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Lesson Plan Outline

\ Teacher: Burton Class:Calc Date: Period:


DOL: Attitudes & Perceptions

Objective: Students will be able to define and find limits by looking at the graph of a function.

Warm Up: Trig Quiz unit circle, identities, solving

Acquire & Integrate Knowledge

Activities: 1. Grouping Activity students will get into groups of 3 - 4 2. Discovering Limits group work 3. Notes intro to limits by graphing 4. Think-Pair-Share solving limits by graphing worksheet

Extend & Refine Knowledge

Use knowledge meaningfully

Productive Habits of Mind

READING STRATEGIES: Word Wall

Closure: Assign HW

Reflection:

Notes Intro to limits Importance of Limits: 1. Limits allow us to work with _______________________that we didnt have the ________________ to consider previously EX: functions with ______________________________ functions that ______________________________ these are the most important functions for modern applications of mathematics.

2. Limits allow us to work more effectively with the _____________________________________ ____________________________________________________. 3. The _________________________________________ is built on limits. All calculus _______________________ and the definitions of derivatives and integrals use limits (if just implicitly). Motivating Example 1: f(x) =

What are the values for y when x=0, 1, -1, -2?

What is interesting about the graph?

Where are the discontinuities?

Intuitive definition of Limit (version 1):

Left- and right-sided limit notation and limits involving infinity. Revisiting Example 1:

Evaluate lim a. x 1+ f ( x) lim b. x 1 f ( x ) c. xlim f ( x) 0+ lim d. x 0 f ( x ) e. lim f ( x) x 1 f. lim f ( x) x0

g. f (0)

h. f (1)

i. xlim+ f ( x ) 1 j. xlim f ( x ) 1 k. f (1) l. lim f ( x ) x

Important Note involving right- and left-sided limits:

lim f ( x) = L if and only if ________________ and _______________ x a


Intuitive Definition of Limit (version 2, from Stewart):

Reasons that Limits Fail to Exist at a Point:

Summary and extension: Whether or not a the limit of a function exists at a point, c , has __________ to do with whether or not ___________ exists. In other words, limits can _______________ holes in the function.

Practice: p. 79 #1 15 odd

Notes Intro to limits Importance of Limits: 1. Limits allow us to work with TOOLS FUNCTIONS that we didnt have the

to consider previously

EX: functions with DISCONTINUITIES functions that BLOW UP (GO TO INFINITY)

these are the most important functions for modern applications of mathematics.

2. Limits allow us to work more effectively with the IMPOSSIBLY LARGE AND SMALL VALUES THAT OCCUR IN THESE FUNCTIONS. 3. The FOUNDATION OF CALCULUS is built on limits. All calculus THEOREMS implicitly). Motivating Example 1: f(x) = and the definitions of derivatives and integrals use limits (if just

What are the values for y when x=0, 1, -1, -2?

What is interesting about the graph?

Where are the discontinuities?

Intuitive definition of Limit (version 1):

The limit of a function is the value that the function gets arbitrarily close to as x gets arbitrarily close to some number. In other words, when x gets close to some number (x0), then y gets close to some number (L). We call L the limit.
Left- and right-sided limit notation and limits involving infinity.
x 1+

lim f ( x) means
x 1

we look at f(x) from the RIGHT of x = 1.

lim f ( x) means we look at f(x) from the LEFT of x = 1.

Revisiting Example 1:

Evaluate lim a. x 1+ f ( x) lim b. x 1 f ( x ) c. xlim f ( x) 0+ lim d. x 0 f ( x ) e. lim f ( x) x 1

g. f (0) h. f (1) i. xlim+ f ( x ) 1 j. xlim f ( x ) 1 k. f (1)

f. lim f ( x) x0

l. lim f ( x ) x

Important Note involving right- and left-sided limits:

lim f ( x) = L if and only if lim+ f ( x) = L and lim f ( x) = L x a x a x a

Reasons that Limits Fail to Exist at a Point (keep in mind the example):

Summary and extension: Whether or not a the limit of a function exists at a point, c , has NOTHING to do with whether or not

f(c) exists. In other words, limits can IGNORE holes in the function.

Homework: Stewart, pages 7981, numbers 410, 13 Go over left- and right-sided limit notation and limits involving infinity. Important Note: lim f ( x) = L if and only if lim+ f ( x) = L and lim f ( x ) = L
x a x a x a

Group Practice: from Anton, exercise set 2.1. Students should write the important note at the top. Intuitive Definition of Limit (version 2, from Stewart):

We write values of

lim f ( x) = L and say the limit of x a

f ( x)

arbitrarily close to

(on either side of

a ).

f ( x) as x approaches a , equals L if we can make the L (as close to L as we like) by taking x to be sufficiently close to a

Brainstorm Reasons that Limits Fail to Exist at a Point: The one-sided limits arent equal to the same limit at that point. The function becomes infinite at that point (more on this later). The function oscillates wildly at that point (more on this later). Summary: Whether or not a the limit of a function exists at a point, c , has nothing to do with whether or not f (c) exists. In other words, limits can ignore holes in the function. Homework: Stewart, pages 7981, numbers 410, 13