You are on page 1of 3

Notes on Elements of Fiction:

Plot, Character, Setting, Point of View, Theme, Mood

I. Plot the sequence of events in a literary work Stages of a Plot

1) Exposition introduction of the setting, characters, and basic situation 2) Inciting Incident introduction of the central conflict 3) Rising Action (rising action) series of plot events after the inciting incident
gradually increasing the central conflict

4) Climax high point of suspense or conflict 5) Falling action events following the climax where conflicts resolve 6) Resolution (denouement) point following the falling action where general
insight or change is conveyed. Conflict a struggle between opposing forces Internal and External Conflicts: Internal Conflict involves a character having conflict within themselves External Conflict a character struggling against an outside force Types of Conflicts:

Person vs. Self internal conflict

Person vs. Person external conflict with another person Person vs. Society external conflict with the standards or expectations of a

group.

Person vs. Nature external conflict with elements of nature.

Flashback an earlier series of events told within the plot sequence to clarify a character or conflict.

Notes on Elements of Fiction:


Plot, Character, Setting, Point of View, Theme, Mood

Foreshadowing use of clues that suggest plot events that are yet to occur.

II. Character a person or an animal who takes part in the action of a literary work. Types of Characters Round Characters vs. Flat Characters - A round character shows many different traits faults as well as virtues. - A flat character shows only one trait. Dynamic Characters vs. Static Characters - A dynamic character develops and grows during the course of a story. - A static character does not change. Protagonist vs. Antagonist - The protagonist is the central character in a literary work - The antagonist is the major character (or force) in conflict with the protagonist. Characterization the act of creating or developing a character Types of Characterization 1) Direct characterization the author directly states the characters traits. 2) Indirect characterization the author shows the characters traits without directly telling the reader. The author can do this through: a. Actions b. Dialogue c. Characters appearance d. Other characters reactions to the character III. Setting time and place in a story Time past, present, future; year, season, type of day Place region, country, state, town; social, economic, cultural environment IV. Point of View amount and type of information the writer reveals; the type of narrator telling the story Narrator a speaker or character who tells the story 1) First Person Narrator : when a character in the story tells the story 2) Third Person Narrator: when a voice outside the story tells the story Types of Third Person Narrators: a. Omniscient an all-knowing narrator who knows how every character thinks and feels.

Notes on Elements of Fiction:


Plot, Character, Setting, Point of View, Theme, Mood

b. Limited sees the world through only one characters eyes. c. Objective tells the story from outside the action without direct
knowledge of any of the characters thoughts or feelings.

V. Theme a central message or insight into life revealed through a literary work: the moral of the story The theme of a literary work may be stated directly or implied. When the theme of a work is implied, readers think about what the work suggest about people or life. VI. Tone and Mood (these two ideas overlap a bit) Tone - the writers attitude toward the subject and audience the tone can often be described by a single adjective: formal or informal, serious or playful, bitter or ironic, etc. Mood the feeling or atmosphere the mood is often described by an emotion: dark, depressed, jolly, angry, tense, light, etc.