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A LITTIE TREASURY

OF

Ijifl^

I n\it*

/>V///W/

\hiri i

The

Little

Treasury Series

OSCAR WILLIAMS, Editor

A LITTLE TREASURY OF MODERN POETRY *


edited by Oscar Williams

A LITTLE TREASURY OF GREAT POETRY


edited by Oscar Williams

LITTLE TREASURY OF AMERICAN POETRY


edited by Oscar Williams

**

LITTLE TREASURY OF BRITISH POETRY


edited by Oscar Williams

A LITTLE TREASURY OF AMERICAN


edited by George Maybernj

PROSE

A LITTLE TREASURY OF LOVE POEMS


edited by John

Holmes

A LITTLE TREASURY OF WORLD POETRY


edited by Hubert Crcekmore
* Available
in

Itemed Editions

e7,*w**W)*

Coi-utunrr, 1051, BY

CHARLES SCIUBXKH'S
Printed

.SONS
America

the United States

<>i

Most

of the

poems

in Fart II of this

anthology

arc protected by copyright, and may wot be reproduced in any form without the consent ol

the poets, their publishers, or their agents. Since


this

pugc cannot

legibly

accommodate

all

the

copyright notices, the opposite page and the two pages following it (pages v to vii) con
stitute

an extension of the copyright page.


JDJLMJ.oJllIJ

COPYRIGHT NOTICES

AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
"'
'

\,\] \ V
Thanks

'

V
'

are due the following poets, their copyright owners and their publishers for permission to reprint certain poems in this anthology:

JONATHAN CAPE LiMiTEi>(and Mrs. W. H. Davies) for the poems by W. H. Davies from Collected Poems', for the poems from A Map of Verona by Henry Reed CHATTO & WINDUS -for the poems by Wilfred Owen; for the poems by Peter Quennell; for "Legal Fiction" and "Letter I" by William Empson. CLARENDON PRESS for poems by Robert Bridges from the Poems in Classical Prosody of Robert Bridges, from October and Other Poems of Robert Bridges, from New Verse of Robert Bridges, from New Poems of Robert Bridges, all by pci mission of the Clarendon Press, Oxford. JOHN DAY COMPANY- for the poems from Selected Verse by John Mani fold, copyright, 1946, by The John Day Company. DIAL PRESS- for the poems reprinted from Adamastor, Poems, by Roy Campbell by permission of the Dial Press, Inc., copyright, 1931, by
the Dial Press, Inc. DODD, MEAD & COMPANY for the poems from The Collected Poems of Rupert Brooke, copyright, 1915, by Dodd, Mead & Company, Inc,, copyright, 1943, by Edward Marsh, reprinted by permission of Dodd, Mead & Co, DOUBLEDAY & COMPANY for the poems from Aegean Islands and Other Poems by Bernard Spencer, copyright, 1946, by Bernard Spencer, re for the poems printed by permission of Doubleday & Company, Inc by Eudyard Kipling from Departmental Ditties and Ballads and Barrack- Room Ballads by Rudyard Kipling, from The Seven Seas by
;

Rudyard Kipling, from The Jungle, Book by Rudyard Kipling,, from The Five Nations by Rudyard Kipling, all repiinted by permission of Mrs. George Bambiidge and Doubleday & Company, Inc. FABBR & FADER LIMITED for the poems from Collected Poems by T. S. Eliot; for "The Dry Salvages" from Four Quartets by T. S. Eliot; for the poem from A Private Country by Lawrence Durrell; for "Agamemnon's Tomb" from Giant Art by Sacheverell Sitwell; for the poems by George Barker from News of the World by George Barker and Sros in Dogma by George Barker; for the poems from The Lady with the Unicorn by Vernon Watkms; for the poems from The Gathering jStorm by William Empson; for the poems by Edwin Muir from The "Voyage and The Labyrinth by Edwin Muir and from A Little Book of Modern Verse edited by Anne Ridler. THE FORTUNE PRESS for four poems by Dylan Thomas from 18 Poems by Dylan Thomas. HARCOURT, BRACE & COMPANY for the poems by T. S. Eliot from Col lected Poems 1909-1935 by T. S. Eliot, copyright, 1936, by Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc.; for "The Dry Salvages" from four Quar 1943, by T. S. Eliot, reprinted by permission of tets, copyright, Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc. for the poems by William Emp son from Collected Poems, copyright, 1935, 1940, 1949, by William Empson, reprinted by permission of Harcourt, Brace and Company, for the poems by Henry Reed from A Map of Verona, copy Inc. right, 1947, by Henry Reed, reprinted by permission of Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc. for the poem from A World Within a War,
;

and Company

'

HOGARTH PRESS, LiMiMP-for


Fuller,

''Spring "TO8'

ll

"il Dra*liKI

book by Roy

publisl^T^ByeiMojaHt^BBMg.

COPYRIGHT NOTICES AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


& COMPANY- for the poems by Walter do la Male from Collected Poems, 1901-1918, by Waller de la Mare, copyright, 1920, by Henry Holt and Company, Inc., copyright, 1948, by Walter do la JMare, used by permission of the publishers; for three poems by A. K. Ilousman from The Collected Poems of A. E. lions man, copyright, 1922, 1940, by Henry Holt and Company, Inc., copyright, 11)36, 1950, by Barclays Bank, Ltd., used by permission ol the publishers. Au'RKi) A. KNOW for three poems by I). II. Lawrence reprinted trom /Vmsfcs by I), H. Lawrence, by pcnmssion of Alfred A. Knopi, Inc., copyright, 1929, by Alfred A. Knopt, Inc. THE MACMHJUAN COMPANY- -for the selections by Thomas Hardy trom Collected Poems by Thomas Hardy, copyright, 1925, by The Macmillan Company, and used with their permission; for the selections by William Butler Yeats from Collected P or ins by William Butler Yeats, copyright, 1933, by The Maemillan Company, and used with their permission lor the selections by William Butler Yeats from Last, Poems by William Butler Yeats, copyright, 1940, by Georgia Yeats, and used with the permission of The Maemillan Company; i<r the selections by John Masefield from Poems Complete Edition, by John Masefield, copyright, 1913, by Haipor and Brothers, copyright, 1914, by The Century Company and by the McClure Publications, copyright, 1912, 1913, 1914, by The Maemillan Company, copyright, 1915, 1923, 1924, 1926, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1935, 1940, and 11)41, by John Masofield, from Collected Poems by John Masefiehl, copyright, 1918, by John Masefield, and usod with the permission of The Maemillan Company; for the selections by George Barker, from Selected Poems by George Barker, copyright, 1941, by Tho Maemiilim Company and used with their permission;; for the selection from Collected Poems by James Stephens, copyright, 1926, by Tho Maemillan Company and
HKNIIY HOLT
t

used with their permission; for the selection from The (fa ft of Brightness by F. R. Hig^ms, copyright, 1940, by The Maemillan Com pany and used with their permission; for the selections from Poems by Ralph Hodgson, copyright, 1945, by The Maemillan Company, and used with their permission. HAROLD MATOONfor the four poems by C. pay Lewis. MRS. ALIDA, MONRO for the two poems (from Collected Poems) by

Harold Monro.
FREDERICK LIMITED for the selection from The, Hoy With a Cart by Christopher Fry. NKW DIRECTIONS- for six poems by Dylan Thomas from Selected Writ

Mum

ings by Dylan Thomas, copyright, 1946, by Now Directioiw, QXFQRP UNIVERSITY PREKB, London for the selections by Gerard Manley Hopkins from The, Collected Poems of (Gerard Mantey Hopkins by permission of Oxford University Press, London. F. T. PRiNCB-for his poem "Holdiem Bathing" from New Pnem* M44, edited by Oscar Williams, copyright, 1944, by Oscar Williams, KATHLEKN RAINK for two poems, from titonc and JPlmwr by Kathleen

Raino.

RANDOM HOXJSR -for the selections by W. II. Auden from (Collected Poetry of W. H. Auden, copyright, 1945, by W, IL Auden; for iho selections from Another Time by W. H, Audon, copyright, 15)40, by W, IL Auden; for ilia selections by Stephen Hpender from Pocms copyright, 1934^ by Modern Library. Inc.; for the neluctionH fniiu Ruvn* and VISLOHB by Stephen Spender, copyright, 1042, by Htephen Spender; for the selections by Robert Graven from Collected Poem* by Robert Graves, reprinted by permission of Random llouwe, Inc, for the selections by Louis MacNcuu* front Poems WM ti)40, copyright, 1940, by Louis MucNoico, and from^prm^^oarc/, copyright, 1945, by Random House,, Inc., all by permission of Random lfoue, Ine. W. R. RODOKRH for the poems by W, tt. Hodgers from Awake! and Other Wartime Potxms, copyright, 1942, by W. U* RotlgWH, publinhed by Uarcourt Brace and (Company; from Ne>w Poems, 19$ t edit<d }t
t ;

Oscar Williams, copyright,

1943,

by OHCOT

VI

COPYRIGHT NOTICES AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


& REGAN PAUL LIMITED for the selections from Under the by GeoUrey Gngson, Shadows of Chrysanthemums by Miss E. J. Man by Julian Symons, Time to Mourn by D. S. Savage and The Collected Poems of Sidney Kcyes. CHARLES SCUWNEU'B SONS for the elections by A. E. Housman reprinted from My Brother, A. E, H. by Laurence Housman, copyright, 1938, by Laurence Housman., used by pel mission of the publishers, Charles
ROUTLEDGE
Cliff

Scovdl, The Second

Scribner's Sons. SOCIETY OF AUTHORS for selections by A. E, Housman by permission of The Society ot Authors as the Literary Representative of the Trustees of the Estate of the late A. E. Housman, and Messrs. Jonathan Cape, Ltd., publishers of A. E, Housman's Collected Poems. DYLAN THOMAS for five poems (exclusive of those poems acknowledged to The Fortune Press, Ann Watkins, Inc. and New Directions) fiom from The The of Love, published by J. M. Dent & Son, Ltd Atlantic Monthly, copyright, 1947, and copyright, 1951, by The Atlantic Monthly Company, and from The Hudson Review, copyright, 1950 by The Hudson Review, Inc. (The poem, In the White Oiant's Thigh, was revised in 1951 by Mr. Thomas, and appeared for the first time America in The Atlantic Monthly.) MRS. HELEN THOMAS for the poems by Edward Thomas. HENRY TBEKCB for hi two poems.

THE

Map

THE VIKING Pnsssfor

the selections from Last Poems by D. H. foi the selections 1933, by Frieda Lawrence Poems by D. H. Lawrence, copyright, 1929, by Jona from Collected than Cape and Harrison Hmith; for the selections from The Song of Lazarus by Alex Comfort, copyright, 1945, by Alex Comfort; for the selection from Finnvyans Wake by James Joyce, copyright, 1939, by JniucH Joyce, all reprinted by permission of The Viking Press, Inc.,

Lawrence, copyrighted,

New

York.
for

VEENON WATKINH

"Music

of Colours:

The Blossom Scattered" from

WATKINH, INC. for four poems (by Dylan Thomas) from IB Poems by Dylan Thomas, published by The Fortune Press. A. P. WATT & SON (and Mrs. George Bambndgo and The Macmillan Company of Canada) for the selections by Rudyard Kipling fiom ttarrack-lioom Ballads, The Seven Seas, The Second Jungle Book and The Five Nations for the poems by Robert Graves from Poems 10381946 by Robert Graves, published by Creative Age Press, copyright, 1946, by Robert Graves; ior "Homage to Texas" by Robert Graves, from The New Yorker, copyright, 1950, by The Yorker Magazine, Inc. and from Poems and Satirett, 1 9 fit by Robert Graves. OHCAR WILUAMH- for the poem "Klegy V" by George Barker, from New Poems 1043 edited by Oscar Williams, copyright, 1943, by Oscar

Poetry (Chicago).

ANN

Williams.

vii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS FOR PORTRAITS AND PHOTOGRAPHS


John Donne, from Miniature by Isaac Oliver. Andrew Marvell, from portrait bij Adrian Hannemann in I? arena Art Gallery, Hull Edmund Spenser, from Portrait at Pembroke College, Richard Lovelace, from portrait at Dulwick College.
John Wilmot, Earl
tlie

Huysnwns

Sir Walter John Dry den, by unknown artist, Bodleian Library. Sir Philip Sidney, from the original by Sir. Ant. More. William Blake, from oil painting by Phillips. John Milton, from a print; by Faithorne. Emily Bronte, by "Branwdl Bronte. Robert Ilerrick, from a print by Marshall. Christina Georgina Rosaetti, by D. G. Rowetti. Lewis Carroll, portrait by Hcrkomer, Christ Church, Oxford Thomas Moore, from painting In/ Sir T. Lawrence, P.R.A.

of Rochester, from portrait Inj Jacob in the National Portrait Gallery. Ralegh, portrait in National Portrait Gallery.

Algernon Charles Swinburne,


Sir

Elliott 6- Pry,

Fry. Thompson, John Clare, portrait by W. Hilton, National Portrait Gallery Thomas Lovell Beddoes, from portrait by N. C. Branwhite, George Meredith, photograph by J. Thomson. William Butler Yeats from a charcoal drawing by John S Sargent, H,A James Stephens, Lafayette, Dublin, John Maaefield, Gillman and Soame. W. H. Dames, portrait by Harold Knight. Herbert Read, photograph by Charles Leirons. Vernon Watkins, portrait by Alfred /anew, photograph by

S. Gilbert, Elliot 6* Fry. Elliot 6Francis

W.

Tal Williams.
F. H. Iliggins, photograph by Bachrach, Wilfred Given, from frontispiece in his first book of poems, published by Chatto 6- Windus in 1920,

Rupert Brooke, from a photograph by Sherril Schett. Dylan Thomas, portrait by Gene DerwoocL Robert Bridgesf photograph by Bachrach*

VIM

C ontents
See ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF AUTHORS

&

TITLES, 859 TO 874


xi

INTRODUCTION

Part

I:

The Chef
Ballads ...
6-

Poets,
3
Sir

1500

to

1QOO
203 203 205 211 213 217 225 232 238

Anonymous: Anonymous: Songs


Lyrics
Sir

Thomas More Sir Thomas Wijatt Henry Howard, Earl


Surrey
Sir Philip Sidney Fulke Grevilte, Lord Sir

17 31

John William Richard Richard

Suckling
Gartright

Crashaw
Lovelace

33
of

35 38

Abraham Cowlcy Andrew Marvell Henry Vaughan Thomas Traherne John Dry den
John Wilmot, Earl of
Rochester

Brooke Walter Ralegh

Sir

Edward Dyer
Spenser

Edmund

45 50 56 58

65 66 Chidiock Tichborne 67 Robert Southwell 69 Samuel Daniel 70 Michael Drat/ton Christopher 'Marlowe ..71 William Shakespeare ... 74 112 Thomas Nashe 112 Thomas Campion 114 Sir Henry Wotton 115 Sir John Dames 116 Ben Jonson 124 John Donne 150 John Webster 151 Richard Corbet 152 George Wither 154 Robert Ilerrick 159 George Herbert 168 James Shirley 169 Thomas Carew 170 Edmund Waller 171 John Milton

Thomas Lodge

247 250 251 John Gay 253 Alexander Pope 258 Thomas Gray William Collins 266 268 Christopher Smart 272 Oliver Goldsmith 274 William Cowper Thomas Chatterton ....276 281 William Blake 294 Robert Burns .304 William Wordsworth Samuel Taylor Coleridge 328

Matthew

Prior

Walter Savage Landor. .353

Thomas Campbell Thomas Moore


George Gordon, Lord Byron Percy Bysshe Shelley John Clare John Keats George Darley

354 355
357
.
.

.368

Thomas Hood
William Barnes

377 380 395 396 400 IX

CONTENTS
Thomas Edward
Lovcll

BcddocsAOO
. . .

.404 Alfred* Lord Tennyson. .416


Pitzgcrald
ElizabctJi Barrett

George Meredith Lewis Carroll James Thomson William Morris


Sir

Browning
Robert Browning Edward Lear

.439

W.

S. Gilbert

464 467 473 478 480


.486

Emily Bronte
Arthur Hugh Clough Matthew Arnold
.
.

440 451 453


.456

Algernon Charles Swinburne


Alice Mcijncll W. E. Henley

457

Oscar Wilde
.

495 497 497

Dante Gabriel
Rcmctti

Rossetti. .459

Christina Georgina

463

Francis Thompson . . , .499 Lionel Johnson 504 Ernest Dowson ...... .506

Part

II:

The Chief Poets, 1QOO


.

to

1QSO
729 733 736 737
,743

509 Gerard Manic}/ Hopkins 529 Robert Bridges 550 561 John Davidson A. E. Ihmsman 564 William Butler Yeats ,575 611 Rudyard Kipling W. Jf. Dories 622 624 Ralph Hodgson Walter deh Marc 631 Harold Monro 634 James Stephens ....... 637 639 James Joyce . D. If. Lawrence 64 654 John Mascfield 667 Rupert Brooke Edwin Muir 671
. .

Thomas Hardy

C. Day Leivis Peter Quenndl

Geoffrey Grigson

William

Enwwn

Vernon Watkins

W. IL Audcn
Louis MacNcice
Christopher Fry
JS. /.

Scovell /.
. ,

Kathleen Raine

748 767 775 776 777


, .

. ,

Edward Thomas
T. S. Eliot

.676

Wilfred Owen Herbert Read Robert Grawx

F. R. Biggins SacJwverctt Sltwctt

Roy Campbell

679 702 710 712 720 721 728

Stephen Spender ..... .778 Bernard Spencer ,784 W. H, jRw/gm...786 Lawrence Durrcll .... .794 796 Roy Fuller ... 798 Henry T recce 799 Julian Si/mons F. T. Prince 800 803 George Barker Dylan Thomas ....... .815 843 Henry Reed 850 John Manifold D. 5, Sewage 852 Alex Comfort ..853 854 Sidney Keycs
. ,
,

PORTRAITS

of the

POETS
and TITLES

INDEX

of

AUTHORS

opposite 858

859

Introduction

there are so

anthology of British poetry when ones already available might seem presumptuous if the new collection did not present a new point of view or perform a new function. The
offer another

To

many good

body

of English poetry

is

so massive

and the

outlines of

its brilliant

past have been made

so clear

by
it

choice and pruning of countless

critics of all

the repeated periods, that

new

discoveries or
It is

new judgments about

cannot well

hope that this anthology will offer the reader a new perspective by showing the natural cul mination of the tradition, that is, modern British poetry,

be made,

my

in its organic relationship with its past Anthologies have, for many people, a cachet of final
ity

and are often

read, especially

by the young,

in a

fashion that raises receptivity to a maximum, so that the general air of the book seems inevitably the only air in which poetry can breathe its life and be read. The

power

of the great poems presented carries its authority over into the plan of the book itself. Thus, for many of

us, the first

important anthology which we cherished, which made us drunk with poetry, becomes our uncon scious criterion forever. In such a manner, The Golden Treasury, The Oxford Book of English Verse and The Faber Book of Modern Verse have determined, rather than influenced, the taste of whole generations. It is fortunate that only good anthologies have such force, and that, on the whole, the basis of taste so established is solid even if limited in area. But a certain injustice is worked by the very authority which exists only be cause it is justified. This injustice has, in the main, been
suffered

by contemporary

poetry, for obvious reasons,

A
such as the
the great
to

Little

Treasury of British Poetry

difficulty of anticipating the verdicts of time,

of contemporary poems that would be read by the editor and the fact that they are hard to find whether in manuscript or printed in obscure periodicals and unrecognized books, etc.

number

need

The Gold&n Treasury barred from its pages all con temporary poetry as well as the kinds of poetry that another taste than its editor's would certainly have in
cluded.

The Oxford Book

to correct this error,

welcome

of English Verse, in its attempt so half-hearted a gesture of to 'modern' poetry that a naive reader of its

made

pages could get only an impression of the feebleness, in


quantitative productiveness at least, of his own time, in contrast to the robust fecundity of the past. The editors
of other general anthologies (including the

ones of the

last

decade) also seem

to

many good have been dazzled


so that,
if

into a kind of paralysis

by the glory of the past

they do include modern pieces at all, they include so few, stop at so early a date and give so little space to

contemporary work that the unalerted reader receives an


impression that modern poetry is virtually non-existent, or if it exists, almost unworthy of attention, The Paher

Book

of

Modern

Ve.rse created

an active audience

for

living poets throughout the English-speaking world and cannot be praised too highly for this feat. But there has

been no previous collection of winch 1 am aware that has attempted to show, by giving contemporary verse the emphasis it should have for a modern reader, its
relation to the

work

of the past.

And

just

how

strong

should that emphasis be?


arbitrarily answered this question by devoting approximately two-fifths of the pages herein to the verso
I

have

of the past fifty years and the remaining three-fifths to the verse of previous periods. If the sole function of an

anthology were to

make long-range

historical

compara

tive judgments, this ratio XII

might well seem grotesque and

INTRODUCTION
biased,

But there

is

offer precisely that kind of judgment, as if it brought to print two centuries in the future.

no reason why an anthology should were being

The

future

will
is

have

its

own

criteria,

and by them determine what

important to it. This anthology is being published for living readers. We belong to a specific period of time, our own, and this period though not yet fully understood, is fully felt, since in it we live and bear the shocks of pain or
pleasure
peculiar to
also

and even bear them after emotional styles peculiar to ourselves and our time, and to no other.
it,

poets who understand us, who articulate for us, are the poets who live beside us in our own historical situation. To us, once the needs of education have been

The only

fulfilled,

they should be as important

as, if

not more im

portant than, the poets of the past. To appreciate Dylan Thomas it is not necessary either to deny the pre-emi

nence of Shakespeare or to forgo the pleasure of reading him. But to Shakespeare our reading is of no importance,
living poet and to the continuance of the great tradition it is of vital importance that there should be a
to the

and aware audience* Only by appreciation contemporary verse can the audience participate
sensitive

of
in

maintaining the values of poetry, especially at a period when the general public has lost almost all respect for learning and the arts.

Hence, by devoting approximately two-fifths of this book to modern verse I am making a judgment on func tion, rather than a judgment on comparative quality. To do the latter would be as impossible as absurd, since only
succeeding generations can decide what shall or shall not live through and beyond their time. It may well be that many poems here included will later be dropped from the record of English literature and that the

great

figures of the past will loom even larger over our chief poets of today than we guess. But if we do not exercise
XIII

Little

Treasury of

BritisJi

Poetry

our privileges as an audience for the poets of today. there will be no poets except the poets of the past in
that future*
ii

have begun the

first

section of this collection, de

voted to the poetry of the past, with the period at which the language shows itself to have definitely changed into what we can recognize as modern English and read

without major translation or extensive glossaries. It was the time when Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, first used the iambic pentameter of blank verse, that fundamental
of great English poetry, in his translation of The /Eneid, the time when the spirit of the Renaissance had finally
of the Middle Ages. Sir those in correspondence with him brought the influences of Italy to English verse and it is with their efforts that it may be said that the English

sxiparseded

the

attitudes

Thomas Wyatt and

medium for the tongue became a perfectly expressive

One of the chief figures greatness of English poetry. of the sixteenth century was Edmund Spenser, who
utilized all of the devices

and

insights of

Europe

to

create his yet characteristically and magically English verse, Then there followed closely the massive work of

the richest of all poetic Shakespeare, and English became media, This first section runs to SOB pages and covers the to 1900, obviously too restricted a space period from 1500 to contain the full glory of English poetry over those
of that glory is made by productive four centuries. Much of the greatest magnitude, poets who, while not names contributed greatness to the tradition. yet have certainly Such poets are represented by one or two poems. But* most of the space is devoted to the chief poets; all trans

except for the above mentioned &ndd by Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, and The Rubdtydt by Edward FiteGerald, are omitted; and a number of long
lations,

XIV

INTRODUCTION

poems

are included in full, together with poems and passages from plays, as well as ballads and lyrics, in order to make this selection representative.

ni

The second section of the anthology is devoted to modern poetry, beginning with 1900, and contains 350
I have placed emphasis upon the chief and included many long poems in full, such as poets 'The Tower' and "Meditations in Time of Civil War' by W. B. Yeats, 'Fragment of an Agon' and 'The Dry Salvages' by T. S. Eliot, 'Spain' and In Memory of Sigmund Freud' by W. H. Auden, In Country Sleep' and *A Winter's Tale' by Dylan Thomas, etc.

pages. Here, too,

A comparative examination of particular poems in both sections of the anthology will, I think, be useful to the reader, and, to those readers who have taken for
granted the too-often quoted, and believed, notion that modern poetry is obscure, this inspection should be re vealing. The most conspicuous fact about modern poetry, and therefore, perhaps, the most over-looked, is the similarity which it bears to the poetry of past centuries.

For the poetry of the Twentieth century, and particularly of the last twenty years, has many more resemblances to
the poetry of the past than it has differences. If modern poetry is obscure, it is obscure only to those to whom all good poetry of any period is obscure, A comparison of

the following passages will show as many subtle and 'difficult' depths in the poems of the Seventeenth and

Eighteenth centuries as in those of the Twentieth:

The falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The blood- dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere The ceremony of innocence is drowned.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre

-W.

B. Yeats

xv

A
Batter

Little Treasury of British Poetry

my heart, three-pets on'd (Joel; for, you As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek lo mend; That I may rise, and stand, overthrow me, and bond Your forces to break, blow, burn and make mo new.
I,

like

Labour

an nsnrpt town, to another duo, to admit you, but oh, to no end. John Donne

Truly, my Satan, Ihou art but a dunce, And dost not know the garment from the

man;

Kvory harlot was

a virgin once,

Nor

can'st thoti ever

change Kate

into

Nan,

Tho* thou

art worshipped by the names divine Of Jesus and Jehovah, llum art still The son of morn in weary night's decline, The lost traveller's dream under the hill,

-William Make
Sir, no man's enemy, forgiving all But will his negative inversion, be prodigal; Send to us power and light, a sovereign touch

Curing

The exhaustion

And

intolerable neural itch, of weaning, the liar's (juinsy, the distortions of ingrown virginity. -W. IL' Audcn
tin*

is often considered too difficult be loaded with classical and scholarly quotations and references. But .surely the same accusation can be

T. S. Eliot's work
it is

cause

made

classical

against Milton, for who, without a knowledge of mythology, Christian theology, and the English

preceded him, could understand him at is perhaps more often considered obscure and difficult than other contemporary poets. But when we compare a passage from., for example, 'In Mem
literature that
all?

Dylan Thomas

ory of

Ann
t,

Jones':
call all

But

Ann's bard on a raised hearth,


like a

The

seas to service that her

wood-ton gucd virtue

Babble
XVI

Bow down

bellbuoy over the hymning heads, the walls of the ferned and foxy woods,

INTRODUCTION
That her love sing and swing through a brown chapel,
Bless her bent spirit with four, crossing birds. Her flesh was meek as milk, but this skyward statue With the wild breast and blessed and giant skull Is carved from her in a room with a wet window

In a fiercely mourning house in a crooked year.

with a passage from 'The Phoenix and the Turtle':


Let the bird of loudest lay On the sole Arabian tree, Herald sad and trumpet be, To whose sound chaste wings obey.

But thou shrieking harbinger, Foul prccurrer of the fiend,

Augur

To
can
it

this

troop

of the fever's end, come thou not near,

rightly said that the language is less complex or more easily understood in Shakespeare than in Thomas? Poems do not live because their content is

be

the meaning

confined to easy language and one simple surface mean ing; nor are contemporary critics so incompetent or
naive as to be taken in by a hocus pocus without mean ing. Not only is our time richly endowed with good
poetry,
it

has perhaps better

critics

than any preceding

period.

Some fundamental education is certainly required for the satisfactory reading of any good poetry, and it is rather evidence of its quality than of any failure that modem poetry requires that the reader bring some
knowledge and

who

sensibility to his reading of it. To people could neither read nor write, all poetry would reach

the ultimate of obscurity; for to

appear
paper.

as
I

them words would no more than mysterious marks upon the


it is

believe that

the education of the person

who

is suspect, not the poetry itself. Poetry is, after all, literature, and to demand that it be easily understood by the half-edu-

finds

modern poetry obscure which

XVII

A
an
it

Little

Treasury of British Poetry

cated, or the uneducated, is equivalent to asking it to be art of the illiterate. Illiterature will flourish without

help; the lovers of poetry will continue to


literature.

want

to

keep

Contemporary poetry resembles the poetry thai has preceded it not only in presenting those 'difficulties' essential to express the profound and ambiguous quality which is one of the values of poetry, but in its technical structures as well. Modern poets make use of the whole category of craft devices and have extended the range of
poetry in form, in phonetics, in rhythms, etc. They are influenced more consciously and knowingly than wen*
their forebears,

and influenced by predecessors from

all

periods of the past. Largely because of extraordinary de velopments in criticism, they are aware of their whole

today may be instructed. Formerly, period succeeded period with a

whom

tradition with a kind of immediacy; there is no telling or by what period a poet of

by

young

and indigenous progression. It is scarcely Pope spending a stimulating evening reading Donne, Beowulf and translations from the
sort of natural

possible to imagine

Chinese. Yet

no incongruity.
favour. This

we can think of doing that ourselves with No poet of the past, even of the recent
is

number of poets are back in a development that might have boon anticipated; as the world has been narrowed by modern
past, is in total disrepute; a

transportation, interlocking interests and wars, local cul tural restrictions have been loosened and all areas of

reading have been opened by travel and translation.


in this catholic reading always the advantage that the modern poet must set himself a high standard, since he knows just how far and high poetry has already reached. But no matter how many the resemblances of modern poetry to the poetry of former times, its differences are

While there may be dangers


there
is

noticeable and various enough to

make

the literature of

xviu

INTRODUCTION
the Twentieth century distinctive.

To make any general

ization about a period of fifty years, especially the first of this century, might, at first view, seem im fifty years
possible, since these daring decades have included tal ents as various as Yeats, Eliot, Graves, Auden, Thomas

and Barker. Perhaps never before have the 'generations' of poets arisen so close upon each other's flourishing. Group after group has appeared to change or overthrow the standards of the preceding few years. Hardy, Yeats, Eliot and Graves, the influence of Hopkins, the popu larity of Auden and his group, the rise of George Barker and Dylan Thomas, all the 'schools' which followed each
other in rapid succession, the Georgian, the Imagist, the pinkish Marxian and the palely loitering meta
it

physical, etc., each creating a minor revolution, make seem impossible to find any general classification for
all.

Yet, probably because the same social upheaval has been going on throughout the period, there are traits held in common by the poets of this century, diverse as their qualities, styles and perceptions may be.
It is safe to say that the poetry of today has an intense verbal richness; the poets have extended their vocabu laries to include whatever common speech or idiom,

poetry

scholarly or technical terminology they have a use for; is no longer written in the speech of 'an English

gentleman/ pastoral language or 'poetic' lingo. A kind of telescoping of language is a frequent device which permits a dense texture of images, words and meaning. This splendour and freedom of vocabulary is to be found in the work of the majority of living poets and perhaps reaches its height in that of Dylan Thomas. That a
reaction from this verbal loading will eventually take place is probable, but meantime it is a characteristic of

our period which we should enjoy here and now. And as the poets handle words, so they also use a great variety XIX

Little

Treasury of

BritisJi

Poetry

of insights gained from the extension of experience into the many fields of adventure which are common to

Twentieth-century

man

in the

midst of his

travels, wars,

economic pressures,

threats

new

understandings of

and social upheavals, with myth and depth psychology for


definitely dis

compass and sounding lead. But the one characteristic that can be

to the whole Twen tinguished as a development common tieth century may be defined as a change of personal atti tude. This change exhibits itself as a shift from the poet's as the centre of observation or individual

personality that includes the observation and feel feeling to a circle of other human beings of his generation, or locale ings in time. It can be observed in the work of poets whose

as well as in the work of poets point of view is classical who are thoroughly romantic. What is here meant is not the 'socialistic* statement to be found in verse that has been written, especially in the 'thirties, with the object

of furthering a political idea, but a genuine organic social feeling tluit causes the poet to bo as intimately involved in concern for others as for himself. Poets, of

course, have always expressed a concern for mankind, but in past centuries that concern was likely to be over the universal fate of men, such as the inevitability of

death, the shortness of youth, the imminence, in other words, of mortality. Lyric poets sang of their own sub in poems such jective feelings; the philosophy expressed as Gray's 'Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard' was the poet's own rumination centred around his own con
victions.

When

a poet used the plural 'we* rather than


definitely

he meant himself and his beloved, or his immediate class-kind. His attitude was
personal one.

friend, or his
his

But now, when the poet says *wc/ and also, in spite of himself, as it were, when he says 'I,' ho is not only speaking of himself and his immediate companions in

xx

INTRODUCTION
the situation, but of other individuals of his time, not in the sense of 'mankind' but truly as individuals. Further,

not expressing his own subjective feelings alone, by a new kind of osmosis, he actually feels, with the intimate involvement of an emotion exactly as personal

he

is

but,

as his

own,

to

situation as well as
I think that this

some extent as others from his own.

feel,

from their

change of attitude can he marked as


the surface the

beginning "Dover Beach.'


that of
all

in

Victorian times with

On

Matthew Arnold's Ve' of the poem is


is

'my beloved and

I/ yet the feeling of the actual 'we'

Imagists, said here, did not develop this attitude, and although they caused some ferment in their hour, we scarcely think of them today as important. The socially human concern of Yeats and Eliot is too well-known to
it

people caught in the dilemma of the time. And yet it is not as 'mankind/ always something apart from the poet, that Arnold feels for others. The tone of the poem shows that others are realized as individuals. This identical concern continues in Hardy, and it is to be found in all the poets who follow, if they are noteworthy at all (Wilfred Owen's true-to-type preoccupation with the suffering of the soldiers around him has made him the leading war poet of a war century.) The

may be

need comment.

It is

of especial interest to trace this atti

tude through the fluctuations of the various styles and influences of each decade of the century and to note that the poets who most strongly manifest it are those who

seem

to us

most important. Poets as different


this

as

W.

H.

Auden and George Barker yet have Such poems as 'Soldiers Bathing' by

common

trait.

F. T. Prince (page 800), or 'Winter Offering' by D. S. Savage (page 852), or almost any other which affects us as both good and

contemporaneous show the poet's modern sensitivity to the subjective world of others as certainly as to his own. When this attitude is expressed in language drawn from
XXI

Little

Treasury of British Poetry

the immediate environment, as in such

poems

as

'Nam

ing of Parts' by Henry Reed (page 846) and 'On the Refusal to Mourn the Death of a Child, by Fire, in London' by Thomas (page 815), we receive an imme
diate awareness of our

own

time which in

itself

should

intensify our experience of reading poetry since it gives us participation in particulars as well as in the universals

common

to the poetry of
is

all

This attitude

a gain,

periods. think, since

it

tends to miti

gate the fault of romantic poetry, which is really that of narrowness of perception. Instead of xittering from one

mouth, the modern romantic poet, while thoroughly in volved with his own personality, has, whether in spite of himself or not, a double voice that gives him some of
the quality of the classical tone.

Out of the approximately 250 poems to be found in the modern section* of this collection, even the most
exacting reader will find,
to
I am sure, many that will seem him worthy to carry on the great tradition of English poetry, poems that have the inevitable ring of per manence, the magic of immortality.

OSCAR WILLIAMS
Ncio
"York City,

July S,

19SL

* See Editorial Note,

on page 808.

xxw

II

A
Little

Treasury

of

Modern

British Poetry

The Chief Poets


from 1QOO
to

ig

Editorial

Note

This collection of British poetry is intended primarily for the American reader as a companion volume to A Little Treasury of American Poetry. Both volumes have been ar ranged on a chronological plan, i.e., according to the birth dates of the poets. T. S. Eliot and W. H. Auden have work included in each volume but the selections are different and complementary. For instance, any reader who notes that 'The Waste Land' and 'Ash Wednesday* by Eliot and 'September 1, 1939* and *At the Grave of Henry James' by Auden are not included in this volume will find them in the American
collection.

There

is

no separate

section in the present

volume

entitled

The Poetry

of the Forties as there is in the American Little but readers interested in comparing British poetry Treasury, of the Forties with American poetry of the Forties will find

poems written during


Authors

this

decade starred in the Index of

Tides (pages 859 to 874). Used together A Little Treasury of British Poetry and A Little Treasury of American Poetry constitute one comprehensive anthology of poetry in

&

the English tongue.

DYLAN THOMAS
And the countrymen of heaven crouch all together under the hedges, and, among themselves, in the tear-salt darkness, surmise which world, which
turning homes in the skies has gone for ever. the heavenly hedgerow rumour, it is the Earth. itself. It is black, petrified, wizened, poisoned, burst; insanity has blown it rotten, and no creatures at all, joyful, despairing, cruel, kind, dumb, afire, loving, dull, shortly and brutishly hunt their days down like enemies on that corrupted face. And, one by one, these heavenly hedgerow men who once were of the Earth, tell one another, through the long night, Light and His tears falling, what they the submerged wilderness and on the ex remember, what they sense posed hairs-breadth of the mind, of that self-killed place. They remem ber places, fears, loves, exultation, misery, animal joy, ignorance and mysteries, all you and I know and not not know. The poem- to -be is made of these tellings. And the poem becomes, at last, an affirmation of the beautiful and terrible worth of the earth. It grows into a praise of what is and what could be on this lump in the skies. It is a poem about happiness. I do not, of course, know how this first part of the poem called In the White Giant's Thigh, will, eventually, take its place in that lofty, pre
star,

which of their

late,

And this time, spreads The Earth has killed

tentious,

scheme.

structure.

down-to-earth-mto-the-secrets, optimistic, ludicrous, mooney do not yet know myself its relevance to the whole, hypothetical But I do know it belongs to it. D.T.

Henry Reed

THE WALL
place where our two gardens meet undivided by a street, And mingled flower and weed caress And fill our double wilderness,
Is

THE

Among whose riot undismayed And unreproached, we idly played,


While, unaccompanied by fears, The months extended into years, Till we went down one day in June To pass the usual afternoon

And And

there discovered, shoulder-tall, Rise in the wilderness a wall: The wall which put us out of reach
into silence split our speech.

843

A Little Treasury of Modern British Poetry We knew, and we had always known
And strummed its
It

That some dark, unseen hand of stone Hovered across our days of ease,
tunes upon the breeze. had not tried us overmuch, But here it was, for us to touch.

is still as wild, separately unreconciled The tangled thickets play and sprawl Beneath the shadows of our wall, And the wall varies with the flowers And has its seasons and its hours. Look at its features wintrily

The wilderness

And

Frozen to transparency; it an icy music swells And a brittle, brilliant chime of

Through

bells:

Would you

We

conjecture that, in Spring,

lean upon it, talk and sing, Or climb upon it, and play chess Upon its summer silentness? One certain thing alone we know:

A habit now
And watch

Silence or song,
to
it

it

does not go.


first

wake with day


ray,

catch the sun's

Or terrorised, to scramble through The depths of night to prove it true.

We need not
Is

doubt, for such a wall based in death, and does not fall.

LIVES
You cannot cage a field. You cannot wire it, as you wire a summer's roses To sell in towns; you cannot cage it Or kill it utterly. All you can do is to force Year after year from the stream to the cold woods The heavy glitter of wheat, till its body tires
844

HENRY REED

And the

yield grows

weaker and

dies.

But the

field

never

dies,

it, burn it black, or domicile thousand prisoners upon its empty features. You cannot kill a field. A field will reach Right under the streams to touch the limbs of its brothers.

Though you build on

But you can cage the woods.

You can throw up fences, as round a recalcitrant heart Spring up remonstrances. You can always cage the woods, Hold them completely. Confine them to hill or valley, You can alter their face, their shape; uprooting their
outer saplings

You can even

alter their wants,

and

their smallest long

ings Press to your own desires. The woods succumb To the paths made through their life, withdraw the trees,

Betake themselves where you

tell

them, and acquiesce.

The woods
Pitifully

retreat; their protest of leaves whirls to the cooling heavens, like dead or

dying

prayers.

But what can you do with a stream? You can widen it here, or deepen it there, but even

you alter its course entirely it gives the impression That this is what it always wanted. Moorhens return To nest or hide in the reeds which quickly grow up there, The fishes breed in it, stone settles on to stone. The stream announces its places where the water will bubble Daily and unconcerned, contentedly ruffling and scuffling With the drifting sky or the leaf. Whatever you do,
If

To

stream has rights, for a stream is always water; cross it you have to bridge it; and it will not flow
uphill.

845

A Little Treasury

of

Modern

British

Poetry

LESSONS OF THE WAR


Et
I.

Vixi duelhs nuper idoneus militavi non sine gloria

NAMING OF PARTS

We We

TO-DAY we have naming of parts. Yesterday, had daily cleaning. And to-morrow morning, shall have what to do after firing. But to-day,
To-day we have naming
of parts. Japonica

Glistens like coral in all of the neighbouring gardens, And to-day we have naming of parts.

This is the lower sling swivel. And this the upper sling swivel, whose use you will see, When you are given your slings. And this is the piling
Is

Which
Hold
This

swivel, in your case

you have not got. The branches in the gardens their silent, eloquent gestures, Which in our case we have not got.
the safety-catch, which is always released of the thumb. And please do not let

is

With an easy flick

me

See anyone using his finger. You can do it quite easy If you have any strength in your thumb. The blossoms Are fragile and motionless, never letting anyone see

Any

of

them using

their finger.

you can see is the bolt. The purpose of this open the breech, as you see. We can slide it Rapidly backwards and forwards: we call this Easing the spring. And rapidly backwards and forwards The early bees are assaulting and fumbling the flowers:
this
Is to

And

They

call it

easing the Spring.

They call it easing the Spring: it is perfectly easy If you have any strength in your thumb: like the bolt,
the breech, and the cocking-piece, and the point of balance, Which in our case we have not got; and the almond-

And

blossom

846

HENRY REED
Silent in all of the gardens

and the bees going back wards and forwards, For to-day we having naming of parts.
H. JUDGING DISTANCES

away, but the way that you say it very important. Perhaps you may never get The knack of judging a distance, but at least you know How to report on a landscape: the central sector,
far
Is

Not only how

The

right of arc and that, which And at least you know

we had last

Tuesday,

That maps are of time, not place, so far as the army Happens to be concerned the reason being, Is one which need not delay us. Again, you know There are three kinds of tree, three only, the fir and the

And

poplar, those which have bushy tops too;

and

lastly

That things only seem

to

be things.

A barn
Or a

is

not called a barn, to put

field in the distance,

it more plainly, where sheep may be safely

grazing.

You must never be


porting:

over-sure.

You must

say,

when

re

At five o'clock in the central sector is a dozen Of what appear to be animals; whatever you
Don't
I call the bleeders sheep.

do,

sure that's quite clear; and suppose, for the sake of example, The one at the end, asleep, endeavours to tell us What he sees over there to the west, and how far away, After first having come to attention. There to the west, On the fields of summer the sun and the shadows bestow

am

Vestments of purple and gold.

The

And under

white dwellings are like a mirage in the heat, the swaying elms a man and a woman Lie gently together. Which is, perhaps, only to say
still

Treasury of Modern British Poetry That there is a row of houses to the left of arc, And that under some poplars a pair of what appears

A Little

tq

be humans

Appear
Well

to

be

loving.

that, for an answer, is what we might rightly call Moderately satisfactory only, the reason being, Is that two things have been omitted, and those are

The human

important. beings, now: in


far

what

And how

away, would you say? And do not forget There may be dead ground in between.

direction are they,

There may be dead ground in between; and I may not have got The knack of judging a distance; I will only venture A guess that perhaps between me and the apparent
lovers,

(Who, incidentally, appear by now to have finished,) At seven o'clock from the houses, is roughly a distance Of about one year and a half.
in.

UNARMED COMBAT

In due course of course you will be issued with Your proper issue; but until to-morrow, You can hardly be said to need it; and until that time, We shall have unarmed combat. I shall teach you. The various holds and rolls and throws and breakfalls

Which you may sometimes meet.

And the various holds and rolls and throws and breakfalls Do not depend on any sort of weapon,
But only on what I might coin a phrase and call The ever-important question of human balance, And the ever-important need to be in a strong
Position at the start.

There are many kinds of weakness about the body, Where you would least expect, like the ball of the

foot.

But the various holds and 848

rolls

and throws and

breakfalls

HENRY REED
Will always come in useful. And never be frightened To tackle from behind: it may not be clean to do so, But this is global war.

So give them all you have, and always give them As good as you get; it will always get you somewhere. tie a Jerry (You may not know it, but you can without rope; it is one of the things I shall teach

Up

you.)

Nothing will matter

if

for him. only you are ready

The

readiness

is all.

The
I I

readiness is all How can I help but feel have been here before? But somehow then,

was the

Was

And even if I had always then my problem. of rope I was always the sort of person piece Who threw the rope aside.
in

tied-up one.

How

to get out

And

my time

Which was
where.

I have given them all I had, never as good as I got, and it got

me no

And the various holds and rolls and throws and breakf alls Somehow or other I always seemed to put In the wrong place. And as for war, my wars Were global from the start.
Perhaps
I

was never

Or Where I had

the ball of

While awaiting proper Of the ever-important question


It is

in a strong position, foot got hurt, or I had some weakness my least expected. But I think I see your point. a issue, we must learn the lesson of

human

balance.

courage that counts.


the same again; and we must fight of winning but rather of keeping alive: so that when we meet our end,

Things

may be

Not
It

in the

hope

Something wherever we could, may be said that we tackled we lived, and though defeated, That battle-fit

Not without

glory fought.

849

Index of Authors and Titles


Anonymous: Songs
continued

&

Lyrics

Anonymous: Ballads
Spens The Falcon The Demon Lover
Sir Patrick

London
3

Bells
. .

5
6 8

Foggy, Foggy Dew Broom, Green Broom


Arnold, Matthew (18S&-1888)

29 29 30

Lord Randal 9 Edward, Edward Helen of Kirconnell .... 10 Bonny Barbara Allan ... 12 The Wife of Usher's Well 13

Dover Beach
Requiescat

457 458

Thomas

the

Rhymer

...

14

Auden, W. H.
(b.

1907)
Arts.
B.

Anonymous: Songs & Lyrics I 17 Sing of a Maiden The Bailey Beareth the
17 18 Crabbed Age and Youth 18 1 Saw My Lady Weep. 18 Fine Knacks for Ladies 19 My Love in Her Attire. 19 As I Sat Under a Syca
Bell

Petition

*Musee des Beaux

Away Western Wind

*Paysage Moralise *In Memory of W.


Yeats

748 749 750


751

Lay Your Sleeping Head, 753 My Love

O What Is That Sound. 754 O Where Are You Go


ing

more Tree

20 20 22 23
23 24
*

Doom

Is

Dark
and
in

God

Rest

You Merry,

Gentlemen The First Nowell Love Not Me


I Saw Your Face Devotion There Is a Lady Sweet and Kind Back and Side Go Bare, Go Bare The Sea Hath Many Thousand Sands ....

Spain 1937 Consider This

756 756 757

Our Time
*In

760
of

Memory
Freud

Sigmund
762 765

Since First

*Mundus

et Infans

B
24 25
Barker, George (b. 1913) * Resolution of

Depend

26 ence 803 Tom O'Bedlam's Song. 26 (More Barker, next page] * Poems preceded by an asterisk can be considered part of The Poetry of the Forties. See Editorial Note, page 508. 859

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Barker, George continued
Blake, William

continued

The Three Dead and


the Three Living .805 *The Death of Yeats ...806
.

To

the Muses

The Tiger The Immortal


For the Sexes: The Gates
of Paradise

289 90 291

^Triumphal Ode

MCMXXXIX
to

807

292

Allegory of the Adoles cent and the Adult. .809

*Sonnet

My

Mother. .810

Bridges, Robert

Elegy V: Separation of Man from God 811 *News of the World I.. 812 *News of the World II 813
.
.

(1844-1930)
I

Heard a Linnet Court


ing a Dead Child

*News

of the

World 111,814

Barnes, William (1801-1886)

The May Tree


Beddoes, Thomas
(1808-1849)

400
Lovell

550 551 London Snow 552 A Passer-by 552 554 Nightingales Eros 554 Johannes Milton, Senex.555

On

Noel:

Christmas

Eve,

401 Times Do I Love Thee, Dear 402 402 Dream-Pedlary


Song:

Dirge Song: Old Adam, Carrion Crow

400
the

1913 Low Barometer The Storm Is Over The Psalm

556 557 558 559

How Many

Bronte, Emily (1818-184S) No Coward Soul Is Mine 453 Stanzas: Oft Rebuked .454
.

Blake, William (1757-1827)

The Visionary Remembrance


.
.
.

454 455

Reeds of Innocence

.281

281 Auguries of Innocence. .282


I

The Lamb

Brooke, Rupert
(1887-1915)

Saw
Gold

a Chapel All of

A Poison Tree
The New Jerusalem
860

The Angel London The Scoffers The Garden Song

285 286 286 287


of

The Soldier The Dead The Great Lover Heaven

667 668 668 670

Love

.287

Browning, Elizabeth Barrett


(1SOG-1861)

288 288 289

How Do
If

I Love Thee. .439 Thou Must Love Me. 439


.

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Browning, Robert
(181&-1889)

Home-Thoughts from Abroad


Pippa's Song Soliloquy of the Spanish
Cloister

Campbell,

Roy
728 729

440 440

(b. 1902)

The Serf The Zebras


Campbell, Thomas

My
A

Last Duchess

Prospice

441 443 444

Toccata of Galuppfs. .445 The Last Ride Together, 447

The River

(1774-1844) of Life

354

Campion, Thomas
(1667-1880)

Bums, Robert
(1769-1796)

Follow Thy Fair Sun,

Un
112 113

happy Shadow

My

Love

Is

Like a

Red

Cherry-Ripe

Red Rose 294 Auld Lang Synge 295 Comin' Thro* The Rye. .295 Green Grow the Rashes, O 296 297 John Anderson Sweet Afton 298 For A' That and That. 298

Carew, Thomas
(1595P-1639?)

Song: Ask Me No More Where Jove Bestows .169 He That Loves a Rosy

Cheek
Carroll,

170

A Poet's
ter

Welcome
?

to

His

Lewis

Love-Begotten Daugh

The Rigs o Barley To a Louse

300 301 302

(Charles L. Dodgson) (1832-1898)

467 Jabberwocky The Walrus and the Car 468 penter Father William 472
Cartright, William

Byron, Lord, George Gordon


(1788-1824)

She Walks in Beauty. There Be None of


Beauty's Daughters
So,

.357

No
.

(1611-1643) Platonic Love

We

11

Go No

.357 More a

To Chloe

203 204

358 358 The Sea 359 It Is the Hush of Night. 361 Darkness 363 The Isles of Greece 365

Roving Sonnet on Chillon

Chatterton, Thomas (1752-1770) An Excellente Balade of

Charity Sing Unto


lay

276

My Rounde
279
fifil

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Clare,

John
377 378 378 379

Cowper, William
continued

(1739-1864)

Badger
I

Am

Light Shining Darkness

Out

of

275

Mouse's Nest
Clock-a-Clay

Crashaw, Richard
(161B-1649)

Clough, Arthur

Hugh
.

(1819-1861) Say Not the Struggle.

.456

The Tear For Hope The Flaming Heart

205 206 208

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

D
Daniel, Samuel (1562-1619) Fair Is My Love

Kubla Khan

328
329 348 352

The Rime
Mariner
Dejection:

of the Ancient

An Ode

Care-Charmer Sleep
Davidson, John

Epigram
Collins,

William

(1857-1909)

(1721-1759)

Thirty

Bob

Week

...561

Ode

to

Evening

266
Darley, George (1795-1S46)

Comfort, Alex
(b. 1920)

The
.

Solitary

Lyre

,.395

*Hoc Est Corpus *The Atoll in the Mind


Corbet, Richard (1582-1635) The Fairies* Farewell

853 853

Davies, Sir John (1569-1629) In What Manner the Soul Is United to the Body. 115 Davies, W. H. (1810-1940)

.151

Cowley, Abraham
(1018-1667)

A Great Leisure
213 214 215

Time

Beauty

The White Monster

622 622 623

Hope The Wish


Against
i

De

la

Mare, Walter
631 631 632 633

(b. 1873)

Cowper, William
(17S1-1SOQ) The Solitude of Alexan der Selkirk 274

An Epitaph
The Linnet The Listeners The Miracle

862

INDEX or AUTHOKS AND TITLES


Donne, John
Dryden, John
(1681-1700) (1678-1681) and Catch a Falling

Go
The The The The

A
124 125 125 126 128 129 130
131 132 133 134 135 138 139 140 141

Star

Good-Morrow
Flea

Song for St. Day, 1687

Cecilia's

238

The Anniversary The Dream The Sun Rising

Ecstasy Canonization Love's Deity

240 No, No, Poor Suffering Heart 241


Alexander's Feast
Durrell,

Farewell, Ungrateful Traitor

246

Lawrence

(b. 1912)

Lovers' Infmiteness On His Mistress Love's Progress

*At Epidaurus
Dyer, Sir Edward (1545P-1607)

794

Going to Bed The Blossom Break of Day

My Mind
dom
Is

to

Me

a King

56

The Will

A
If

Nocturnal Upon Saint 143 Lucy's Day Poisonous Minerals .144 Valediction Forbid
.

Eliot, T. S.
(b. 1888)

ding Mourning

The

Relic
.

144 145

The Love Song


Alfred Prufrock

of

J.

Death, Be Not Proud. .146 What If This Present ... 147

679
. . .

At

the

Round
Heart
to

Earth's
.

The Hippopotamus

Imagined Corners
Batter

My A Hymn
Father

147 148
148 149

Song for Simeon Animula

.683 .684

God,

the

The Wind Sprang Up

685 Fragment of an Agon .686


at

A Hymn

to Christ

Four O'clock 692 Chorus from 'The Rock' III 692 *The Dry Salvages 694

Dowson, Ernest
(1867-1900)

Empson, William
506
(b. 1906) Letter I

Cynarae
Drayton, Michael
(1563-1631)

IV *Aubade * Courage Means Run


^Letter

737 738 739

Night and Day

The

Parting

70 70

740 ning (More Empson, next page)


863

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Empson, William
continued
Graves, Robert continued

Legal Fiction Missing Dates

741 742

Ogres and Pygmies

.713

FitzGerald, Edward (1809-1883)

The Rubaiyat Khayyam

of

Omar
404

The Legs ........... 714 Rocky Acres ........ 714 The Eremites ........ 715 ^Homage to Texas ..... 716 A Love Story ........ 717 The Door ........... 718 *To Juan at the Winter
Solstice

*The Persian Version


Gray,

........... 718 .719


.

Fry, Christopher (b. 1907) From 'The Boy with a


Cart'

Thomas

(1716-1771)

775

Fuller,
*

Roy
.796

(b. 1912)

.... Spring 1943

Elegy Written in a Coun try Churchyard ..... 258 Ode on a Distant Pros pect of Eton College. .262 On a Favourite Cat

G
Gay, John
(1685-17S&)

Drowned

in a

Tub

of

Gold Fishes ........ 265


Greville, Fulke,

Lord Brooke

To a Lady on Her Pas


sion for

Old China ...251

(1554-1628) Wearisome Condition


of

Humanity ........ 45
46 48 49 49

Gilbert, Sir
Sir Joseph's

W.

S.

(1863-1911)

Song

480

481 Bunthorne's Song 482 Ko-~Ko's Song The Mikado's Song .... 484 Ko Ko's Winning Song. 485
Goldsmith, Oliver
(1788-177 4)

Epitaph on Sir Philip Sidney ............. Three Things There Be. When as Man's Life ... To Myra .............
Grigson, Geoffrey (b. 1905)

*The Landscape
Heart

of

the

............ 736

Woman
Sweet Auburn
Graves, Robert
(b. 1895)

272 272

H
Hardy, Thomas

Interruption

712

The Darkling Thrush .509 (More Hardy, next page]


.

864

IISBEX OF

AUTHORS AND TITLES


Herrick, Robert (1691-1674) To the Virgins, to Much of Time

Hardy, Thomas
continued

The

Souls of the Slain

.510

Make
154 154 155 155 156

To an Unborn Pauper
Child

The Ruined Maid The Last Chrysanthe

513 514

The

Night-Piece, to
Julia's Clothes
.

Julia

mum

Upon
515 515 516 517
519

In Tenebris In Tenebris In Tenebris

Delight in Disorder
Child's Grace

II
III

The Bad Season Makes


the Poet Sad Tis Hard to Find God Mirth
Prayers Poise

156
.

The Man He

Killed ....518

.156

Channel Firing

156
157 157 157 157 157

The Convergence of the Twain 520 The Statue of Liberty. .521 Under the Waterfall .523 The Going 525
.
.

Must Have

The Rod
Temptation Thanksgiving Neutrality Lothsome Sins Loathed, and Yet
.
.

Afterwards Refusal

No

Buyers In Time of 'The Break


ing of Nations'

526 527 528

528

Loved Good Christians To Daffodils Good Men Afflicted


Most

157 157 158


158

Henley,

W.

E.

(1849-190S) Invictus

497

Higgins, F. R.

Herbert, George
Easter- Wings

*Song for Bones


159 159 160 161 162 162 163 164 164 165 166 166

(1896-1941) the Clatter-

720

Redemption

Hodgson, Ralph
(b.

The Collar The Quip


Love

The Song Eve

187%) of Honour

. .

624 630

The

Pulley

Discipline Life

Hood, Thomas
(1198-1845)
I

Jordan The Rose Avarice


Affliction

Remember,
ber

Remem
396 397 398 865

Autumn The Sea

of

Death

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Hopkins, Gerard Mauley
'

(1844-1S89)

God's Grandeur Pied Beauty

529 530
530
540 542 543
. .

Housraan, A. E. continued Into My Heart

568
Heart
Is

The Wreck

of the

With Rue Laden


Stuff

My

559 569

Deutschland

Terence, This Is Stupid


Soldier

The Leaden Echo and


the Golden Felix Randal

Echo

from

the

Wars
571

Returning

The Windhover The Candle Indoors


Spring

and

Fall:

To

.543 a

Young Child Inversnaid

544 544
Is

The Chestnut Casts His Flambeaux 572 When Israel Out of 573 Egypt Came The Jar of Nations 574
Infant Innocence

No

Worst, There

574

None The Habit

545 o Perfection 545 546 Carrion Comfort That Nature Is a Hera547 clitean Fire The Sea and the Sky 548 lark 548 Andromeda I Wake and Feel the Fell 549 of Dark The Lantern Out o 549 Doors
.

Howard, Henry, Earl of


Surrey (1616-1547)

How No Age
tent

Is

Con
. .

Description of Spring Translation from The

35 36
36

Aeneid

Housman, A. E.
(1869-1986) Loveliest of Trees
Reveille

Johnson, Lionel (1SG7-190&J

On Wenlock Edge
Others,
First
I

564 564 565

The Dark Angel


Jonson, Ben (1673-1637) To Celia

504

Am

Not the
566

When

Was One-and566

On My
It Is

First

Son

116 116
117 117

Oh, When I Was in Love 567 with You To an Athlete Dying 567 Young

Twenty

Not Growing Like a

Tree

The Hour Glass


Inviting a Friend to

Sup
117

per

White
866

in the

Moon

the

Long Road

Lies

568

The Triumph of Charis.118 (More Jonson, next page)

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Jonson, Ben continued To the Memory of My Beloved, Master Wil liam Shakespeare 119

Keyes, Sidney (1988-1948) *The Wilderness


Kipling,

854

Rudyard
611 612 613 615

An Ode to Himself ....122 To Heaven 123


Joyce, James

(1865-1936) Recessional

Danny Deever Gunga Din


Mandalay
Sestina

The Ballad
O'Reilly

(1888-1941) of Persse

of

the

Tramp617

639

Royal

The Law

When

of the Jungle. .619 Earth's Last Pic

ture Is Painted

621

Keats, John (1796-1881)

Landor, Walter Savage


into
.

On On

Looking Chapman's Homer


Seeing
the

First

(1775-1864)

380 380

Rose Aylmer
Dirce

Elgin

353 353
353

Marbles
.

On

His Seventy-fifth

To One Who Has Been Long in City Pent ..381

On

the Grasshopper

and

Birthday Death Stands Above lanthe


Lately

Me. 353
354 354

381 When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be. ..382


the Cricket

Our

Poets

Lawrence, D. H.
(188S-19SO)

Bright

Star!

Would

Were Steadfast Thou Art On The Sea La Belle Dame Sans


Merci

as

382 383
383
.

Bavarian Gentians ..... 642 643 Piano

When
cus Don'ts

Went

to the Cir

Ode to a Nightingale. Ode on a Grecian Urn. Ode to Psyche Ode on Indolence Ode on Melancholy To Autumn

.385 .387

Humming
Snake

Bird
Is

645 647

A Thing
There

of

Beauty
a

388 390 392 393 394

The Elephant Mate

Slow to
647 648 651

The Ship
Lear,

of

Death

Edward
451 867

Was

Naughty
395

(1818r-1888)

Boy

The Jumblies

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Lewis, C. Day (b. 1904) Consider These, for We

Marlowe, Christopher
(1664r-169S)

Have Condemned

Who
729

Them Do Not

Loved

Ever Loved that Not at First


71 71 73

Expect Again a 730 Phoenix Hour

Sight Fair Is Too Foul an Epi


thet

Nearing Again the Legendary Isle

The

Conflict

731 731

Helen

The Passionate Shepherd to His Love 73


Marvell, Andrew (1621-1678) To His Coy Mistress .217
.
.

Lodge, Thomas
(1556?-1625) Rosaline

65

The Garden The Picture


Flowers

218
of
Little

Lovelace, Richard (1618-1668) To Lucasta, On Going to 211 the Wars

T. C. in a Prospect of

220

The Definition of Love .221 The Mower Against Gar

To
To

Lucasta,

on

Going
... .211

Beyond the Seas

On

dens a Drop of

222

Dew

.223

Althea from Prison. .212


Masefield,

John

(b. 1878)

M
MacNeice, Louis
(b. 1907)

On Growing Old The West Wind


There on the Darkened

654 655

Deathbed
767 767
on
the

Sunday Morning

Among These
Stacks

Turf-

An Old Song Re-Sung. .657 658 Lolling don Downs


The
Passing Strange
.
. .

How Many Ways

656 657

665

The

Sunlight

Garden
*Prayer Before Birth
.
.

768
.769

^Bagpipe Music
"Entirely

^Refugees ^Entered in

770 771 772 the Minutes. 774


(b.

Meredith, Georgef/ 828-1909) Lucifer in Starlight .464 Love in the Valley 465
.
.
.

Meynell, Alice (1847-1988)

Letter from a Girl to

Her
Manifold, John
1016)
*Fife Tune 850 *The Sirens 850 *The Bunyip and the

Own

Old Age ...495

Whistling Kettle

851

Milton, John (1608-1674) On His Blindness 171 On His Deceased Wife.. 171 (More Milton, next

868

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Milton. John

O
.
.

continued

How
On

Soon Hath Time

172

the Late Massacre in

Piedmont
Lycidas
L/ Allegro
111

Penseroso

On Time
Blindness of Samson Ode on the Morning of
. . .

172 173 178 182 186 187


188

Owen, Wilfred (1893-1918) Greater Love 702 The Send-Off 703


Dulce
et

Arms and

Decorum the Boy

Est. .703

Spring Offensive
Insensibility

The Show
Strange Meeting

704 705 706 708 709

Christ's Nativity

Satan

and

the

Fallen

Angels Light
Satan's

Soliloquy

Satan's Guile

195 196 197 199

Pope, Alexander (1688-1744) Know Theu Thyself 253 Vital Spark of Heavenly

FLime

256

True & False Glory

201

256 Learning Engraved on the Collar


Little

Monro, Harold (1879-1982)


Living
Bitter Sanctuary

of a

Dog

634 635

The Coxcomb Bird


Prince, F. T. (b. 1912) * Soldiers Bathing
Prior,

258 258

Moore, Thomas (1779-1852) Believe Me 355


Oft in the
Stilly

800

Night. .356

Matthew (1664-1721) To a Child of Quality. .250


.

More, Sir Thomasfj? 478-1 58S) A Rueful Lamentation 31


. .

Quennell, Peter (b. 1905)

Morris, William (1 834-1896) The Earthly Paradise .478


.

Hero Entombed

733

The

Flight Into Egypt. .734

Procne

735

Muir, Edwin

(b. 1887)

*The Road *Too Much *The Combat *The Interrogation *The Castle

671 672 673 674 675

Raine, Kathleen (b. 1908) *Easter Poem 777

*Love Poem
Ralegh, Sir Walter
(1668-1618)

777

N
Nashe, Thomas (1567-1602) Spring, the Sweet Spring 112

The Nymph's Reply

to

the Shepherd 50 (More Ralegh, next page)

869

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Ralegh, Sir Walter continued
Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)

Even Such Is Time The Passionate Man's


grimage

51
Pil

Tell

Me Where

Is

51 The Silent Lover ...... 53 The Merit of True Pas sion ............... 53 53 Walsinghame ......... The Lie .............. 55

Bred Under the Tree


ter

Fancy
74

Greenwood
75

Blow, Blow, Thou

Win
75 76

Fear
Full

Wind No More

Read, Herbert (b. 1898) *To a Conscript of 1940.710


Reed, Henry
(b.

Fathom Five Thy Father Lies 77 Hark Hark! the Lark ... 77
Should
I

How
It

Your True
77 78

Love Know
1914)

Was

a Lover and His

*The Wall ........... 843


*Lives ............... 844 * Lessons of the War:

Now

Lass the Roars


Mistress

Hungry Lion
Mine
.
.

Naming

of Parts ---. .

Judging Distances

Unarmed Combat
Rodgers,

846 847 848

Sigh No More, Ladies When That I Was and

78 79 79

^Neither Here Nor There 788

W. R. (b. 1911) * .786 Apollo and Daphne *Stormy Day ......... 787
. .

Tiny

Little

Saint Valentine's

Take

O
Is

Who
the

80 81 Take Those Lips 81 Silvia? 81

Boy

Day

When

Icicles

^Summer Holidays

... .789

Hang by
82

Wall

Rossetti, Christina Georgina (1890-1894)

You Spotted Snakes 82 Did Not the Heavenly


Rhetoric of Thine
Sonnets:

Birthday ........... 463

Eye 83

When

Dead, My Dearest ............ 463


I

Am

From

We
Look
a

Fairest Creatures Desire Increase 83


. .

Rossetti,

Dante Gabriel
.

When Forty Winters Shall


Besiege

(1888-1888)

The Blessed Damozel

.459

in

Thy Brow Thy Glass

...
to

84 84
85

Shall I

Compare Thee
in

Savage, D. S. (b. 1917) * Winter Offering ...... 852


Scovell, E. J. (b. 1907) * Love's Immaturity ....

When

Summer s Day

....

Disgrace with

When

Fortune & Men's Eyes 85


to the Sessions of

776

Sweet Silent Thought. 85 (More Shakespeare, next page)

870

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Shakespeare, William continued Full Many a Glorious Morning Have I Seen. What Is Your Substance. Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments ... Like as the Waves
Shakespeare, William continued The Cares of Majesty Wolsey's Farewell

86 86 87 87

He

Jests at Scars

98 99 99
100

Mercutio's

Queen

Mab

Speech

When

Have Seen by

No Longer Mourn for Me When I Am Dead ...


Mayest
Farewell!
in

87 Time's Fell Hand Since Brass, nor Stone, nor Earth, nor Bound 88 less Sea Tired with AIL These, for 88 Restful Death I Cry.
.

101 Imagination Ulysses Advises Achilles. 102 Our Revels Are Ended. .103 The Quality of Mercy. .103
.

To Thine Own
True

Self

Be
104

To Be
To

104 Not to Be Tomorrow and Tomor 105 row and Tomorrow


or
.

89

That Time of Year Thou

106 Gild Refined Gold Antony's Oration Over


. .

Me

Behold. 89

Caesar's

Body
.

106

Thou Art Too

Dear

for

My Possessing
Have Power
I

89

The Phoenix & the Turtle 109


Shelley,

They

that

to

Hurt

90

Percy Bysshe
Is

From You Have


Absent

Been
.
.

(1798-1828)

in the Spring

90

One Word
Profaned Music

Too Often
368 368

When

in the Chronicle of

91 Wasted Time Not Mine Own Fears, nor


the Prophetic Soul ... 91

Let

Me

riage of

Not to the Mar True Minds


.

Ode to the West Wind. .369 The Cloud 371 The Indian Serenade .373
.

91

To

a Skylark

374

Th' Expense of Spirit in


... 92 My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun. 92 Poor Soul, the Center of 93 My Sinful Earth

Waste

of

Shame

Shirley,

James (1596-1666) 168 Death the Leveller

Sidney, Sir VhStttf 1664-1686) 38 Desire

Loving in Truth

Opportunity
Passages from Plays: All the World's a Stage. The Uses of Adversity.

93
95 96 97

The Highway Leave Me, O Love

Cleopatra

39 39 40 Delight of Solitariness... 40 41 The Nightingale 42 Heart Exchange 43 Double Sestine 871

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Sitwell, Sacheverell (b. 1897)

Agamemnon's Tomb
Smart, Christopher (1788-1770)

.721

Swinburne, Algernon Charles continued A Forsaken Garden .... 489

The
268 271
67 68

Garden

of

Pros

The Man
Times

My

Cat Jeoffry
of Prayer

erpine

492
(b. 1912)

Symons, Julian

Southwell, Hoben(ieei-lS9S)

*Pub

799

Go by

Turns

The Burning Babe


.

Spencer, Bernard (b. 1909) ^Behaviour of Money. .784

Tennyson, Alfred, Lord


(1809-1898) Tears, Idle Tears

*Part of Plenty

785

Spender, Stephen (b. 1909) Ultima Ratio Regurn .778


.

Ask

Me No More

Not

Palaces,

An

Era's

Blow, Bugle, Blow Flower, in the Crannied

416 416 417 417 418

Crown

779
School

Wall
St.

An Elementary
*From
I

Agnes' Eve

Classroom in a Slum. 780 All These Events. 781

As Through the Land T

Think Continually of 782 Those .783 *The Double Shame


. .

Spenser, Most Glorious

Edmund (1552-1599)
Lord .... 58

Fresh Spring, the Herald 58 My Love Is Like to Ice. 59

One Day

Wrote Her
.

Name
Ye Tradeful Merchants
Prothalamion

59 59 60

Stephens, James (1882-1950) 637 The Goat Paths


Suckling, Sir John (1609-1642)

The Constant Lover


(1837-1909)

.203

Swinburne, Algernon Charles


Before the Beginning
the
.
. .

486

When
872

Hounds

of

Spring

488

419 419 All in All 420 420 Ulysses The Lotos-Eaters 422 Tithonus 427 Proem to "In Memoriam' 429 I Held It Truth 430 Oh Yet We Trust 431 Of One Dead 432 Dark House 432 433 Calm Is the Morn To-night the Winds Be 433 gin 434 Be Near Me I Cannot See the Fea 435 tures Right I Wage Not Any Feud 435 with Death I Envy Not 436 As Sometimes in a Dead 436 Man's Face .437 Ring Out, Wild Bells 438 Crossing the Bar
Break, Break, Break
.

Eve

We

W ent

at

INDEX OF AUTHOKS AND TITLES


Thomas, Dylan
(b. 1914)

*A

Refusal

To Mourn

Death by

the Fire of a
.
.

Traherne, Thomas (1637P-1674)

Child in London .815 Light Breaks Where No Sun Shines 816 The Force that Through the Green Fuse 817 I See the Boys of Sum

On Leaping Over Moon


Wonder
Shadows

the

232 234

in the Water. ,236

Treece, Henry (b. 1912) *In the Beginning 798

mer

818
of

On No Work
*Poem

*The Dyke-Builder

798

Words. 820
Vaughan, Henry (1621-1695) The Shower 225

Not from This Anger. .820 I, in My Intricate Image 821


in October

*Fern Hill *Over Sir John's Hill


*In Country Sleep *In Memory of
Jones ^Especially

824 826
.
.

.828

830

Ann
834
the

When
Wind
Tale

The Morning-Watch The Retreat The World They Are All Gone The Night

.225

226 227 229 230

October

*A Winters
*In
the

835 836
Giant's

W
Waller, On A Girdle

White

Edmund

(1606-1687)

Thigh

840

170

Thomas, Etow&(1878-1917)

The Gallows
Tears

The Owl
Adlestrop

676 677 677 678

WatMns, Veraon (b. 1906) * Music of Colours: The


Blossom Scattered
.
.

.743

Thompson, Francis
(1S59-1907)

*The Cave-Drawing .745 *The Yew-Tree 746 *The Lady with the Uni
.

corn

746

The Hound
In

of

No

Strange

Land

Heaven. .499 503

All

Webster, John (1680P-1830?) the Flowers of the

Thomson, James (1834-1882)

The
As
I

City

Is of

Came

.473 Night Through the


. .

Spring Dirge

150 150

Desert

475

Wilde, Oscar (1856-1900) In Reading Gaol 497

Tichborne, Chidiock (1668-1586) Written on the Eve of Execution 66

Wilmot, John, Earl of Rochester (1647-1680)

Satire

Against

Man
247
873

kind

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


Wither, George
Shall
I

(1588-1667)
in

Wasting

Despair

152

Yeats, William Butler (1865-1939)

Wordsworth, William
(1770-1860) Daffodils and Resolution

The Second Coming To a Shade


304

.575

575
576

A A

Prayer for
ter

My Daugh

Inde

pendence
Character of the Warrior

304

Among

School Children. 579

Happy
308
Spirit

Dialogue of Self and Soul 580

Strange Fits of Passion. .311

Slumber Did
Seal

My

Upon a Dying Lady: Her Courtesy

583

312

She Dwelt Among the 312 Untrodden Ways 312 The Rainbow

Certain Artists 583 She Turns the Dolls Faces to the Wall. .583

The

Solitary Reaper ...313 She Was a Phantom of 314 Delight Ode: Intimations o Im 315 mortality 321 Tintern Abbey

Friends Bring Her a Christmas Tree. .585 .585 Sailing to Byzantium


.

The Her Her Her

End

of

Day

Race
Courage

584 584 584

The Tower
Meditations
Civil
in

586

The World With Us

Is

Too Much
325 325 326 326
327 327

Time

of

War:
593 594
.
.

Upon

Westminster

Ancestral Houses .... 592

Bridge

London, 1802
Mutability
It
Is

My My My
I

House
Table Descendants
.

.595

a Beauteous Eve

The Road at My Door. 595 596 The Stare's Nest


See Phantoms of 597 Hatred 597 1919 Two Songs from a Play. 602 603 1 Am of Ireland'
.

ning Surprised by Joy

Wotton,

Sir

Henry
of

(1668-1639) The Character Happy Life

114

News

for

the

Delphic

Wyatt, Sir

Thomas

Oracle Lapiz Lazuli

604 605
Gallery

(1503-15W They Flee from Me Farewell, Love

The

Municipal

33 33 I Find No Peace ...... 34 34 My Galley 874

Revisited

Bronze Head
Circus Animals'

607 608

The

De
609

sertion

CONTINUED FROM FRONT FLAP


verse the emphasis it should have for a modern reader, its relation to the work of

the past.

This present volume is an ideal com panion for A Little Treasury of American Poetry, and the two, together totaling al most 1,800 pages, comprise the most repre sentative and comprehensive two-volume
anthology available in the English lan guage at the present time.

OSCAR WILLIAMS
EDITOR
Oscar Williams, editor of A LITTLE TREASURY OF BRITISH POETRY, and
the originator of The Little Treasury Series of books, is himself a well-known poet

whose poems have appeared in The South ern Review, The Sewanee Review, Partisan
Review, Harper's Magazine, The Atlantic, Republic, The Nation, Horizon, New Verse and many other of the important periodicals of both England and America.

New

He

is

also the author of four published

books of poetry.
"Oscar Williams
is

thologist in America."

probably the best an Robert Lowell in

The Sewanee Review