrison, J. and Enz, C. (2005) Hospitality: Strategic Management Concepts and Cases, J Wiley & Sons 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Journal of the Institute of Hospitality Travelmole electronic mail www.travelmole.com Emerald Insight Harvard Business Review Financial Times Caterer and Hotelkeeper (Reed International) Hospitality (Reed Business Information) Hospitality Year Book (Institute of Hospitality) Management Today (BIM) People Management (IPD) Travel Trade Gazette (TTG) Voice of the BHA (British Hospitality Association) 4.4 Other Sources:

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Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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Innovative Strategies for IT Environments


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: High technology products are based on new technology and often precede a market demand. To create then market a high tech product, a firm must understand the needs of customers, educate them about the product and its underlying technology, and convince them that the new product represents the best solution to their problems. This module explores strategy from the perspective of firms operating in high tech environments. The module will explore the firms capacity to strategically innovate, plan, apply change and reconfigure resources and capabilities to meet the requirements of this rapidly changing environment. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The objective of the module is to give both future and current managers an understanding of the nature of strategic innovation and planning for firms operating in the high tech environment by providing a comprehensive overview of relevant issues, both theoretical and practical, applicable to such firms and markets. The module aims to combine a broad theoretical background of strategic innovation and planning with practical implications to the way modern high tech companies are run and the market conditions in which they operate. An important objective of the module is to provide learners with tangible skill sets to innovate and plan strategies for the high tech environment which then can be practically adapted to real world situations. 1.1.1 Key Aims: To develop learners ability to think both plan and innovate strategically about a given high tech company and its business environment. To enable learners to explore how a given business/industry can gain sustainable competitive advantage, and how its strategy can be implemented and executed successfully. To consider different market contexts and different competitive situations in the high tech business environment and the strategic implications of the companies operating in these environments.

ISITE Innovative Strategies for IT Environments 15, 7 Roy Butcher Dorota Bourne

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At the end of the module, learners should have mastered a range of methods and techniques of strategic innovation and planning for those firms engaged in high tech business environments and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical foundations, range of applicability, qualifications and limitations.

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: At the end of this module learners will have: Knowledge & Understanding: The relationship between innovation and the development of functional strategies to develop competitive strength within the high tech business environment Understand the nature of strategic management for high tech firms and its competitive and institutional context Business strategy decision areas Success factors in strategy implementation for firms engaged in high tech development To think strategically about a given high tech company, its business situation, how it can gain sustainable competitive advantage and how its strategy can be planned, implemented and executed successfully Analyze business strategy within structured framework, incorporating product and strategic innovation, market positioning, performance objective targeting and business capabilities development Select appropriate elements from a diverse range of perspectives on strategy formulation and implementation Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory and practice relating to the high tech economy Industry Related/Transferable Skills: Be able to conduct a companys strategic analysis Carry out independent study and research on issues that face high tech firms Analyze the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas within the organization for strategy innovation and formulation Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field

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2.1 Indicative Content: A. Introduction to innovation and planning strategies for high tech environments; definition, aims and challenges. B. Strategic capabilities; innovation and planning sustainability and management capability. C. Strategic positioning; the high tech environment, expectations and purposes. D. Developing innovation, planning strategies to sustain competitive advantage. E. The development of strategy; directions, methods and success criteria. F. Strategy in action; organizational and environmental challenges. G. The innovation emergent strategies. 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leaders will aim to combine lectures with seminar activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the learner to understand the module material through case studies, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities and discussion about the significant role of business strategy in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills.

3.0 Assessment 3.1 Skills Assessment 74

The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Individual Presentation Examination Weight Pass towards final mark grade 80% 50% 20% 50% Outline details Individual Presentation Open Examination Submission Date TBC Book TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment One: Individual Presentation This assessment accounts for 80% of the total marks for this module and is based on a high techs firms (real or imaginary) strategic innovation of a new product and then the planned strategy for bringing that new product to market. This is essentially a 20 minute pitch to potential investors outlining briefly what the product is, what the market is, who the competitors are, how the product will gain strategic advantage and capture market share and how much capital is required to execute the strategy. Assessment Two: Open Book Examination This is the second assessment for this course. Learners are required to answer questions within three hours. The answers should reflect the theoretical aspects of the material taught on the module with relevant, where applicable, practical examples. The questions will explicitly test the students ability to analyze a firms ability to innovate and plan strategy for the high tech environment. Marks will be awarded for detail of insightful analysis and novelty of approach. Due to current and developing nature of the topic, marks will also be awarded for those who tackle current and perceived planned developments in the high tech sector. Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. This assessment will be graded on the individual performance for the entire period of the module. The module leader will keep records of attendance and formative assessment comments. The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy:

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Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Shane, S. (2009) Technology Strategy for Managers and Entrepreneurs Harlow : Financial Times/Prentice Hall. ISBN 10: 0131879324 4.2 Recommended Reading: George, G and Bock, A. (2009) Inventing Entrepreneurs: Technology Innovators and their Entrepreneurial Journey Harlow : Financial Times/Prentice Hall. Mankani, D (2003) Technopreneurship: The Successful Entrepreneur in the New Economy Harlow : Financial Times/Prentice Hall. Vogel, C. Cagan J and Boatwright P. (2005) The Design of Things to Come : How Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products Harlow : Financial Times/Prentice Hall.

4.3 Journals & Newspaper: The McKinsey Quarterly Technovation Journal of Research and Technology Management

4.4 Other Sources:

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Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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International Competition in IT
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: The rise and fall of the high-technology industries of the 1990s reflect broader changes in markets, production organization, and business models, as well as the operation of government policies. These broader changes, which include but go well beyond the Internet revolution itself, suggest that the industrial economy is being fundamentally transformed by the diffusion of innovations in technology and business models across the industrial and industrializing economies. At the same time, these changes cannot be understood without a deeper examination of the factors that created competitive advantage at the national level in many of these industries during the previous three decades. This course explores the broad changes in who is winning, who is losing, and why in global markets for high-technology. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: Modern technologies develop in markets that are international in scope, often imperfectly competitive, and subject to influence by a variety of economic and political stakeholders. This module aims to assess the decline and prospective recovery of U.S. high-technology industries, the evolution of innovation and technology strategies and policies in Western Europe and Asia as well as the historic and current roles of governments in shaping markets for high technology goods. The module also seeks to assess the impact on business strategies of recent developments in early-stage capital markets. The module views technological innovation and competition as dynamic processes that reflect previous choices made by firms and governments. 1.1.1 Key Aims:

ICIT International Competition in IT 15, 7 Roy Butcher Dorota Bourne

To allow learners to consider the competitive advantage of nations; both natural and artificial To assist learners explore industrial policy, past and present To enable learners to assess how governments engage with industry to devise a national high- tech strategy. Which states have been successful and which have not To help learners identify the role of capital markets in developing high tech

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capability To consider the risks associated with international business in the high technology sector especially those associated with Intellectual Property Right (IPR) infringement

On successful completion of this module, learners should have developed a comprehensive understanding of the development of high technology industries, if and how government policy has assisted such development, what are the consequences and risks associated with such development and where the future of high tech development lies, which countries and what sectors.

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: At the end of this module learners will have: Knowledge & Understanding The relationship between stakeholders in the creation of national strategies for high tech business development Understand the nature of private sector investment in financing high tech development Industrial policy aspirations in different states Success factors in such policy implementation for firms engaged in high tech development To think strategically about industrial policy for high tech and how such strategies can be planned, implemented and executed successfully Analyze different states policies and ascertain how successful they are Select appropriate elements from a diverse range of perspectives on industrial policy formulation and implementation Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory and practice relating to the high tech economy and its development in various countries Industry Related/Transferable Skills: Be able to conduct a companys strategic analysis of global markets Carry out independent study and research on appropriate investment, R&D and outsourcing locations Identify stakeholder aspirations when developing national high tech strategies Analyze the international environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas

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Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field 2.1 Indicative Content: A. Introduction to the competitive advantage of nation states B. Strategic capabilities; innovation and planning sustainability and management capability of high tech sectors C. Strategic positioning; industrial policy development in the high tech environment and stakeholder expectations D. Private sector capital engagement with high tech firms 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leaders will aim to combine lectures with seminar activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the learner to understand the module material through case studies, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities and discussion. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills.

3.0 Assessment

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3.1 Skills Assessment


The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Individual Report 80% 50% Open Book 20% 50% Examination Outline details Submission Date

Individual Report TBC Open Book TBC Examination

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment One: Individual Report This assessment accounts for 80% of the total marks for this module and is based 2500 word report on an established high techs firms past strategic development. Please choose an established firm in the high tech sector. Identify the stakeholders engaged in its development, for example, was it able to benefit from governmental assistance, did private or institutional investors fund any part of its development. In terms of its R&D and production or other factors, were any of these outsourced? If so where and why and what were the implications of such outsourcing? Finally what is the future strategy of the firm? Assessment Two: Open Book Examination This is the second assessment for this course. Learners are required to answer questions within three hours. The answers should reflect the theoretical aspects of the material taught on the module with relevant, where applicable, practical examples. The questions will explicitly test the students ability to analyze industrial policy, competitive advantage and international trade in the high tech market. Marks will be awarded for detail of insightful analysis and novelty of approach. Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. This assessment will be graded on the individual performance for the entire period of the module. The module leader will keep records of attendance and formative assessment comments. The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy:

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Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading: Porter, M. (1998) The Competitive Advantage of Nations Free Press ISBN-10: 0684841479 4.2 Recommended Reading: Clayton, C (2003) The Innovator's Solution Harvard Business Press Friedman, T. (2007) The World is Flat New York : Picador Moore, G. (2002) Crossing the Chasm, Inside the Tornado, and The Gorilla Game New York: Harper Collins 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: The McKinsey Quarterly Technovation Journal of Research and Technology Management

4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence

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often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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Analysis of Financial Reporting


Module Specification
Module Title: Analysis of Financial Reporting and Financial regulations Module Code: Level: M Credit: 15 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Skills module: None None No Pre-cursor: None Module Leader: Andy Wright Additional Tutors: Bartosz Zielinski

Excluded combinations (e.g skills modules): None University-wide option: No

Location of delivery: London School of Business and Finance Main aim(s) of the module: The aim of Financial Reporting and Analysis is to provide a basic understanding of financial reporting, and to provide the ability to interpret the accounts and financial statements of companies and financial institutions from a financial analyst point of view. Students will be able to interpret a companys sustainable earning power by analyzing its financial report. The students will learn about the regulatory principles designed to maintain financial stability in major financial markets, the practical application and effectiveness of these principles, and whether self-regulation is effective Main topics of study: Accounting Principles and mechanics: Students will acquire a sound knowledge of basic accounting concepts, recording business transactions and preparing financial statements. Topics as double entry, trial balance, finalising accounts will be taught. This will lead students to study more complex areas and critically assess companies accounting policies and treatment in specific scenarios. Accounting Standards will also be discussed. Inventory and Long-term assets analysis In inventory part, three methods of inventory valuation FIFO, LIFO, and Weighted Average will be introduced. Their impact on financial ratios will also be discussed. Long-term assets analysis mainly covers 2 areas: 1) capitalisation rule and its impact on cash flow from operation, on leverage ratios; 2) different methods of depreciation and amortisation and also their impact on financial ratios calculation. Long-term liabilities analysis Students will understand the accounting treatment of bond issues and its interests, including the difference in par vale, market vale, par interests and effective interests. Also, convertible bonds and bonds with attached warrants will be analysed. Self-regulation and SROs Moral hazards and asymmetric information Financial stability and crisis Regulation against insider dealing

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Capital adequacy requirements Ethical and agency problems: moral hazard and adverse selection Causes and courses of bank failures

Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1 Identify principles and trends in the international accounting standards and financial regulations. 2 Determine and evaluate the nature of accounting difficulties in the fast-developing modern world. 3 Demonstrate deep and systemic knowledge in the sphere of financial analysis. Thinking skills 4 Critically evaluate financial information to make investment decisions 5 Reflect on the roles, skills and responsibilities needed for effective compliance of financial regulations. 6 Discuss in context the linkage between current theory and practice and be able to organise appropriate evidence and reasoning to produce a balanced conclusion 7 Demonstrate problem solving and analytical approaches to facilitate effective financial decision-making Subject-based practical skills 8 Demonstrate effective approaches to analyzing financial report and financial system failure. 9 Possess the ability to plan and implement tasks at professional level; make decisions in complex and unpredictable context of using different accounting approaches Skills for life and work (general skills) 10 Present information and communicate effectively in written or oral form, at an appropriate level including the acknowledgement and referencing of sources and also capacity for independent and self managed learning 11 Contextualise the knowledge, competencies and practical skills from the module and apply this to the real world project contexts and activities

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the module: Assessment 1 Individual Report Financial Report Analysis Based on one companys financial report, calculate key financial ratios, identify and criticize the accounting policies used, and recommend action taken from an investors position. (Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4,5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11) Open Book Examination 3 hours (Learning outcomes 1, 3, 4, 9, 10)

Weighting:

50%

85
50%

Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module will be taught by lectures and understanding will be reinforced by the completion of individual and group exercises. It will also use case studies from blue chips companies, discussions and exercises. Intensive workshops will be used to ensure that all three parts are appropriately covered within the taught component using the time available.

Reading and resources for the module: Books Frank Wood and Alan Sangster (2005), Business Accounting: V. 1, Prentice Hall. Hefferman, S. (2005) Modern Banking, WileyK Barry Elliott and Jamie Elliott (2007), Financial Accounting and Reporting, Prentice Hall. Thomas R. Ittelson (1998), Financial Statements: A Step-By-Step Guide to Understanding and Creating Financial Reports, USA, Career Press. Herve Stolowy (2006), Financial Accounting and Reporting: A Global Perspective, Thomson. Koch, T., and Macdonald, S (2005) Bank Management, 5th ed, South-Western (Thomson Learning) (K&M) Thomas J.Mc Cool, Financial Regulations Diane Publishing, ISBN 756733588 Financial Regulation, Why, How and Where now? Routledge, an imprint of Taylor and Francis Books limited ISBN: 041518505X Craig Deegan and Jeffrey Unerman (2005), Financial Accounting Theory, McGraw-Hill. David Alexander and Christopher Nobes (2007), Financial Accounting: An International Introduction, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall. International GAAP 2008, Gernerally Accepted Accounting Practice under International Financial Reporting Standards, Ernst & Young LLP. Cynthia Cooper (2008), Extraordinary Circumstances: The Journey of a Corporate Whistleblower, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey. Other Resources Journal of Accountancy ACCA Accounting and Business Magazine www.FT.co.uk www.iasb.org www.accaglobal.com

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Performance Measurements and Control


Module Specification
Module Title: Performance Measurements and Control Module Code: Level: M Credit: 15 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Skills module: None None No Pre-cursor: None Module Leader: Lawrence Wu Additional Tutors: Feroza Cooper

Excluded combinations (e.g skills modules): None University-wide option: No

Location of delivery: London School of Business and Finance Main aim(s) of the module: The aim of this syllabus is to develop knowledge and skills in the application of management accounting techniques. It covers modern techniques, decision making, budgeting and standard costing, concluding with how a business should be managed and controlled. Main topics of studies: Specialist cost and management accounting techniques The emphasis of this topic is on ABC. Student will critically understand the advantages of ABC comparing with traditional techniques, such as absorption costing. Other techniques as target costing, life-cycle costing, back-flush accounting, and throughput accounting will also be studied. Budgeting The nature and purpose of budgeting function and budgeting and students will also be able to critically use flexible budgets and standard budget. Budget income statement, budget balance sheet and budget cash flow are the topic of technical area. Short-term Decision-making Students will understand the relation of cost-volume-profit. The concepts of relevant costing, limiting factor will be studied. The decision of outsourcing or in-house building, keep or close a department will be analysed. Standard costing and variance analysis Basic variance of material, labour and overhead variance will be studied. More advanced variance analysis as material mix and yield variances, planning and operational variances will be analysed here. The scope of performance measurement Students will be able to describe, calculate and interpret financial performance indicators and suggest methods to improve these measures. Also, the application of non-financial performance indicators will be studied. Divisional performance and transfer pricing Students will be able to explain the basis for setting a transfer price and how transfer prices can distort the performance assessment of divisions and decision made. The application of Return on Investment (ROI) and Residual income (RI) will also be introduced. Performance analysis in not for profit organisations and the public sector

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The main area of study is the problems of having non-quantifiable objectives and how performance could be measured in this sector. The objective of Value for Money will also be studied. External considerations and behavioural aspects The effect of external considerations from stakeholders, market conditions and allowance for competitors will be introduced. Students will also be able to identify and explain the behaviour aspects of performance management.

Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1 Identify principles and trends in the performance measurements and controls. 2 Determine and evaluate the nature of performance measurements. 3 Demonstrate deep and systemic knowledge in the sphere of international trading. Thinking skills 4 Critically evaluate the economic benefit of budgeting. 5 Reflect on the roles, skills and responsibilities needed for effective management of transfer price. 6 Discuss in context the linkage between current theory and practice and are able to organise appropriate evidence and reasoning to produce a balanced conclusion 7 Demonstrate problem solving and analytical approaches to facilitate effective foreign budget control. Subject-based practical skills 8 Demonstrate effective approaches to management information control. 9 Possess the ability to plan and implement tasks at professional level; make decisions in complex and unpredictable context of using rational decision making approach. Skills for life and work (general skills) 10 Present information and communicate effectively in written or oral form, at an appropriate level including the acknowledgement and referencing of sources and also capacity for independent and self managed learning 11 Contextualise the knowledge, competencies and practical skills from the module and apply this to the real world project contexts and activities 12 Work effectively in groups and appropriately communicate the groups findings

Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module will be taught by lectures and understanding will be reinforced by the completion of individual and group exercises. Case studies will be bought to students attention. Intensive workshops will be used to ensure that all contents are appropriately covered within the taught component using the time available.

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Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the module: Assessment 1 Individual Report A report on describing the latest development on management accounting and give your opinion that whether helps manage the organisation more effectively and efficiently. (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11)

Weighting:

50%

50% Opening Book Examination 3 hours (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9)

Reading and resources for the module: Books BPP Learning Media (2008), Management Accounting. BPP Learning Media (2008), performance management.

Other Resources C. Drury (2004), Management and Cost Accounting (6th edition), Thomson. www.accaglobal.com

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Risk Management
Module Specification
Module Title: Risk Management Module Code: Level: M Credit: 15 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Skills module: None None No Pre-cursor: None Module Leader: Peter Wheale Additional Tutors: Louis Liu

Excluded combinations (e.g skills modules): None University-wide option: No

Location of delivery: London School of Business and Finance Main aim(s) of the module: The financial market changes dramatically on an incredible rate. The means of manage these risks have developed accordingly. This module provide students a firm understanding of market risk, investment risks, credit risk, and also the issues relating legal, accounting and tax consideration. Main topics of studies: Capital Markets This topic concentrates on derivatives as the mean of managing financial risks. Forwards, futures, options, fixed-income securities and derivatives will be studied. Also, equity, currency, and commodity markets will be studied as well. Market Risk Management Students will understand the sources of market risk, how to hedging linear risk and nonlinear risk. The quantitative areas of how to model risk factors will also be covered. Investment Risks Management Through study of this topic students will have an understanding of portfolio management and hedge fund risk management. For portfolio management, the technical of portfolio risk measurement, portfolio performance measurement, performance attribution, and some important formulas will be studied. For hedge fund risk management, the concepts of leverage, long, and short position, hedge fund styles will be analysed. 4. Credit Risk Management

Students will understand how to measure actuarial default risk, how to measure default risk from market prices, how to use credit derivatives and structured product to manage credit risk. 5. Operational and Integrated Risk Management

Students will be able to identify and assess operational risk, the concept of RAROC will be introduced, and how organisations manage risk from firm-wide. 6. Accounting, Legal, and Tax Risk Management

This topic covers the legal risks with derivatives, with netting, and also the 2002 Sabanes-Oxley Act of the legal side. For accounting and tax side, issues of the internal and external reporting according to FASB and IASB and tax consideration will be studied. 7. Regulation and Compliance

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This topic introduces students the regulations on commercial banks and securities houses. The focus will be on the basel accord. It includes the 1988 basel accord and the new basel accord. Also, the basel market risk charge will be studied as well. 8. Backtesting, VARs, and Stress Testing

Students will understand how to backtest expected shortfall and the entire distribution, how VARs methodology can simulate and measure of the P&L distribution. Stress testing will also be studied here.

Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1 Identify principles and trends in the financial risk management. 2 Determine and evaluate the nature risk management. 3 Demonstrate deep and systemic knowledge in the sphere portfolio management. Thinking skills 4 Critically evaluate the economic benefit of managing risks from firm-wide perspective. 5 Reflect on the roles, skills and responsibilities needed for effective risk management. 6 Discuss in context the linkage between current theory and practice and are able to organise appropriate evidence and reasoning to produce a balanced conclusion 7 Demonstrate problem solving and analytical approaches to facilitate effective risk management Subject-based practical skills 8 Demonstrate effective approaches to financial risk management. 9 Possess the ability to plan and implement tasks at professional level; make decisions in complex and unpredictable context of using rational risk management approach Skills for life and work (general skills) 10 Present information and communicate effectively in written or oral form, at an appropriate level including the acknowledgement and referencing of sources and also capacity for independent and self managed learning 11 Contextualise the knowledge, competencies and practical skills from the module and apply this to the real world project contexts and activities

Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module will be taught by lectures and understanding will be reinforced by the completion of individual and group exercises. Case studies will be bought to students attention. Intensive workshops will be used to ensure that all contents are appropriately covered within the taught component using the time available.

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Reading and resources for the module: Books Philippe Jorion and GARP (Global Association of Risk Professionals) (2007), Financial Risk Manager Handbook, Wiley Finance. Steve L. Allen (2003), Financial Risk Management: A Practitioner's Guide to Managing Market and Credit Risk, Wiley Finance. JOHN C HULL (2007), Risk Management and Financial Institutions. Peter Christoffersen (2003), Elements of Financial Risk Management, Academic Press. Other Resources Journal of Wealth Management Journal of Finance Journal of Financial Economics www.FT.co.uk www.afajof.org

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Equity and Fixed Income Investment


Module Specification
Module Title: Equity and Fixed Income Investment Module Code: Level: M Credit: 15 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Skills module: None None No Pre-cursor: None Module Leader: Louis Liu Additional Tutors: Ahmed El-Masry

Excluded combinations (e.g skills modules): None University-wide option: No

Location of delivery: London School of Business and Finance Main aim(s) of the module: This module introduces students the characteristics of equity and fixed income investment. The focus is on the valuation techniques. These include dividend discount model, free cash flow model, residual income model. Students will be able to critically judge the appropriateness of these models. The risks associated with bonds investment, and the measurement of yield spread. Also, the bond valuation techniques, interest rate risk measurement will be studied. Also, this module provides an introduction to real estate investment. Main topics of studies: 1. Introduction equity and fixed income investment The basic characteristics and equity and fixed income will be introduced. The focus is on the different usage in the market. 2. Free cash flow valuation Two models free cash flow to the firm (FCFF) and free cash flow to equity (FCFE) will be studied. Students will be able to interpret the appropriateness of the usage of these two models and be able to calculate FCFF and FCFE from net income or cash flow of operation. Bond valuation is an application of discounting future cash flow to present value. The important area will be on the understanding of using spot rates to discount future cash flow and the arbitrage-free idea of bond valuation. Other techniques as binominal tree for bond securities with and without a option will be discussed. 3. Residual income valuation This topic will introduce four types of residual income models. Students will be able to adjust financial statement so that to successful use these models. The concept of continuing residual income is also introduced here. 4. Valuation in emerging market Students will understand the valuation techniques in emerging markets are the same as investment in developed economy. However, inflation will make the forecast of cash flow more challenging. Students will be able to bring inflation factor in different valuation models. 5. Income Property analysis and appraisal Different income capitalisation approach and the gross income multiple appraisals will be discussed. Students will be

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able to understand when each of the method is appropriate. 6. Risks in fixed income investment Various risked that investors may expose to when invest in bonds will be introduced. Also, risk measurement such as duration and its drawbacks will be discussed here. 7. Yield spread and measurement Students will understand the definition and terminologies of yield spread. The emphasis of this topic will be on the three theories of term structure (pure expectations theory, liquidity preference theory, and market segmentation theory) and their implication of each theory. The key yield measures of current yield, yield to maturity, and yield to all will be introduced. Students will get a firm grip of bond equivalent yield and the conversion of different yields to bond equivalent yields. Students will also understand the limitations of each yield measures. 8. Mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities The general mechanics and important concepts as mortgage passthrough securities, collateralised mortgage obligations, and stripped mortgage-backed securities will be introduced. Students will be able to appreciate the impact of prepayment risks to an investor. The basic idea of an asset-backed securities and its difference from mortgagebacked securities will be studied here.

Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1 Identify principles and trends in the financial equity and fixed income investment. 2 Determine and evaluate the nature equity and fixed income market. 3 Demonstrate deep and systemic knowledge in the sphere investment management. Thinking skills 4 Critically evaluate the economic benefit of investing equity investment over bonds and other securities. 5 Reflect on the roles, skills and responsibilities needed for effective management equity and fixed income investment. 6 Discuss in context the linkage between current theory and practice and be able to organise appropriate evidence and reasoning to produce a balanced conclusion 7 Demonstrate problem solving and analytical approaches to facilitate effective equity and fixed income selection Subject-based practical skills 8 Demonstrate effective approaches to equity and fixed income valuation 9 Possess the ability to plan and implement tasks at professional level; make decisions in complex and unpredictable context of using rational securities selection approach Skills for life and work (general skills) 10 Present information and communicate effectively in written or oral form, at an appropriate level including the acknowledgement and referencing of sources and also capacity for independent and self managed learning 11 Contextualise the knowledge, competencies and practical skills from the module and apply this to the

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Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module will be taught by lectures and understanding will be reinforced by the completion of individual and group exercises. Case studies will be bought to students attention. Intensive workshops will be used to ensure that all contents are appropriately covered within the taught component using the time available.

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the module: Assessment 1 Individual Report Through analysing a FTSE100 companys annual report and information from other financial resources, please determine its value. You are required to use at least three valuation models and critically assess your valuation. (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11,) Opening Book Examination 3 hours

Weighting:

50%

50% (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9)

Reading and resources for the module: Books CFA (2008), Assets Valuation and Equity, Level 2, Schweser. John D. Stowe, Thomas R. Robinson, Jerald E. Pinto, and DennisW.McLeavey (2002), Analysis of Equity Investments: Valuation. James English (2001), Applied Equity Analysis: Stock Valuation Techniques for Wall Street Professionals, McGraw-Hill. Shanta Acharya (2002), Asset Management: Equities Demystified (Society of Investment Professions), Wiley Finance. Robert A. Schwartz, Reto Francioni, and Bruce W. Weber (2006), The Equity Trader Course, Wiley Trading. Frank J. Fabozzi (2007), Fixed Income Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Lionel Martellini, Philippe Priaulet, and Stephane Priaulet (2003), Fixed Income Securities: valuation, Risk Management and Portfolio Strategies, Wiley Finance. Moorad Choudhry (2005), The Fixed Income Securities and Derivatives Handbook: Analysis and Valuation, Bloomberg. Other Resources Journal Journal Journal Journal Journal of of of of of Portfolio Management Wealth Management Finance Fixed Income Financial Economics

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www.FT.co.uk

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Integrated Marketing Communications


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director 1.0 Introduction:
With the advance of technology and the Internet, organisations face the realm of communicating to global stakeholders by creating global reputations and brands. Integrating the channels of communication and speaking to stakeholders with the same voice seams a challenge for many organisations. In a competitive global world the objectives of marketing communications stretch beyond convincing customers to develop favourite attitudes to products. The key to effective marketing communications is to develop one clear voice that will be heard over the noise and will influence customers perceptions and attitudes. This module is designed to develop critical appreciation of the importance of marketing communications strategies for businesses, non-profit-making and governmental organisations. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: To develop the necessary skills, capabilities and competencies to develop a marketing communications strategy. 1.1.1 Key Aims

IMC Integrated Marketing Communications 15, 7 John Bredican Dorota Bourne

Develop a critical appreciation of the relationship between corporate objectives and communications strategies Evaluate the nature of marketing communications and the marketing communications process. Including marketing communications objectives, communication mix and channels Understand the need for effective cross functional communications within the organisation and how this influences the effectiveness of external communication Analyse various kinds of appeals and media, including their advantages and disadvantages Investigate the relation between corporate image and brand equity in various organisations Anticipate opportunities and threats presented by the rapid developments of the Internet and technology

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Critically evaluate to what extent corporate citizenship is a true response to ethical and environmental dilemmas or a tool for convincing marketing communications Assess the role of brands, innovation, integrated marketing communications, alliances, customer relationships and service in decisions for developing a differentiated positioning to create exceptional value for the customer 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge & Understanding Grasp fundamental theoretical concepts in the area of marketing communications management Develop sound understanding of the communication process and its impact on the customer decision-making process Develop critical awareness of marketing communications approaches and strategies used by a wide range of organisations Research effectively a wide range of sources of information Prioritise and assess secondary data in order to communications issues within a wide range of organisations investigate marketing

Demonstrate the skills of using secondary data to illustrate or support arguments in the context of marketing communications decision-making Analyse advantages and limitations of the main marketing communications concepts and be able to apply them to scenarios in current marketing cases Critically analyse and evaluate marketing communications strategies employed by organisations in different contexts Identify management problems in the area of marketing communications and critically evaluate alternative course of actions dependent on the context of the situation Evaluate best practices as well as marketing communications failures Industry Related / Transferable Skills: Enhance the ability to write analytical marketing essays and reports Present information by demonstrating quality and clarity of expression, use of terminology appropriate for the target audience by communicating marketing theories and practice in a coherent way At the end of this module, students will be able to work effectively in teams and have improved interpersonal skills

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Participate in class discussions and tackling effectively case-studies Demonstrate autonomy by completing individual assignments 2.1 Indicative Content A. The need for integrating marketing communication messages and channels B. Critical evaluation of integrating marketing communications role within marketing management C. Managing the segmentation process: Requirements for creative media strategies to reach target audiences D. Managing integrated marketing communications planning: approaches to designing marketing communications strategies and development of communication budgets E. Managing expectations of consumers and other stakeholders: Theories and models of buyers behaviour F. Managing the communications mix for better balance of internal and external communications: The role of PR in crisis management G. Managing brands: Building brand equity, repositioning brands, and creating brand loyalty H. Establishing corporate identity and objectives of corporate communications I. Technology and the growth of direct marketing and customisation of communications; Managing interface with customers at each point of contact J. The impact of cultural/ethical, legal, political, and economic variables on marketing communications in the international environment

K. Ethical and law considerations in advertising


2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Methods of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners

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can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Coursework 80% 50% Examination 20% 50% Outline details Case Study Open Book Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment 1 Coursework Students will be required to investigate the marketing communication policy of a company, details of which will be provided in a tutor designed case study. They may select a related conceptual area relevant to their work experience in order to apply the knowledge and understanding gained through the module. Assessment 2 Open Book Examination The examination will consist of a choice of three essay questions from a selection of nine. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are

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assessed. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Fill C (2009), Marketing Communications: Interactivity, Communities and Content, (5th Ed), Pearson Education 4.2 Recommended Reading: Aaltio I and Mills A J (eds) (2002). Gender, Identity and the Culture of Organizations, Pickton and Broderick,(2005), Integrated Marketing Communication, 2nd edition Prentice Hall Belch G and Belch M Advertising and Promotion: An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective McGraw Hill Higher Education; 8 edition (2008) Fill, C. (2006) Marketing Communications: Contexts, Contents, and Strategies, 5th edition, Prentice Hall Kapferer, J-N. (2007) The new strategic brand management. 4 edition. London, KoganPage De Pelsmacker, P., Geuens, M., &Van Den Bergh, J, (2007), 3rd edition Prentice Hall Shrimp, T.(2000), Advertising Promotion: Supplemental Aspects of Integrated Marketing Communications, Dryden Engel, J.F., Warshaw. M.R., Kinnear, T. C. (1994), Promotional Strategy: Managing the Marketing Communication Process, 8th edition, Irwin Russel, J.T. and Lane, W.R. (1998), Kleppner's Advertising Procedure, 14th edition, Prentice Hall Hart, N. (1995), The Practice of Advertising, 4th edition, Butterworth-Heinemann Schultz, DE, Schultz H (2003) IMC, The Next Generation : Five Steps For Delivering Value and Measuring Financial Returns McGraw-Hill; 1 edition

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4.3 Journals & Newspaper: ABI/Inform global (journals) Financial Times online Economist Times & Sunday Times Athens database Wall Street Journal Europe (daily business newspaper) Eurobusiness (monthly business magazine) Financial Times (daily business newspaper) Fortune (monthly business magazine) Business Week (weekly business magazine) Marketing Week (monthly marketing oriented magazine) Journal of Marketing Journal of International Marketing International Marketing Review (MIR) International Journal of Research and Marketing Research: The Journal of the Market Research Society McKinsey Quarterly 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. The Charter Institute of Marketing http://www.cim.co.uk/cim Marketing Magazine is now also available at http://www.marketing.haynet.com and includes an archive of Features and Online News. Marketing Online://Internet marketing and e-marketing training : consulting : knowledge http://www.marketing-online.co.uk/ Industry news, views and publications http://www.dragonbrands.com/dart/0001.htm The World's Only FREE Knowledge Database on Business, Advertising, Marketing, Image and the Brand http://www.personako.com/ The Institute for Learning and Research http://www.bized.co.uk Guerrilla Marketing http://gm.clickndrop.com/cnd/newsletter BBC marketing communications news and publications http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2 UK online for business is a DTI-led programme that offers expert, impartial, jargon-free advice, plus information and support on the best use of technology for small and medium-sized business (SMEs). Across the UK there are nearly 400 UK online for business Advisers. They are there to help you make the most of technology in your business

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http://www.ukonlineforbusiness.gov.uk/cms/template/gatewayhome/310294.htm PR activities on the web http://www.number-10.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp Course Unit Title

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Global Marketing
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: The effect of globalisation is influencing many aspects of the business world. Top management has a responsibility to respond and to develop approaches that prepare organisations for the effects of globalisation. One such approach is to understand the global marketing context. This module develops an understanding of international marketing environments, global strategies and the components of global marketing plans. Students will be able to appreciate issues around global marketing decisionmaking processes within various organisations. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: To develop the necessary skills, capabilities and competencies to develop an international marketing strategy. 1.1.1 Key Aims

GM Global Marketing 15, 7 Mo Willan Dorota Bourne

To understand the global marketing environment and its impact on marketing strategy formulation in the context of the International Marketing Manager To develop and evaluate global strategies To assess the application of international marketing theory and practice in various organisations To provide students with coherent frameworks and theory and practice so that they develop a strategic approach to global marketing 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge & Understanding Discuss and critically assess the main approaches to global marketing Identify and analyse information needed to establish and implement effective global marketing decisions, policies and strategies Critically analyse and evaluate global marketing practices employed by organisations in different contexts Identify management problems in the area of global marketing and critically evaluate alternative course of actions dependent on the context of the situation

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Industry Related / Transferable Skills: Enhanced ability to use and present quantitative & qualitative data, in suitable formats that increase understanding by the use of appropriate techniques and application of IT skills At the end of this module, students will be able to work effectively in teams and have improved interpersonal skills 2.1 Indicative Content A. Introduction to global marketing environment and cross-cultural management issues B. Finding international market spaces marketing research C. Market entry strategies D. Global expansion strategies E. Competitive advantage, business strategy and organisational structures in global context F. International marketing strategic planning process, segmentation, targeting and positioning G. International marketing mix decisions H. Constructing the international value chain 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Methods of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This

105

methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Coursework 80% 50% Examination 20% 50% Outline details International Marketing Strategy Open Book Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment 1 Coursework Students will be required to work in groups to develop an international marketing strategy for an organisation of their choice. The strategy will be present to a mock Board of Directors meeting to achieve budgetary approval. Assessment 2 Open Book Examination The examination will consist of a choice of three essay questions from a selection of nine. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return

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date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Albaum G & Duerr E (2008), International Marketing and Export Management, (6th Ed), Pearson Education 4.2 Recommended Reading: Jain, S. C., (2001) International Marketing, 6th edition, Thomson Learning, London. Bradley, F., (2002) International Marketing Strategy 4th edition, Pearson Education, Harlow, UK Albaum, G, Strandskov, J., & Duerr, E., (2002) International Marketing & Export Management, 4th edition, Pearson Education, Harlow, UK Cateora, P. R., & Graham, J.L., (2002) International Marketing, 11th edition, McGrawhill, USA Czinkota, M. R., & Ronkainen, I. A., (2001) Best Practices in International Marketing, Harcourt Brace College Publishers, Fortworth, TX, USA Czinkota, M. R., & Ronkainen, I. A., (2001) International Marketing, 6th edition, Harcourt Brace College Publishers, Fortworth, TX, USA Doole, I., & Lowe, R., (2001) International Marketing: Analysis, Development and Implementation, 3rd edition, Thomas Business Press Hollensen, S., (2007) Global Marketing: A Market-Responsive Approach 4th edition, Prentice Hall Europe, Hemel Hempstead, UK Jeannet, J., & Henessey, H., (1995) Global Marketing Strategies, 3rd edition, International Edition, Houghton Mifflin Co., UK Keegan, W. J., & Schlegemilch, B. B., (2001) Global Marketing Management: A European Perspective, Pearson Education, Harlow, UK Keegan, W. J., (1999) Global Marketing Management, 6th edition, Prentice-Hall International Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA Kotabe, M. and Helsen, K. (2007) Global Marketing Management Wiley; 4 edition Kotler, P., (1998) Marketing Management: Analysis, Planning, Implementation, and Control, 7th edition, Prentice-Hall International Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA Mulbacher, H., Dahringer, L., & Leihs, H., International Marketing: A Global Perspective, 2nd edition, International Thomson Business Press, London

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Perrault,W. D., & McCarthy, E.J., (2002) Basic Marketing: A Global-Managerial Approach 14th edition, McGraw-Hill, USA Paliwoda, S. J., & Thomas, M.J., (1998) International Marketing, 3rd edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford, UK/Woburn, MA, USA 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: ABI/Inform global (journals) Osiris (companies) Datamonitor (market surveys, available via Osiris) Financial Times online Economist Times & Sunday Times Athens database Wall Street Journal Europe (daily business newspaper) Eurobusiness (monthly business magazine) Financial Times (daily business newspaper) Fortune (monthly business magazine) Business Week (weekly business magazine) Marketing Week (monthly marketing oriented magazine) Journal of Marketing Journal of International Marketing International Marketing Review (MIR) International Journal of Research and Marketing Research: The Journal of the Market Research Society McKinsey Quarterly Strategy & Business Strategic Management Journal (SMJ) European Management Journal (EMJ) Harvard Business Review (HBR) Journal of Long Range Planning (LRP) 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. The Charter Institute of Marketing http://www.cim.co.uk/cim http://www.cim.co.uk/cim/ser/html/knoTopic.cfm?objectID=793B8A35-F488-42A894D2D5E27813B52C Marketing Magazine is now also available at http://www.marketing.haynet.com and includes an archive of Features and Online News Marketing Online: Internet marketing and e-marketing, training, consulting,

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knowledge http://www.marketing-online.co.uk/ Industry news, views and publications http://www.dragonbrands.com/dart/0001.htm The World's Only FREE Knowledge Database on Business, Advertising, Marketing, Image and the Brand http://www.personako.com/ The Institute for Learning and Research http://www.bized.co.uk Guerrilla Marketing http://gm.clickndrop.com/cnd/newsletter BBC marketing communications news and publications http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2 UK online for business is a DTI-led programme that offers expert, impartial, jargonfree advice, plus information and support on the best use of technology for small and medium-sized business (SMEs). Across the UK there are nearly 400 UK online for business Advisers. They are there to help you make the most of technology in your business. http://www.ukonlineforbusiness.gov.uk/cms/template/gatewayhome/310294.htm PR activities on the web http://www.number-10.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp

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Internet and Digital Marketing Communications


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: In this module students will understand Internet and Digital Marketing communication strategies, and elements of law that particularly apply to the digital media. Students will also examine the search engines methodology to get an understanding of how they work and what they look for. Examination and evaluation of optimisation reports to provide improvements that certain pages require will be central to this section and will influence any designs the students are producing. In addition to the search engine optimisation work (SEO), students will also be taught to develop accessible web pages according to accepted standards and principles. Search Engine marketing is also covered in this section, including AdWords, Overture and MSN PPC, giving the students a full and complete understanding of Web advertising tools. The module will equip the students with all the relevant and up-to-date techniques and information to ensure maximum return from search engine activities. 1.2 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of this module is to explore the rise of the Internet and its impact on marketing around the globe. It builds on the main strengths of the digital media discipline - the communications opportunities offered. Within the Digital Communications Strategy section, fundamental web design principles will be covered, including obtaining familiarity with web-based environments and platforms. 1.2.1 Key Aims Determine effective digital marketing principles in the context of business and society Identify effective strategies, tools and development approaches for digital marketing Compare and contrast implementation of appropriate customer-centric strategies such as customer relationship management (CRM) and data modeling Examine critically advanced theoretical frameworks.

IDMC Internet and Digital Marketing Communications 15, 7 Nigel Bradley Dorota Bourne

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Integrate the theoretical, conceptual and analytical considerations of digital marketing management. At the end of the course, you will have mastered a range of methods and techniques and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical foundations, range of relevance, applicability and limitations. 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge & Understanding Use appropriate marketing terminology, concepts, theories and models applied in a variety of digital marketing settings. Describe the inter-related nature of the basic digital marketing concept and the business environment. Analyse the elements of the digital marketing mix and the role of different elements in achieving marketing objectives. Demonstrate a critical appreciation of a variety of market research techniques in digital marketing environment Identify and evaluate effective development and implementation of digital marketing strategies Describe the components of a professional digital marketing communications plan and strategy. Appreciate the dynamic nature of marketing in a changing, global business environment. To think strategically about a given companys digital marketing approach in order to ensure the creation and capture of value Analyse a digital marketing strategy within a structured framework, incorporating market positioning, performance objectives and success factors Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory & practice Synthesise relevant literature from a diverse range of perspectives on specific aspects of digital marketing management, identify knowledge gaps and propose research through which the identified gaps could be addressed. Industry Related / Transferable Skills: Formulate/develop coherent strategies that are holistic in nature and internally congruent in terms of both conceptual and operational requirements of marketing management. Carry out independent study and research in the subject areas of the course

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Analyse the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas from the perspective of the digital marketing function Demonstrate how digital marketing could be organised and applied in a business context. Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field 2.1 Indicative Content A. B. C. D. Principles of Internet Marketing; definition, aims and origins Introduction to e-Promotion strategies Principles of mobile marketing Strategic digital marketing E. Management and assessment of digital marketing communications F. Digital media and advertising G. Internet communications channels and strategies H. Managing direct and database marketing I. Consumer behaviour in cyber environment J. Interactive communications with customers and consumers K. New media, new trends L. Strategic considerations of internet marketing 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Methods of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are

112

designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment:

Assessment Title Coursework Examination

Weight Pass towards final mark grade 80% 50% 20% 50%

Outline details Marketing planning Open Book

Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment 1 Coursework Students will be expected to develop a commercially viable and coherently written digital marketing plan in response to a scenario set by their tutor. They will be expected to present the marketing plan in a mock Boardroom style setting in order to secure funds for the project. Assessment 2 Open Book Examination The open book exam will comprise of a case study response. The case study will be pre-seen by students. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed.

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Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Chaffey, D. (2006) Internet Marketing: Strategy, Implementation and Practice Prentice Hall; 3 edition 4.2 Recommended Reading: Aaker D. Strategic Market Management Wiley; 8 edition (March 9, 2007) Aaker, D. and McLoughlin, D (2007) Strategic market management. European edition. Chichester, John Wiley. (European edition). Adamson, AP (2008) BrandDigital: Simple Ways Top Brands Succeed in the Digital World Palgrave Macmillan Chaffey, D and Smith, P. (2008) eMarketing eXcellence, Third Edition: Planning and optimising your digital marketing (Emarketing Essentials) Butterworth-Heinemann; 3 edition Chernev A. and Kotler P. Strategic Marketing Management, 3rd Edition Brightstar Media, Inc.; 3rd edition (July 1, 2008) Cocoran, I (2007) The Art of Digital Branding Allworth Press Gilligan, C. and Wilson, R.Strategic Marketing Management, Third Edition: planning, implementation and control Butterworth-Heinemann; 3 edition (2005) Hooley, G. Saunders, J. Piercy, N. and Nicoulaud, B. Marketing Strategy and Competitive Positioning (4th Edition) South-Western College Pub; 4 edition (2007) Lambin, J., Chumpitaz, R. and Schuiling, I. Market-Driven Management, Second Edition: Strategic and Operational Marketing Palgrave Macmillan; 2nd edition (2007) Hafner, K. (2003) Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins of the Internet London - Free Press Hanson, W. and Kalyanam, K. (2006) Internet Marketing and e-Commerce SouthWestern College Pub; 1 edition Krug, S. (2002) Dont make me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web

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Usability USA - New Rider Lehmann, D. Analysis for Marketing Planning McGraw-Hill/Irwin; 7 edition (2007) McDonald, M., and Wilson, H. (2002) The New Marketing: Drive the Digital Market or It Will Drive You London - Elsevier Roberts, ML (2007) Internet Marketing: Integrating Online and Offline Strategies Atomic Dog; 2 edition Ryan, D and Jones, C (2009) Understanding Digital Marketing: Marketing Strategies for Engaging the Digital Generation Kogan Page Wertime, K and Fenwick, I (2008) DigiMarketing: The Essential Guide to New Media and Digital Wiley Wind, J. (2001) Digital Marketing: Global strategies from the worlds leading experts - USA - John Wiley and Sons Inc 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Journal of Marketing Campaign European Journal of Marketing Marketing Week The Marketer (CIM) Precision Marketing (Haymarket) International Journal of Marketing Harvard Business Review 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. www.cim.co.uk www.emarketer.com www.wisemarketer.com www.mad.co.uk www.marketingmagazine.co.uk www.rnib.co.uk www.w3c.org

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Fundamentals of Islamic Banking and Finance


Module Specification
Module Title: Fundamentals of Islamic Banking and Finance Module Code: Level: M Credit: 15 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Skills module: None None No Pre-cursor: None Module Leader: Ahmed El-Masry Additional Tutors: Peter Wheale

Excluded combinations (e.g skills modules): None University-wide option: No

Location of delivery: London School of Business and Finance Main aim(s) of the module: Many experts are estimating the growth of the Islamic finance industry at 15-20% per annum, with some predicting that it could become a major competitor to the conventional finance industry. Experts expect to see Islamic finance spread beyond Muslim countries, as seen in Europe, where it has already made considerable headway in the UK, Germany and Switzerland. As a result of these developments, Islamic financial institutions have developed a vast range of products designed to serve the growing market. Several "Islamic equity" investment funds have also been launched, with both FTSE and Dow Jones providing indices to monitor this growing market. Islamic finance is important in helping the City of London maintain and develop its status as the global financial centre. Presently, it is estimated that Islamic banks and financial institutions manage some US$200-300 billion of funds all over the world (Standard & Poors Islamic Finance Outlook 2006). This module will provide students a unique chance to grasp the latest trend in the financial market. Main topics of studies: 1. Induction to Islam Key concepts of Shariaa, the Quran, the Sunnah, ijma, Qiyas, ijtihad of Islamic law and the authorities for interpreting the Quran and Sunnah will be introduced. 2. Introduction to Islamic Banking and Finance

Students will understand the main sources for application of Islamic Guidance to commerce. The concepts underlying Islamic finance will be studied. The historical development of modern finance and banking will also be analysed. 3. Financial techniques in Lslamic Banks:

Students will understand the distinction between a traditional bank and an Islamic bank and the operation of current accounts under Shariaa conditions. The Islamic banking model and the challenges it presents will be another area of study. Financial Statements for Islamic Banks The conceptual framework of OFRS/IAS will be introduced. The need for Islamic accounting standards will be explained. The role and responsibilities of AAOIFI will be analysed. Islamic Corporate Governance Students will understand the reasons for Islamic banks presenting different corporate governance challenges to

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conventional banks. The rile of the Shariaa supervisory board in the corporate governance and how RIAH and UIAH works in corporate governance Islamic Bond Market The difference between conventional and Islamic securities will be introduced. Students will be able to apply the Mudaraba Sukuk, the Ijara Sukuk, and Salam Sukuk. Islamic Co-operative Insurance Students will understand the position of Islam regarding insurance. They will be able to apply the three models for understanding and managing the investments of the Takaful.

Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1 Identify principles and trends in the Islamic banking. 2 Determine and evaluate the nature of different banks. 3 Demonstrate deep and systemic knowledge in the sphere of international financial market. Thinking skills 4 Critically evaluate the economic benefit of various types of banking system 5 Reflect on the roles, skills and responsibilities needed for effective management of corporate governance 6 Discuss in context the linkage between current theory and practice and be able to organise appropriate evidence and reasoning to produce a balanced conclusion 7 Demonstrate problem solving and analytical approaches to facilitate effective financial management in Islamic world Subject-based practical skills 8 Demonstrate effective approaches to analyzing conventional banking structure 9 Possess the ability to plan and implement tasks at professional level; make decisions in complex and unpredictable context of using rational decision-making approach Skills for life and work (general skills) 10 Present information and communicate effectively in written or oral form, at an appropriate level including the acknowledgement and referencing of sources and also capacity for independent and self managed learning 11 Contextualise the knowledge, competencies and practical skills from the module and apply this to the

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Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module will be taught by lectures and understanding will be reinforced by the completion of individual and group exercises. It will also use case studies from blue chips companies, discussions and exercises. Intensive workshops will be used to ensure that all contents are appropriately covered within the taught component using the time available.

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the module: Assessment 1 Individual Report providing the current turmoil in the financial market, state the nature, interpret the reasons and recommend solutions how Islamic banking approach might help (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11) Open Examination 3 hours (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8)

Weighting: 50%

50%

Reading and resources for the module: Books Islamic Finance Qualification (2007), Securities and Investment Institute. Other Resources Journal of Finance Journal of International Finance www.sii.org.uk www.FT.co.uk www.afajof.org

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Islamic Portfolio Management


Module Specification
Module Title: Islamic Portfolio Management Module Code: Level: M Credit: 15 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Skills module: None None No Pre-cursor: None Module Leader: Ahmed El-Masry Additional Tutors: Peter Wheale

Excluded combinations (e.g skills modules): None University-wide option: No

Location of delivery: London School of Business and Finance Main aim(s) of the module: The aim of the Portfolio Management subject is to build on the techniques for portfolio selection and it will address both the theory and practice of portfolio management with emphasis in Islamic world The theoretical part of this subject will involve the topics of constructing an investment portfolio, and adjusting its composition through time to ensure its performance. It will also consider the use of derivatives in managing risks. The practical part will provide students hands-on experience of constructing and managing an portfolio. Main topics of studies: Financial instruments and markets Students will understand how and where securities are traded, and much of the terminology of securities trading will introduced. The calculation of margin accounts will be discussed. Also, this topic includes the difference between primary and secondary market, the mechanics of short sales, the difference between a dealer market and an exchange market, types of orders, and the different arrangements with investment bankers when issuing new securities. Introduction to portfolio management Markowitz portfolio theory and optimal portfolio choice will be covered. Students will understand the relationship between portfolio risk and correlation which is the key to understanding modern portfolio theory. Diversification, correlation, indifference curves, expected return, and the efficient frontier is discussed. 3. Understanding and applying passive asset allocation

The rational and procedures of passive investment strategy will be discussed. Students will also understand the trade-off between risk diversification and the lower expected returns, and the suitable circumstances when to apply this strategy. 4. Understanding and applying active portfolio management

Students will be able to justify the use of active portfolio management, even when the markets are assumed to be in equilibrium. Also, students will appreciate the logic and the steps underlying the Treynor-Black portfolio management model, which combines market inefficiency, security analysis, and modern portfolio theory. Islamic law of contract Students will understand the ethical underpinning of Islamic finance. The major prohibitions in Islamic will be introduced. 6. Hedging/ Islamic portfolio insurance

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Students will understand the mechanics of the strategy of hedging a stock portfolio against market risk by selling stock index futures short or buying stock index put options. Black-Scholes formula of how a call option could be perfectly hedged by a negative stock position. Also, Hayne E. Leland and Mark Rubinsteins work in Portfolio Insurance will also be discussed. 7. Islamic Asset and Fund Management

The constraints applying to Islamic investment will be introduced. The use of Ijara, the growth of different types of Islamic investment products will be studied. Students will also be able to apply the Islamic selection process through the industry and financial screen. 8. Islamic Portfolio management in practice

This topic will demonstrate students the real world practice. The difficulties of constructing an index, following an index, and other issues in relation of taxation, trading cost ect. will be discussed. A reputable fund manager from the city will be invited to speak in this session. Some Islamic cases will be analysed here.

Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1 Identify principles and trends in theIslamic portfolio management. 2 Determine and evaluate the nature of Islamic securities market. 3 Demonstrate deep and systemic knowledge in the sphere of Islamic portfolio investment. Thinking skills 4 Critically evaluate the economic benefit of investing in a portfolio in a Islamic world 5 Reflect on the roles, skills and responsibilities needed for effective management of a portfolio. 6 Discuss in context the linkage between current theory and practice and be able to organise appropriate evidence and reasoning to produce a balanced conclusion 7 Demonstrate problem solving and analytical approaches to facilitate effective financial decision-making Subject-based practical skills 8 Demonstrate effective approaches to Islamic portfolio selection 9 Possess the ability to plan and implement tasks at professional level; make decisions in complex and unpredictable context of using rational Islamic securities selection approach Skills for life and work (general skills) 10 Present information and communicate effectively in written or oral form, at an appropriate level including the acknowledgement and referencing of sources and also capacity for independent and self managed learning 11 Contextualise the knowledge, competencies and practical skills from the module and apply this to the real world project contexts and activities

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Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module will be taught by lectures and understanding will be reinforced by the completion of individual and group exercises. Case studies will be bought to students attention. Intensive workshops will be used to ensure that all contents are appropriately covered within the taught component using the time available.

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the module: Assessment 1 Group Report A dummy portfolio will be constructed and managed by students at the beginning of this course. A report on the performance of this portfolio will be submitted by the end of this course. (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11,12)

Weighting:

50%

50% Open Examination 3 hours (Learning outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9)

Reading and resources for the module: Books CFA (2008), Corporate Finance, Portfolio Management, Markets, and Equities, Level 1 and Level 2, Schweser. Keith Brown and Frank K. Reilly (2005), Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management, 8th edition. Project Management Institute (2006), The Standard for portfolio Management. Richard C. Grinold and Ronald N. Kahn (1999), Active Portfolio Management: A quantitative approach for producing superior returns and selecting superior money managers, McGraw-Hill. Christine Brentani (2003), Portfolio Management in Practice, Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann. Edwin J. Elton, Martin J. Cruber, Stephen J. Brown and William N. Goetzmann (2006), Modern Portfolio Theory and Investment Analysis. Other Resources Journal of Portfolio Management Journal of Wealth Management Journal of Finance www.FT.co.uk www.afajof.org

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E-Commerce
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction:

ECM E-Commerce 15, 7 Nigel Bradley Dorota Bourne

This module focuses on concepts and issues to provide an overview of the current and next generations of e-commerce. The module emphasises the three major driving forces behind e-commerce: technology change, business development, and social and marketing controversies. This module offers indepth coverage of concepts in technology, the Internet, economics, marketing, IT, privacy, intellectual property, equity, and governance related to running e-business.
1.1 Learning Aims of the Module:

The e-commerce and e-business industry is a rapidly developing industry with many business specifics. The objective of the module is assist learners in developing the analytical and conceptual skills sets to devise appropriate strategies for the internet based business. A special focus will be placed upon encouraging debate on important current issues and strategic policy initiatives and practices pertinent to the industry. 1.1.1 Key Aims: To provide a thorough understanding of e-commerce and e-business strategic policy-making within an international and a national context To develop and apply innovative strategic planning approaches in response to corporate policies and market challenges To create the necessary tools, procedures and competencies needed to analyse, define, plan internet based business in a global context Develop critical thinking with quest for sustainable competitive advantage within internet business environment 122

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: Upon completion of the module, learners should possess a working knowledge of the practical skills and constraints associated with strategic planning for internet based business. Knowledge & Understanding: Have knowledge of the development of functional strategies to develop competitive strength within e-commerce sector Understand the nature of strategic management for firms engaged in ecommerce sector Show knowledge of various policy agendas for the industry at the national and international level Express and understanding of business strategy decision areas Express and understanding of the success factors in strategic implementation for firms engaged in e-commerce development To think strategically about firms engaged e-commerce, their business situation, how they can gain sustainable competitive advantage and how such strategies can be planned, implemented and executed successfully Analyse business strategy within structured framework, incorporating product and strategic innovation, market positioning, performance objective targeting and business capabilities development Select appropriate elements from a diverse range of perspectives on strategy formulation for firms engaged in internet business and understand the implementation of such strategies, plus their limitations Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory and practice relating to the internet based business Industry Related/Transferable Skills: Be able to conduct a sectoral strategic analysis at both national and international levels Carry out independent study and research on issues that face firms in the sector 123

Analyse the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas for strategy innovation and formulation Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field 2.1 Indicative Content: Introduction to a range of approaches and tools available for strategic planning, as well as understanding the relative strengths and weaknesses of differing approaches and tools. F. Create strategies for the industry both in the national and international markets G. Implementation of e-commerce in practice H. Regulatory impact on the e-commerce sector I. Competitive strategies in digital business environment
E.

2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leaders will aim to combine lectures with seminar activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the learner to understand the module material through case studies, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with 124

the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Individual Presentation Individual Assignment Weight towards final grade 80% 20% Pass mark 50% 50% Outline details Individual Presentation Individual Assignment Submission Date TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment One: Individual Presentation This assessment accounts for 50% of the total marks for this module and is based on a twenty minute individual presentation highlighting what the learner believes are the main issues facing to be the industry in the 21st Century. The learner should look at a broad range of issues such as competition, new market entrants, new destinations as well as regulatory and environmental issues. Assessment Two: Individual Assignment This is the second assessment for this course and accounts for 20% of the total marks for this module. Armed with the outcomes from the individual presentation, learners should develop a strategic plan for a e-commerce firm that wishes to break either into a new segment of the market or that wishes to take its business into a new geographical market. Marks will be awarded for detail of insightful analysis and novelty of approach. 125

Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Chaffey D (2008) E-Business and E-Commerce Management Prentice Hall; 3 edition 4.2 Recommended Reading: Hanson W and Kalyanam K (2006) Internet Marketing and eCommerce South-Western College Pub; 1 edition Laudon KC Traver CG (2008) E-Commerce: Business,Technology, Society Prentice Hall; 4 edition Reynolds J (2004) The Complete E-Commerce Book: Design, Build and Maintain a Successful Web-Based Business CMP Books; 2 edition Schneider G (2008) Electronic Commerce Course Technology; 8 edition 126

4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Revolution (Haymarket) Marketing (Haymarket) International Journal of Marketing 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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Strategic Sales Management


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: In this module we will look at the development of the sales function e.g. as influenced by growing competition, market-saturation and up-scaling. We will ponder the relationship between the sales objectives and the business objectives and the strategic choices that every business has to make first. Furthermore we will look at the different sales techniques and sales management will be scrutinised further. This module makes a particular emphasis on sales planning and prognosis as well as managing sales team. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The objective of the module is to give the future managers an understanding of the nature of strategic sales management, by providing a comprehensive overview of relevant issues, both theoretical and practical, on the topic. The module aims to combine broad theoretical background of sales management with practical implications and practices employed by companies. An important objective of the module is to provide learners with tangible strategic analysis, design, and implementation skills that they can readily put into practice. 1.1.1 Key Aims: To develop learners ability to understand the strategic sales management function within organisation and interrelation between business, marketing and sales objectives Allow learners to understand the international context of sales management Acquire necessary skills and techniques to access, plan and manage sales in organisation

SSM Strategic Sales Management 15, 7 Mo Willan Dorota Bourne

At the end of the module, learners should have mastered a range of concepts and techniques of strategic sales management and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical foundations, range of applicability, qualifications and

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limitations. 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: At the end of this module learners will have: Knowledge & Understanding The nature of strategic sales management The importance of the customer management process The nature, diversity and challenges of sales force management Models for sales strategy implementation To think strategically about the sales function and customer management Select and discuss appropriate elements from a diverse range of perspectives on strategic sales management Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory and practice to the sector Industry Related/Transferable Skills: Be able to conduct a strategic sales analysis and plan Carry out independent study and research in the subject areas of the course Analyse the competitive environment, and competitors sales strategies Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field 2.1 Indicative Content: I. J. K. L. M. N. O. Strategic Sales Management; the nature, definition, aims and challenges Sales analysis, prognosis and planning Management of the sales team Strategic management and resource planning of sales operations Clint management and customer cycle Tools and techniques to analyse and make sales prognosis Leadership and motivation

2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leader will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities and discussion. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximizing their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career.

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2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that students can utilize their private study time more effectively. These lectures act as a guide to the students and are a focused route through out the syllabus. The basic ethic is to guide, explain and teach rather than to transmit factual material that can be readily obtained from the recommended texts through private study. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give students an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the students. This method of study gives the student an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the module leader and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. WORKSHOPS: These are an innovative form of student centred learning. This method of study involves the students to work in small groups with a difference. Here generally the student takes the lead and the module leader acts as a facilitator. The sessions consider problems and essay questions, case studies and tackle the conceptual challenging aspects of the subject. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable students to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyze the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This helps to test the students ability which will allow him to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Individual report Open Book Exam Weight towards final grade 80% 20% Pass mark 50% 50% Outline details Individual report Open Book Exam Submission TBC TBC

Pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each

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assessment. Assessment One: Individual Report: In the individual report will be based upon a case study given to learners at the beginning of the term. Learners will have the opportunity to discuss the assignment, and ensure that they understand what is required in the report during class. The learners are required to answer a set of given questions based on the case study, and the knowledge delivered in the course should be applied to analyze each question. The coursework should be written in an essay format and around 3000 words. Assessment Two: Open Book Exam: Learners are required to answer essay questions within three hours. The answers should reflect the theoretical aspect with relevant examples from corporate industry. The questions will explicitly test the learners ability to analyze and correlate the business strategies in a business activity. Marks will be awarded for detail of analysis, novelty of approach to the problem and, in particular, if you have a good idea. Due to current and developing nature of the topic marks will also be awarded for those who tackle current and planned developments in international business environment. Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff in the college aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on learner performance within fifteen working weeks of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process we will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered unfair practice and is strictly forbidden and may be heavily penalized. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading(s) Ingram TN, La Forge RW and Avila RA (2008) Sales Management: Analysis and Decision Making M.E. Sharpe; 7 edition

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4.2 Recommended Reading: Miller W (2001) ProActive Sales Management: How to Lead, Motivate, and Stay Ahead of the Game AMACOM Harvard Business Review on Strategic Sales Management (2007) Harvard Business School Press Spiro R, Stanton W and Rich G Management of a Sales Force McGraw-Hill/Irwin; 12 edition DiModica PR (2006) Sales Management Power Strategies: Building a replicable and scalable sales process Johnson & Hunter 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: The Charter Institute of Marketing http://www.cim.co.uk/cim Marketing Magazine is now also available at http://www.marketing.haynet.com and includes an archive of Features and Online News. Marketing Online://Internet marketing and e-marketing training : consulting : knowledge http://www.marketing-online.co.uk/ Industry news, views and publications http://www.dragonbrands.com/dart/0001.htm The World's Only FREE Knowledge Database on Business, Advertising, Marketing, Image and the Brand http://www.personako.com/ The Institute for Learning and Research http://www.bized.co.uk Guerrilla Marketing http://gm.clickndrop.com/cnd/newsletter BBC marketing communications news and publications http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2 UK online for business is a DTI-led programme that offers expert, impartial, jargon-free advice, plus information and support on the best use of technology for small and medium-sized business (SMEs). Across the UK there are nearly 400 UK online for business Advisers. They are there to help you make the most of technology in your business http://www.ukonlineforbusiness.gov.uk/cms/template/gatewayhome/310294.htm PR activities on the web http://www.number-10.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp Course Unit Title 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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MODULE DESCRIPTION (MSc in Marketing TAUGHT)

Key Account Management


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: Key Accounts are the most valuable commercial asset of the company. This module is purely dedicated to equip student with necessary management skills for effective and efficient key account and sales management to aiming to maximise customer satisfaction as well as profitability of the company. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The objective of the module is to give both future and current managers an understanding of the nature of key account management by providing a comprehensive overview of relevant issues, both theoretical and practical. The module aims to combine a broad theoretical background of strategic innovation and planning with practical implications for the modern concepts of account management. An important objective of the module is to provide learners with tangible skill to plan and manage relations with the key accounts, which then can be practically adapted to real world situations. 1.1.1 Key Aims: To develop learners ability to access customers and identify the key accounts for the companies within various business environments. To enable learners to explore how they can develop the relations with the client to maximise the effectiveness of cooperation for both sides To consider different market contexts and different competitive situations for the key account management and the strategic implications of the companies in respect to their client management procedures. At the end of the module, learners should have mastered a range of methods and techniques of key account management and planning and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical foundations, range of applicability, qualifications and limitations. 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: At the end of this module learners will have: Knowledge & Understanding: Understand the nature of key account management and its competitive context Sales and customer management strategic decision areas

KAM Key Account Management 15, 7 Mo Willan Dorota Bourne

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Success factors in account management policy implementation for the companies To think strategically about a given key account of the company, business situation, how account plan can be implemented and executed successfully Debate and appreciate interpretations and applications of academic theory and practice relating to the high tech economy

Industry Related/Transferable Skills: Be able to conduct a companys key accounts strategic analysis Carry out independent study and research on issues that face companies dealing with key accounts Analyse the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas within the organization to develop the relevant key account management policies Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field A. B. C. 2.1 Indicative Content: Development of strategic approach to client management Account selection and planning Organisational Models of Account Management D. Account analysis and information management. E. Account plan and implementation F. Building long-term sustainable relations with key accounts G. Key Account Management in the global context 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leaders will aim to combine lectures with seminar activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the learner to understand the module material through case studies, text and video material and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities and discussion about the significant role of business strategy in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are

134

designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. 3.0 Assessment 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Individual 80% 50% Presentation Open Book 20% 50% Examination Outline details Individual Presentation Open Examination Submission Date TBC Book TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment One: Individual Presentation This assessment accounts for 80% of the total marks for this module and is based on a strategic key account plan developed by the student for the company suggested by the tutor. Assessment Two: Open Book Examination This is the second assessment for this course. Learners are required to answer questions within three hours. The answers should reflect the theoretical aspects of the material taught on the module with relevant, where applicable, practical examples. The questions will explicitly test the students ability to analyze a firms customer relations processes. Marks will be awarded for detail of insightful analysis and novelty of approach. Due to current and developing nature of the topic, marks will also be awarded for those who tackle current and perceived planned developments in the high tech sector. Further details of assessment criteria are available in the study guide for this module. This assessment will be graded on the individual performance for the entire period of the module. The module leader will keep records of attendance and formative assessment comments.

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The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your study guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading McDonald M and Woodburn D (2006) Key Account Management, Second Edition: The Definitive Guide Butterworth-Heinemann 4.2 Recommended Reading: Blythe J (2004) Sales & Key Account Management Cengage Learning Business Press; 1 edition Capon N (2001) Key Account Management and Planning: The Comprehensive Handbook for Managing Your Company's Most Important Strategic Asset Free Press Cheverton P (2008) Key Account Management: Tools and Techniques for Achieving Profitable Key Supplier Status Kogan Page; 4th edition Schiffman S (2006) Mastering Your Key Accounts: Maximize Relationships; Create Strategic Partnerships; Increase Sales Adams Media 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: The Charter Institute of Marketing http://www.cim.co.uk/cim Marketing Magazine is now also available at http://www.marketing.haynet.com and includes an archive of Features and Online News. Marketing Online://Internet marketing and e-marketing training : consulting : knowledge http://www.marketing-online.co.uk/ Industry news, views and publications http://www.dragonbrands.com/dart/0001.htm The World's Only FREE Knowledge Database on Business, Advertising, Marketing,

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Image and the Brand http://www.personako.com/ The Institute for Learning and Research http://www.bized.co.uk Guerrilla Marketing http://gm.clickndrop.com/cnd/newsletter BBC marketing communications news and publications http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2 UK online for business is a DTI-led programme that offers expert, impartial, jargon-free advice, plus information and support on the best use of technology for small and medium-sized business (SMEs). Across the UK there are nearly 400 UK online for business Advisers. They are there to help you make the most of technology in your business http://www.ukonlineforbusiness.gov.uk/cms/template/gatewayhome/310294.htm PR activities on the web http://www.number-10.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp Course Unit Title 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Learners are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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Web-Marketing Metrics, Analysis and Evaluation


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: Modern business uses performance indicators to assess success and failure. In this module, students will gain an appreciation of the digital metric and analysis tools and methods available to report digital marketing performance. The module will also require students to evaluate and report on the trends they see, and use the various software interfaces to present their findings. The measurement and tracking will also cover the tracking of Pay-Per-Click (PPC) and affiliate marketing programmes. Product and service development is vital for the continued success of companies. Students will appreciate different methods of New Product Development (NPD) and how they can be applied to the digital environment. In this module, students will not only learn how they can use a new product development process to develop or redevelop a website but also how they can use the electronic media to help define, develop, track and report development progress. Privacy is important in the digital environment and so system design and security is vital. Students will appreciate the methods and issues of system design, and the complexities of system and website security. This module is not a technical guide to building secure systems, but will allow students to manage experts. Within this module, students will also get firsthand experience of how to develop a security policy and implement it onto a computer system. 1.3 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of this module is to explore to equip marketing managers with practical toolkit of assessment and management of web and digital marketing activities in various business contexts. 1.3.1 Key Aims Identify and evaluate website traffic analysis tools, reports and techniques Contextualise the management, evaluation & reporting of affiliate marketing programmes Determine effective strategies for the tracking, evaluation and reporting of emarketing campaigns

WMAE Web-Marketing, Analysis and Evaluation 15, 7 Nigel Bradley Dorota Bourne

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Understand the development, management and tracking of effective ebusiness key performance indicators (KPIs) At the end of the course, you will have mastered a range of methods and techniques and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical foundations, range of relevance, applicability and limitations.

2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge & Understanding Identify and evaluate effective development and implementation of digital marketing metrics strategies Critically evaluate the design and development of online security techniques Determine and evaluate the most appropriate planning methodology and techniques for the digital environment Demonstrate use of appropriate project performance, metrics, management and reporting techniques Effectively use relevant design, development and management techniques to secure online elements, e.g. databases, checkout pages, etc Effectively use a range of appropriate ICT skills, in particular project management and digital security Analyse a range of complex scenarios for decision-making Industry Related / Transferable Skills: Formulate/develop coherent strategies that are holistic in nature and internally congruent in terms of both conceptual and operational requirements of digital marketing assessment and control. Carry out independent study and research in the subject areas of the course Analyse the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas from the perspective of the digital marketing management evaluation Demonstrate how digital marketing could be organised and applied in a business context. Effectively communicate research findings Debate contested issues in the field 2.1 Indicative Content A. Web site traffic analysis and tools B. Web Trends C. Pay-Per-Click Analysis D. E-marketing campaigns analysis and evaluation E. New Product Development process in digital environment F. E-Research and Focus groups G. Security and systems H. Interactive communications with customers and consumers I. Web 2.0. and social network marketing assessment J. Return on web and digital marketing investments K. Marketing and business metrics to evaluate performance of the digital marketing L. Evaluation and financial reporting methods

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M. Strategic, ethical and law considerations in web-marketing N. Critical evaluation of web-marketing impact on overall marketing performance of the organisation 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Methods of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above.

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3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Coursework 80% 50% Examination 20% 50%

Outline details Critical Marketing analysis Open Book

Submission Date

Digital TBC Plan TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment 1 Coursework Students will be expected to develop a critical report on measurement and business feasibility of digital marketing plan for particular company provided by their tutor. They will be expected to present the proposed changes and amendments. Assessment 2 Open Book Examination The open book exam will comprise of a case study response. The case study will be pre-seen by students. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Kaushik, A (2007) Web Analytics: An Hour a Day Sybex

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4.2 Recommended Reading: Chaffey, D (2006) Internet Marketing: Strategy, Implementation and Practice Prentice Hall; 3 edition Chaffey, D and Smith, P. (2008) eMarketing eXcellence, Third Edition: Planning and optimising your digital marketing (Emarketing Essentials) Butterworth-Heinemann; 3 edition Cooper, R. (2001) Winning at New Products: Accelerating the Process from Idea to Launch London - Perseus Books Davis, J. (2006) Marketing Metrics: How to create Accountable Marketing plans that really work USA - John Wiley and Sons (Asia) Hanson, W. and Kalyanam, K. (2006) Internet Marketing and e-Commerce SouthWestern College Pub; 1 edition Krug, S. (2002) Dont make me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability USA - New Rider Lehmann, D. Analysis for Marketing Planning McGraw-Hill/Irwin; 7 edition (2007) Lenskold, J. (2003) Marketing ROI: how to plan, Measure and Optimise strategies for Profit London - McGraw Hill Contemporary McDonald, M., and Wilson, H. (2002) The New Marketing: Drive the Digital Market or It Will Drive You London - Elsevier Mc Grawth, M. (2000) Product Strategy for High Technology Companies - McGraw Hill Education Merrick,D. and Shaw, R. (2005) Marketing Payback: is your Marketing Profitable London - FT Prentice Hall Ryan, D and Jones, C (2009) Understanding Digital Marketing: Marketing Strategies for Engaging the Digital Generation Kogan Page Roberts, ML (2007) Internet Marketing: Integrating Online and Offline Strategies Atomic Dog; 2 edition Trott, P. (Dec 2004) Innovation Management and New Product Development London - FT Prentice Hall Wind, J. (2001) Digital Marketing: Global strategies from the worlds leading experts - USA - John Wiley and Sons Inc Wertime, K and Fenwick, I (2008) DigiMarketing: The Essential Guide to New Media and Digital Marketing Wiley 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Journal of Marketing Campaign European Journal of Marketing Marketing Week The Marketer (CIM) Precision Marketing (Haymarket) International Journal of Marketing Harvard Business Review 4.4 Other Sources:

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Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. www.cim.co.uk www.emarketer.com www.mad.co.uk www.marketingmagazine.co.uk

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PR Management and Corporate Communications


2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: This module aims to provide candidates with an awareness of the role of public relations in relation to the many different publics with which an organisation is concerned and provide an understanding of all means of communication by which those publics can be reached. This module will also provide knowledge of the organisational and professional context in which people working full-time in public relations operate. 1.2 Learning Aims of the Module: To develop the necessary skills, capabilities and competencies to perform public relations management. 1.2.1 Key Aims

PRCC PR Management and Corporate Communications 15, 7 John Bredican Dorota Bourne

Develop a critical appreciation of the relationship between marketing objectives and public relations strategies Evaluate the nature of corporate communications and the public relations management process. Including corporate communications objectives, communication mix and stakeholder analysis Understand the need for effective cross-functional communications within the organisation and how this influences the effectiveness of external communication Analyse various kinds of appeals and media, including their advantages and disadvantages Investigate the relation between corporate image and corporate reputation in various organisations Anticipate opportunities and threats presented by the rapid developments of the Internet and technology Critically evaluate to what extent corporate citizenship is a true response to ethical and environmental dilemmas or a tool for convincing marketing communications. Corporate Social Responsibility. 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module:

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On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge & Understanding Grasp fundamental theoretical concepts in the area of corporate communications management Develop sound understanding of the communication process and its impact on the public opinion and corporate reputation Develop critical awareness of corporate communications approaches and strategies used by a wide range of organisations Research effectively a wide range of sources of information Prioritise and assess secondary data in order to investigate corporate communications issues within a wide range of organisations Demonstrate the skills of using secondary data to illustrate or support arguments in the context of corporate communications decision-making Analyse advantages and limitations of the main corporate communications concepts and be able to apply them to scenarios in current marketing cases Critically analyse and evaluate corporate communications strategies employed by organisations in different contexts Identify management problems in the area of public relations and critically evaluate alternative course of actions dependent on the context of the situation Evaluate best practices as well as corporate communications failures Industry Related / Transferable Skills: Enhance the ability to write analytical PR essays and reports Present information by demonstrating quality and clarity of expression, use of terminology appropriate for the target audience by communicating marketing theories and practice in a coherent way At the end of this module, students will be able to work effectively in teams and have improved interpersonal skills Participate in class discussions and tackling effectively case-studies Demonstrate autonomy by completing individual assignments 2.1 Indicative Content A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. The need for strategic corporate communication: messages and channels Managing the communication process Alignment of marketing, advertising and PR strategies Managing corporate communications planning: approaches to designing PR plans Managing expectations of stakeholders: corporate reputation and corporate social responsibility Managing the PR communications mix for better balance of internal and external communications: The role of PR in crisis management Establishing corporate identity and objectives of corporate communications Technology and the growth of direct marketing and customisation of communications; Managing interface with customers at each point of contact The impact of cultural/ethical, legal, political, and economic variables on corporate communications in the international environment

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2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities The module tutor(s) will aim to combine lectures with tutorial activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the student to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners in maximising their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable students to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Methods of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions led by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. CASE STUDIES: An important learning methodology is the extensive use of case study. They enable learners to apply the concepts that they learn in their subjects. The learners have to study the case, analyse the facts presented and arrive at conclusion and recommendations. This assists in the assessment of the learners ability to apply to the real world the tools and techniques of analysis which they have learnt. The case study serves as a supplement to the theoretical knowledge imparted through the course work. 3.0 Assessment Strategy: 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass Outline details Submission towards final mark Date

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Coursework Examination

grade 80% 20%

50% 50%

Individual Project Open Book

TBC TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment 1 Coursework Students will be required to develop corporate communication plan for the company details of which will be provided in a tutor designed case study. They may select a related conceptual area relevant to their work experience in order to apply the knowledge and understanding gained through the module. Assessment 2 Open Book Examination The examination will consist of a choice of three essay questions from a selection of nine. Assessments 1 and 2 will be designed to ensure all learning outcomes are assessed. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, staff will aim to return marked coursework with individual feedback on student performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process, LSBF will advise a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those students found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Students can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Student Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading Cornelissen JP (2008) Corporate Communication: A Guide to Theory and Practice Sage Publications Ltd; 2nd edition 4.2 Recommended Reading:

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Sernovitz A (2009) Word of Mouth Marketing: How Smart Companies Get People Talking Kaplan Publishing; Revised edition Breakenridge D (2008) PR 2.0: New Media, New Tools, New Audiences FT Press; 1 edition The New Rules of Marketing and PR: How to Use News Releases, Blogs, Podcasting, Viral Marketing and Online Media to Reach Buyers Directly (Paperback) by David Meerman Scott (Author) Davis, A. (2007) Mastering public relations. 2nd revised edition. London, Palgrave. Supplementary reading Bland, M., Theaker, A and Wragg, D. (2005) Effective media relations: how to get results. London, Kogan Page. Foster, J. (2005) Effective writing skills for public relations. London, Kogan Page. 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Financial Times (daily business newspaper) Fortune (monthly business magazine) Business Week (weekly business magazine) Marketing Week (monthly marketing oriented magazine) Journal of Marketing Journal of International Marketing International Marketing Review (MIR) McKinsey Quarterly 4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non-academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments. The Charter Institute of PR http://www.cipr.co.uk Marketing Magazine is now also available at http://www.marketing.haynet.com and includes an archive of Features and Online News. Marketing Online://Internet marketing and e-marketing training : consulting : knowledge http://www.marketing-online.co.uk/ Industry news, views and publications http://www.dragonbrands.com/dart/0001.htm The World's Only FREE Knowledge Database on Business, Advertising, Marketing, Image and the Brand http://www.personako.com/ The Institute for Learning and Research http://www.bized.co.uk Guerrilla Marketing http://gm.clickndrop.com/cnd/newsletter BBC marketing communications news and publications http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2 UK online for business is a DTI-led programme that offers expert, impartial, jargon-free advice, plus information and support on the best use of technology for small and

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medium-sized business (SMEs). Across the UK there are nearly 400 UK online for business Advisers. They are there to help you make the most of technology in your business http://www.ukonlineforbusiness.gov.uk/cms/template/gatewayhome/310294.htm PR activities on the web http://www.number-10.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp Course Unit Title

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International Financial Markets and Institutions


Module Specification
Module title: International Financial Markets and Institution Pre-requisite: None Module Code: Level: Masters Credit: 15 ECTS credit: Excluded Combination: None Module Leader: Ahmed El-Masry Additional Tutor: Marcus Davison

Main Aims of the Module: This will provide an insight into the economic, market and ethical contexts in which financial institutions operate and students will be able to apply general valuation methods to stock, money, bonds (fixed-income securities), foreign exchange and derivatives markets. Main Topics of Study: Financial Markets, their functions, classifications, uses and users Intermediation, transformation and disintermediation How banks differ from other financial services firms National banking systems compared Modern international banking: similarities and differences Ethical and agency problems: moral hazard and adverse selection Differing roles of central banks around the world Risk and return in banking: issues in their identification, measurement, and optimisation Causes and courses of bank failures Case studies: HSBC, Barclays, Goldman Sachs, HBOS and Northern Rock Stock markets, their functions and types and main participants Bonds: markets and instruments Money markets Exchange markets Derivatives markets Cases of misuse of derivatives Stock market crashes

Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of the Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Understand the economic rationale for financial markets and for different types of firms operating within them, with particular reference to commercial and investment banks Analyse and evaluate the different business models for banking firms, as well as the main profit drivers and risks affecting each of them Appreciate the conflicting pressures operating on the strategic management of banking firms and of central banks Understand the rationale for money, bond, and equity markets and how multinationals use them Familiarize participants with modern instruments of hedging

Thinking skills 6. 7. 8. 9. Critically evaluate different business models for banking firms Relate this to the effective strategic management of banks Discuss in context the linkage between current theory and practice of banking Critically evaluate how companies use derivatives to hedge against various types of risk

Subject-based practical skills 10. Demonstrate awareness of different approaches to the implementation of a chosen strategy for a banking firm

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11. Show awareness of different valuation methods commonly used in equity, bond and derivatives markets Skills for life and work (general skills) 12. Present information effectively in written form at an appropriate level including the acknowledgement and referencing of sources and also capability for independent and self-managed learning 13. Contextualise the knowledge, competencies and practical skills from the module and apply this to real world project contexts and activities 14. Communicate effectively using appropriate oral and presentation techniques Cognitive/Intellectual skills Analysis 1 14 Synthesis 6-9 Evaluation 1 - 14 Application 1 - 14

Key /transferable skills Group working + Problem solving 1 - 14 Learning resources 1 - 14 Self Evaluation Management of information 1 - 14 Autonomy Communications

1 - 14

1 - 11

1 - 14

Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: This module will be taught by lectures and seminars and understanding will be reinforced by the completion of individual and group exercises. It will also use case studies, discussions and exercises. Summative assessment methods which will enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Module: Assignment Individual report (Learning outcomes 1-14) TOTAL Students must achieve: an overall average of at least 50% for the whole module, and a mark of at least 40% in each of the individual report, and group report. 100% Weighting:

Reading list for this Module: Core Text and Learning Materials Hefferman, S. (2005) Modern Banking, Wiley Comprehensive Lecture Notes (LN) Solnik, B. and McLeavey, D., 2003, International investments, 5/E, Addison-Wesley. Valdez, S., 2007, An introduction to global financial markets, 5/E, Palgrave. Comprehensive Lecture Notes (LN) 1 - 18 Annual reports and other publications from Investor Relations websites of banks to be studied: Barclays Goldman Sachs HBOS HSBC Northern Rock Blastland, M., and Dilnot, A. (2007) The Tiger That Isnt, Profile

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Golding, T., (2003) The City: Inside the great expectation machine, 2nd ed, FT Prentice Hall Koch, T., and Macdonald, S (2005) Bank Management, 5th ed, South-Western (Thomson Learning) (K&M) Partnoy, F. (2003) Infectious Greed: How deceit and risk corrupted the financial markets, Profile Roberts, R. (2004) The City: A guide to Londons global financial centre, Profile (in association with The Economist) Roberts, R. (2003) Wall Street: The markets, mechanisms and players, Profile (in association with The Economist) Rutterford, J., and Davison, M. (2007) Introduction to Stock Exchange Investment, 3rd ed, Palgrave Vaitilingam, R. (2005) The Financial Times Guide to Using the Financial Pages, 5th ed, FT Prentice Hall Suggested Further Reading

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Campbell, J.Y. and Shiller, R.J., 2001, Valuation ratios and the long run stock market outlook: An update, Cowles Foundation Discussion Paper no. 1295, available at http://cowles.econ.yale.edu/P/cd/d12b/d1295.pdf Eiteman, D.K., Stonehill, A.I. and Moffett, M.H. 2004, Multinational Business Finance, 10/E, Pearson- Addison Wesley. Kidwell, D. Peterson, R., Blackwell, D. and Whidbee, D. 2003, Financial institutions, markets and money, 8/E, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. Madura, J. 2003, Financial markets and institutions, 6/E, Thomson: South-Western Vila, A. and Weeken, O., 2002, Equity valuation measures: What can they tell us, Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin. Also available at www.ssrn.com

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Part Two
Business Research Methods
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: For many learners undertaking academic research and dissertation writing is an entirely new experience involving learning academic writing, conducting rigorous research. A well researched dissertation delivered on time is a critical feature of our Master programme. It is for this reason that the Research Methods module is compulsory. This module will help the learner to acquire key skills and competencies to carry out management research or prepare a dissertation, suitable for the completion of a MBA. The module will address philosophical issues, explore underlying management research and show how to select methods and judge the quality and value of research outcomes. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of the module is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and competencies to carry out a sound academic research project supported by critical understanding of the use and value of research methods and techniques. Through this process, the learner will develop a sense of involvement with the research community that supports academic research and reflective practice. 1.1.1 Key Aims: Analyze critical components of research methods, from design, techniques, values, and methods; Identify research methods for producing empirical data analysis, qualitative research outputs; Demonstrate critical evaluation of a research proposal and appreciate the limitations of research; Evaluate the quality of research designs when commissioning research; Work towards and complete a successful Master level research project. At the end of the module, learners will have mastered a range of methods and techniques and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical

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foundations, range of relevance, applicability and limitations. 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge and Understanding: Planning the research dissertation and process; How to analyze qualitative and qualitative data; The research process; A specific area of knowledge specified in their dissertation project. Analyse case study information to determine the alignment; Distinguish between perspective and emergent strategies; Analyse the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas within the organization for strategy formulation. Industry Related / Transferable Skills: In addition to this knowledge, you will have the opportunity to apply it in the form of practical research methods workshops. Through these, you will acquire skills in survey design; statistical analysis; marketing research; fieldwork investigation; information-gathering techniques and the basic research techniques you will need to carry out your final dissertation/research project. Be able to conduct a companys research project Carry out independent study and research in the subject areas of the course Effectively present the results of learning in writing, through presentations and informal explanations Debate contested issues in the field Analyze case study information to determine the alignment Distinguish between perspective and emergent strategies Analyze the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas within the organization for strategy formulation 2.1 Indicative Content

A. The need for research into businesses: reasons for researching businesses;
history and development; research philosophy; politics of research; ethical issues, anonymity and confidentiality. B. Research Issues: definition of problems; facts and theories; choosing the topic; analogies and project generation; concepts, hypotheses; propositions and theories; ways of observing and knowing; social constructionist and phenomenological approaches; static and dynamic research; qualitative and

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quantitative approaches.

C. Research structure Identification; research issues and scooping research;


literature search and review; conceptual mapping; relationship between concepts; alternative conventions; relevance trees. D. Methodology and data generation; experimental and quasi experimental methods; case studies, surveys; ethnography; sampling frames; research design questions; constructing questionnaires, interviewing and fieldwork; recording data; document analysis repertory grid; group techniques; focus groups; and brainstorming. E. Data analysis; quantitative analysis and explanation generation; assessing the power and limitations of quantitative analysis; qualitative analysis of phenomena; analytical technique and strategies; validity in qualitative interpretations. 2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: The module leader will aim to combine lectures with seminar activities. This environment will provide opportunities for the learner to understand the course material through case study and text and to apply it in a practical way. The intent is to facilitate interactive class activities, and discussion about the significant role of research in a global and local business environment. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: LECTURES: will be developed around the key concepts as mentioned in the indicative course content and will use a range of live examples and cases from business practice to demonstrate the application of theoretical concepts. This method is primarily used to identify and explain key aspects of the subject so that learners can utilize their private study time more effectively. SEMINARS: These act as additional complements to the lectures. The seminars are designed to give learners an opportunity to test their understanding of the material covered in the lectures and private study with the help of reference books. This methodology usually carries a set of questions identified in advance. Seminars are interactive sessions conducted by the learners. This method of study gives the learner an excellent opportunity to clarify any points of difficulty with the tutor and simultaneously develop their oral communication skills. 3.0 Assessment 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes

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identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Individual 30% 50% Presentation Individual Assignment (dissertation proposal) 70% 50% Outline details Submission Date

Individual TBC presentation on the proposal assignment. 2500 words TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment One: Individual Presentation This assessment accounts for 30% of the total marks for this module and is based on a 20 minute presentation of the research proposal this will include the hypothesis, rationale, methods and limitations. Learners will have the opportunity to discuss the presentation, and ensure that they understand what is required, during seminars. The presentation will last no longer than 15 minutes, with a further five minutes for questions. Learners will receive feedback from the module leader to further develop their written assignment. Assessment Two: Dissertation Proposal This is the second assessment for this module, which accounts for 70% of the total marks. Learners are required to write a 2500 word proposal which highlights what they intend to conduct their research on. The contents of the report should include: A: A contents page. B: An Executive Summary. C: An Introduction to the subject being researched plus the objectives of said research. D: A short literature review. E: A methodology and research design F: An implementation plan with dates for beginning and concluding their dissertation. G: Conclusions. H: Recommendations. I: References and bibliography (Harvard formatted) J: Appendix (where necessary) Further details of assessment criteria are available in the Study Guide for this module. This assessment will be graded on the individual performance for the entire period of

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the module. The module leader will keep records of attendance and formative assessment comments. The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading: Saunders, M. Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2009), Research Methods for Business Students, 5th ed. Harlow: Financial Times/Prentice Hall. ISBN 10: 0273716867 4.2 Recommended Reading: Anderson, J. and Poole, M. (2001) Assignment and Thesis Writing, 4th ed. John Wiley & Sons, Milton. Berry, Ralph (2000) The Research Project: How to Write It 4th ed. London: Routledge Bryman, A. (2004) Social Research Methods, 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Flick, U. (2002). An Introduction to Qualitative Research, London: Sage. Gomm, R., Hammersley, M. and Foster, P. (2000) (eds), Case Study Methods, London: Sage Publications. Hart C. (2004), Doing Your Masters Dissertation, London: Sage. Levin, P. (2004) Write Great Essays, Open University, England. Yin, R. (2003) Case study research: design and methods, 3rd ed. London: Sage Publications. Silverman, D. (2000) Doing Qualitative Research. A Practical Handbook. London: Sage. Swetnam, D. (2000), Writing Your Dissertation: 3rd ed. Oxford: How to Books.

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4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Journal of Leadership Quarterly Journal of Entrepreneurship and Regional Development Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development

4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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MODULE DESCRIPTION (MSc in Marketing TAUGHT)

Dissertation
2009 Module Code: Module Title: Credit Value & Level: Module Leader: Program Director
1.0 Introduction: This module is a culmination of all the study effort required by previous modules. Dissertation module will require from student to demonstrate analytical and research skills as well as critical reflection on the material learned along the course. Dissertation module is supported by Business Research Module and ongoing academic support by academic supervisor. 1.1 Learning Aims of the Module: The aim of the module is to put in practice the knowledge, skills, and competencies to carry out a sound academic research project supported by critical understanding of the use and value of research methods and techniques acquired during previous modules. Through this process, the learner will develop a sense of involvement with the research community that supports academic research and reflective practice. 1.1.1 Key Aims: Undertake independent research work Produce a dissertation thesis or project report (15,000 to 20,000 words) Identify research methods for producing empirical data analysis, qualitative research outputs; Demonstrate critical evaluation of a research proposal and appreciate the limitations of research; Evaluate the quality of research designs when commissioning research; Work towards and complete a successful Master level research project. At the end of the module, learners will have mastered a range of methods and techniques and have a clear appreciation of their theoretical and empirical foundations, range of relevance, applicability and limitations. 2.0 Learning Outcomes of the Module: On successful completion of the module the learner will have: Knowledge and Understanding:

DS Dissertation 40, 7 Geoff Payne Dorota Bourne

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Planning the research dissertation and process; How to analyze qualitative and qualitative data; The research process; A specific area of knowledge specified in their dissertation project. Analyse case study information to determine the alignment; Distinguish between perspective and emergent strategies; Analyse the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas within the organization for strategy formulation. Industry Related / Transferable Skills: In addition to this knowledge, you will have the opportunity to apply it in the form of practical research methods workshops. Through these, you will acquire skills in survey design; statistical analysis; marketing research; fieldwork investigation; information-gathering techniques and the basic research techniques you will need to carry out your final dissertation/research project. Be able to conduct a companys research project Carry out independent study and research in the subject areas of the course Effectively present the results of learning in writing, through presentations and informal explanations Debate contested issues in the field Analyse case study information to determine the alignment Distinguish between perspective and emergent strategies Analyse the environment, market, competitors, customers and other functional areas within the organization for strategy formulation 2.1 Indicative Content

A. The need for research into businesses: reasons for researching businesses; B.
history and development; research philosophy; politics of research; ethical issues, anonymity and confidentiality. Research Issues: definition of problems; facts and theories; choosing the topic; analogies and project generation; concepts, hypotheses; propositions and theories; ways of observing and knowing; social constructionist and phenomenological approaches; static and dynamic research; qualitative and quantitative approaches. Research structure Identification; research issues and scooping research; literature search and review; conceptual mapping; relationship between concepts; alternative conventions; relevance trees. Methodology and data generation; experimental and quasi experimental methods; case studies, surveys; ethnography; sampling frames; research design questions; constructing questionnaires, interviewing and fieldwork; recording data; document analysis repertory grid; group techniques; focus groups; and brainstorming. Data analysis; quantitative analysis and explanation generation; assessing the power and limitations of quantitative analysis; qualitative analysis of phenomena; analytical technique and strategies; validity in qualitative interpretations.

C. D.

E.

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2.2 Teaching and Learning Activities: Academic coaching delivered by Dissertation Supervisor on one-to-one basis. 2.3 Teaching Ethos: The colleges approach towards teaching and learning is simple and effective. The main aim of LSBF is to assist learners to maximize their potential by ensuring that they are taught clearly and effectively. This will enable learners to engage with the learning environment and promote success in both their academic studies and subsequent career. 2.3.1 Modes of Delivery: One-to-one review and feedback sessions. 3.0 Assessment 3.1 Skills Assessment The skills related to the module will be assessed as part of the learning outcomes identified above. 3.2 Methods of Assessment: Assessment Title Weight Pass towards final mark grade Individual 100% 50% Assignment (masters dissertation) Outline details 15 000 words Submission Date TBC

The pass mark is 50% of total marks and 40% is minimum threshold for each assessment. Assessment: Masters Dissertation Assessment and marking criteria include (but not exhaustively) Feasible aims and viable objectives identified Ethical, environmental and professional values considered Justification of selection of research method and instrument Evidence of significant critical analysis Demonstration that research design or problem/project approach is informed by theory and practice Presentation of written material at Masters level of scholarship

The contents of the dissertation should include: A: A contents page.

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B: An Executive Summary. C: An Introduction to the subject being researched plus the objectives of said research. D: A short literature review. E: A methodology and research design F: An implementation plan with dates for beginning and concluding their dissertation. G: Conclusions. H: Recommendations. I: References and bibliography (Harvard formatted) J: Appendix (where necessary) Further details of assessment criteria are available in the Study Guide for this module. This assessment will be graded on the individual performance for the entire period of the module. The module leader will keep records of attendance and formative assessment comments. The module will be assessed jointly by the above two forms of assessment against the designated learning outcomes. Feedback Policy: Wherever possible, marked coursework with individual feedback on a learners performance within fifteen working days of submission. If there is a delay in the marking process the college will let you know why and give you a new anticipated return date. 3.3 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another persons work (published or unpublished) without clearly acknowledging it. Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be unfair practice and is strictly forbidden. Those learners found guilty of plagiarism will fail the assignment. Learners can re-submit the assignment but the re-submitted assignments mark will be capped at the pass mark only. 4.0 Source Material: As well as your Study Guide for this module you are expected to make full use of the following sources; 4.1 Core Reading: Saunders, M. Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2009), Research Methods for Business Students, 5th ed. Harlow: Financial Times/Prentice Hall. ISBN 10: 0273716867 4.2 Recommended Reading: Anderson, J. and Poole, M. (2001) Assignment and Thesis Writing, 4th ed. John Wiley & Sons, Milton.

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Berry, Ralph (2000) The Research Project: How to Write It 4th ed. London: Routledge Bryman, A. (2004) Social Research Methods, 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Flick, U. (2002). An Introduction to Qualitative Research, London: Sage. Gomm, R., Hammersley, M. and Foster, P. (2000) (eds), Case Study Methods, London: Sage Publications. Hart C. (2004), Doing Your Masters Dissertation, London: Sage. Levin, P. (2004) Write Great Essays, Open University, England. Yin, R. (2003) Case study research: design and methods, 3rd ed. London: Sage Publications. Silverman, D. (2000) Doing Qualitative Research. A Practical Handbook. London: Sage. Swetnam, D. (2000), Writing Your Dissertation: 3rd ed. Oxford: How to Books. 4.3 Journals & Newspaper: Journal of Leadership Quarterly Journal of Entrepreneurship and Regional Development Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development

4.4 Other Sources: Relevant information is available from non academic sources on the internet. Great care must be taken as internet content is published for marketing purposes. Most of the web sites are of consulting companies and commercial training providers hence often present a one sided view of a subject and the content may not be supported by real facts. Little or no credit is given if such material is used as evidence, without support from academic sources. Students are given credit for using a wide range of academic sources in their assignments.

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