Solar Vision 

Here’s the good news. Solar Costs have halved in the last two years, and dramatic further price reductions are  expected. This means that we are rapidly approaching Grid Parity, the point at which buying a solar system  and having free power for 20 plus years costs effectively the same as continuing to buy electricity from the  grid1.   Now, when that occurs, a wave will build of massive public demand for solar power – indeed, billions of dollars  in private investment will be unleashed. This carbon abatement measure will have no public cost– it will be  justified entirely by its own economics, much as an investment in energy efficient lightbulb is.2  

The Barrier 
But a major barrier stands in the way. Currently, as soon as your generation exceeds your consumption in any  given instant, your power has zero regulated value.  For the solar industry, this makes it difficult to sell systems. It also sends some crazy messages – that the  government endorses a situation where coal power has greater value than solar power3.  

Simple Solution 
The simple solution is a Solar Energy Buyback, in which solar power is purchased for the same price as the  prevailing retail rate. Effectively this is a one‐for‐one price paid for all generation.  This was supported by CoAG a year ago, and is already implemented in Victoria, Tasmania, and the NT. South  Australia’s recent legislation has similar intent, ActewAGL has voluntarily offered it. Indeed the US Energy Act  supports net metering as law in at least 48 of the US States.  A Solar Energy Buyback does not create an unsustainable solar bubble, indeed quite the opposite ‐ it only  provides a 12 year payback at current conditions. But supporting a fair minimum entitlement, can’t be  conscionably argued against, and should form part of an energy strategy for the future that encompasses  demand management and energy storage. 

Getting there 
As a policy measure, a Solar Energy Buyback makes sense. It’s fair, responsible, and will be easily understood  by the public. (But not everyone likes this forthcoming solar revolution. Especially not incumbent electricity  retailers who fear their ability to sell ever‐increasing amounts of energy will be jeopardised4. Little surprise  that two of them are actively selling solar power (indeed the #1 and #14 installers nationwide)).  The question is which parties will fund this fair value for solar? And that is a topic of significant debate, debate  that reflects the great complexity of the issue, and the interplay between federal and state regulation. On the  one hand you have ESCoSA “ESTIMATING” the value of PV is 6c, the ACT government minister “deciding”  similarly5. But its time to stop estimating and start calculating – and all major stakeholders should be involved.  However, we need to be careful to whom we listen in the debate. Do we listen to the bureaucrats that use  outdated data to say solar power is expensive, or compare rooftop solar to coal6? Do we listen to the 

                                                            
1 2

 (This will happen first on residences in 2‐5 years time, then on commercial buildings a few years later.)   So a solar revolution is approaching that can deliver carbon abatement… at zero cost to the taxpayer.  3  As well as other perverse outcomes Such as encouraging electricity consumption for new solar owners 
4
5

 nor bureaucrats whose skill set might be outdated in the process. 

 Personally, I still find it unjustifiable to on‐sell at 20‐40c power that was purchased at 6c, but concede that  the current regulatory framework presents barriers to efficient recovery of the true value of solar power.  6  Do we believe that solar emissions abatement is expensive when we see clearly that from parity forward it  costs nothing? 

hypocritical retailers that use questionable methodology to claim solar power is middle class welfare, when all  other direct evidence is to the contrary? Indeed, do we trust a regulator that uses creative language to  demonise solar7, but who comes up with no recommendations or actions to address the biggest issue –  network price rises – and its cause – air conditioning and lack of demand management – and its impact – indirect taxation on an unprecedented scale of regression? In short, do we listen to incumbents that are  arguing in self‐interest to support the status quo? Or do we finally not just consult, but actually engage the  solar industry?  For these reasons, I am calling for an independent ‐ expert‐engaged ‐ in‐depth ‐  publically‐released  commission into the value of residential and commercial solar power in the NSW electricity network.8 One that  engages the expertise of the solar industry, consults IPART and the AER, and listens discerningly to the  electricity retailers and distributors. For it’s ridiculous to compare point‐of‐consumption microgeneration to  the wholesale cost of coal power, unless of course you plan to set up a coal station in your back yard.   This study should also identify market distortions and barriers that exist to recognising and recouping this true  value of PV. IPART has already identified one discrepancy9, but indications and bias suggest it will wont get it  right again without proper engagement10. This study would conclude by recommending the payments from  each party to reach full value of solar generation. And any regulatory barriers to recognising the true value of  PV should be addressed nationally to ensure that no party is disadvantaged by a solar connection.  Now if there is a gap, I suggest it is sufficiently minor to be immaterial, but the gap could be easily bridged  using CoAG‐agreed principles, or by recovering the undue gains from STC price gouging or Solar Bonus Scheme  windfall. 

And beyond 
To conclude, the Solar Energy Buyback provides a fair price for solar. Its doesn’t overheat the market – indeed  greater support is justified. But it’s a simple right that must be enshrined in perpetuity.  This isn’t revolutionary, it’s just about keeping the goal posts where they are.   And by the way, do it now – there’s an industry that’s about to implode. In this critical moment, having  invested over a billion dollars in developing the NSW solar industry, an industry collapse is wasteful in the  extreme, like training an elite athlete and then amputating their legs weeks before the Olympics. One‐for‐one  Solar Energy Buyback NOW.  Warwick Johnston MSc (Renewable E) BE BSc. Director, SunWiz Consulting   Advisor: CEC, APVA, AuSES, SEIA (VP). warwick@sunwiz.com.au 0413 361 534.   

                                                            
 describe as ‘fastest growing’ one‐off increases in green scheme costs   One that accounts for avoided generation capacity fuel, O&M, and capital cost, avoided transmission and  distribution costs, avoided losses, reduced wholesale electricity prices plus the values of deployment ease, grid  support, fuel price hedges, and health benefits of solar power (oh yes, the environmental too). One that  considers there may be network costs associated with PV deployment, but that assesses the penetration  thresholds before which no material costs arise.  9  under a gross metering configuration retailers pay distribution fees for gross energy consumption but  wholesale rates for net energy consumption (gross consumption less total solar production). This contrasts  with the situation under a net metering configuration – which seems to be a major inconsistency.  10  The study would consider why there is such a major distinction between consumption (which is read once  every three months) and exported power that is measured every 5 minutes. I calculate that across the state at  least 60% of solar generation is consumed on site, but that over 90% of householders still import more energy  at night than they exported during the day. 
8 7

30/06/2011

Impending Parity == $‐ve abatement from  user perspective (APVA, 2011)

Source: APVA

Precedent
• COAG (2008) Principles: 
– “That Governments agree that residential and small  g business consumers with small renewables (small  renewable consumers) should have the right to export  energy to the electricity grid and require market  participants to provide payment for that export which is  at least equal to the value of that energy in the relevant  electricity market and the relevant electricity network it  feeds in to, taking into account the time of day during  which energy is exported. which energy is exported “ – “assignment of tariffs to small renewable consumers  should be on the basis that they are treated no less  favourably than customers without small renewables but  with a similar load on the network.”
Source: APVA; ActewAGL website

1

30/06/2011

No Boom

Source: ESCoSA 2011

Status Quo: putting fingers in the air
• “the retailer payment will be equal to the  Commission s estimate of the value of the  Commission’s estimate of the value of the electricity that is generated” – ESCoSA 2011 • “the ‘normal cost of electricity’—currently determined by the Minister to be 6c/kWh—is  funded by retailers. That amount  approximates the savings retailers are able to the savings retailers are able to  make by avoiding purchases of electricity from  the National Electricity Market.” – ICRC 2010

2

30/06/2011

PV Demonisation…
Elderly, low income earners  = regressive indirect taxation???

Australian  Governments  consistently overstate  the price of PV   compared to trusted  international bodies

Source: UNSW; Melbourne University Institute

...vested interest… or just wrong?
Creative English “increases in green scheme are the fastest  growing in percentage terms” ‐ IPART Fact *Network prices > 50% of bill  and rising 15‐20% this year. *Bill Increase: network charges 2.6c/kWh vs green 0.73c/kWh (excludes retailer margin) % growth to 2013 41% (IPART says 49%)

AEMC Distribution Network

Portion of Bill 36‐45% VERSUS

RET FiT

2‐4% 0.12‐2.4%

11% 3% “an increase in peak demand of  1 kVA will, on average, require  an investment of some $2,500  in network augmentation” – Country Energy (2010)

Source: IPART, AEMC 

3

30/06/2011

PV Value

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/blog/post/2011/06/smaller‐generation‐incites‐ largest‐renewable‐energy‐gains

IPART’s Simplified Explanation…

4

30/06/2011

… misses the point  (multiple times over)

Price Gouging > 20% WACC???
• • • “prices below $40 reflect short term mismatch between supply and demand, ...  likely that a small number of certificates are being sold at these low prices  reflecting some participant’s cost of carry.” – IPART/Frontier Economics 2011 “it is unclear what volume of trades have occurred at prices below $30, and to  what extent retailers could expect to achieve this price for a material proportion of  h t t t t il ld tt hi thi i f t i l ti f the STCs they need to acquire.” – IPART/Frontier Economics 2011 “Even allowing for the holding costs that you are talking about, it is surprising that  the certificate price has stayed that low.” –DCCEE Executive Secretary, 23/5/11 STC Market Behaviour
$40.00 $35.00 $30.00 e STC Price $25.00 $20.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $0.00 18/11/2010 7/01/2011 26/02/2011 Greenbank 20% cost of carry +$1 margin 17/04/2011 6/06/2011 NextGen Weekly Trading Volume 0 26/07/2011 1,500 1 500 1,000 500 2,000 Thousands $45.00 2,500

STC price  is far lower  than 20%  WACC  justifies &  most  trades at  low prices

Green Energy Trade In Green

STC Trading Volume

5

30/06/2011

Summary
• Address both demand & supply side aspects  e.g. Air Conditioning – e g Air Conditioning DM/Levy • Engage Solar Expertise • Determine True PV Value • Don’t Demonise the solution consumers will  force you to embrace • Net 1‐for‐1 Solar Energy Buyback as a  enshrined right (and its justifiable to provide  more)
Warwick Johnston MSc (Renewable E) BE BSc. Director, SunWiz Consulting Advisor: CEC, APVA, AuSES, SEIA (VP). warwick@sunwiz.com.au 0413 361 534. 

6