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Five Towns College


2010-2011
UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG
The graduate programs offered by the College which lead to
the Master of Science Degree in Education (M.S.Ed.), Master
of Music Degree (M.M.) and the Doctor of Musical Arts
Degree (D.M.A.) are set forth in the Graduate Catalog.

Five Towns College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE),
and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). It's academic programs
are registered by the New York State Education Department.

Five Towns College is approved by:

New Jersey Higher Education Assistance Authority

New York State Education Department, Bureau of Veterans Education for the Training of Veterans,
Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID)

New York State Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC)

Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistant Agency

Rhode Island Higher Education Assistance

State of New York, Department of Social Services, Commission for the Visually Handicapped

United States Department of Education, for the Federal Grants, Loans and Work Study (FWS)
Programs

United States Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service with Authorization
to Accept and Enroll Non-Immigrant Foreign Students and Social Security Administration

Veterans Administration, Central Office, Washington, DC, for the Vocational Rehabilitation of
Disabled Veterans
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Regulations in this Catalog and other official statements of the College are binding on all students. Students who
enroll at the College are deemed to have read, understood and agreed to be bound by the provisions contained in
this Catalog. The College reserves the right at any time, without prior notice, whenever it deems it advisable, to
change or modify its schedule of tuition and fees, and to withdraw, cancel, reschedule or modify any course, program
of study, requirement or regulation affecting any of the foregoing.
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Table of Contents
General Information................................................ 5 Course Descriptions................................................. 60
Accreditation............................................................ 5 Art History................................................................. 60
Audio Recording Technology.................................... 61
Mission and Goals.................................................... 5
Basic Educational Skills............................................ 62
Degree Programs...................................................... 7
Business..................................................................... 62
General Education................................................... 8 Childhood Education................................................. 65
Bachelor Degrees...................................................... 11 Computer Business Applications............................... 68
Jazz/Commercial Music—Mus.B........................... 13 Economics.................................................................. 68
Performance............................................................... 15 English....................................................................... 69
History....................................................................... 71
Composition/Songwriting.......................................... 17
Language.................................................................... 72
Musical Theatre/Vocal............................................... 18
Mass Communication................................................ 72
Audio Recording Technology.................................... 19 Mathematics............................................................... 73
Music Business.......................................................... 21 Music......................................................................... 74
Music Education—Mus.B....................................... 22 Music Business.......................................................... 84
Childhood Education—B.S..................................... 25 Music Education........................................................ 85
Music History............................................................ 86
Mass Communication—B.S.................................... 28
Philosophy................................................................. 88
Broadcasting.............................................................. 29
Psychology................................................................. 88
Journalism.................................................................. 30 Science....................................................................... 89
Theatre Arts—B.F.A................................................ 32 Social Science............................................................ 89
Film/Video—B.F.A................................................... 36 Sociology................................................................... 89
Business Management—B.P.S................................ 38 Speech........................................................................ 90
Theatre Arts................................................................ 90
Audio Recording Technology.................................... 41
Film/Video................................................................. 93
Business Management............................................... 43
Facilities and Equipment......................................... 96
Music Business.......................................................... 45
Student Life.............................................................. 101
Associate Degrees..................................................... 46
Student Services....................................................... 103
Liberal Arts—A.A.................................................... 46 Admission................................................................. 104
Teaching Assistant..................................................... 48 Academic Information............................................. 106
Literature.................................................................... 48 Tuition and Fees...................................................... 113
Business Administration—A.S................................ 49 Financial Aid............................................................ 115
Board of Trustees..................................................... 123
Business Management—A.A.S............................... 51
Administration......................................................... 123
Audio Recording Technology.................................... 54
Faculty....................................................................... 125
Business Management............................................... 55
Academic Calendar.................................................. 144
Music Business.......................................................... 57 Index.......................................................................... 145
Jazz/Commercial Music—A.A.S............................ 59 Directions to College................................................ 148
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AFFIRMATIVE ACTION POLICY

Five Towns College is committed to the federal government's mandate for equal opportunity employment. It is the policy
of the Board of Trustees to recruit, employ, retain and promote employees without regard to sex, age, color, or creed.

The College does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national
origin, race, or sex in the educational programs and activities which it operates. Inquiries concerning this policy of equal
opportunity and affirmative action should be referred to the College's Affirmative Action Officer.
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General Information MISSION STATEMENT

Founded in 1972, Five Towns College is an independent, Five Towns College orchestrates a lifelong pursuit of learning
nonsectarian, coeducational institution of higher education that fosters a commitment to ethical, intellectual, and social
that serves both residential and commuter student populations. values. Dedicated to excellence in learning, teaching, and
It is committed to providing high quality undergraduate scholarship, the College celebrates the worlds of jazz/
and graduate programs at the Associate, Baccalaureate, commercial music, media, business, teaching, the performing
Master’s, and Doctoral levels that lead to professional and arts, and the entertainment industry. By integrating rigorous
liberal arts degrees. academic inquiry, research, and practical experience, the
College prepares graduates to be articulate and imaginative
participants in our democratic society.
ACCREDITATION
Five Towns College nourishes in its students a global
perspective, through distinctive curricula that combine
Five Towns College is accredited by the Commission on
content expertise with a general education program.
Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Col-
By bringing students and faculty together in a creative
leges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA
community, the College facilitates an environment that
19104; (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Edu-
respects both individuality and diversity, while challenging
cation is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by
students to expand their unique talents to the fullest.
the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher
Education Accreditation.
GOALS OF THE COLLEGE
The Education Unit at Five Towns College is accredited by • To foster a learning environment that encourages individual
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Educa- and collaborative creativity and respects the differences
tion (NCATE), 2010 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Suite 500, of others.
Washington, DC 20036; (202) 466-7496. This accreditation • To develop in undergraduate students college-level
covers initial teacher preparation programs and advanced proficiencies in general education.
educator preparation programs. • To develop in undergraduate students content expertise
consistent with their career objectives.
The College is chartered by the New York State Board of • To strengthen graduate students' professional-level
Regents. Its curricula are registered by the New York State proficiencies in content-specific areas.
Education Department, 89 Washington Avenue - 2 West • To promote a lifelong commitment to learning and
Mezzanine, Albany, New York 12234; (518) 474-3862. professional development through curricular and
extracurricular offerings that nourish a community of
artists and scholars.
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THE CAMPUS PERSONAL AND PRACTICAL
Nestled in the rolling hills of Long Island's North Shore, Five Five Towns College offers courses that are designed to ensure
Towns College offers students the opportunity to study in an success and prepare students to achieve in the real world.
attractive suburban environment. The College's serene 35-acre
Five Towns College provides a small-college environment
campus, located in the wooded countryside of Dix Hills, in the
that enables students to receive personalized attention, in-
town of Huntington, New York, provides students with a park-
dividualized educational formats, hands-on training, and a
like refuge where they can achieve their academic goals.
practical, well-rounded education in all of its programs.
The campus consists of a number of interconnected structures
that house the academic and other related facilities of the
College. These include a performing arts center, Upbeat
Café, student center, library, classrooms, gymnasium, ad-
ministrative offices and The John Lennon Center for Music
and Technology. Residence Halls are located on campus in
the new Living/Learning Center. The campus also contains
an attractive central courtyard and athletic fields.
THE LONG ISLAND METROPOLITAN REGION
Five Towns College is situated within an easy commute to
the places where the world's greatest musicians gather and
perform, as well as the varied cultural attractions that make
the Long Island Metropolitan Region a mecca of world
culture. The educational advantage of being in the artistic
capital of the world cannot be overemphasized.
New York City, with everything from Lincoln Center to
Broadway, is just a train ride away and provides students FACULTY
with some of the best cultural advantages in the world. The
opportunity to see, hear and directly experience the plethora In addition to possessing the requisite professional prepara-
of creative activities that only New York City offers is one tion and appropriate educational experience, the members of
that cannot fail to make a student's years at Five Towns Col- the faculty are individuals who have demonstrated teaching
lege much more than an opportunity for technical growth. skill, an ability to relate to students as individuals, and a
It is truly a chance to expand every horizon and to mature genuine interest in enriching the life of the College com-
intellectually, emotionally, and culturally. munity. They are committed to helping each student learn
to the best of his/her capacity. Faculty serve as academic
Closer to campus, the many communities of Long Island
advisors, lead various extracurricular activities, and provide
abound with cultural and recreational opportunities. The
support services to students as tutors.
sandy shores of Jones Beach State Park and the Fire Island
National Seashore are world renowned for their white sandy
STUDENT BODY
beaches. Just off campus is Long Island's bustling Route 110
corridor, the home of numerous national and multinational Five Towns College students are a microcosmic reflection of
corporations. the diversity that characterizes the larger society. They run
EDUCATIONAL RELEVANCE the full gamut of difference, from the traditional-age student
who comes to the College directly from high school to the
Five Towns College, as a suburban college with a growing non-traditional student who comes to the College either full-
reputation for educational innovation and excellence, is in or part-time after an educational hiatus of varying duration.
the vanguard of those institutions that have recognized and Five Towns College was founded to meet the needs of this
responded to the unique responsibilities and opportunities that widely divergent student body.
are the special province of suburban colleges. The College
is committed to providing relevant educational opportuni- And it meets them superbly! Five Towns College students
ties to the widest mix of students. It is aware of its pivotal are as diverse in their motives, means, and goals as is the
role in educating tomorrow's workers—and educating them region that the College serves. All students at the College
in terms of what is required to succeed economically and share a strong desire and determination for a first-class col-
culturally in the 21st century. lege education.
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Degree Programs
The College awards the degrees of Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.), Master of Music (M.M.), Master of Science in Education
(M.S.Ed.), Bachelor of Music (Mus.B.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Professional
Studies (B.P.S.), Associate in Arts (A.A.), Associate in Science (A.S.), and Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.). The
undergraduate degrees are listed below. Graduate degrees are listed in the Five Towns College Graduate Catalog. These
programs are registered by the New York State Education Department. Enrollment in programs other than those that are
registered or approved may jeopardize a student's eligibility for student aid awards.
BACHELOR DEGREE PROGRAMS
HEGIS Code HEGIS Code
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC—Mus.B. 1004 CHILDHOOD EDUCATION—B.S. 0802
Concentrations
Performance MUSIC EDUCATION—Mus.B. 0832
Composition/Songwriting
FILM/VIDEO—B.F.A. 1010
Musical Theatre/Vocal
Audio Recording Technology THEATRE ARTS—B.F.A. 1007
Music Business
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT—B.P.S. 0599
MASS COMMUNICATION—B.S. 0601 Concentrations
Concentrations Audio Recording Technology
Broadcasting Business Management
Journalism Music Business

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

LIBERAL ARTS—A.A. 5649 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT—A.A.S. 5004


Concentrations Concentrations
Teaching Assistant Audio Recording Technology
Literature Business Management
Music Business
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—A.S. 5004
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC—A.A.S. 5610

Jeffrey Biegel, Elmer Bernstein, and Dr. Jim Odrich conversing at Commencement
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General Education
All degrees offered by Five Towns College include a Gener- generally offered in the form of humanities coursework,
al Education Core Curriculum that is common to all degree such as literature, music or art appreciation and history, and
programs. The core curriculum expresses the fundamental cultural studies within the context of a specific discipline
values that the faculty seeks to inculcate in all undergraduate (i.e., art, film or theatre history). However, the General
students. The General Education program is designed so that Education Core Curriculum and the Liberal Arts courses
students acquire and demonstrate college-level proficiency contained therein, are not directed toward specialized
in essential skills, including oral and written communica- study or specific occupational or professional objectives,
tion, scientific and quantitative reasoning, critical analysis while the Liberal Arts courses contained in major content
and reasoning, technological competency, and information areas do have such a focus.
literacy. The General Education program also incorporates
the study of values, ethics, and diverse perspectives, while Information Literacy
fostering an appreciation for the musical and artistic tradi-
tions at Five Towns College. Information Literacy provides an intellectual framework for
identifying, finding, understanding, evaluating and using
General Education Core Curriculum Credits information. It includes determining the nature and extent
ART ___ Art History (non-music education of needed information; accessing information effectively
majors)................................................. 3 and efficiently; evaluating critically information and its
ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2.................... 6 sources; incorporating selected information in the learner’s
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity................................ 3 knowledge base and value system; using information
MAT/SCI Mathematics or Science...................... 3 effectively to accomplish a specific purpose; understanding
MUH ___ Music History..................................... 3 the economic, legal and social issues surrounding the use
____ 101 General Psychology or of information and information technology; and observing
Introduction to Sociology................ 3 laws, regulations, and institutional policies related to the
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2.................... 2 access and use of information. At Five Towns College
SPE 101/231 Fundamentals of Speech or Information Literacy is an integral part of the General
Public Speaking (non-theatre majors)..... 3 Education required of all students. Information Literacy
is taught discretely in SCI 101 and SCI 102, and taught
Total 26 in conjunction with ENG 101 and ENG 102. In addition,
Information Literacy is infused into a variety of other
Liberal Arts courses, such as those with research requirements.
Courses of a general or theoretical nature that are designed
to develop judgment and understanding about human Technological Competency
beings’ relationship to their social, cultural, and natural
environment constitute the Liberal Arts. Technological Competency as expressed in the General
Education Program at Five Towns College implies that
All degree programs offered by Five Towns College include undergraduate students demonstrate proficiency in those
a distribution of coursework in the Liberal Arts. The specific technological skills that are requisite for academic success
number of Liberal Arts courses required for each program in both General Education and in content specific degree
of study varies depending upon the specific degree being programs.
pursued. Professional degree programs include a minimum
distribution requirement in the Liberal Arts of 25%, while In General Education these proficiencies include knowledge
others programs offered by the College require between of computer hardware and software, file management, word
50% and 75%. processing, spreadsheets, and Internet and email systems.
Technological Competency skills for General Education
Liberal Arts courses may be incorporated in both the are introduced during Orientation, and in SCI 101 and SCI
General Education Core Curriculum and into major degree 102. In addition, Technological Competency is infused
program content areas. When Liberal Arts courses are into a variety of other courses, such as COM 101, COM
included in major degree program content areas, they are 102, SCI 141, and ELE 363.
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Technological Competency for content specific degree pro- ENG 102 builds upon the foundation established in ENG
grams is infused into a wide variety of courses, depending 101, moving through more sophisticated writing patterns
upon the degree program being pursued and the techno- and advanced library skills. The culmination of the course
logical proficiencies required for success therein. For ex- is a research paper and a brief oral presentation that
ample, students pursuing a course of study in Audio Re- summarizes the major findings of that research. Students
cording Technology develop content specific technological are required to submit essays that demonstrate proficiency
proficiencies in courses such as AUD 101 – 403. Similarly, in each of the following five areas: Cause and Effect;
students pursuing a course of study in Theatre Arts develop Comparison and Contrast; Classification and Division;
content specific technological proficiencies in courses such Definition; and Argumentation.
as THE 111–412.
Oral and Written Communication skills are introduced in dis-
Technological Competency is also infused across the crete courses that are included in the General Education Core
curriculum through the use of new and emerging learning Curriculum. These include SPE 101, ENG 101, and ENG
technologies that are embedded in the College’s teaching 102. The Oral Communication skill of students pursuing a
methods. For example, each semester a variety of courses program in Theatre Arts has its foundation in THE 161.
are offered online through the College’s Blackboard
Oral Communication skills are addressed in SPE
platform. This distance learning initiative affords students
101. The course content here encompasses all areas
the opportunity to develop the skills and dispositions
of communication—verbal and non-verbal, ethnic and
necessary to successfully utilize new and emerging learning
gender diverse, and intra and inter-personal. Students are
technologies. In addition, Five Towns College policies
required to deliver three oral presentations of increasing
mandate that new students entering the College on or after
sophistication, and these presentations are accompanied
the fall 2006 have access to a personal computer at their
by written reports that are graded for content. Finally,
place of residence. In addition, nearly every course offered
the presentations themselves are evaluated according to a
by Five Towns College has online Blackboard Learning
carefully constructed rubric.
site associated with it. These policies and procedures
further enhance the General Education goal of developing The oral and written proficiencies established during the
in students college-level Technological Competency. freshman year, along with the skills in critical analysis and
reasoning, are further developed beyond the first year by
requiring that students present research papers and oral
Oral and Written Communication presentations in upper division coursework.

Undergraduate students are expected to acquire and Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning
demonstrate college-level proficiencies in Oral and
Written Communication. Oral Communication skills Undergraduate students are expected to acquire and dem-
require the abilities to prepare and deliver well organized, onstrate college-level proficiencies in Scientific and Quan-
content-rich, and articulate public presentations. Written titative Reasoning. Proficiencies in Scientific and Quanti-
Communication skills include the abilities to state clearly tative Reasoning are introduced to undergraduate students
and literally a thesis and to develop that thesis so that it is either through discrete courses that are included in the
supported by evidence, logic, and specific arguments. General Education Core Curriculum, such as MAT 111,
MAT 123, MAT 231, PSY 101, and SOC 101, or through
The writing exercises that students in ENG 101 encounter infusion into a variety of courses such as SCI 131, SCI
move from Invention through Narration, Description, 141, and SCI 211. Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning
and Exemplification to Process. This course also stresses skills are further advanced by infusion into a wide variety
Information Literacy beginning with a Library Orientation of other courses where inductive and deductive reasoning
and culminating in the documentation of research materials. skills are essential.
Drafting and revising are major components of the course,
and students are required to submit the final drafts of Scientific reasoning is characterized by adherence to a self-
five essays that are graded according the standards of the correcting system of inquiry, the scientific method, that
English Department’s Rubric. Critical Thinking skills are relies on empirical evidence and testable theory to describe,
infused into the course and are reflected in assignments for understand, predict and control natural phenomena.
the students’ Reaction Journals as well as in their essays Quantitative Reasoning employs simple mathematical
and their performance on Mid-semester and Final Exams. methods, whether graphical, symbolic, or numerical to
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solve real-world problems. Infusion occurs in a wide variety
of courses where troubleshooting and problem solving skills
are developed. For example, Film/Video students develop
troubleshooting and problem solving skills in courses such as
VID 101 – 464. Similarly, Theatre Arts students develop these
skills in courses such as THE 111, THE 313 and THE 411.

Similarly students may elect to take other courses where


these General Education skills are emphasized. AUD 101,
for instance, deals with the physics of sound, BUS 101
and BUS 251 are grounded solidly in mathematics, ECO
101 and 102 are concerned with mathematical data and
formulas, and SOC 101 and PSY 101 are rooted in the
scientific method.

Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Undergraduate students are expected to acquire and


demonstrate college-level proficiencies in Critical Analysis
and Reasoning, including the ability to interpret, analyze,
and evaluate arguments based on their merits and to
construct logically developed arguments based upon sound Maury Yeston displaying the Music by Maury
data. Proficiencies in Critical Analysis and Reasoning show poster, after receiving an
are developed though discrete courses in the General Honorary Doctor of Music Degree (D.M.A.).
Education Core Curriculum, such as ENG 101, ENG 102,
PSY 101 and SOC 101. In addition, the development of
these proficiencies is infused into a wide variety of other
courses, such as Literature and History courses offered by Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives
the Liberal Arts Division.
The Mission and Goals of Five Towns College, as adopted
by its Board of Trustees, broadly express the values and
ethics of the College while fostering an appreciation for
diverse perspectives and the College’s musical and artistic
traditions. These characteristics find further expression
in the General Education Core Curriculum as adopted
by the Faculty. These characteristics are inculcated into
undergraduate students in a variety of ways. For example,
the General Education Core Curriculum includes courses
that challenge students to respect diversity, and foster an
appreciation for the College’s creative characteristics.
In Diversity, the College seeks to develop in students a
disposition of respect for diverse perspectives and respect
for diverse cultures. These courses include HIS 301, and
a wide variety of Art and Music History courses such as
ART 101 – 202 and MUH 101 – 408. The College also
fosters a learning environment where dispositions toward
Values, Ethics and Diverse Perspectives are developed.
This includes a rich offering of co-curricula and extra-
curricula activities, and policies and standards that facilitate
a campus climate that reflects these characteristics.
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Bachelor Degrees
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC PROGRAM Composition/Songwriting
The Bachelor of Music (Mus.B.) degree program in Jazz/
The Composition/Songwriting Concentration provides pro-
Commercial Music with concentrations in Performance,
fessional training for students who intend to pursue careers
Composition/Songwriting, Musical Theatre, Audio Record-
as composers, arrangers and songwriters. Students receive
ing Technology, and Music Business is designed for students
intensive instruction in a core of technical studies, that in-
planning to pursue careers as professional performers, com-
clude courses such as harmony, orchestration, counterpoint,
posers, recording engineers, music business executives or
MIDI, songwriting, keyboard techniques, form and analysis,
producers of video music.
commercial arranging and composition.
The comprehensive program in Jazz/Commercial Music
provides both a common core of technical studies and a
Music Business
foundation for specialized courses in the student's major
area of concentration. Music compositions selected from
The Music Business Concentration is designed for students
various styles, periods and composers provide the textual
interested in preparing for a career in a music-related busi-
material for the program. A comparative survey of music
ness field. Studies include the technical, legal, production,
literature in contrasting styles and media is utilized as an
managing, merchandising and licensing aspects of the music
integral approach to the study of harmony, melody, rhythm,
business.
counterpoint, instrumentation, texture, and composition.
Class performance of relevant music is encouraged and writ-
This Concentration assists those graduates who plan to work
ing skills, ear skills, music analysis, and reading facility are
as artist managers, record and publishing company owners,
developed in accordance with individual potential.
executives, promoters and producers of music videos to
achieve their career goals.

Musical Theatre/Vocal

The Musical Theatre/Vocal Concentration is designed to


provide an opportunity for students to develop the special
skills needed for the challenges of a career in the musical
theatre.

The coursework ensures that students receive a balanced


education by requiring training in music, movement, acting,
voice, general education, and musical theatre production.

Students participate in productions staged in the College's


Audio Recording Technology 600 seat professionally-equipped theatre that has been de-
scribed as "acoustically perfect" in order to develop the skills
The Audio Recording Technology Concentration at Five
required for competitive auditions for a career in the theatre,
Towns College is designed to provide students with the tools
television, or further study in a graduate program.
needed to succeed as professional engineers and producers
of music for soundtracks in film and video productions.
Students study the theory of sound, recording electron- Performance
ics, engineering procedures, music production techniques,
and audio/video post production in a sequence of courses The Performance Concentration is designed for students
designed to develop practical and technical skills. The planning to pursue careers as professional performers. It
college's state-of-the-art recording studios, editing suites, and provides a common core of technical studies and a founda-
MIDI workstations provide students with a highly focused tion of specialized courses such as music history, harmony,
learning environment for both assigned and extracurricular counterpoint, improvisation, ensemble performance and
recording projects. private instruction.
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BUSINESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MASS COMMUNICATION PROGRAM

The Business Management Program with concentrations in The Mass Communication degree program is designed
Audio Recording Technology, Business Management and so that students acquire and demonstrate proficiency
Music Business, that leads to the Bachelor of Professional in the essential skills necessary for a career in the mass
Studies Degree (B.P.S.), is designed for students planning communication industry and in the fields of broadcasting
to pursue careers as business management/marketing and journalism. Students learn the principles, laws, and
executives with firms in the areas of record and music historical background of the mass communication industry,
production, broadcasting, concert promotion, radio, while enhancing their oral, written, and critical thinking
television, theatre, and communications. The program is skills. Students also select a major area of concentration in
intended for students who are interested in developing their broadcasting or journalism. Learning goals for all students
business and technical expertise. pursuing a Mass Communication degree program include
mass media and society, voice and diction, new and
In addition to the learning goals for each major area of emerging media.
concentration declared by business management students,
learning goals for this program also focus upon accounting, Broadcasting
business organization and management, business law,
economics, and marketing, business technology, and finance. The Broadcasting concentration is designed to build upon
the major proficiencies acquired by students pursuing a Mass
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM (1-6) Communication degree by adding additional specialized
proficiencies that focus upon Broadcasting as a career,
The Childhood Education program develops in students the cultural influence, and form of individual and collective
knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to become expression. Learning goals for students focus upon media
teachers who transform information into knowledge, law, broadcast journalism, broadcast announcing, broadcast
knowledge into judgment, and judgment into action. Starting programming, sound theory, and television production.
with a conceptual framework that Teaching Is Prepared
Performance, the Childhood Education program seeks to Journalism
prepare educators for this role. Learning goals for students
focus upon content knowledge, knowledge of the learner, The Journalism concentration is designed to build upon the
diversity, instructional methodology, communication skills, major proficiencies acquired by students pursuing a Mass
reflective-assessment strategies, collaboration and shared Communication degree by adding additional specialized
inquiry, and educational technology. proficiencies that focus upon Journalism as a career, cultural
influence, and form of individual and collective expression.
Film/Video program Learning goals for students focus upon expository and
creative writing, news writing, scriptwriting, photo
The Film/Video degree program develops in students the
journalism, and film criticism.
knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to produce
broadcast-style and narrative motion pictures. Graduates of
the Film/Video program are prepared for entry-level posi- MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAM
tions as film editors, production crew, and cinematographers.
Learning goals for students focus upon cinematography, film The Music Education degree program develops in music
history, film/video editing, motion picture directing, motion students the knowledge skills and dispositions necessary
picture production, and scriptwriting. to become certified music teachers (K – 12) who transform
information into knowledge, knowledge into judgment,
THEATRE ARTS PROGRAM and judgment into action. Starting with a conceptual
framework that “Teaching Is Prepared Performance, the
The Theatre Arts program develops knowledge, skills, and Music Education Program seeks to prepare music educators
dispositions in acting, singing, dancing, theatre design and for this role. Learning goals for students focus upon content
technology, management, and theatre history. By providing knowledge, knowledge of the learner, diversity, instructional
a wide variety of experiences, the program prepares students methodology, communication skills, reflective-assessment
who are capable of participating in the entertainment strategies, collaboration and shared inquiry, and educational
industry which encompasses live, broadcast, and recorded technology.
productions.
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JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC PROGRAM
Bachelor of Music Degree (Mus.B.)
HEGIS Code: 1004

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The courses below are required of all students in the Jazz/


Commercial Music program.

Credits
A.LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION........... 32
B. APPLIED MUSIC................................................... 54
C. MUSIC HISTORY................................................... 12
D.CONCENTRATION................................................ 24
E. ELECTIVES............................................................ 8
Total 130

A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION.......... 32


ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2............ 6
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................ 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or
Introduction to Sociology.......... 3
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy................... 2
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech............. 3
ART_____ Art History Elective.................... 3
MAT_____ Mathematics Elective.................. 3
Social Science 100/200 level................................... 3
Social Science 300/400 level................................... 3
Liberal Arts 200-400 level....................................... 3

B. APPLIED MUSIC................................................... 54
MUS 111-212 Harmony 1-4............................... 12
MUS 121-222 Sight Singing 1-4......................... 4
MUS 123-224 Ear Training 1-4.......................... 4
MUS 131-232 Keyboard Lab 1-4....................... 8
MUS 141-442 Major Instrument/Voice 1-8........ 16
MUS 314 Arranging.................................... 2
PE__ ___ Performance Ensemble................ 8

C. MUSIC HISTORY................................................... 12
MUH 101-202 Music History 100/200 level....... 6
MUH 301-408 Music History 300/400 level....... 6

D. CONCENTRATION................................................ 24

E. ELECTIVES . ................................................... 8

Full-time students are required to register for Performance


Ensemble every semester.
14
CONCENTRATION COMPONENT
Students in the Jazz/Commercial Music program select one of the following concentrations. The 24 credits in the selected
concentration, together with the 32 credits in Liberal Arts/General Education, 12 credits in Music History, 54 credits in Ap-
plied Music, and the 8 credits of Electives, comprise the 130-credit requirement for the Bachelor of Music degree.

Performance Concentration Credits Audio Recording Technology Concentration Credits


MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level.............. 3 AUD 101 Audio Recording Theory.................... 3
MUS 311 Counterpoint ...................................... 2 AUD 102 Audio Recording Techniques............. 3
MUS 315 Commercial Arranging....................... 2 AUD 201 Recording Studio Operations............. 3
MUS 318 Improvisation 1................................... 2 AUD 202 Advanced Audio Production............... 3
MUS 331,332 Keyboard Lab 5, 6.............................. 4 AUD 303 MIDI Applications.............................. 3
MUS 393 Instrumental Conducting ................... 2 AUD 304 Nonlinear Recording.......................... 3
MUS 394 Choral Conducting.............................. 2 AUD 401 Audio/Video Post Production............. 3
MUS 411 Computer Music Notation.................. 3 AUD 402 Advanced Mixing Procedures............ 3
MUS 415 Popular Songwriting........................... 2 Total 24
MUS 451 Keyboard Harmony............................ 2 Musical Theatre/Vocal Concentration
Total 24
THE 131-232 Stage Movement 1-4........................... 4
THE 151-252 Play Production 1-4............................ 4
THE 161 Acting Fundamentals.......................... 3
Composition/Songwriting Concentration THE 162 Acting Methods.................................. 3
MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level.............. 3 THE 261 Reality in Acting................................. 3
MUS 311 Counterpoint ...................................... 2 THE 333 Modern Dancing................................. 3
MUS 315 Commercial Arranging....................... 2 MUS 331,332 Keyboard Lab 5, 6.............................. 4
MUS 331, 332 Keyboard Lab 5, 6.............................. 4 Total 24
MUS 393 Instrumental Conducting ................... 2 Music Business Concentration
MUS 394 Choral Conducting.............................. 2 MUB 101 Music Business Careers...................... 3
MUS 411 Computer Music Notation.................. 3 MUB 102 Record Promotion and Broadcasting.. 3
MUS 412 Composition ...................................... 2 MUB 201 Music Publishing and Copyright........ 3
MUS 415 Popular Songwriting........................... 2 MUB 202 Music Business Contracts................... 3
MUS 451 Keyboard Harmony............................ 2 MUB 301 Artist Management............................. 3
Total 24 MUB 302 Concert Production and Promotion.... 3
MUB 401 Music Marketing................................ 3
MUB 403 Advanced Music Publishing............... 3
Total 24
15
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC
Performance Concentration
Bachelor of Music Degree (Mus.B.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 1004
SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits
MUS 111 Harmony 1......................................... 3 MUS 314 Arranging........................................... 2
MUS 121 Sight Singing 1.................................. 1 MUS 318 Improvisation 1.................................. 2
MUS 123 Ear Training I..................................... 1 MUS 331 Keyboard Lab 5................................. 2
MUS 131 Keyboard Lab 1................................. 2 MUS 341 Major Instrument/Voice 5.................. 2
MUS 141 Major Instrument/Voice 1.................. 2 MUS 411 Computer Music Notation................. 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
ENG 101 English Composition 1...................... 3 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level............ 3
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3 ________ Elective.............................................. 1
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1....................... 1 16
17
SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
MUS 112 Harmony 2......................................... 3 MUS 311 Counterpoint...................................... 2
MUS 122 Sight Singing 2.................................. 1 MUS 315 Commercial Arranging...................... 2
MUS 124 Ear Training 2.................................... 1 MUS 332 Keyboard Lab 6................................. 2
MUS 132 Keyboard Lab 2................................. 2 MUS 342 *Major Instrument/Voice 6.................. 2
MUS 142 Major Instrument/Voice 2.................. 2 MUS 393 Instrumental Conducting................... 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
ENG 102 English Composition 2...................... 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.............................. 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level............ 3
Introduction to Sociology................ 3 17
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2....................... 1
17 SEMESTER VII
SEMESTER III MUS 394 Choral Conducting . .......................... 2
MUS 211 Harmony 3......................................... 3 MUS 441 Major Instrument/Voice 7.................. 2
MUS 221 Sight Singing 3.................................. 1 MUS 451 Keyboard Harmony........................... 2
MUS 223 Ear Training 3.................................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
MUS 231 Keyboard Lab 3................................. 2 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level............ 3
MUS 241 Major Instrument/Voice 3.................. 2 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level................. 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 ________ Elective.............................................. 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech.................... 3 16
MAT_____ Mathematics Elective......................... 3
16 SEMESTER VIII
MUS 415 Popular Songwriting.......................... 2
SEMESTER IV MUS 442 *Major Instrument/Voice 8.................. 2
MUS 212 Harmony 4......................................... 3 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
MUS 222 Sight Singing 4.................................. 1 ART_____ Art History Elective........................... 3
MUS 224 Ear Training 4.................................... 1 ________ Social Science 300/400 level............. 3
MUS 232 Keyboard Lab 4................................. 2 ________ Electives............................................. 4
MUS 242 Major Instrument/Voice 4.................. 2 15
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 Total 130
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3
________ Social Science 100/200 level............. 3
16
Chorus must be taken every semester by voice majors * Recital required.
and for four semesters by instrumental majors.
16

Charles Strouse three-time Tony Award winning composer of Bye Bye Birdie, Annie,
Applause, Rags, Golden Boy and the theme song for All In The Family, surrounded by
members of the cast appearing in the recent College production of Strouse on Strouse.
17
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC
Composition/Songwriting Concentration
Bachelor of Music Degree (Mus.B.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 1004

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


MUS 111 Harmony 1......................................... 3 MUS 314 Arranging........................................... 2
MUS 121 Sight Singing 1.................................. 1 MUS 331 Keyboard Lab 5................................. 2
MUS 123 Ear Training 1.................................... 1 MUS 341 Major Instrument/Voice 5.................. 2
MUS 131 Keyboard Lab 1................................. 2 MUS 411 Computer Music Notation................. 3
MUS 141 Major Instrument/Voice 1.................. 2 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble 1................... 1 MUH ____ Music History 300/400 level............ 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1...................... 3 ________ Social Science 300/400 level 3
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3 16
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1....................... 1
17
SEMESTER VI
SEMESTER II
MUS 311 Counterpoint ..................................... 2
MUS 112 Harmony 2......................................... 3
MUS 315 Commercial Arranging...................... 2
MUS 122 Sight Singing 2.................................. 1
MUS 332 Keyboard Lab 6................................. 2
MUS 124 Ear Training 2.................................... 1
MUS 342 * Major Instrument/Voice 6.................. 2
MUS 132
Keyboard Lab 2................................. 2
MUS 393 Instrumental Conducting................... 2
MUS 142 Major Instrument/Voice 2.................. 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.............................. 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2...................... 3
MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level............. 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech.................... 3
17
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2....................... 1
17
SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII
MUS 211 Harmony 3......................................... 3 MUS 394 Choral Conducting............................. 2
MUS 221 Sight Singing 3.................................. 1 MUS 441 Major Instrument /Voice 7................. 2
MUS 223 Ear Training 3.................................... 1 MUS 451 Keyboard Harmony........................... 2
MUS 231 Keyboard Lab 3................................. 2 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
MUS 241 Major Instrument/Voice 3.................. 2 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level............. 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level................. 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or ________ Elective.............................................. 3
Introduction to Sociology................ 3 16
MAT_____ Mathematics Elective......................... 3
16
SEMESTER IV SEMESTER VIII
MUS 212 Harmony 4......................................... 3 MUS 412 Composition . .................................... 2
MUS 222 Sight Singing 4.................................. 1 MUS 415 Popular Songwriting.......................... 2
MUS 224 Ear Training 4.................................... 1 MUS 442 * Major Instrument/Voice 8.................. 2
MUS 232 Keyboard Lab 4................................. 2 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
MUS 242 Major Instrument/Voice 4.................. 2 ART_____ Art History Elective........................... 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 ________ Electives............................................. 4
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3 14
________ Social Science 100/200 level............. 3 Total 130
16
Chorus required for four semesters. * Recital required.
18
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC
Musical Theatre/Vocal Concentration
Bachelor of Music Degree (Mus.B.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 1004
SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits
MUS 111 Harmony 1......................................... 3 THE 131 Stage Movement 1............................. 1
MUS 121 Sight Singing 1.................................. 1 THE 151 Play Production 1............................... 1
MUS 123 Ear Training 1.................................... 1 THE 161 Acting Fundamentals......................... 3
MUS 131 Keyboard Lab 1................................. 2 MUS 314 Arranging........................................... 2
MUS 141 Major Instrument/Voice 1.................. 2 MUS 331 Keyboard Lab 5................................. 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 MUS 341 Major Instrument/Voice 5.................. 2
ENG 101 English Composition 1...................... 3 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level............. 1
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1....................... 1 15
17
SEMESTER VI
SEMESTER II THE 132 Stage Movement 2............................. 1
MUS 112 Harmony 2......................................... 3 THE 152 Play Production 2............................... 1
MUS 122 Sight Singing 2.................................. 1 THE 162 Acting Methods................................. 3
MUS 124 Ear Training 2.................................... 1 MUS 332 Keyboard Lab 6................................. 2
MUS 132
Keyboard Lab 2................................. 2 MUS 342 * Major Instrument/Voice 6.................. 2
MUS 142 Major Instrument/Voice 2.................. 2 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.............................. 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2...................... 3 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level............ 3
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3 ________ Elective.............................................. 1
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2....................... 1 17
17 SEMESTER VII
SEMESTER III THE 231 Stage Movement 3............................. 1
MUS 211 Harmony 3......................................... 3 THE 251 Play Production 3............................... 1
MUS 221 Sight Singing 3.................................. 1 THE 261 Reality in Acting................................ 3
MUS 223 Ear Training 3.................................... 1 THE 333 Modern Dancing................................ 3
MUS 231 Keyboard Lab 3................................. 2 MUS 441 Major Instrument/Voice 7.................. 2
MUS 241 Major Instrument/Voice 3.................. 2 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level................ 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech.................... 3 ________ Elective.............................................. 3
MAT_____ Mathematics Elective......................... 3 17
16
SEMESTER VIII
SEMESTER IV THE 232 Stage Movement 4............................. 1
MUS 212 Harmony 4......................................... 3 THE 252 Play Production 4............................... 1
MUS 222 Sight Singing 4.................................. 1 MUS 442 * Major Instrument/Voice 8.................. 2
MUS 224 Ear Training 4.................................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble ..................... 1
MUS 232 Keyboard Lab 4................................. 2 ART_____ Art History Elective........................... 3
MUS 242 Major Instrument/Voice 4.................. 2 ________ Social Science 300/400 level............. 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 ________ Electives............................................. 4
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or 15
Introduction to Sociology................ 3 Total 130
________ Social Science 100/200 level............. 3
16
Chorus must be taken every semester by voice majors * Recital required.
and for four semesters by instrumental majors.
19
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC
Audio Recording Technology Concentration
Bachelor of Music Degree (Mus.B.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 1004

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


AUD 101 Audio Recording Theory................... 3 AUD 303 MIDI Applications................................ 3
MUS 111 Harmony 1......................................... 3 MUS 314 Arranging.............................................. 2
MUS 121 Sight Singing 1.................................. 1 MUS 341 Major Instrument/Voice 5...................... 2
MUS 123 Ear Training 1.................................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble.......................... 1
MUS 131 Keyboard Lab 1................................. 2 MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level................. 3
MUS 141 Major Instrument/Voice 1.................. 2 PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 Introduction to Sociology.................... 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1...................... 3 ________ Elective.................................................. 2
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1....................... 1 16
17
SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
AUD 102 Audio Recording Techniques............. 3 AUD 304 Nonlinear Recording............................. 3
MUS 112 Harmony 2......................................... 3 MUS 342 * Major Instrument/Voice 6...................... 2
MUS 122 Sight Singing 2.................................. 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble.......................... 1
MUS 124 Ear Training 2.................................... 1 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level................. 3
MUS 132
Keyboard Lab 2................................. 2 MAT_____ Mathematics Elective............................ 3
MUS 142 Major Instrument/Voice 2.................. 2 ________ Social Science 100/200 level................ 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 ________ Elective.................................................. 1
ENG 102 English Composition 2...................... 3 16
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2....................... 1
17
SEMESTER VII
SEMESTER III AUD 401 Audio/Video Post-Production............... 3
AUD 201 Recording Studio Operations............. 3 MUS 441 Major Instrument/Voice 7...................... 2
MUS 211 Harmony 3......................................... 3 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble.......................... 1
MUS 221 Sight Singing 3.................................. 1 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.................................. 3
MUS 223 Ear Training 3.................................... 1 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level................. 3
MUS 231 Keyboard Lab 3................................. 2 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.................... 3
MUS 241 Major Instrument Voice 3.................. 2 ________ Elective.................................................. 1
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 16
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3
16
SEMESTER IV SEMESTER VIII
AUD 202 Advanced Audio Production.............. 3 AUD 402 Advanced Mixing Procedures............... 3
MUS 212 Harmony 4......................................... 3 MUS 442 * Major Instrument/Voice 8...................... 2
MUS 222 Sight Singing 4.................................. 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble.......................... 1
MUS 224 Ear Training 4.................................... 1 ART_____ Art History Elective.............................. 3
MUS 232 Keyboard Lab 4................................. 2 ________ Social Science 300/400 level................ 3
MUS 242 Major Instrument/Voice 4.................. 2 ________ Electives................................................ 4
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 16
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech.................... 3
16 Total 130

Chorus required for four semesters. * Recital required.


20

Newport Jazz Festival promoter George Wein being presented with an Honorary Doctorate
from College President Dr. Stanley Cohen and Artist-in-Residence Ervin Drake.

Al Feilich, Charles Strouse, Frank Military, Stanley Cohen and Ervin Drake at recent
Friar's Foundation Awards Dinner at the Plaza Hotel, New York City, Grand Ballroom.
21
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC
Music Business Concentration
Bachelor of Music Degree (Mus.B.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 1004

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


MUB 101 Music Business Careers........................ 3 MUB 301 Artist Management............................... 3
MUS 111 Harmony 1............................................ 3 MUS 314 Arranging.............................................. 2
MUS 121 Sight Singing 1..................................... 1 MUS 341 Major Instrument/Voice 5..................... 2
MUS 123 Ear Training 1....................................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1
MUS 131 Keyboard Lab 1.................................... 2 MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level................ 3
MUS 141 Major Instrument/Voice 1..................... 2 PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1 Introduction to Sociology................... 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1......................... 3 ________ Elective................................................. 2
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1.......................... 1 16
17
SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
MUB 102 Record Promotion and Broadcasting.... 3 MUB 302 Concert Production and Promotion...... 3
MUS 112 Harmony 2............................................ 3 MUS 342 * Major Instrument/Voice 6..................... 2
MUS 122 Sight Singing 2..................................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1
MUS 124 Ear Training 2....................................... 1 MAT_____ Mathematics Elective........................... 3
MUS 132 Keyboard Lab 2.................................... 2 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level................ 3
MUS 142 Major Instrument/Voice 2..................... 2 ________ Social Science 100/200 level................ 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1 ________ Elective................................................. 1
ENG 102 English Composition 2......................... 3 16
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2.......................... 1
17
SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII
MUB 201 Music Publishing and Copyright.......... 3 MUB 401 Music Marketing.................................. 3
MUS 211 Harmony 3............................................ 3 MUS 441 Major Instrument/Voice 7..................... 2
MUS 221 Sight Singing 3..................................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1
MUS 223 Ear Training 3....................................... 1 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity................................. 3
MUS 231 Keyboard Lab 3.................................... 2 MUH ___ Music History 300/400 level................ 3
MUS 241 Major Instrument Voice 3..................... 2 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.................... 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1 ________ Elective................................................. 1
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech....................... 3 16
16
SEMESTER IV SEMESTER VIII
MUB 202 Music Business Contracts.................... 3 MUB 403 Advanced Music Publishing................. 3
MUS 212 Harmony 4............................................ 3 MUS 442 * Major Instrument/Voice 8..................... 2
MUS 222 Sight Singing 4..................................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1
MUS 224 Ear Training 4....................................... 1 ART_____ Art History Elective.............................. 3
MUS 232 Keyboard Lab 4.................................... 2 ________ Social Science 300/400 level................ 3
MUS 242 Major Instrument/Voice 4..................... 2 ________ Electives............................................... 4
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1 16
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level................ 3
16 Total 130

Chorus required for four semesters. * Recital required.


22
MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAM
Bachelor of Music Degree (Mus.B.)
HEGIS Code: 0832

The Music Education Program is designed for students


interested in a career as a teacher of music in a public or
private school (K-12). The program leads to New York
State Certification and provides professional training and a
student teaching experience in a public school district under
the supervision of the Music Education Director.

Music Education majors are required to maintain a minimum


grade point average of 3.0.

Vocalists who are accepted into the Music Education


Program will be reclassified as piano majors and must meet
the Recital and Qualifying Examination requirements for
piano majors.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS Credits ADMISSION STANDARDS


A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION.......... 35 Candidates for admission to the Music Education Program
B. APPLIED MUSIC.................................................. 63 are expected to have a Regents diploma with a minimum
C. MUSIC HISTORY.................................................. 12 average of 80% and a combined SAT score of at least 1010 or
D. MUSIC EDUCATION............................................ 25 1400 (new version) as evidence of potential to complete the
Total 135 program and obtain New York State certification for teaching
Music Education.
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION.......... 35
ENG 101,102 English Composition 1, 2.............. 6 C. MUSIC HISTORY.................................................. 12
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.......................... 3
PSY 101 General Psychology....................... 3 MUH 101-202 Music History 100/200 level......... 6
PSY 301 Educational Psychology................ 3 MUH 407 Classical Music to 1840................ 3
PSY 302 Child Psychology........................... 3 MUH 408 Classical Music after 1840............ 3
SCI 131 Human Biology.............................. 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.............. 3
SPE 231 Public Speaking............................. 3 D. MUSIC EDUCATION............................................ 25
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2............... 2
______ Language 1, 2................................ 6 EDU 241 Minor Instrument.......................... 1
EDU 311 Methods of General Music
Education ................................... 3
B. APPLIED MUSIC.................................................. 63 EDU 312 Methods of Choral Music
MUS 111-212 Harmony 1-4.................................. 12 Education.................................... 2
MUS 121-222 Sight Singing 1-4........................... 4 EDU 313 Methods of Instrumental Music
MUS 123-224 Ear Training 1-4............................. 4 Education.................................... 2
MUS 131-332 Keyboard Lab 1-6.......................... 12 EDU 314 Literacy in Schools....................... 3
MUS 141-442 Major Instrument 1-8..................... 16 EDU 321 Instrumental Techniques............... 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble.................. 7 EDU 331 School and Society........................ 3
MUS 311 Counterpoint ................................. 2 * EDU 421 Student Teaching........................... 9
MUS 314 Arranging....................................... 2
MUS 393, 394 Instrumental & Choral Conducting ... 4 * A Qualifying Examination is a prerequisite.
23
MUSIC EDUCATION
Bachelor of Music Degree (Mus.B.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 0832

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


MUS 111 Harmony 1......................................... 3 EDU 321 Instrumental Techniques....................... 2
MUS 121 Sight Singing 1.................................. 1 EDU 331 School and Society................................ 3
MUS 123 Ear Training 1.................................... 1 MUS 314 Arranging.............................................. 2
MUS 131 Keyboard Lab 1................................. 2 MUS 331 Keyboard Lab 5..................................... 2
MUS 141 Major Instrument 1............................ 2 MUS 341 Major Instrument 5............................... 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1
ENG 101 English Composition 1...................... 3 MUH 407 Classical Music to 1840........................ 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1....................... 1 ___ 101 Language 1............................................ 3
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3 18
17
SEMESTER VI
SEMESTER II EDU 311 Methods of General Music
MUS 112 Harmony 2......................................... 3 Education............................................ 3
MUS 122 Sight Singing 2.................................. 1 EDU 312 Methods of Choral Music
MUS 124 Ear Training 2.................................... 1 Education............................................ 2
MUS 132 Keyboard Lab 2................................. 2 MUS 332 Keyboard Lab 6..................................... 2
MUS 142 Major Instrument 2............................ 2 MUS 342 * Major Instrument 6............................... 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 MUS 394 Choral Conducting ............................... 2
ENG 102 English Composition 2...................... 3 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1
SPE 231 Public Speaking................................. 3 PSY 301 Educational Psychology........................ 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2....................... 1 ___ 102 Language 2............................................ 3
17 18
SEMESTER III
SEMESTER VII
MUS 211 Harmony 3......................................... 3
EDU 313 Methods of Instrumental Music
MUS 221 Sight Singing 3.................................. 1
Education............................................ 2
MUS 223 Ear Training 3.................................... 1
EDU 314 Literacy in Schools............................... 3
MUS 231 Keyboard Lab 3................................. 2
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.................................. 3
MUS 241 Major Instrument 3............................ 2
MUS 311 Counterpoint ........................................ 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
MUS 393 Instrumental Conducting . .................... 2
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.................. 3
MUS 441 Major Instrument 7............................... 2
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble......................... 1
16
PSY 302 Child Psychology.................................. 3
SEMESTER IV 18
MUS 212 Harmony 4......................................... 3
MUS 222 Sight Singing 4.................................. 1 SEMESTER VIII
MUS 224 Ear Training 4.................................... 1 EDU 421 Student Teaching K-12.......................... 9
MUS 232 Keyboard Lab 4................................. 2 MUH 408 Classical Music after 1840.................... 3
MUS 242 Major Instrument 4............................ 2 MUS 442 * Major Instrument 8............................... 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1 14
EDU 241 Minor Instrument............................... 1
PSY 101 General Psychology........................... 3 Total 135
SCI 131 Human Biology.................................. 3
17
Chorus must be taken for seven semesters by piano majors * Recital required.
and for four semesters by instrumental majors.
24

Maury Yeston, composer of the Broadway shows Grand Hotel, Titanic and
Nine, surrounded by student performers after a show featuring his music.

The Children's Theatre presentation of The Wizard of Oz.


25
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM (1-6) ADMISSION STANDARDS
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.) Candidates for admission to the Childhood Education Program
HEGIS Code: 0802 are expected to have a Regents diploma with a minimum average
of 80% and a combined SAT score of at least 1010 or 1400
The undergraduate program in Childhood Education leading (new version) as evidence of potential to complete the program
to the Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.) is designed for and obtain New York State certification for teaching grades
candidates planning to pursue careers as teachers in public 1-6 or present other credentials satisfactory to the faculty.
or private elementary schools. This program fulfills the
New York State Education Department requirements for the COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Initial Certificate in Childhood Education (1-6). The program
The Courses below are required of all students in the
includes field experiences, observations, and a student
Childhood Education Program.
teaching experience in both the upper (4-6) and lower (1-3)
Credits
elementary grade levels in a cooperating public school district
A. LIBERAL ARTS
under the supervision of the Education Division Chair.
General Education Core................................. 53
B. LITERATURE CONCENTRATION
The courses in the Pedagogical Core designed for this
Content Core.................................................. 30
program incorporate the learning standards embodied in the
C. CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
regulations of the Commissioner of Education.
Pedagogical Core........................................... 39
D. ELECTIVES ......................................................... 6
The Content Core in Literature includes both intermediate
Total 128
and advanced level courses in the discipline. Literature has
been selected for a major concentration in order to prepare A. LIBERAL ARTS
graduates with a broad, humanistic appreciation of the world, General Education Core................................. 53
its diversity, peoples and cultures. ART___ Art History Elective..................... 3
ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2............ 6
The Liberal Arts courses in the General Education Core have HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................ 3
been selected to broaden and elevate candidate awareness, MAT 111 Mathematical Reasoning............. 3
cultivate the intellect and stimulate the imagination. These MAT 123 College Algebra........................... 3
courses are designed to develop skills that will provide MUH___ Music History.............................. 3
excellent preparation for a teaching career. Liberal arts PSY 101 General Psychology..................... 3
courses that draw candidates into important new academic PSY 301 Educational Psychology.............. 3
and intellectual areas and increase awareness of differing PSY 302 Child Psychology......................... 3
cultural heritages are a major component of the program. SCI 101,102 Information Literacy 1,2.............. 2
SCI 131 Human Biology............................ 3
The choice of electives presents the prospective teacher SCI 141 Computer Literacy....................... 3
with the opportunity to select courses in an area of personal SCI 211 Environmental Science................ 3
interest. The expertise developed in these elective areas SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology............ 3
may be used to enhance all other subject areas of the SPE 231 Public Speaking........................... 3
elementary school curriculum. ___ 101, 102 Language 1, 2.............................. 6
B. LITERATURE CONCENTRATION
Content Core................................................... 30
ENG 221 The Poem..................................... 3
ENG 241 Short Fiction................................ 3
ENG 261 The Drama................................... 3
ENG 271 Art of the Essay........................... 3
ENG 330 American Literature..................... 3
ENG 333 Children’s Literature.................... 3
ENG 352 British Literature.......................... 3
ENG 361 Masterworks of Literature........... 3
ENG ___ English Literature 300/400 level ... 3
ENG ___ English Literature 300/400 level ... 3
26
C. CHILDHOOD EDUCATION D. ELECTIVES . ...................................................... 6
Pedagogical Core............................................. 39
ELE 331 School and Society...................... 3
ELE 341 Reading/Language Arts (1-3)...... 3 Prospective teachers are required to complete approved
ELE 342 Reading/Language Arts (4-6)...... 3 workshops dealing with the identification, and reporting
ELE 351 Teaching Social Studies.............. 3 of suspected child abuse or maltreatment and substance
ELE 361 Teaching Science......................... 3 abuse maltreatment, and school violence prevention and
ELE 362 Teaching Mathematics................ 3 intervention in accordance with section 3004 of the Education
ELE 363 Computers and Technology......... 2 Law. The College reserves the right to be selective in
ELE 391 Teaching Physical Education...... 2 acceptance to Teacher Education Programs, student teaching,
ELE 451 Health & Learning Disabilities... 3 and recommending students for state certification.
ELE 471 Planning, Assessment and
Management . ......................... 2
ELE 481 Student Teaching (1-6) . ............. 12

The Student Cast from Neil Simon's "Fools."


27
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (1-6)
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 0802

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


ENG 101 English Composition 1.......................... 3 ELE 331 School and Society................................ 3
MAT 111 Mathematical Reasoning....................... 3 ELE 341 Reading/Language Arts (1-3)................ 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1.......................... 1 ELE 391 Teaching Physical Education................ 2
SCI 211 Environmental Science......................... 3 ENG 271 Art of the Essay..................................... 3
___ 101 Language 1............................................ 3 ENG 330 American Literature.............................. 3
_______ Elective................................................. 3 PSY 302 Child Psychology.................................. 3
16 17

SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
ENG 102 English Composition 2.......................... 3 ELE 342 Reading/Language Arts (4-6)................ 3
MAT 123 College Algebra.................................... 3 ELE 351 Teaching Social Studies........................ 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2.......................... 1 ELE 363 Computers and Technology ................. 2
SCI 141 Computer Literacy................................ 3 ENG 333 Children's Literature.............................. 3
___ 102 Language 2............................................ 3 ENG 352 British Literature................................... 3
_______ Elective................................................. 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.................................. 3
16 17

SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII


ENG 221 The Poem.............................................. 3 ELE 361 Teaching Science.................................. 3
ENG 241 Short Fiction.......................................... 3 ELE 362 Teaching Mathematics......................... 3
PSY 101 General Psychology.............................. 3 ELE 451 Health and Learning Disabilities....... 3
SPE 231 Public Speaking.................................... 3 ELE 471 Planning, Assessment and
MUH____ Music History Elective......................... 3 Management . ..................................... 2
15 ENG 361 Masterworks of Literature..................... 3
ENG ___ English Literature 300/400 level........... 3
SEMESTER IV 17
ENG 261 The Drama............................................ 3
PSY 301 Educational Psychology........................ 3 SEMESTER VIII
SCI 131 Human Biology..................................... 3 ELE 481 Student Teaching (1-6).......................... 12
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology..................... 3 ENG ___ English Literature 300/400 level........... 3
ART_____ Art History Elective.............................. 3 15
15
Total 128
28
MASS COMMUNICATION PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)
Hegis Code: 0601

The Mass Communication Program that leads to the B. MASS COMMUNICATION ............................... 30
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.) is designed for MAC 101 Mass Communication ................. 3
students interested in a career in the fields of broadcasting, MAC 102 Broadcast Fundamentals ............. 3
journalism, or media management. The Program deals MAC 201 Voice and Diction......................... 3
with the principles, laws and historical background of MAC 301 New and Emerging Media........... 3
the professions associated with mass communication MAC 302 Media Ethics and Criticism.......... 3
and is designed to improve oral, written and critical MAC 401 Public Opinion Polling................. 3
thinking skills. Selected practicums and internships BUS 121 Business Law 1............................ 3
provide students with the on-site professional training and BUS 471/472 Internship 1,2............................... 6
experience necessary to pursue a media-related career. COM 211 Desktop Publishing...................... 3

C. CONCENTRATION............................................. 24
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
D. ELECTIVES ..................................................... 6
The courses below are required of all students in the Mass
Communication Program.
Credits C. CONCENTRATION COMPONENT
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION........ 62 Students in the Mass Communication Program select
B. Mass Communication................................ 30 one of the following concentrations. The 24 credits in
C. CONCENTRATION............................................. 24 the selected concentration together with the 62 credits
D. ELECTIVES......................................................... 6 in Liberal Arts/General Education, 30 credits in Mass
Total 122 Communication and 6 elective credits comprise the 122-
credit requirement for the Bachelor of Science degree.

Broadcasting Credits
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION ...... 62 MAC 202 Media Law..................................... 3
ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2............ 6 MAC 211 Broadcast Journalism.................... 3
ENG 203 Journalism.................................... 3 MAC 212 Broadcast Announcing.................. 3
ENG 261 The Drama..................................... 3 MAC 312 Broadcast Programming................ 3
ENG 271 Art of the Essay............................ 3 AUD 101 Audio Recording Theory............... 3
HIS 201 Contemporary Issues.................... 3 BUS 241 Principles of Marketing................. 3
HIS 202 Film History . .............................. 3 BUS 461 Business Seminar.......................... 3
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................ 3 VID 131 Televison Workshop 1................... 3
PSY 101 General Psychology..................... 3 Total 24
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2............. 2
SCI 211 Environmental Science................ 3 Journalism Credits
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology........... 3 ENG 201 Creative Writing..................................... 3
SOC 351 Social Problems.......................... 3 ENG 202 News Writing......................................... 3
SOC 361 Mass Media and Society.............. 3 ENG 204 Script Writing.................................... 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech............. 3 ENG 210 Feature and Magazine Writing.......... 3
ART___ Art History 100/200 level.......... 3 ENG 302 Photo Journalism............................... 3
MAT ___ Mathematics................................. 3 ENG 330 American Literature.......................... 3
MUH ___ Music History.............................. 3 ENG 332 Film and Literature............................ 3
THE ___ Theatre History............................ 3 ENG 401 Editorial and Review Writing........... 3
_______ Liberal Arts 300/400 level........ 6 Total 24
29

MASS COMMUNICATION
Broadcasting Concentration
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
Hegis Code: 0601

SEMESTER I SEMESTER V
MAC 101 Mass Communication ......................... 3 MAC 202 Media Law........................................... 3
AUD 101 Audio Recording Theory..................... 3 MAC 301 New and Emerging Media................... 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1......................... 3 ENG 271 Art of the Essay.................................... 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1......................... 1 SCI 211 Environmental Science........................ 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.................... 3 MAT ___ Mathematics......................................... 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech...................... 3 15
16

SEMESTER VI
SEMESTER II MAC 302 Media Ethics and Criticism . ................ 3
MAC 102 Broadcast Fundamentals...................... 3 MAC 312 Broadcast Programming........................ 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1.................................... 3 BUS 241 Principles of Marketing......................... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2......................... 3 SOC 361 Mass Media and Society....................... 3
PSY 101 General Psychology............................. 3 THE ___ Theatre History..................................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2......................... 1 15
ART___ Art History 100/200 level.................... 3
16
SEMESTER VII
MAC 401 Public Opinion Polling......................... 3
SEMESTER III BUS 471 Internship 1........................................... 3
MAC 201 Voice and Diction................................. 3 SOC 351 Social Problems.................................... 3
COM 211 Desktop Publishing.............................. 3 ______ Liberal Arts 300/400 level.................... 3
ENG 203 Journalism............................................ 3 ______ Elective................................................. 3
HIS 201 Contemporary Issues............................ 3 15
VID 131 Television Workshop 1......................... 3
15
SEMESTER VIII
BUS 461 Business Seminar.................................. 3
SEMESTER IV BUS 472 Internship 2........................................... 3
MAC 211 Broadcast Journalism............................ 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity................................. 3
MAC 212 Broadcast Announcing.......................... 3 ______ Liberal Arts 300/400 level.................... 3
ENG 261 The Drama........................................... 3 ______ Elective................................................. 3
HIS 202 Film History ........................................ 3 15
MUH ___ Music History....................................... 3
15 TOTAL 122
30

MASS COMMUNICATION
Journalism Concentration
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
Hegis Code: 0601

SEMESTER I SEMESTER V
MAC 101 Mass Communication ......................... 3 MAC 301 New and Emerging Media................... 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1......................... 3 ENG 210 Feature and Magazine Writing............. 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1......................... 1 ENG 271 Art of the Essay.................................... 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.................... 3 ENG 302 Photo Journalism.................................. 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech...................... 3 SCI 211 Environmental Science........................ 3
MAT ___ Mathematics......................................... 3 15
16

SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
MAC 102 Broadcast Fundamentals...................... 3 MAC 302 Media Ethics and Criticism . ................ 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1.................................... 3 ENG 330 American Literature.............................. 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2......................... 3 ENG 332 Film and Literature............................... 3
PSY 101 General Psychology............................. 3 SOC 361 Mass Media and Society....................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2......................... 1 THE ___ Theatre History..................................... 3
ART___ Art History 100/200 level.................... 3 15
16

SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII


MAC 201 Voice and Diction................................. 3 MAC 401 Public Opinion Polling......................... 3
COM 211 Desktop Publishing.............................. 3 BUS 471 Internship 1........................................... 3
ENG 203 Journalism............................................ 3 SOC 351 Social Problems.................................... 3
ENG 204 Script Writing....................................... 3 ______ Liberal Arts 300/400 level.................... 3
HIS 201 Contemporary Issues............................ 3 ______ Elective................................................. 3
15 15

SEMESTER IV SEMESTER VIII


ENG 201 Creative Writing................................... 3 ENG 401 Editorial and Review Writing............... 3
ENG 202 News Writing....................................... 3 BUS 472 Internship 2........................................... 3
ENG 261 The Drama........................................... 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.................................. 3
HIS 202 Film History......................................... 3 ______ Liberal Arts 300/400 level ................... 3
MUH ___ Music History....................................... 3 ______ Elective................................................. 3
15 15

TOTAL 122
31

Main Stage musicals, such as Thoroughly Modern Millie,


regularly play to packed houses at Five Towns College.

Five Towns College is home to both the Huntington Public Access


and Educational Access television channels.
32
THEATRE ARTS PROGRAM
Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)
HEGIS Code: 1007

The Theatre Arts Program is designed for students interested


in a career in the performing arts field as an actor, entertainer,
director, stage manager, lighting or sound technician or any
other related aspect of the dynamic and rapidly expanding
entertainment industry including the musical theatre. Students
are interviewed for appropriate class placements.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The courses below are required of all Theatre Arts students.

Credits
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION.. 35
B. THEATRE ARTS........................................... 40
C. THEATRE HISTORY................................... 12
D. THEATRE PRODUCTION........................... 29
E. ELECTIVES.................................................. 9
Total 125

A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION... 35


ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2..... 6
ENG 204 Script Writing......................... 3
ENG 332 Film and Literature................. 3
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity................... 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or
Introduction to Sociology... 3
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2........ 2
THE 141 Voice & Diction ..................... 3
ART_____ Art History 100/200 level....... 3
ENG_____ Literature 200-400 level......... 3 C. THEATRE HISTORY................................... 12
MAT_____ Mathematics 100/200 level..... 3 THE 101 Introduction to Theatre.......... 3
MUH_____ Music History 100/200 level. 3 THE 201 Modern Theatre...................... 3
THE ___ Theatre History 300/400 level. 6
B. THEATRE ARTS........................................... 40
THE 161 Acting Fundamentals............. 3 D. THEATRE PRODUCTION........................... 29
THE 162 Acting Methods...................... 3 THE 111 Introduction to Stagecraft....... 3
THE 261 Reality in Acting................... 3 THE 151-452 Play Production 1-8................ 8
THE 262 Character Development........ 3 THE 213 Stage Management................. 3
THE 333 Modern Dancing................... 3 THE 311 Stage Lighting......................... 3
THE 334 Theatrical Dancing................ 3 THE 313 Costume Design/Makeup....... 3
THE 361 Acting for Camera.................. 3 THE 315 Theatre Management.............. 3
THE 371 Directing................................. 3 THE 425, 426 Senior Project 1, 2.................. 6
THE 131-232 Stage Movement 1-4............. 4
MUS 141-242 Major Voice 1-4.................... 8
PEV 111-212 Chorus 1-4.............................. 4 E. ELECTIVES.................................................. 9
33
Theatre Arts
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (B.F.A.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 1007

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


THE 101 Introduction to Theatre...................... 3 THE 313 Costume Design/Makeup................... 3
THE 111 Introduction to Stagecraft.................. 3 THE 315 Theatre Management......................... 3
THE 131 Stage Movement 1............................ 1 THE 333 Modern Dancing................................ 3
THE 151 Play Production 1.............................. 1 THE 351 Play Production 5.............................. 1
THE 161 Acting Fundamentals......................... 3 THE 361 Acting for Camera............................. 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1...................... 3 THE ___ Theatre History 300/400 level........... 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1....................... 1 PEV 111 Chorus 1............................................. 1
MUS 141 Major Voice 1..................................... 2 17
17

SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
THE 132 Stage Movement 2........................... 1 THE 334 Theatrical Dancing............................. 3
THE 141 Voice and Diction ............................ 3 THE 352 Play Production 6............................... 1
THE 152 Play Production 2.............................. 1 THE 371 Directing............................................ 3
THE 162 Acting Methods................................ 3 ART____ Art History 100/200 level.................. 3
THE 201 Modern Theatre.................................. 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.............................. 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2...................... 3 PEV 112 Chorus 2............................................. 1
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2....................... 1 14
MUS 142 Major Voice 2..................................... 2
17

SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII


THE 213 Stage Management............................. 3 THE 311 Stage Lighting.................................... 3
THE 231 Stage Movement 3........................... 1 THE 425 Senior Project 1.................................. 3
THE 251 Play Production 3.............................. 1 THE 451 Play Production 7.............................. 1
THE 261 Reality in Acting................................ 3 ENG 332 Film and Literature............................ 3
ENG___ Literature 200-400 level................... 3 PEV 211 Chorus 3............................................. 1
MAT___ Mathematics 100/200 level................ 3 _______ Elective.............................................. 3
MUS 241 Major Voice 3..................................... 2 14
16

SEMESTER IV SEMESTER VIII


THE 232 Stage Movement 4........................... 1 THE 426 Senior Project 2.................................. 3
THE 252 Play Production 4.............................. 1 THE 452 Play Production 8.............................. 1
THE 262 Character Development..................... 3 THE ___ Theatre History 300/400 level........... 3
ENG 204 Script Writing..................................... 3 PEV 212 Chorus 4............................................. 1
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3 _______ Electives............................................. 6
MUS 242 Major Voice 4..................................... 2 14
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or
Introduction to Sociology............. 3 Total 125
16
34

Students take their curtain call following a Main Stage production


of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest.

Broadway-style musicals, such as Cole Porter's Anything Goes,


are produced regularly at Five Towns College.
35

The cast of Suessical the Musical

Arthur Miller's The Crucible.


36
Film/Video program
Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)
HEGIS Code: 1010

The Film/Video Program is designed to provide students


enrolled for a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (B.F.A.) with
the knowledge and technical expertise required to succeed in
the wide range of career paths this interesting and expanding
field has to offer, including cinematography, motion picture
editing, and multi-camera television production.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The courses below are required of all students in the Film/
Video Program.
Credits
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION... 47
B. FILM/VIDEO................................................ 42
C. FILM/THEATRE HISTORY......................... 9
D. THEATRE PRODUCTION........................... 12
E. ELECTIVES.................................................. 12
Total 122

A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION... 47


ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2..... 6
ENG 204 Scriptwriting........................... 3
ENG 302 Photo Journalism.................... 3 Industry-standard equipment, such as this
ENG 304 Screenwriting.......................... 3 35mm Panavision film camera, help train future
ENG 332 Film and Literature................. 3 cinematographers at Five Towns College.
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity................... 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or
Introduction to Sociology... 3
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2........ 2
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech......... 3
ART____ Art History 100/200 level....... 3
ENG____ Literature 200-400 level......... 9
MAT____ Mathematics 100/200 level..... 3
MUH____ Music History 100/200 level... 3

B. FILM/VIDEO................................................ 42
VID 131 Television Workshop 1........... 3 C. FILM/THEATRE HISTORY......................... 9
VID 132 Television Workshop 2........... 3 HIS 202 Film History............................ 3
VID 231 Digital Film Editing 1............. 3 HIS 204 Film Classics........................... 3
VID 232 Filmmaking Aesthetics............ 3 THE ___ Theatre History 300/400 level.... 3
VID 233 Narrative Filmmaking............. 3
VID 302 Audio for Video...................... 3
D. THEATRE PRODUCTION........................... 12
VID 312 Stage Lighting......................... 3
THE 111 Introduction to Stagecraft....... 3
VID 331 Intermediate Cinematography... 3
THE 211 Set Design............................... 3
VID 332 Advanced Cinematography.... 3
THE 361 Acting for Camera.................. 3
VID 333 Filmmakers Workshop............ 3
THE 371 Directing................................. 3
VID 336 TV Commercial Production.... 3
VID 425, 426 Senior Project 1, 2.................. 6
VID 432 Independent Filmmaking........ 3 E. ELECTIVES.................................................. 12
37
Film/Video
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (B.F.A.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 1010

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


VID 131 Television Workshop 1...................... 3 VID 312 Stage Lighting.................................... 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1...................... 3 VID 331 Intermediate Cinematography........... 3
HIS 202 Film History....................................... 3 VID 333 Filmmakers Workshop....................... 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1....................... 1 ENG 304 Screenwriting..................................... 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech.................... 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.............................. 3
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3 15
16

SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
VID 132 Television Workshop 2...................... 3 VID 332 Advanced Cinematography............... 3
ART ___ Art History 100/200 level.................. 3 VID 336 TV Commercial Production............... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2...................... 3 THE 361 Acting for Camera............................. 3
HIS 204 Film Classics...................................... 3 THE 371 Directing............................................ 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2....................... 1 ---------- Elective.............................................. 3
MAT_____ Mathematics 100/200 level................ 3 15
16

SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII


VID 231 Digital Film Editing 1........................ 3 VID 302 Audio for Video................................. 3
VID 232 Filmmaking Aesthetics...................... 3 VID 425 Senior Project 1.................................. 3
ENG 204 Scriptwriting...................................... 3 ENG 332 Film and Literature ........................... 3
ENG____ Literature 200-400 level.................... 3 ENG_____ Literature 200-400 level.................... 3
THE 111 Introduction to Stagecraft.................. 3 * _______ Elective.............................................. 3
15 15

SEMESTER IV
VID 233 Narrative Filmmaking........................ 3 SEMESTER VIII
ENG____ Literature 200-400 level.................... 3 VID 426 Senior Project 2.................................. 3
THE 211 Set Design.......................................... 3 VID 432 Independent Filmmaking................... 3
ENG 302 Photo Journalism............................... 3 THE ___ Theatre History 300/400 level........... 3
_____101 General Psychology or * _______ Electives............................................. 6
Introduction to Sociology............. 3 15
15
Total 122

* BUS 473 Internship 3 may be taken for 12 credits instead


of BUS 472 and 9 elective credits.
38
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Music Business

The Bachelor of Professional Studies (B.P.S.) degree program The Music Business Concentration of the Business Manage-
in Business Management with concentrations in Audio ment Program is designed to provide students enrolled for
Recording Technology and Music Business is designed for a Bachelor of Professional Studies Degree with the acumen
students planning to pursue careers as business management/ and music business expertise required to pursue a career
marketing executives with firms in the areas of record and in a wide range of music-related business fields. Students
music production, broadcasting, concert promotion, radio, study the legal, production, management, marketing, and
television, theatre, and communications. The program is merchandising aspects of this fast-growing segment of the
intended for students who are interested in developing their economy. Field internships are available prior to gradua-
business and technical expertise. tion to provide the opportunity for students to gain practical
experience working in a music business.
The program in Business Management includes a core
curriculum of Liberal Arts/General Education and general Students in this concentration are prepared to pursue careers
business courses that provides the foundation for specialized as artist managers, concert promoters, record retailers, and
courses in the student's major area of concentration. independent record producers.

Audio Recording Technology

The Audio Recording Technology Concentration of the Business Management Program is designed to provide students
enrolled for a Bachelor of Professional Studies Degree with the business acumen and technical expertise required to operate,
manage, and market a state-of-the-art, computer-automated multi-track audio recording studios and related facilities and
equipment.

Students study the theory of sound, recording electronics, engineering procedures, audio/video post production and advanced
mixing procedures in a sequence of courses designed to develop the practical and technical skills required for success in this
exciting and challenging field. This concentration prepares students to pursue careers as business management/marketing
executives with music production and promotion firms. Learning goals for students focus upon sound theory, signal flow,
audio recording techniques, digital recording (MIDI), non-linear production, and synchronization skills.

SSL 9000J Recording Console housed in Studio A


with 5.1 Surround Sound Mixing Capabilities
39
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Bachelor of Professional Studies Degree (B.P.S.)
HEGIS Code: 0599

COURSE REQUIREMENTS CONCENTRATION COMPONENT

The courses below are required of all students in the Busi- Students in the Business Management Program take the
ness Management Program. courses below under Business Management or select one
of the following concentrations. The 24 credits in the se-
Credits lected concentration, together with the 44 credits in Liberal
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION.......... 44 Arts/General Education, 45 credits in Business, and the 9
B. BUSINESS . ....................................................... 45 credits of Electives, comprise the 122-credit requirement for
C. CONCENTRATION............................................. 24 the Bachelor of Professional Studies degree.
D. ELECTIVES ......................................................... 9
Total 122
Business Management Concentration Credits
A.LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION............ 44 BUS 102 Accounting 2...................................... 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics-Macro...... 3 BUS 122 Business Law 2................................... 3
ECO 102 Principles of Economics-Micro...... 3 BUS 205 Managerial Accounting...................... 3
ENG 101,102 English Composition 1, 2................ 6 BUS 243 Retailing............................................. 3
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity............................ 3 BUS 246 Consumer Behavior............................ 3
MUH 101/202 Music History.................................. 3 BUS 307 E-Commerce....................................... 3
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2................ 2 BUS 310 Management Theory & Practice......... 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech................. 3 BUS 312 Organizational Behavior..................... 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or Total 24
Introduction to Sociology............. 3
ART ___ Art History...................................... 3
MAT ___ Mathematics.................................... 3 Audio Recording Technology Concentration
SCI ___ Science............................................ 3 AUD 101 Audio Recording Theory.................... 3
_______ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.............. 9 AUD 102 Audio Recording Techniques............. 3
AUD 201 Recording Studio Operations............. 3
B. BUSINESS . ....................................................... 45 AUD 202 Advanced Audio Production.............. 3
BUS 101 Accounting 1................................... 3 AUD 303 MIDI Applications............................. 3
BUS 111 Business Organization and AUD 304 Nonlinear Recording.......................... 3
Management.................................. 3 AUD 401 Audio/Video Post Production............. 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1............................... 3 AUD 402 Advanced Mixing Procedures............ 3
BUS 211 Principles of Management.............. 3 Total 24
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing................... 3
BUS 242 Salesmanship................................... 3
BUS 244 Advertising...................................... 3 Music Business Concentration Credits
BUS 251 Principles of Finance....................... 3 MUB 101 Music Business Careers...................... 3
BUS 306 Management Information Systems. 3 MUB 102 Record Promotion and Broadcasting.. 3
BUS 311 Human Resource Management....... 3 MUB 201 Music Publishing and Copyright........ 3
BUS 341 Public Relations.............................. 3 MUB 202 Music Business Contracts.................. 3
BUS 461 Business Seminar............................ 3 MUB 301 Artist Management............................. 3
BUS 471,472 Internship 1, 2................................. 6 MUB 302 Concert Production and Promotion.... 3
COM 101 Computers in Business.................... 3 MUB 401 Music Marketing................................ 3
MUB 403 Advanced Music Publishing............... 3
C. CONCENTRATION.............................................. 24 Total 24

D. ELECTIVES . ....................................................... 9
40

Legendary Music Producer Phil Ramone, College President Stanley Cohen,


Distinguished Artist-in-Residence, Ervin Drake and Mrs. Edith Drake
at a recent Songwriter's Hall of Fame Dinner.

Acclaimed screenwriter and novelist Author Budd Schulberg and Music Industry
Producer Clive Davis surrounded by College President Stanley Cohen
and other dignitaries at a recent Commencement.
41
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Audio Recording Technology Concentration
Bachelor of Professional Studies Degree (B.P.S.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 0599

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


AUD 101 Audio Recording Theory...................... 3 AUD 303 MIDI Applications................................ 3
BUS 111 Business Organization and BUS 341 Public Relations.................................... 3
Management........................................ 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.................................. 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics - Macro.......... 3 SCI ____ Science ................................................. 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1.......................... 3 ________ Elective................................................. 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1.......................... 1 15
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level................. 3
16

SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
AUD 102 Audio Recording Techniques................ 3 AUD 304 Nonlinear Recording............................. 3
BUS 101 Accounting 1......................................... 3 BUS 311 Human Resource Management............. 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1..................................... 3 ART ___ Art History ........................................... 3
ECO 102 Principles of Economics-Micro............ 3 MAT ___ Mathematics.......................................... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2.......................... 3 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2.......................... 1 15
16

SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII


AUD 201 Recording Studio Operations................ 3 AUD 401 Audio/Video Post Production............... 3
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing......................... 3 BUS 251 Principles of Finance............................. 3
BUS 242 Salesmanship......................................... 3 BUS 471 Internship 1........................................... 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.................... 3
Introduction to Sociology................... 3 ________ Elective................................................. 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech....................... 3 15
15

SEMESTER IV SEMESTER VIII


AUD 202 Advanced Audio Production................. 3 AUD 402 Advanced Mixing Procedures............... 3
BUS 211 Principles of Management.................... 3 BUS 306 Management Information Systems....... 3
BUS 244 Advertising............................................ 3 BUS 461 Business Seminar.................................. 3
COM 101 Computers in Business.......................... 3 * BUS 472 Internship 2........................................... 3
________ Elective................................................. 3 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.................... 3
15 15

Total 122

* BUS 473 Internship 3 may be taken for 12 credits instead


of BUS 472 and 9 elective credits.
42

College President and founders Stanley and Lorraine Cohen with actress Kitty Carlisle
Hart and legendary writers and lyricists Betty Comden and Adolph Green
at a Friars Foundation Annual International Gala Dinner and Ball.

Dr. Stanley Cohen, Cy Leslie and Clive Davis at recent Commencement


awarding an Honorary Doctor of Music Degree (Mus.D.) to Mr. Davis.
43
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Bachelor of Professional Studies Degree (B.P.S.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 0599

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


BUS 101 Accounting 1.................................. 3 BUS 307 E-Commerce...................................... 3
BUS 111 Business Organization and BUS 341 Public Relations................................. 3
Management................................. 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.............................. 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics-Macro..... 3 SCI ___ Science ............................................. 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1................... 3 _______ Elective.............................................. 3
COM 101 Computers in Business................... 3 15
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1................... 1
16

SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
BUS 102 Accounting 2.................................. 3 BUS 310 Management Theory and Practice..... 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1.............................. 3 BUS 311 Human Resource Management......... 3
ECO 102 Principles of Economics-Micro..... 3 ART ___ Art History......................................... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2................... 3 MAT ___ Mathematics...................................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2................... 1 _______ Liberal Arts 200-400 level................. 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech................ 3 15
16

SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII


BUS 122 Business Law 2.............................. 3 BUS 251 Principles of Finance......................... 3
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing.................. 3 BUS 312 Organizational Behavior.................... 3
BUS 242 Salesmanship.................................. 3 BUS 471 Internship 1........................................ 3
BUS 243 Retailing......................................... 3 _______ Liberal Arts 200-400 level................. 3
BUS 246 Consumer Behavior....................... 3 _______ Elective.............................................. 3
15 15

SEMESTER IV SEMESTER VIII


BUS 205 Managerial Accounting.................. 3 BUS 306 Management Information Systems.... 3
BUS 211 Principles of Management............. 3 BUS 461 Business Seminar.............................. 3
BUS 244 Advertising..................................... 3 * BUS 472 Internship 2........................................ 3
MUH___ Music History 100/200 level.......... 3 _______ Liberal Arts 200-400 level................. 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or ________ Elective.............................................. 3
Introduction to Sociology............ 3 15
15
Total 122

*BUS 473 Internship 3 may be taken for 12 credits instead


of BUS 472 and 9 elective credits.
44

Cole Porter's Kiss Me Kate.

The production of Jack Heifner's Vanities brought students together with


Academy Award winning producer Milton Justice.
45
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Music Business Concentration
Bachelor of Professional Studies Degree (B.P.S.)
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 0599

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER V Credits


MUB 101 Music Business Careers........................ 3 MUB 301 Artist Management................................ 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1.......................... 3 BUS 341 Public Relations.................................... 3
BUS 111 Business Organization and HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.................................. 3
Management........................................ 3 SCI ____ Science.................................................. 3
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level................. 3 ________ Elective................................................. 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1.......................... 1 15
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech....................... 3
16

SEMESTER II SEMESTER VI
MUB 102 Record Promotion and Broadcasting.... 3 MUB 302 Concert Production and Promotion....... 3
BUS 101 Accounting 1......................................... 3 BUS 311 Human Resource Management............. 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1..................................... 3 ART ___ Art History ........................................... 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics - Macro.......... 3 MAT ___ Mathematics.......................................... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2.......................... 3 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2.......................... 1 15
16

SEMESTER III SEMESTER VII


MUB 201 Music Publishing and Copyright.......... 3 MUB 401 Music Marketing................................... 3
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing......................... 3 BUS 251 Principles of Finance............................. 3
BUS 242 Salesmanship......................................... 3 BUS 471 Internship 1........................................... 3
COM 101 Computers in Business.......................... 3 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.................... 3
ECO 102 Principles of Economics-Micro............ 3 ________ Elective................................................. 3
15 15

SEMESTER IV SEMESTER VIII


MUB 202 Music Business Contracts..................... 3 MUB 403 Advanced Music Publishing................. 3
BUS 211 Principles of Management.................... 3 BUS 306 Management Information Systems ...... 3
BUS 244 Advertising............................................ 3 BUS 461 Business Seminar.................................. 3
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or * BUS 472 Internship 2........................................... 3
Introduction to Sociology................... 3 ________ Liberal Arts 200-400 level.................... 3
________ Elective................................................. 3 15
15
Total 122

* BUS 473 Internship 3 may be taken for 12 credits instead


of BUS 472 and 9 elective credits.
46

Associate Degrees
LIBERAL ARTS DEGREE PROGRAM LIBERAL ARTS
Acquainting the student with the broad cultural, social, and A.A. Degree
scientific aspects of the world and stimulating him or her to Recommended Sequence of Courses
think, to analyze, and to communicate are the primary goals HEGIS Code: 5649
of a liberal education. Such an education not only offers the
potential for a richer, more rewarding life but is also basic SEMESTER I Credits
to all pursuits in the arts, sciences, and professions. ENG 101 English Composition 1................... 3
PSY 101 General Psychology....................... 3
The Liberal Arts program provides a general education in SCI 101 Information Literacy 1................... 1
the traditional areas of knowledge, regardless of the student's SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech................ 3
career choice. In addition, the student has the opportunity for ART ___ Art History 100/200 level.............. 3
additional study in a particular discipline in selected fields ________ Elective.......................................... 3
to explore its methods, acquire its tools, and gain a mastery 16
of its body of knowledge.
For the student whose career choice is not clearly defined, SEMESTER II
the Liberal Arts program, leading to the Associate in Arts ENG 102 English Composition 2................... 3
degree, provides an opportunity to explore selected areas MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level.......... 3
in the humanities, the arts, and the social and behavioral SCI 102 Information Literacy 2................... 1
sciences. Some students develop interest in a particular SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.............. 3
career and transfer after graduation for further educational ________ Liberal Arts.................................... 3
preparation. ________ Elective.......................................... 3
16
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS (A.A.) DEGREE IN
LIBERAL ARTS SEMESTER III
The Associate in Arts graduate is prepared for transfer with ENG ___ English 200 level............................ 3
advanced standing to a baccalaureate program where ad- HIS ____ History .......................................... 3
ditional professional training may be undertaken. Advisors MAT ___ Mathematics................................... 3
should be consulted for assistance in selection of programs ________ Liberal Arts.................................... 3
and electives geared to personal educational goals. ________ Elective.......................................... 3
15
REQUIREMENTS FOR ASSOCIATE IN ARTS
(A.A.) DEGREE SEMESTER IV
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION Credits HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................... 3
English............................................................ 9 SCI ____ Science........................................... 3
Speech............................................................ 3 ________ Liberal Arts.................................... 3
Art History...................................................... 3 ________ Electives......................................... 6
History............................................................ 3 15
Information Literacy....................................... 2
Music History................................................. 3 Total 62
Mathematics................................................... 3
Science............................................................ 3
Social Science................................................. 6
Theatre History............................................... 3
Liberal Arts..................................................... 9
47
B. CONCENTRATION...................................... 0-12
C. ELECTIVES................................................... 3-15
Total 62
47

CONCENTRATION COMPONENT

Students in the Liberal Arts program may select one of the


following concentrations. The 12 credits in the selected
concentration, together with the 47 credits in General Edu-
cation/Liberal Arts and the 3 credits of an appropriate elec-
tive, comprise the 62-credit requirement for the Associate
in Arts degree.

Teaching Assistant

The Teaching Assistant concentration is designed to develop


in students pursuing a Liberal Arts degree the additional
knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to be certified
by the New York State Education Department as Teaching
Assistants and to prepare these students to become candidates
in a program for the preparation of teachers leading to a
bachelor’s degree and initial certification. Learning goals for
students focus upon communication, reflective assessment,
instructional methodology, and knowledge of the learner
skills.

Credits
ELE 101 Teachers and Parents...................... 3
ELE 102 Motivating Students....................... 3
ELE 202 Classroom Management................. 3
PSY 301 Educational Psychology................. 3
Total 12

Literature

The Literature concentration develops in undergraduate


students the knowledge, skills, and dispositions, necessary
to analyze major influence on written language, and to
compare and contrast their own writing style in that context.
Students in an associate degree program demonstrate these
skills through coursework in poetry, fiction, drama, and
essay writing.

Credits
ENG 221 The Poem....................................... 3
ENG 241 Short Fiction................................... 3
ENG 261 The Drama..................................... 3
ENG 271 Art of the Essay.............................. 3
Total 12
48
LIBERAL ARTS LIBERAL ARTS
Teaching Assistant Concentration Literature Concentration
A.A. Degree A.A. Degree
Recommended Sequence of Courses Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 5649 HEGIS Code: 5649

SEMESTER I Credits SEMESTER I Credits


ELE 101 Teachers and Parents...................... 3 ENG101 English Composition 1................... 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1................... 3 ART ___ Art History 100/200 level.............. 3
MAT 111 Mathematical Reasoning................ 3 PSY 101 General Psychology....................... 3
PSY 101 General Psychology....................... 3 SCI 101 Information Literacy 1................... 1
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1................... 1 SCI 141 Computer Literacy ........................ 3
SCI 211 Environmental Science.................. 3 SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech................ 3
16 16

SEMESTER II SEMESTER II
ELE 102 Motivating Students....................... 3 ENG 102 English Composition 2................... 3
ART 101 History of Art................................. 3 MAT ___ Mathematics 100/200 level............ 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2................... 3 MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level.......... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2................... 1 SCI 102 Information Literacy 2................... 1
SCI 141 Computer Literacy......................... 3 SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.............. 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.............. 3 ________ Liberal Arts.................................... 3
16 16

SEMESTER III SEMESTER III


ELE 202 Classroom Management................. 3 ENG 221 The Poem....................................... 3
ENG 221 The Poem....................................... 3 ENG 241 Short Fiction................................... 3
ENG 241 Short Fiction................................... 3 ENG ___ English 200 level............................ 3
MUH 102 Popular Music in America............. 3 HIS ____ History .......................................... 3
SPE 231 Public Speaking............................. 3 ________ Liberal Arts.................................... 3
15 15

SEMESTER IV SEMESTER IV
ENG 271 Art of the Essay.............................. 3 ENG 261 The Drama..................................... 3
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................... 3 ENG 271 Art of the Essay.............................. 3
MAT 123 College Algebra............................. 3 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................... 3
PSY 301 Educational Psychology................. 3 ________ Liberal Arts.................................... 3
SCI 131 Human Biology.............................. 3 ________ Elective.......................................... 3
15 15

Total 62 Total 62
49
BUSINESS DEGREE PROGRAMS ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE (A.S.) DEGREE IN
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The College offers programs leading to the A.S. degree in
Business Administration and the A.A.S. degree in Business The Associate in Science graduate is prepared for transfer
Management. The latter degree program offers concentra- with advanced standing to a four-year program where ad-
tions of courses that lead primarily to careers upon completion ditional professional training in the business field may be
of the program while the Business Administration program pursued.
is designed for students who are considering transferring to
a four-year program.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The objective of the Business Administration program is to The courses below are required of all students in the Business
help prepare students to assume managerial and administra- Administration Program.
tive responsibilities. Students graduating with an A.S. degree
in this field usually plan to continue their studies toward a Credits
baccalaureate degree. A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION..... 32
B. PROFESSIONAL COURSES............................ 27
The liberal arts and business courses recommended for this C. ELECTIVES....................................................... 3
A.S. degree are designed to develop the student's ability to Total 62
communicate well, to work smoothly with others on the job,
to analyze and solve problems effectively, and to prepare A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION....... 32
students for personal living and social responsibilities. ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2........ 6
ECO 101 Principles of Economics-Macro... 3
Career courses for this degree include the tool areas of ac- ECO 102 Principles of Economics-Micro... 3
counting, statistics, and law as well as foundation studies HIS 301 Cultural Diversity...................... 3
in business organization and management, marketing, and PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or
finance. Students may also select courses from the wide Introduction to Sociology...... 3
variety of offerings available in the many programs offered SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2........... 2
by the College. SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech............ 3
ART____ Art History 100/200 level.......... 3
MAT____ Mathematics 100/200 level........ 3
MUH____ Music History 100/200 level...... 3

B. PROFESSIONAL COURSES............................... 27
BUS 101 Accounting 1................................... 3
BUS 111 Business Organization and
Management.................................. 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1............................... 3
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing................... 3
BUS 242 Salesmanship................................... 3
BUS 243 Retailing.......................................... 3
BUS 244 Advertising...................................... 3
BUS 251 Principles of Finance....................... 3
COM 101 Computers in Business.................... 3

C. ELECTIVES . ....................................................... 3
50
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
A.S. Degree
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 5004

SEMESTER I Credits
BUS 101 Accounting 1.................................. 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1.............................. 3
COM 101 Computers in Business................... 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics-Macro..... 3
ENG 101 English Composition 1................... 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1................... 1
16

SEMESTER II
BUS 111 Business Organization and
Management................................ 3
BUS 242 Salesmanship.................................. 3
BUS 244 Advertising..................................... 3
ECO 102 Principles of Economics-Micro..... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2................... 1
16

SEMESTER III
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing.................. 3
BUS 243 Retailing......................................... 3
ART ___ Art History..................................... 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech................ 3
_____101 General Psychology or
Introduction to Sociology........... 3
15

SEMESTER IV
BUS 251 Principles of Finance...................... 3
MAT ___ Mathematics 100/200 level............ 3
MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level.......... 3
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................... 3
________ Elective.......................................... 3
15

Total 62

51
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

The Associate in Applied Science Degree is designed for The A.A.S. degree program in Business Management with
students preparing for entry into the business or professional the concentrations in Audio Recording Technology and
world directly after completion of their course of study. Music Business is intended for those students who wish
These programs include both professional skills and liberal to enter the business world directly after completion of
arts/general education courses. their studies at the College.

Requirements for the Program in Business Management


leading to the Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree Students who pursue the Business Management program can
seek job situations as advertising assistants, assistant buyers,
assistant credit managers, and other entry-level positions in
Credits retail chain organizations, wholesale firms, and other business
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION..... 23 enterprises such as broadcasting and data processing.
ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2........ 6
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity...................... 3 The availability of the various concentrations described below
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or make it possible for students to focus on an area of special
Introduction to Sociology........ 3 interest and acquire marketable skills and expertise.
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2........... 2
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech............ 3 Business Management
________ Art or Music History
100/200 level........................... 3 The Business Management concentration provides an
MAT____ Mathematics 100/200 level........ 3 additional emphasis on management related topics for
those students who do not seek the music industry emphasis
provided by other concentrations.
B. PROFESSIONAL COURSES......................... 15
BUS 101 Accounting 1.................................. 3
BUS 111 Business Organization Audio Recording Technology
and Management......................... 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1.............................. 3 The Audio Recording Technology Concentration provides
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing.................. 3 business management students with those facts, skills, and un-
ECO 101 Principles of Economics-Macro . .. 3 derstandings which are relevant to the practical applications of
studio procedures in professional audio recording situations.

C. CONCENTRATION....................................... 12
Music Business

D. ELECTIVES.................................................... 12 The Music Business Concentration deals with various


aspects of this rapidly growing industry: technical, legal,
Total 62 personnel, and trade. Students are prepared for careers
as artist managers, concert promoters and independent
record producers.
52
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
A.A.S. Degree
HEGIS Code: 5004

CONCENTRATION COMPONENT

Students in the Business Management program must elect


one of the following concentrations. The 23 credits in Liberal
Arts/General Education, 15 credits of professional courses, 12
credit concentration component, and 12 credits of electives
complete the 62-credit requirement for the A.A.S. degree.

Business Management Credits


COM 101 Computers in Business...................... 3
BUS 211 Principles of Management................. 3
BUS 242 Salesmanship..................................... 3
BUS 244 Advertising........................................ 3
Total 12

Audio Recording Technology Concentration Credits


AUD 101 Audio Recording Theory................... 3
AUD 102 Audio Recording Techniques............ 3
AUD 201 Recording Studio Operations............ 3
AUD 202 Advanced Audio Production............. 3
Total 12

Music Business Concentration Credits


MUB 101 Music Business Careers.................... 3
MUB 102 Record Promotion and Broadcasting.. 3
MUB 201 Music Publishing and Copyright....... 3
MUB 202 Music Business Contracts................. 3
Total 12
53

Robert F.X. Sillerman, Rick McKay, Sheldon Harnick, Stewart Lane and Michael Feinstein
visiting the Entertainment Industry Gallery of Honor Museum at Five Towns College.

Jazz Keyboardist and Composer Joseph Zawinul of Weather Report fame


speaking with Dr. Judith Alstadter during a recent graduation ceremony.
54
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Audio Recording Technology Concentration
A.A.S. Degree
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 5004

SEMESTER I Credits
AUD 101 Audio Recording Theory............... 3
BUS 111 Business Organization and
Management................................. 3
ENG101 English Composition 1................... 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1................... 1
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech................ 3
________ Elective.......................................... 3
16

SEMESTER II
AUD 102 Audio Recording Techniques . ...... 3
BUS 101 Accounting 1.................................. 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics-Macro..... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2................... 1
________ Elective.......................................... 3
16

SEMESTER III
AUD 201 Recording Studio Operations......... 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1.............................. 3
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing ................ 3
_____101 General Psychology or
Introduction to Sociology........... 3
MAT____ Mathematics 100/200 level............ 3
15

SEMESTER IV
AUD 202 Advanced Audio Production.......... 3
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................... 3
________ Art or Music History...................... 3
________ Electives......................................... 6
15

Total 62
55
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Business Management Concentration
A.A.S. Degree
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 5004

SEMESTER I Credits
BUS 101 Accounting 1.................................. 3
BUS 111 Business Organization and
Management................................. 3
COM 101 Computers in Business................... 3
ENG101 English Composition 1................... 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1................... 1
________ Art or Music History...................... 3
16

SEMESTER II
BUS 121 Business Law 1.............................. 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics-Macro..... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2................... 1
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech................ 3
MAT____ Mathematics 100/200 level............ 3
16

SEMESTER III
BUS 241 Principles of Marketing ................ 3
BUS 242 Salesmanship.................................. 3
_____101 General Psychology or
Introduction to Sociology........... 3
________ Electives......................................... 6
15

SEMESTER IV
BUS 244 Advertising..................................... 3
BUS 211 Principles of Management............. 3
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................... 3
________ Electives......................................... 6
15

Total 62
56

Michael Feinstein with the Jingle Belles at recent visit to the College.

Students utilize state-of-the-art Midi Lab at Five Towns College.


57

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Music Business Concentration
A.A.S. Degree
Recommended Sequence of Courses
HEGIS Code: 5004

SEMESTER I Credits
MUB 101 Music Business Careers................. 3
BUS 111 Business Organization and
Management................................. 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1................... 1
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech................ 3
ENG101 English Composition 1................... 3
________ Elective.......................................... 3
16

SEMESTER II
MUB 102 Record Promotion and Broadcasting... 3
BUS 101 Accounting 1.................................. 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics-Macro..... 3
ENG 102 English Composition 2................... 3
SCI 102 Information Literacy 2................... 1
________ Elective.......................................... 3
16

SEMESTER III
MUB 201 Music Publishing and Copyright... 3
Classrooms at Five Towns College are equipped BUS 241 Principles of Marketing ................ 3
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity........................... 3
with web-enabled learning technologies.
________ Art or Music History ..................... 3
________ Elective.......................................... 3
15

SEMESTER IV
MUB 202 Music Business Contracts.............. 3
BUS 121 Business Law 1.............................. 3
_____101 General Psychology or
Introduction to Sociology........... 3
MAT____ Mathematics 100/200 level............ 3
________ Elective.......................................... 3
15

Total 62
58

Music clinics and performances of every genre are scheduled in the


Dix Hills Center for the Performing Arts at Five Towns College.

The Five Towns College Concert Band under the


musical direction of Professor Dean Karahalis.
59
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC PROGRAM JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC
A.A.S. Degree
Music as a career today is an exciting, challenging, and Recommended Sequence of Courses
diversified field. The well-educated professional who is ca- HEGIS Code: 5610
pable of responding to varied musical demands has a decided
advantage over the individual with lesser qualifications in SEMESTER I Credits
the keen competition for those desirable positions that offer MUS 111 Harmony 1......................................... 3
financial as well as aesthetic rewards. MUS 121 Sight Singing 1.................................. 1
MUS 123 Ear Training 1.................................... 1
The Five Towns College Jazz/Commercial Music program MUS 131
Keyboard Lab 1................................. 2
has been organized to enable its graduates to prepare for MUS 141 Major Instrument/Voice 1.................. 2
careers as instrumental and vocal performers, music arrang- PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
ers and composers, private music teachers, and music store ENG 101 English Composition......................... 3
and studio operators. MUH ___ Music History 100/200 level............. 3
SCI 101 Information Literacy 1....................... 1
An intensive schedule of ensemble workshops, coordinated 17
with composition, arranging and repertory courses, enables SEMESTER II
students to perform, analyze, and evaluate their work in MUS 112 Harmony 2......................................... 3
professional-level laboratory sessions. This thorough MUS 122 Sight Singing 2.................................. 1
training is accomplished through a carefully structured MUS 124 Ear Training 2.................................... 1
program taught by a faculty of experienced educators and MUS 132
Keyboard Lab 2................................. 2
professional musicians. MUS 142 Major Instrument/Voice 2.................. 2
PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
Graduates may pursue careers immediately upon graduation ENG 102 English Composition 2...................... 3
from college or transfer and continue their studies towards SCI 102 Information Literacy 2....................... 1
a baccalaureate degree and more advanced professional _____101 General Psychology or
training. Introduction to Sociology................ 3
17
Credits SEMESTER III
A. LIBERAL ARTS/GENERAL EDUCATION..... 23 MUS 211 Harmony 3......................................... 3
ENG 101, 102 English Composition 1, 2........ 6 MUS 221 Sight Singing 3.................................. 1
HIS 301 Cultural Diversity...................... 3 MUS 223 Ear Training 3.................................... 1
PSY/SOC 101 General Psychology or MUS 231
Keyboard Lab 3................................. 2
Introduction to Sociology........ 3 MUS 241 Major Instrument/Voice 3.................. 2
SCI 101, 102 Information Literacy 1, 2........... 2 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech............ 3 SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech.................... 3
________ Art or Music History MAT_____ Math or Science Elective................... 3
100/200 level........................... 3 16
MAT____ Mathematics 100/200 level........ 3 SEMESTER IV
MUS 212 Harmony 4......................................... 3
B. PROFESSIONAL COURSES............................ 40 MUS 222 Sight Singing 4.................................. 1
MUS 111-212 Harmony 1-4.............................. 12 MUS 224 Ear Training 4.................................... 1
MUS 121-222 Sight Singing 1-4....................... 4 MUS 232
Keyboard Lab 4................................. 2
MUS 123-224 Ear Training 1-4......................... 4 MUS 242 Major Instrument/Voice 4.................. 2
MUS 131-232 Keyboard Lab 1-4...................... 8 PE __ ___ Performance Ensemble...................... 1
MUS 141-242 Major Instrument/Voice............. 8 HIS 301 Cultural Diversity.............................. 3
PE___ _____ Performance Ensemble.............. 4 ________ Elective.............................................. 3
16
C. ELECTIVE......................................................... 3
Total 66
Total 66
Chorus or Choir is required for two semesters.
60

Course Descriptions
All of the courses offered by the College are described
below. The recommended sequences of courses for each
program indicate which courses are offered for the Fall
semester (I, III, V, VII) and for the Spring semester (II,
IV, VI, VIII). The College reserves the right to cancel
any elective course for which there is insufficient reg-
istration. For information about the specific course of-
ferings for any given semester, consult the appropriate
semester class schedule.

COURSE NUMBERS

Each course number has three digits. the first digit


ART HISTORY
indicates the level of the course. Courses starting with
0 are developmental; those starting with 1 are intended
ART 101 HISTORY OF ART
primarily for first year students; those starting with 2 are
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
primarily for second year students; those starting with 3
and 4 designed for third and fourth year students. The Development of art from ancient to modern times. Evolving
second digit indicates the area of the subject, and the techniques and styles in historical context. Major movements,
third digit indicates the particular course in the area. For concepts, and artists in painting, sculpture, photography and
example, in BUS 203 the 2 indicates that is an advanced architecture are explored and discussed.
course in Business, the 0 indicates that it is a course in
Accounting, and the 3 indicates that its particular subject ART 103 MODERN ART
matter is Cost Accounting. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours

Course descriptions are arranged alphabetically accord- Concentrating on the 20th century, this course deals with
ing to discipline. the major directions the various art forms—painting, sculp-
ture, architecture, and photography—have taken into the
contemporary period. The intellectual, social, and cultural
LOWER DIVISION forces creating the form and content of modern art will be
considered.
Students who have earned fewer than 54 credits are classified
as freshmen or sophomores. Such students normally register ART 201 VISUAL ARTS
for course work designated at either the 100 or 200 level. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Courses offered at the 100 or 200 level are designated as Exploration of the ways of looking at and understanding
lower division. All work taken at a community or two-year works of art in the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture,
college is considered to be lower division work and cannot and photography. Consideration of the relationships between
be transferred for upper division credit. these arts and society at large. The creative process in both
the artist and the viewer.
UPPER DIVISION ART 202 RENAISSANCE ART
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Students who have earned 54 or more credits are classified
as juniors or seniors. Such students typically register for Outstanding artistic achievements in Italy and Northern
courses at the 300 and 400 levels. Courses offered at the 300 Europe from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries.
and 400 levels are designated as upper division. Graduation Development of painting, sculpture, and architecture; their
requirements for upper division work are indicated in the relation to political and social movements; study of major
Recommended Sequence of Courses for each program. schools and representative artists.
61
AUDIO RECORDING TECHNOLOGY AUD 212 ADVANCED SOUND DESIGN
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
AUD 101 AUDIO RECORDING THEORY Prerequisite: AUD 211
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Remote recording with applications in sound reinforcement.
Study of basic audio and acoustic theory. Understanding the Emphasis on independent stage monitor mixing techniques,
concepts of audio recording. Characteristics and suggested and multi-track recording.
uses of various microphones. Operating principles of tape
recorders, recording consoles, and state-of-the-art outboard AUD 303 MIDI APPLICATIONS
recording equipment. Demonstrations of special effects and 3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
other technical tools used in recording. Prerequisite: AUD 202 or MUS 212
Concepts and techniques of music synthesis and MIDI for
AUD 102 AUDIO RECORDING TECHNIQUES the recording studio. Study of the MIDI language as a form
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour of communication between devices. The configuration and
Prerequisite: AUD 101 control of workstations, drum machines, computer sequenc-
ers and samplers.
Study and demonstration of techniques in recording, mixing,
and production. Practical application of studio procedures AUD 304 NONLINEAR RECORDING
in actual recording situations. Development of skills on 3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
recording consoles, tape machines (8-track and 2-track) Prerequisite: AUD 303
and special outboard recording equipment, including reverb
Concepts and techniques of hard-disk recording. Computer
systems, digital delay, compression and harmonizers. An
platforms are used for recording, processing and digital edit-
overview of the recording studio and the medium itself as
ing. Emphasis on the application and operation of primary
a creative art form.
plug-ins and outboard controllers.

AUD 201 RECORDING STUDIO OPERATIONS AUD 401 AUDIO/VIDEO POST PRODUCTION
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour 3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
Prerequisite: AUD 102 Prerequisite: AUD 304

An in-depth study of studio procedures, production tech- Study of production techniques common to the audio/video
niques, digital signal processing, audio alignment procedures, environment. Synchronization of audio and video devices
editing, system analysis, and studio business. Completion of using various SMPTE time code formats and post produc-
a 24-track recording from pre-production to mixdown. tion sweetening (insertion of sound effects, re-equalization,
mixing, etc.) are among the topics covered.

AUD 202 ADVANCED AUDIO PRODUCTION AUD 402 ADVANCED MIXING PROCEDURES
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour 3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
Prerequisite: AUD 201 Prerequisite: AUD 202
Development of skills necessary for employment in a profes- Computer controlled automated mixdowns. Students par-
sional studio using 48-track SSL equipment in the analog ticipate in a hands-on class atmosphere while they learn to
and digital format. operate a state of the art automated mixing console. Computer
driven software allows students to save mixes in memory
or on disk. Students will also learn mix updating, subgroup
AUD 211 THEATRE SOUND DESIGN channel set up, solo grouping, and muting procedures.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: AUD 102 or THE 213 AUD 403 ADVANCED NONLINEAR PRODUCTION
The use of sound reinforcement, effects, and music to 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
clarify and heighten the theatre experience. Emphasis on Prerequisite: AUD 304
microphone and speaker selection and placement, sound Concepts and techniques of using a nonlinear recording
effect design, script interpretation, and the role of sound as system for various aspects of music production. Emphasis
a mood setting element. on the application of control surfaces and plug-ins.
62
BASIC EDUCATIONAL SKILLS BUSINESS
Basic educational skills courses are intended for students BUS 101 ACCOUNTING 1
who are underprepared in reading, writing and mathematics. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
To identify who is underprepared, the College may require
Introduction to accounting principles and techniques. Their
entering students to take placement evaluations in those areas.
application to records and statements, general and special
The scores achieved by students determine placement.
journals and ledgers. Controlling accounts, preparation of
financial statements, and completion of all stages of the
BES 023 COLLEGE COMMUNICATION SKILLS
*0 Credits 3 Class Hours entire accounting cycle.

Study of the terms and topics in college level reading. Em- BUS 102 ACCOUNTING 2
phasis on strengthening reading and writing skills through 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
the use of readings as models for writing. Learning how Prerequisite: BUS 101
to construct paragraphs and short essays. Applying basic
library techniques to library research projects. Accounting for specialized commercial and industrial ac-
tivities, including partnerships and corporation accounting.
MAT 011 DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS Decision making, income taxes, consolidated statements,
*0 Credits 3 Class Hours computerized accounting, and electronic spreadsheets.

Designed to help students better understand concepts in the BUS 111 BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND
areas of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, and MANAGEMENT
measurements. Develops ability to apply the fundamental 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
mathematical operations (adding, subtracting, multiplying,
and dividing). Individualized, self-paced approach. Character, forms, and structure of business organizations;
their relationships to society and human factors in business.
*Three equated credits for the determination of tuition and Marketing methods, information systems, finance and invest-
full-time status. ment are examined within the business environment.

BUS 121 BUSINESS LAW 1


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Survey of the American legal system; fundamentals of le-
gal liability; growth of legal institutions; Federal and New
York State court systems. Development and application of
principles of law to business and sales.

BUS 122 BUSINESS LAW 2


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: BUS 121
Legal aspects of business operations; partnerships, corpora-
tions, and related business organizations. Their formation,
operation, and dissolution. Basic principles of personal
property, bailments, sales, security devices, real property,
estates, and bankruptcy.

BUS 201 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: BUS 102
Accounting theory and practice reviewed in depth. Balance
sheet classification, valuations and income statement presen-
tation and classification. Special attention to publications of
the AICPA and other professional organizations.
63
BUS 205 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING BUS 242 SALESMANSHIP
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: BUS 102 Prerequisite: BUS 111
Fundamental accounting principles and practices applied to Techniques of industrial and retail salesmanship; demonstra-
the managerial decision making process within an organiza- tion and analysis of products, determination of customer needs
tion. Topics include cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, and motivations. Organization, presentation and evaluation
control and performance evaluation, and product costing. of sales talks and promotions; handling objections; closing
Practical business problems will be used to illustrate cur- strategies and personal qualifications for effective selling.
rent techniques.
BUS 243 RETAILING
BUS 211 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prequisite: BUS 111
Prerequisite: BUS 111 Survey of retailing; shopping centers, plazas, malls and retail
Principles of Management as they relate to the planning, stores; major divisions, their functions, and interrelationship;
organization, leading, controlling and evaluation of man- merchandising techniques; promotion, control of operations,
agement activities. Case studies and problems are used to and personnel management.
analyze management problems. Both classical and current
BUS 244 ADVERTISING
theories of management are explored.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: BUS 111
BUS 214 PRINCIPLES OF INCOME TAX
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Fundamental principles, techniques, and procedures used in
Prerequisite: BUS 102 modern advertising. Product identification, media selection,
layout and copywriting, research, space and time purchas-
Detailed analysis of basic income tax principles as they apply ing. Role of the advertising agency; campaign planning,
to individuals, partnerships, and corporations. Examination of organization, and management.
Federal and New York State tax laws and covering tax forms.
Preparation of Federal and State income tax returns. BUS 246 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
BUS 241 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
A study of theory and practice of consumer behavior. Con-
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
cepts and findings from the fields of sociology, psychology,
Principles, methods, policies, problems, and institutions social psychology, and economics, bearing upon buyer be-
involved in distribution of goods and services from producer havior are considered. The importance of consumer research
to consumer. Marketing activities, functions, and methods as a prerequisite to marketing decisions. The elements of
of manufacturers, wholesalers, jobbers, and retailers. consumer decision processes.
64
BUS 251 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE BUS 318 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisites: BUS 101 Prerequisites: BUS 111, BUS 241
An introduction to the principles and methods of financing Study of the language, practices, and distinctions of inter-
with emphasis upon monetary policy and bank manage- national business, including analysis of major international
ment. Topics studied include public and private finance, political contexts and economic forces that affect global
money and banking, capital management, business financ- markets and international trade.
ing, securities markets, government finance, consumer
credit, and interest rates.
BUS 341 PUBLIC RELATIONS
BUS 306 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: BUS 241
Prerequisite: BUS 211, COM 101 Developing corporate public relations policies. Communica-
The policies, methods, procedures and management tech- tions between a firm and its various constituents, including
niques used to collect, store, retrieve and distribute informa- personnel, consumers, community, stockholders, govern-
tion needed for the operation of an organization. ment, and the media. Factors such as ecology, politics,
ethics, and social concerns are explored.
BUS 307 E-COMMERCE
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
BUS 461 BUSINESS SEMINAR
Prerequisite: BUS 211, COM 101
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Advanced study of business on the Internet. Strategies for
Special study or original research of selected business prob-
Internet marketing, sales and promotion. Analysis of legal
lems and policies. The decision making process is used to
and ethical issues as well as security concerns. Development
systematically examine areas of business such as marketing,
of business plans to implement E-Commerce.
management, finance, law, advertising, public relations, mass
communication and information systems.
BUS 310 MANAGEMENT THEORY AND PRACTICE
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: BUS 211 BUS 471, 472 INTERNSHIP 1, 2
Application of advanced managerial techniques, methods 3 Credits each 90 Field Service Hours Weekly Seminars
and strategies designed to increase production, quality and The internship experience includes placement in a field
job satisfaction. experience which supplements classroom theory and laboratory
instruction with related on-the-job professional training.
BUS 311 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Students are placed with selected employers for a minimum of
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
90 hours and receive a written evaluation from the employer.
Prerequisite: BUS 211
Students participate in weekly seminars, keep a journal and
Major personnel functions in business and industry. Poli- submit reports related to their work experience.
cies, procedures, and practices in employment training,
staffing, and management. A blend of behavioral science
with traditional personnel and labor relations philosophies. BUS 473 INTERNSHIP 3
Effective ways to deal with problems in communication, 9-12 Credits 360 Field Service Hours
leadership, discipline, performance and compensation. Internship 3 includes placement with selected employers for
35-40 hours a week. Students keep a journal, write a report
BUS 312 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR related to their experience, give an oral presentation and
3 Credits 3 Class Hours receive a written evaluation from the employer.
Prerequisite: BUS 211
Focus upon human behavior within organizations, both Open only to matriculated students who have completed at
formal and informal, including such topics as: motivation, least 87 credits. Students who wish to take this course must
communication, leadership, implementing change and or- obtain the approval of the Internship Coordinator before the
ganizational development. start of the semester to make the necessary arrangements.
65
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

ELE 101 TEACHERS AND PARENTS


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
The dynamics of interaction with parents, community mem-
bers, professional colleagues and other school personnel.
Emphasis on the skills necessary to: win parent-teacher
cooperation; conduct successful parent-student conferences;
build positive relationships with parents and colleagues.

ELE 102 MOTIVATING STUDENTS


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Designed to develop the expertise and skill required to mo-
tivate students and assist in the establishment of an optimal
teaching-learning environment.

ELE 201 Behavior Modification


3 Credit 3 Class Hours
Classroom skills and strategies that develop mutual respect
in dealing with behavioral problems through positive inter- ELE 341 Reading/Language Arts (1-3)
action with students. 3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: PSY 301
ELE 202 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
3 Credits 3 Class Hours This course is designed to present the prospective teacher
wwith the methodologies, instructional techniques and mate-
Designed to assist the establishment of a classroom envi- rials used to develop language arts skills in elementary school
ronment that promotes order, readiness for learning, and children grades 1-3. Special emphasis is given to the teach-
other techniques that create an atmosphere in the classroom ing of reading and writing and the development of thinking
conducive to learning. skills. Candidates engage in observation and participation
in the teaching/learning process of reading, writing, listening
ELE 331 School and Society
and speaking in a variety of learning situations that address
3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours
student needs and abilities. Through active participation
The historical, philosophical and social foundations that with a master teacher, candidates prepare reading/writing
have a direct impact on educational theory and practice. lessons for individual students, small groups and whole class
The role that contemporary education and the schools play instruction. Field-based experience required.
in the shaping of society. The role of the school in provid-
ing active learning opportunities for a diverse sociocultural ELE 342 Reading/Language Arts (4-6)
community, special learning needs and individual variations 3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours
is explored. Field-based experience required. Prerequisite: PSY 301
This course is designed to present the prospective teacher
with the methodologies, instructional techniques and materi-
als used to develop language arts skills in elementary school
children grades 4-6. Special emphasis is given to the teach-
ing of reading and writing and the development of thinking
skills. Students engage in observation and participation in
the teaching/learning process of reading, writing, listening
and speaking in a variety of learning situations in grades 4
through 6 that address student needs and abilities. Through
active participation with a master teacher, candidates partake
in the preparation of reading/writing lessons and assessment
techniques. Field-based experience required.
66
ELE 362 Teaching Mathematics
3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: PSY 301, MAT 111, 123
The current methods and materials relevant to teaching
mathematics in the elementary school. The use of problem-
solving approaches to study and understand mathematical
content. Attention will be given to the use of teacher
prepared and commonly used standardized tests to assess
children's needs in mathematics. Special attention to meth-
odology for teaching mathematics to bilingual and learning
disabled children. Field-based experience required.

ELE 363 COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY


2 Credits 2 Class Hours
Prerequisite: PSY 301, SCI 141
The use of the microcomputer as a resource for the classroom
teacher. Planning and management for computer instruc-
tion in the classroom. Selection and evaluation of computer
hardware and software.

ELE 351 Teaching Social Studies ELE 391 TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCATION
3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours 2 Credits 2 Class Hours
Prerequisite: PSY 301 Designed to assist the classroom teacher with planning,
teaching, promoting, and assessing healthy physical activities
Methods and materials relevant to the teaching of social
for elementary school students
studies in the elementary school. Study of the current
theories and research that influence the learning and
exploration of children in their growing social world. The
relationship of the social sciences to multicultural education,
bilingualism, career opportunities and the acceptance of
differences in the individual and society are explored.
Field-based experience required.

ELE 361 Teaching Science


3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: PSY 301, SCI 131, 211
Examination of the purposes, content, experiences,
methods and materials of science activities appropriate
for elementary school pupils. A variety of classroom
and laboratory strategies for planning and teaching
science from first to sixth grade. Emphasis is on the
development of teacher skills required to construct
activities and investigations that will motivate children
to appreciate science. The needs of bilingual and learn-
ing handicapped children are addressed in the study of
diverse methods of instruction in science. Field-based
experience required.
67
ELE 451 Health and Learning Disabilities
3 Credit 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: PSY 301

Current research and theories related to the education


and development of children with health and learning
disabilities. Methods and materials that can be employed
by the elementary classroom teacher to help integrate these
children into classroom learning activities. Field-based
experience required.

ELE 471 PLANNING, ASSESSMENT AND


MANAGEMENT
ELE 441 ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2 Credits 2 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: PSY 301
Methods and materials for integrating art into the elementary Study of the principles of teaching and classroom management
classroom that incorporates the learning standards established as they apply to all aspects of the curriculum. Long and
by the New York State Education Department. Hands-on short-term planning techniques. The development of an
experience in creating art; preparing and developing lesson integrated approach to the learning process. Individual
plans; locating materials, resource guides, web sites, field pupil differences, special education needs, classroom and
trip information and related children’s literature. individual motivation, group management and issues related
to evaluation and assessment are discussed.
ELE 442 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
3 Credits 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours
ELE 481 Student Teaching 1-6
Methods and materials for integrating music into the el-
12 Credits 360 Field Service Hours Weekly Seminars
ementary school classroom that incorporate the National
Prerequisites: ELE 331-471
Standards developed by the Music Educators National
Conference (MENC) through use of an electronic keyboard. A minimum grade point average of 2.5, a grade point aver-
Emphasis on interdiscriplinary projects that correlate music age of 3.0 or better in education courses, passing scores on
with social studies, language arts and other areas of the the LAST, ATS-W and CST-Multi Subject examinations,
elementary school curriculum. and approval of the Education Chair.

ELE 443 THEATRE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Education majors are placed in cooperating school districts
3 Credits 3 Class Hours under the supervision of selected master teachers and the
Education Chair.
Methods and materials for integrating theatre into the
elementary school classroom that incorporate the learning
The supervised student teaching experience requires full-
standards established by the New York State Education
time service at an assigned elementary school for at least
Department. Techniques include mime, improvisation,
15 weeks. The assignment is equally divided between the
puppetry and plays. Particular emphasis is placed on using
lower grades 1-3 and the upper grades 4-6. Candidates are
drama in meeting the needs of diverse student populations.
required to participate in all related local school activities
such as conferences, meetings, and extracurricular activities
ELE 444 Theatre in the Secondary School
until the end of the school term.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Methods and Materials for integrating theatre into the The required weekly seminars, which are held on campus
secondary school classroom that incorporate the learning under the leadership of the Chair of Childhood Education,
standards established by the New York State Education focus on the integration of daily classroom observation and
Department. Techniques include mime, improvisation, teaching experience with current educational theory and
scene study and script analysis. Emphasis on using drama practice and the analysis, understanding, and handling of
in meeting the needs of diverse student groups. special situations.
68
COMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS COM 212 WEBSITE DESIGN
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
COM 101 COMPUTERS IN BUSINESS Prerequisite: COM 101
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Introduction to website design using Adobe GoLive! Program
Instruction in touch keyboarding and computer applications on the Macintosh platform. Site construction, posting and
in business. Analysis of the Windows operating system. maintenance of the site created by the student.
Hands-on exercises in word processing, desktop publishing,
spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software. Integra- ECONOMICS
tion of the Internet with these applications.
ECO 101 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS—MACRO
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
COM 102 ELECTRONIC SPREADSHEETS
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Study of the relationships among social groups in their
Prerequisite: COM 101, BUS 101 activities relating to the production and consumption of
wealth. Analysis of forces determining prices, wages,
Analyzing and solving business problems utilizing the com- employment, and profits. Consideration of facts and theories
puter: an in-depth look at various software packages focusing concerning national income, business cycles, public finance,
on the electronic spreadsheet and its uses in today's business money and banking, and inflation. Comparison of different
world. The basic skills required for the use of the spreadsheet, economic systems.
including data entry and editing, manipulation and use of data-
entering formulas, including the preparation of templates. ECO 102 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS—MICRO
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ECO 101
COM 201 DATABASES
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Study of the interaction of supply, demand, and prices in
Prerequisite: COM 101 a market economy. Critical analysis of price theory under
conditions of perfect and imperfect competition, oligopoly, and
Information systems for management: study of the database monopoly. Applications to wages, profits, rent, and interest.
and the database management system. Hands-on experience Theory of consumer behavior. Practices of the individual
in the building, searching, sorting, editing and modifying firm. Economic growth and international problems.
of the database, creating command files, and designing and
developing database programs. ECO 201 MONEY AND BANKING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ECO 102, BUS 101
COM 202 ADVANCED COMPUTER SYSTEMS
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Introduction to the theories and functions of money; the
Prerequisite: COM 201 or BUS 306 money supply, interest rates, and the private and central
systems of banking.
Advanced use of microcomputers in business. Creation of
programs to generate cash disbursements, purchases, sales,
payroll and projections. Generation of electronic as well
as traditional correspondence, including the creation and
maintenance of business web sites.

COM 211 DESKTOP PUBLISHING


3 Credits 3 Class Hours

Introduction to Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop CS2, with


focus on image creation and manipulation, photo correction,
photo collage, editing, cropping, scanning, text and image,
uploading, and using layers and filters.
69
ENGLISH ENG 204 SCRIPTWRITING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Placement examinations in reading and writing may be re- Prerequisite: ENG 102
quired of entering students. Students who are unprepared
Training in the preparation of scripts for theater, television,
for ENG 101 in either or both of these areas will be required
and film with an emphasis on character portrayal, dialogue,
to take one or more Basic Educational Skills courses. ENG
and scene construction. Introduces the student to basic script
101 is a prerequisite for all other English courses.
formats, terminology, and techniques.
ENG 101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 1
ENG 210 FEATURE AND MAGAZINE WRITING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Focus upon strengthening writing skills in general and per- Prerequisite: ENG 102
sonal experience and expository essays in particular. Critical
Writing and reporting of feature news stories with special
reading of essays and short stories; library usage and research
emphasis on stories intended for magazine publication.
methods employed in a library research paper.
ENG 221 THE POEM
ENG 102 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 2 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: ENG 102
Prerequisite: ENG 101
Study of selected poetry, emphasizing poetic technique and
Critical reading of poetry and drama, with analyses of, and
the role that literary criticism plays in shaping and enriching
written responses to, selections in these genres. The im-
the reader's appreciation and understanding.
provement of students' composition skills is a major course
objective. Students will further develop library skills leading
ENG 241 SHORT FICTION
to a documented paper.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102
ENG 201 CREATIVE WRITING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Study of selected short stories and novellas, emphasizing
Prerequisite: ENG 102 narrative technique and the role that literary criticism plays
in shaping and enriching the reader's appreciation and
Practice in various kinds of writing styles for different purposes.
understanding.
Study of techniques in expository and creative writing; the
selection of style and form to match the objective, including
ENG 261 THE DRAMA
personal poetry, critical essays, and dramatic dialogues.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102
ENG 202 NEWS WRITING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Study of selected plays, emphasizing dramatic technique and
Prerequisite: ENG 102 the role that literary criticism plays in shaping and enriching
the reader's appreciation and understanding.
Survey of writing and reporting. Emphasis on print and on-
line journalism. Practical writing and reporting, interviewing
ENG 271 ART OF THE ESSAY
techniques, feature writing, beat reporting, speeches, news
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
conferences, crime, weather and public personality profiles.
Prerequisite: ENG 102
ENG 203 JOURNALISM Study of the various techniques that the master essayist
3 Credits 3 Class Hours employs in structuring effective prose. An emphasis on
Prerequisite: ENG 102 modeling various essay-writing techniques will be a major
course component.
Basic news reporting skills, including how to cover and
write a news story, with emphasis on reporting actual events.
ENG 302 PHOTO JOURNALISM
Development of a working knowledge of proofreading skills,
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
newspaper layout, and practical grammar. The functions of
daily and weekly newspapers and the moral responsibilities Digital photography for the Mass Media including newspapers,
of the reporter. magazines and Web, slide and CD-ROM technology.
70
ENG 304 SCREENWRITING ENG 352 BRITISH LITERATURE
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102 Prerequisite: ENG 102
Writing for television and film with attention to the use of A survey course reviewing the major writers of the nineteenth
dramatic language, character, plot and screen dynamics. and twentieth centuries from the Romantic and Victorian pe-
Emphasis on advanced script formats, terminology and riods to contemporary times. The principal genres—poetry,
techniques. fiction, and drama—are studied.
ENG 330 AMERICAN LITERATURE
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102 ENG 353 CONTEMPORARY FICTION
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Examination of the major writers of the nineteenth and Prerequisite: ENG 102
twentieth centuries. Consideration of Realism and Natu-
ralism, the Imagists and the Symbolists. Study of works in Study of major selections from the literature of fiction pro-
historical perspective. duced in the 20th Century. Focus is on the literary develop-
ment of the modern and post-modern schools of writing and
ENG 331 LITERATURE IN THE JAZZ AGE their authors who primarily wrote fiction.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102
American literature as it developed in the period during ENG 354 MODERN AMERICAN NOVEL
which jazz and modern popular musical forms emerged as 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
important expressions of American culture. Emphasis on Prerequisite: ENG 330
cross-currents of influence among literature, popular music
and the social climate of twentieth-century United States. Development of the American novel as an evolving narra-
tive form in the twentieth century. Beginning with Drieser's
ENG 332 FILM AND LITERATURE Sister Carrie, this course moves through Hemingway's The
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Sun Also Rises, Lewis's Arrowsmith, and Fitzgerald's Tender
Prerequisite: ENG 102 Is The Night to culminate in Faulkner's The Sound and the
Fury. These works will be examined in their historical and
Study of the narrative film. Emphasis on the elements of
aesthetic contexts.
film, film genres, literary aspects of film, and the place of
the director. Students will consider the major currents of
film criticism theory and will be expected to provide written
and oral evaluations of major narrative films. ENG 361 MASTERWORKS OF LITERATURE
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
ENG 333 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Prerequisite: ENG 102
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102 Analysis of selected world masterpieces from the Middle
Ages to the end of the Renaissance period. The study and
Reading material designed specifically for children in the analysis of poetry, short stories and plays written during
lower and upper elementary grades, 1-3 and 4-6. Attention this period.
concentrated on short stories related to growing up, succeed-
ing in school, junior biographies and novels dealing with
contemporary urban life. ENG 371 MYTHS AND LEGENDS
ENG 342 FOUR MODERN EUROPEAN WRITERS 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: ENG 102
Prerequisite: ENG 102 Examination of Greek and Roman myths of creation,
In-depth study of the works of four major twentieth-century myths of the gods, and Greek sagas and local legends.
European writers. Representative works of a poet, short Contemporary mythological theories of Freud, Jung, and
story writer, novelist, and dramatist will be analyzed with Levi-Strauss. The survival of classical mythology in the
regard to the nature of each genre, the relationship between arts, including fiction, poetry, drama, painting, sculpture,
literature and society, and the creative process. film, and music.
71
ENG 402 SHAKESPEARE HIS 202 FILM HISTORY
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 352
Development of the motion picture industry from its origin to
Shakespeare's life and works. Selected plays and poems the present. Study of major films, current trends and world
representative of several dramatic and poetic genres—his- issues as seen through film.
tory play, tragedy, comedy, and lyric—are studied in their
historical, political, cultural and literary contexts. Analysis HIS 203 HISTORY AND AESTHETICS
of language, characterization, plot and structure are employed OF PHOTOGRAPHY
to develop an appreciation of Shakespeare's art. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours

ENG 403 DANTE Survey and exploration of the origins, pivotal events, person-
3 Credits 3 Class Hours alities, and innovations that influenced the art and aesthetics
Prerequisite: ENG 361 of photography from 1800 to the present. Photography as
a cultural phenomenon will be explored including political,
Critical reading of La Vita Nuova, La Divina Comedia, and scientific and social contexts. Photojournalism, documentary
selections from the works of Dante, with an eye towards photography, portraiture, fashion, and various experimental
placing his writings in the intellectual and social context of genres will be discussed.
the late Middle Ages.
HIS 204 FILM CLASSICS
ENG 404 EDITORIAL AND REVIEW WRITING 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Study of film as an art form and the motion picture industry
Writing editorials and reviews of plays, movies, music, icons that created them, through screenings of seminal film
books, records and film. Students analyze examples of the works. Emphasis on the films of directors such as Chaplin,
best writings in these forms and produce their own editori- Ford, Griffith, Hawkes, Hitchcock, Lubitsch, Preminger,
als and reviews. Cocteau, von Sternberg , Welles, Spielberg, et al for inspira-
tion, guidance and focus.
HISTORY
HIS 301 CULTURAL DIVERSITY
HIS 101 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO 1789 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: HIS/SOC Course

Exploration of the development of the Western world from Exploration of American life and culture as seen from the
ancient Egypt through 1789. Focus on the ideas and institu- perspectives of various ethnic groups. Topics include the
tions of the societies of that time span and the interrelation- culture, history and impact of the African-American, Hispanic-
ships between government, social organization, religion, American and Asian-American communities in America.
law, war, and culture.
HIS 302 AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
HIS 102 WESTERN CIVILIZATION AFTER 1789 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: HIS/SOC Course
Survey of the major ideas, institutions, peoples, leaders, The Executive Branch of government, development of the
forces, and movements from the post-Napoleonic Era through Presidency and the political, economic and social impact the
the present. The revolutions in the economy, government,
office has had on the history of the United States.
science, technology, social attitudes, and aesthetics. The
effects of those revolutions upon the present world.
HIS 311 WAR AND CONFLICT
HIS 201 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: HIS/SOC Course
Contemporary themes in world history that bear on current Study of armed conflict from Athens to the Gulf War. The
problems and situations. Case studies of emerging problems development of warfare and how it has affected the social
involving developing nations and world powers. and economic lifestyle of the peoples involved.
72
LANGUAGE MASS COMMUNICATION

ASL 101 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1 MAC 101 MASS COMMUNICATION


3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Introduction to American Sign Language, Deaf Culture, and Orientation to the mass media. The use of print and non-print
fingerspelling. Development of basic sign-language skills media to inform and entertain. Public relations, advertising
to communicate with the hearing-impaired. Emphasis on and various forms of journalism and their impact on society.
communicating with the deaf in educational and rehabilita-
tive settings, conversation in signs, basic rules of grammar, MAC 102 BROADCAST FUNDAMENTALS
and aspects of the deaf community. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Survey of current practices and policies involved in the
ASL 102 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2
broadcast-media fields. The historical, cultural, legal and
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
management aspects of broadcasting will be reviewed
Prerequisite: ASL 101
and related to the responsibilities of broadcasting to the
Continuation of basic American Sign Language and Deaf public it serves.
Culture study, with opportunities to build receptive and
expressive sign vocabulary and phrases. Development of MAC 201 Voice AND DICTION
conversational skills in American Sign Language. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours

SPA 101 SPANISH 1 Improvement of voice and diction (articulation), relaxation


3 Credits 3 Class Hours and breathing, resonance, phonation, volume and pitch, rate,
emphasis and vocal quality. The sounds of American English
Practice in the listening, reading, speaking and writing skills to create recognition of various vocal patterns.
with emphasis on developing communication strategies with
exposure to Hispanic culture.
MAC 202 MEDIA LAW
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
SPA 102 SPANISH 2 Prerequisite: MAC 101
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: SPA 101 or Placement Test Media law and freedom of speech in the United States.
Case studies, landmark decisions and binding precedents
Intensive course for the acquisition of technical Spanish decided by the United States Supreme Court and their
skills for effective communication in everyday situations impact on mass media.
related to the role of the elementary school teacher in a
Spanish-speaking environment.
MAC 211 Broadcast Journalism
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102
Writing and reporting for broadcast television and radio news
and entertainment. All phases of report writing and editing,
including interviewing techniques, feature writing, beat re-
porting, speeches, news conferences, crime and sports.

MAC 212 BROADCAST Announcing


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Training and preparation of students to perform as
announcers and professional communicators for the
electronic media. Emphasis will be on voice analysis and
improvement, pronunciation, articulation and audio and
video performance.
73
MAC 301 New and Emerging Media MATHEMATICS
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MAC 101 A placement examination in mathematics is required of all
students. Students in need of further preparation will be
A survey of all aspects of the changing media environment. required to take MAT 011.
The role of communication and media in social and cultural
life. The development, operation, and function of various
forms of media: print, radio, television, cable, film, computers, MAT 011 DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS
the Internet, public relations and advertising. How media *0 Credits 3 Class Hours
affects individual lives as well as policy, law and ethics.
Designed to help students understand concepts in the ar-
eas of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, and
MAC 302 MEDIA ETHICS AND CRITICISM measurements. Develops ability to apply the fundamental
3 Credits 3 Class Hours mathematical operation (adding, subtracting, multiplying,
Prerequisite: MAC 202 and dividing). Individualized, self-paced approach.
Focuses on the moral and ethical dilemmas journalists face *Three equated credits for the determination of tuition and
in all areas of the media. Topics include freedom of speech, full-time status.
confidentiality, right to privacy, obscenity, censorship and
truth in advertising are explored through case studies and
current media cases. MAT 111 MATHEMATICAL REASONING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: Elementary algebra or one year of high school
MAC 311 BROADCAST ADVERTISING academic mathematics
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MAC 102 Designed to introduce students to mathematical ways of
thinking, this course focuses on the following topics: sym-
Professional standards and techniques used by the broadcast bolic logic; set theory; numeration systems; inductive and
industry in the writing and editing of copy for news, deductive reasoning; and applications to programming.
documentaries and special events. Emphasis will be placed
on the student's ability to script, edit and critique copy.
MAT 123 COLLEGE ALGEBRA
MAC 312 BROADCAST PROGRAMMING 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: Elementary algebra or two years of high school
academic mathematics
Broadcast programming strategies as they influence the
evaluation, selection and scheduling of different types of First and second degree equations and inequalities, exponents,
programming for networks, independent stations, public polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and graphing.
broadcasting, news and special events.
MAT 231 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
MAC 401 Public Opinion polling 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: Elementary algebra or one year of high school
Prerequisite: SOC 101 academic mathematics

The foundations of statistical methodology relating to public Classification and analysis of data: mean, variance, standard
opinion research. Research topics, sampling, measurement deviation, and linear correlation. Concepts of probability.
and case studies, qualitative and quantitative data analysis, Binomial, hypergeometric, and normal distributions; sampling.
and evaluation techniques as they pertain to mass media
and communication.
74
MUSIC

PLACEMENT
A placement examination and audition are required of all
students enrolling in applied music courses. Music students
are tested for the following skills:
1. Knowledge of the rudiments of music theory, includ-
ing key signatures, major and minor scales, intervals,
triads, and standard music terminology
2. Ability to perform a prepared music selection on their MUS 212 HARMONY 4
major instrument or voice and keyboard 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3. Sight-reading proficiency on their major instrument or Prerequisite: MUS 211
voice Advanced principles of modern chord progression including
4. Aural-Visual Skills the minor mode. Alternative harmonizations of standard pro-
gressions. Analysis of selected examples of popular music.
Students will be placed according to their test results,
individual aptitudes, professional experience, individual MUS 121 SIGHT SINGING 1
counseling and a personal interview. 1 Credits 2 Class Hours

APPLIED MUSIC Training in the singing of intervals and melodic phrases.


Sight reading in bass and treble clefs. The development of a
MUS 111 HARMONY 1 sense of tonality and the ability to sing major scales, triads,
3 Credits 3 Class Hours and diatonic seventh chords.

Introduction to music theory as prerequisite to the study of lit- MUS 122 SIGHT SINGING 2
erature and materials of music. Intensive drill in notation and 1 Credit 2 Class Hours
visual recognition in treble and bass clefs of key signatures; Prerequisite: MUS 121
major, harmonic minor, and melodic minor scales; intervals;
standard meters, triads, and diatonic seventh chords. Training in the singing of intervals and more complex
melodies using syncopated rhythms. Sight reading in bass
and treble clefs. Further development of a sense of tonality
MUS 112 HARMONY 2
and the ability to sing minor scales, minor triads, and minor
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
seventh, dominant seventh and major seventh chords.
Prerequisite: MUS 111 or satisfactory score on placement
examination
MUS 221 SIGHT SINGING 3
Triads and seventh chords, in melodic settings and harmonic 1 Credit 2 Class Hours
progressions, including dominant and substitute dominant Prerequisite: MUS 122
relationships. Principles of harmonic motion and chord Training in aural and visual perception of complex rhythmi-
progression. Basic principles of form in music. Analysis cal, contrapuntal, and melodic material. Sight reading with
of chord progressions found in popular music. emphasis on chromaticism. Modal scales and sight singing
of choral music.
MUS 211 HARMONY 3
3 Credits 3 Class Hours MUS 222 SIGHT SINGING 4
Prerequisite: MUS 112 1 Credit 2 Class Hours
Ninth chords, in melodic settings and harmonic progres- Prerequisite: MUS 221
sions. Use of non-chordal tones, including suspensions, Training in aural and visual perception of more complex
anticipations, and appoggiaturas. Principles of form in mu- rhythmical, contrapuntal, and melodic material. Sight
sic. Analysis of chord progressions found in contemporary reading in additional clefs, singly and in combination with
popular music, including introductions, modulations, and clefs previously studied, with emphasis on chromaticism.
deceptive cadences. Continuation of modal scales.
75
MUS 123 EAR TRAINING 1 MUS 131 KEYBOARD LAB 1
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 2 Credits 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours
Training in the recognition and notation of diatonic intervals, Individualized keyboard training in a group setting. Develop-
rhythms, melodic phrases and triads. Aural recognition of ment of skills relevant to the performance of melodies and
diatonic chord progressions, and melodies. harmonic progressions in small position (SP). Training in
sight reading and accompaniment skills necessary for the
professional musician and music educator.
MUS 124 EAR TRAINING 2
1 Credit 2 Class Hours MUS 132 KEYBOARD LAB 2
Prerequisite: MUS 123 2 Credits 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours
Training in the recognition and notation of simple and com- Prerequisite: MUS 131
pound rhythms, seventh chords, and melodic phrases. Aural Individualized keyboard training in a group setting. Develop-
recognition of melodies and chord progressions, containing ment of skills relevant to the performance of more advanced
both diatonic and chromatic harmony. melodies and harmonic progressions in large position (LP).
Training in sight reading and accompaniment skills necessary
MUS 223 EAR TRAINING 3 for the professional musician and music educator.
1 Credit 2 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 124 MUS 231 KEYBOARD LAB 3
2 Credits 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours
Training in the aural recognition and notation of complex Prerequisite: MUS 132
rhythmic and harmonic material using seventh and ninth
chords. Emphasis on modern chord progressions in the The playing and reading of accompaniments, hymns, and
major and minor modes. Transcription of contemporary folk songs with increased fluency; ability to read at sight
popular music from records and tapes. and transpose compositions of moderate difficulty; marches,
anthems, and other ceremonial music.
MUS 224 EAR TRAINING 4
MUS 232 KEYBOARD LAB 4
1 Credit 2 Class Hours
2 Credits 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 223
Prerequisite: MUS 231
Training in the aural recognition and notation of more The playing and reading of more advanced accompani-
complex rhythmic and harmonic material. Emphasis on ments; ability to read at sight and transpose more advanced
chromaticism and modulation. Dictation of two and three- compositions; modulation and improvisation; reduction of
part contrapuntal material. scores, and conducting from the keyboard.
MUS 331 KEYBOARD LAB 5
2 Credit 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 232
Musicianship training and keyboard facility. Harmoniza-
tion of melodies, modulation, transposition, improvisation,
accompaniment techniques and other background styles.
Application of chord voicings and progressions to selected
melodic material.

MUS 332 KEYBOARD LAB 6


2 Credit 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 331
Advanced musicianship training, modulation, transposition,
harmonization of melodies and keyboard facility. Score
reduction and accompaniment techniques. Contemporary
chord voicings and alterations and their application to the
reharmonization of melodies.
76
PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLES

Students may participate in more than one ensemble each se-


mester providing that their academic progress is not affected.
A maximum of four ensemble credits above the required
program minimum will be accepted for elective credit.

Students who are members of performance ensembles must


wear formal attire for all concerts and shows such as the
Great American Songbook. Information regarding the spe-
cific dress requirements may be obtained in the Admissions,
Student Activities, or Music Division Offices.

BAND ENSEMBLES

PEB 111-412 CONCERT BAND 1-8


1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
Performance of standard and contemporary concert band
selections. Rehearsal and preparation for public perfor-
mance.

PEB 131-432 LAB BAND 1-8 PEB 161-462 JAZZ ORCHESTRA 1-8
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours 1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor

Performance of standard, contemporary, and original music Study and performance of jazz ensemble literature is coupled
literature. Rehearsal and preparation for student recitals and with original compositions and arrangements from the artists
public performances. Technical development and advance- and bands such as Louis Armstrong, Fletcher Henderson,
ment coupled with repertoire extension covering diverse Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Stan Kenton and Paul
periods and styles. Whiteman. Preparation for public performance.

PEB 141-442 JAZZ ENSEMBLE 1-8 PEB 181-482 WIND ENSEMBLE 1-8
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor

Performance of standard, contemporary, and original music Professional training course designed for the study of stan-
literature in small group settings. Rehearsal and preparation dard and contemporary wind ensemble literature. Rehearsal
for student recitals and public performances. Technical and preparation for public performance.
development together with repertoire extension embracing
major artistic trends. PEB 191-492 SWING BAND 1-8
1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
PEB 151-452 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 1-8 Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Performance of classic swing band arrangements of bands
Study and performance of standard, contemporary, and such as Artie Shaw, Harry James, Jimmy and Tommy
original jazz literature. Interaction in the rhythm section Dorsey, Woody Herman, Les Brown and Benny Goodman.
using traditional and non-traditional groupings of rhythm Emphasis on vocal stylists and big bands of the Swing Era.
instruments. Preparation for public performance.
77
STRING ENSEMBLES PES 151-452 THEATRE ORCHESTRA 1-8
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
PES 111-412 GUITAR/BASS ENSEMBLE 1-8 Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Professional orchestra designed to develop and enhance the
Graded sight reading and study of standard, contemporary, skills required to accompany musical theatre productions
and original jazz literature. Study and practice of materials that include the performance of overtures, interludes
for purposes of technical development, repertoire extension, and backgrounds suitable for solo, group and ensemble
and public performance. presentations occurring on a theatre stage. The ability to
follow a conductor from a recessed orchestra pit in front
of the stage is emphasized and is a major requirement for
PES 113-414 ADVANCED GUITAR/ orchestra members.
BASS ENSEMBLE 1-8
VOCAL ENSEMBLES
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director PEV 111-412 CHORUS 1-8
Advanced study and public performance of standard, contem- 1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
porary, and original jazz/commercial literature. Opportunities Performance of standard and contemporary choral literature.
to perform a varied repertoire, drawn from major artistic Rehearsal and preparation for concerts, recitals and other
trends with selected professional guitar artists. public performances. Technical development and advance-
ment coupled with repertoire extension covering diverse
periods and styles.
PES 121-422 STRING ENSEMBLE 1-8
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours PEV 121-422 CHOIR 1-8
1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Study and practice of a variety of standard and contemporary Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
literature composed for the violin, viola, violoncello and
string bass. Rehearsal and preparation for student recitals Advanced ensemble dedicated to the performance of more
and public performance. difficult and challenging traditional and contemporary choral
literature. Preparation for public performances and concerts
with selected soloists and orchestras.
PES 131-432 CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 1-8
PEV 131-432 VOCAL JAZZ 1-8
1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
Professional training orchestra designed for instrumentalists Professional training vocal ensemble designed for vocalists
and vocalists desirous and capable of public performance desirous and capable of public performance on a professional
on a professional level. Opportunities to perform a varied level. Opportunities to perform a varied repertoire, embrac-
repertoire, embracing major artistic trends, with selected ing major artistic trends, a cappella and with instrumental
professional soloists in the field. accompaniment. Recording techniques and the demands of
the recording studio.

PES 141-442 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 1-8 PEV 141-442 BARBERSHOP HARMONY 1-8
1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Corequisite: PEV 111-432
Orchestra dedicated to the performance of the traditional Professional level training for vocalists interested in a cap-
and contemporary literature composed for a fully instru- pella performance of traditional barbershop quartet litera-
mented orchestra of symphonic proportions. Opportunity ture. Preparation for performances at regional and national
to develop the skills and repertoire required for performing competitions sponsored by the Barbershop Quartet Society
with a symphony orchestra. (SPEBSQSA) and the Sweet Adelines, Inc.
78
PEV 161-462 OPERA WORKSHOP 1-8 PEV 371-472 CABARET/TV WORKSHOP 1-4
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Corequisite: PEV 111-432 Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
Individualized instruction in a group setting. Study of stan- Individualized instruction in a group setting. Study of the skills re-
dard and contemporary operatic literature including solo arias quired for professional vocal performance: microphone techniques,
and literary analysis of libretti. Rehearsal and preparation for music and show programming. Public performance in the Great
concerts, recitals and other public performances. Technical American Songbook, Upbeat Café and College Theatre.
development and advancement coupled with repertoire exten-
sion covering diverse periods and styles. Special attention
to terminology, costuming, and traditions of the opera. PEV 381-482 PROFESSIONAL CABARET 1-4
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
PEV 191-492M MEN'S CHORUS 1-8 Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Preparation for performance in Great American Songbook
presentations in a variety of venues including, but not limited
Vocal ensemble for men interested in performing barbershop to, locations in NYC, the Upbeat Cafe and College Theatre.
quartet literature in a large chorus. Performances in the
College Theatre and other venues.
PEV 383-484 AMERICAN SONGBOOK 1-4
PEV 191-492W WOMEN'S CHORUS 1-8 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
Professional training designed for vocal, theatre, film and
Vocal ensemble for women interested in performing audio majors interested in a career that includes creating/
barbershop quartet literature in a large chorus. Performances producing/acting/singing/performing on a television show
in the College Theatre and other venues. that highlights songs from the Great American Songbook.

Jo Sullivan-Loesser and Susan Loesser with Ervin Drake and David Eliscu before award
ceremony conferring Honorary Doctor of Music (Mus.D.) degrees upon Frank Loesser
and Edward Eliscu members of the Songwriters Hall of Fame.
79
MAJOR INSTRUMENT / VOICE

All full-time matriculated students study a major instrument


with a qualified professional musician under the supervision
of a music program chairperson. Juried performance exami-
nations are required at the end of each year of instruction.
Junior and Senior Recitals are required for all students in the
Bachelor of Music degree program at the end of the sixth
and eighth semesters of Major Instrument/Voice instruction.
Recitalists must study with a faculty instructor during the
semester in which the recital is given.
Major instrument instruction emphasizes all aspects of tech-
nical development and tonal production through the study of
traditional methods and repertory as the foundation for the
understanding and application of contemporary techniques
of improvisation.
Students taking Private Instruction must attend at least 8
performances - 4 recitals and 4 concerts that will serve to
refine their musical judgment. Critiques must be submitted
to private instructors demonstrating the ability to describe
and evaluate musical performances in writing. PERCUSSION: Study of time-keeping techniques on the
The technical requirements and materials set forth below drum set using sticks or brushes in diversified styles—jazz,
provide a general guide to the levels of competence which are latin and rock. Chapin, Advanced Techniques for the Mod-
expected in each area of performance. Special fee required. ern Drummer; Stone, Stick Control for the Snare Drummer;
Goldenberg, Snare Drum Reading; Famularo, Drum Set
Duets; Solo Snare Drum Reading. Introduction to mallet
MUS 141,142 MAJOR INSTRUMENT/VOICE 1, 2 instruments, including vibes and marimba, Major scales;
2 Credits each 1 Lesson per week reading of simple melodies; Kraus, Modern Mallet Method,
Book 1.
BASS—ELECTRIC/STRING: Development of intonation;
basic shifting; major, minor and blues scales in all keys. Arpeg-
PIANO: Major and minor scales and arpeggios: 4 octaves,
gio studies in all keys. Selected etudes from Nanny, Simandl
parallel motion. Technique: Hanon Book II, III, IV. Bach
and Kreutzer. Appropriate bass lines, studies and sight-reading
2- and 3-part inventions. Mozart/Beethoven sonatas, Cho-
in various musical idioms. Bowing technique studies.
pin Waltzes, Preludes. II-V cycles and turnarounds. Blues
CLARINET: Study of major and minor scales and arpeg- scales and 12-bar blues. Selections drawn from traditional
gios with different articulations. Klose, Method for Clari- jazz repertoire.
net; Rose, 40 Studies; Stamitz, Concerto in E flat; Mozart,
Concerto in A; Weber, Variations. Blue scales in all keys; SAXOPHONE: Technical development and tone production.
pentatonic scales. Emphasis on embouchure, breathing, intonation, articula-
FLUTE: Studies for the development of tone quality; major tion, vibrato, and finger technique. Scale studies. Studies
and minor scales. Cavally, Melodious and Progressive Stud- by Voxman, Selected Studies; Ferlin, 48 Etudes; Klose, 25
ies, Books I and II (Anderson, Gariboldi, Kochler-Terschak, Daily Studies; Rascher, 24 Intermezzi. Blues scales in all
Kimmer, etc.); solo pieces selected from 24 Concert Pieces keys; pentatonic scales; Niehaus, Jazz Etudes. Transcription
(Cavally); Handel, Sonatas; and works of comparable dif- and study of the solos of Charlie Parker and Lester Young.
ficulty. Blues scales, pentatonic scales.
GUITAR: Emphasis upon proper seating and hand positions. TROMBONE: Development of embouchure, breathing,
Technical material includes studies of scales, arpeggios and staccato and legato tonguing; tenor clef reading. Arban and
right hand techniques through Van Eps and Smith guitar Caruso methods; Mantia. The Trombone Virtuoso. All major
methods. Major, minor and blues scales in closed positions; and minor scales and arpeggios, 2 octaves. Blues scales in
sight-reading in various musical contexts. all keys; sight-reading.
80
TRUMPET: Emphasis on fundamental techniques. Studies PERCUSSION: Continuation of drum-set time-keeping
of Arban, Clarke, Caruso and Smith. Solos of Armstrong, techniques. Study of odd time-signature playing from Marino,
Clarke, Brown, Goedicke, and Purcell. All major and minor Time Capsule; Famularo, Drum Set Duets; Franco, Double
scales and arpeggios, 2 octaves. Blues scales in all keys. Bass Drumming; Kraus, Modern Mallet Method Book II;
Sight-reading in various musical contexts. Goodman, A Modern Method for Tympani. Minor scales,
blues scales, arpeggios, selected jazz melodies.
VOICE: Emphasis on voice building. Proper command of
posture, carriage, and breathing; placement of vowels and PIANO: Major and minor scales, parallel and contrary
consonants; diction, resonance. Vocalises according to the motion. Technique: Czerny, Op. 299; Bach Suites; Chopin
need of the student. Old English art songs, oratorio arias, Etudes, Nocturnes; Debussy, selected short works. Oscar
and contemporary songs of moderate difficulty. Peterson: Jazz Exercises. Modal scales, 4 octaves. Abersold
Improvisational Series. Selections drawn from traditional
and jazz repertoire.
SAXOPHONE: Scales, chords and interval studies; study
of harmonics; transposition studies; Viola, Chord Studies;
Capelli, 20 Grande Etudes; Karg-Elert, 25 Caprices and
Sonatas; Gates, Odd-Meter Studies; transcription and study
of the solos of Coleman Hawkins, Sonny Stitt and Dexter
Gordon. Abersold Improvisational Series.
TROMBONE: Embouchure techniques; Gordon, Daily Stud-
ies; continuation of tenor clef and introduction to alto clef
MUS 241, 242 MAJOR INSTRUMENT/VOICE 3, 4 reading. Clef studies by Blazevitch, Stefaniszin; LaFosse,
2 Credits each 1 Lesson per week School for Sight-reading, Vol. A-B; Kopprasch, Selected
Prerequisite: MUS 142 Studies, Vol. I. Solo material from Solo Book No. 1 (E.
BASS—ELECTRIC/STRING: Major and minor scales in Glover), Paris Conservatoire solos by Busser, Pfeiffer, and
3rds; scales and arpeggios in all keys. Arpeggio studies in Saint-Saens; transcription and study of the solos of Tommy
a cycle of fifths. Continuation of blues scales in all keys. Dorsey, Jack Teagarden, Kai Winding and J.J. Johnson.
Solo selections on the level of Baroque sonatas by Handel, TRUMPET: Development of embouchure techniques.
Eccles, and Pergolesi. Continued study of more advanced Studies of Clarke, Gordon, St. Jacome, Charlier; transposi-
bass-lines and sight-reading. Bowing technique studies. tion; sight-reading; excerpt material, both traditional and
contemporary. Study of improvisation with the Abersold
CLARINET: Major and minor scales and arpeggios; major
Improvisational Series; transcription and study of the solos
and minor scales in thirds; chromatic scales; transposition;
of Louis Armstrong, Roy Eldridge, and Bix Beiderbecke.
Weber Concerto No. 1; Brahms, Sonata No. 2 (or comparable
works); Baermann, Book III; Cavelini, 30 Caprices; Rose, VOICE: Advanced technical studies, improvements in dy-
32 Etudes. Chord scales; transcription and study of solos by namics and range. Old English art songs; Bach, Handel arias;
Benny Goodman and Tony Scott. selected popular and jazz melodies.
FLUTE: Continuation of tone development, application
and study of vibrato, major and minor scales, triad and
dominant seventh chord arpeggios. Cavally, Melodious
and Progressive Studies, Books II and III; Handel, Sonatas;
Mozart, Concerti; J.S. Bach, Suite in B Minor, and works of
comparable difficulty; transcription and study of solos by
Hubert Laws and Joe Farrel.
GUITAR: Increasing technical ability through advanced
studies of J. Pass and W. Montgomery. Concentrated study
in the Kreutzer scales system of 3rds, 6ths, and octaves.
Contrapuntal aspects of instrument explored through works
by J. S. Bach. Improvisational techniques through the use
of the J. Abersold Improvisational Series.
81
MUS 341, 342 MAJOR INSTRUMENT/VOICE 5, 6 SAXOPHONE: Advanced technique studies; extended
2 Credits each 1 Lesson per week range; selected studies from Karg-Elert, 25 Caprices; Bozza,
Prerequisite: MUS 242 12 Etudes-Caprices; Mule, 53 Etudes; Creston, Sonata; Ibert,
Concertino da Camera; transposition studies; transcription
BASS—ELECTRIC/STRING: Advanced finger techniques. and study of the solos of John Coltrane, David Sanborn, and
Modal scales in all keys. Arpeggios with available tensions. Michael Brecker.
Music of the difficulty of J.S. Bach or G. Bottesini. Ad-
TROMBONE: Continuation of clef studies; LaFosse, Vol.
vanced sight-reading. Study of bass lines and solo playing
C-E; Bordogni-Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Vol. II; Koppr-
of Jimmy Blanton, Oscar Pettiford, Charles Mingus and
asch, Selected Studies, Vol. II; Harris, Vol. II; Gordon, Daily
Paul Chambers.
Studies; solo material from Solo Book No. 2 (E. Glover);
solos by Guilmant, Gaubert, Bozza, Boutry, and other French
CLARINET: Augmented, diminished, and seventh arpeg-
composers; transcription and study of the solos of Phil Wilson,
gios; Stark, arpeggio studies; transpositions; Cavalini, Thirty
Frank Rosolino, Trummy Young, and Slide Hampton.
Caprices; Weber, Grand Duo Concertante; Debussy, Premiere
Rhapsodie; Spohr, Concerto No. 1; Brahms, Sonata No. 1; TRUMPET: Advanced technique and embouchure studies.
Saint-Saens, Sonata; modal scales, Abersold Improvisa- Studies of Brandt, Gordon, Colin; solos of Bozza, Enesco,
tional Series; transcription and study of the solos of Buddy Giannini, Hindemith, Hummel, Kaminski, Riisager and
DeFranco and Eddie Daniels. Torelli. Transcription and study of the solos of Clark Terry
and Miles Davis.
FLUTE: Tone and vibrato studies, scales and arpeggios; VOICE: Stability and consistent quality in the upper and
velocity studies; Tafonel-Gambert, Etudes; famous Flute lower vocal registers; study of strong declamatory passages
Studies (Anderson), Op. 15, Op. 30 and Op. 63. Passages and vocal improvisation. Continuation of more advanced
from the orchestral repertoire and sight-reading. J.S. Bach, repertoire including Gershwin, Kern, Berlin, and Porter.
Sonatas; Hindemith, Sonata; Karg-Elert, Sonata Appassio-
nata; Griffes, Poeme; and works of comparable difficulty.
Abersold Improvisational Series; modal scales, transcriptions
and study of the solos of selected jazz masters.

GUITAR: Works by G. Van Eps, P. Metheny, L. Carlton, J.


Pass, W. Montgomery, J. Raney. Advanced technical stud-
ies by Kreutzer; sight-reading; modal scales, chord scales:
diminished whole-tone and pentatonic.

PERCUSSION: Performance of prepared pieces in odd time-


signatures. Reading of drum charts with recorded music
by Chapin and Weckl; snare drum solo works by Albright
and Firth; study of four-way coordination with material by
Dahlgren; study in applying improvised solos and time-keep-
ing patterns to standard song forms. Advanced studies in MUS 441,442 MAJOR INSTRUMENT/VOICE 7, 8
timpani using material from Friese-Lepak, Tympani Method. 2 Credits each 1 Lesson per week
Vibraphone and marimba technique, using four mallets to Prerequisite: MUS 342
play chord progressions. Modal, augmented and diminished BASS—ELECTRIC/STRING: Intensive preparation for
scales. Reading of rhythm section chart on vibraphones. Senior Recital. Bass lines and solo transcriptions of Ray
Brown, Milt Hinton, Red Mitchell, Scott Lafaro, Stanley
PIANO: Major and minor scales in 3rds, 6ths, 10ths. Major, Clark, Jocko Pastorius.
minor, dominant 7th, diminished 7th arpeggios with avail-
able tensions. Techniques: Czerny, Op. 299; Clementi, CLARINET: Preparation for Senior Recital; materials to
Gradus ad Parnassum; Bach preludes and fugues WTC; include a selection of the difficulty of: Weber, Concerto
Beethoven sonatas; Chopin etudes; Bartok, selected works; No. 1 or 2; Hindemith, Sonata; Copland, Concerto; Stamitz,
Joplin piano rags; Shearing, Interpretations for Piano; chord Concerto for Clarinet and Strings; Stravinsky, Three Pieces
scales: diminished, pentatonic, whole tone. Selections from (or comparable works); Mozart, Concerto; transcription of
traditional and jazz repertoire. a solo by a jazz artist.
82
FLUTE: Preparation for Senior Recital; materials to include
a selection of the difficulty of Handel or Bach sonatas; Du-
tilleux, Sonatine; Ibert, Concerto for Flute; Piston, Sonata;
transcription of a solo by a jazz artist.

GUITAR: Preparation for Senior Recital; materials to in-


clude one transcription of a jazz artist, a selection from the
Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin by J.S. Bach and one
selection from the Kreutzer Solo Violin book.

PERCUSSION: Preparation for Senior Recital. Solo pieces


chosen from Marino, Time Capsule for Drum Set; Colgrass,
Six Unaccompanied Solos for Snare Drum; Huston, Suite for
Solo Timpani; Firth, 26 Etudes; Burton, Solos for Vibes. Per-
formance on drum set and vibraphone in a group setting.

PIANO: Technical review and preparation for Senior Re-


cital. Bach Partitas; Brahms, Intermezzi; Debussy, Pour Le
Piano; 20th-century composers. Shearing, Interpretations
for Piano; Peterson, Advanced Jazz Piano Solos. Selections
from the jazz repertoire.

SAXOPHONE: Preparation for Senior Recital; materials of


the difficulty of Lacour, 8 Brilliant Etudes; Creston, Concerto;
Pascal, Sonate; Ibert, Concertino da Camera; Glazunov,
Concerto; transcription of a selected solo by a jazz artist.
MUS 311 COUNTERPOINT
TROMBONE: Preparation for Senior Recital; materials of 2 Credits 2 Class Hours
the difficulty of Creston, Fantasy; Bloch, Symphonie; Takacs, Prerequisite: MUS 212
Sonata; Martin, Ballade; Corello-Gibson, Sonata in D Minor; Species and free counterpoint based on 18th-century practice.
transcription of a selected solo by a jazz artist. Techniques for the writing of imitative forms, including
TRUMPET: Preparation for Senior Recital; materials of the canon and invention, as well as invertible counterpoint and
difficulty of Haydn, Concerto in Eb; Hummel, Concerto in short two-voice pieces.
Eb; Hindemith, Sonata; transcription of a selected solo of a
jazz artist such as Dizzy Gillespie or Clifford Brown. MUS 314 ARRANGING
2 Credits 2 Class Hours
VOICE: Preparation for Senior Recital; materials of the Prerequisite: MUS 212
difficulty of a Handel aria and selections from the popular
and jazz repertoires. Arranging for woodwind, brass, string, and percussion in-
struments. Technical factors relevant to performance, range
limits, melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic potentials. Chart
construction, transposition, and sectional balance and blend.
Reharmonization of melodies; use of counter-melodies and
secondary lines; performing and recording of arrangements.

MUS 315 COMMERCIAL ARRANGING


2 Credits 2 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 314
Arranging techniques for various size ensembles. Substitute
harmonizations, countermelodies, and backgrounds for vocal
and instrumental solos. Utilization of electronic instruments.
Laboratory sessions for scoring, performing, recording, and
evaluation of arrangements.
83
MUS 318 IMPROVISATION 1 MUS 394 CHORAL CONDUCTING
2 Credits 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours 2 Credits 2 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 212 Prerequisite: MUS 212, 314
Improvisation in theory and practice. Application of melody- Conducting techniques applicable to vocal ensembles
harmony relationships to instrumental/vocal performance. including choruses and a cappella groups. Score reading
Techniques for the composition and improvisation of original and analysis, application of the principles of voice develop-
melodies with emphasis on melodic sequences, nuance, ment and choral arranging. Organization of the effective
and mixed rhythmic patterns. Articulation, phrasing, and rehearsal with emphasis on the selection of suitable music
other elements of style are developed through application and preparation for public performance.
to standard and current repertory.

MUS 319 IMPROVISATION 2 MUS 411 COMPUTER MUSIC NOTATION


2 Credits 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 318 Prerequisite: MUS 212
Improvisation in theory and practice. Application of ad-
Use of Sibelius software for music notation and scoring.
vanced melodic/harmonic relationships to instrumental/vocal
Application to lead sheets, single-line parts, large ensemble
performance. Detailed analysis of selected jazz idioms and
arrangements and preparation of printed music for a variety
their application to individual creative expression.
of educational purposes. Scoring techniques for classical,
MUS 393 INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING jazz and popular styles are developed.
2 Credits 2 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 212, 314
MUS 412 COMPOSITION
Conducting techniques applicable to instrumental ensembles. 2 Credits 2 Class Hours
Score reading and analysis, application of principles of Prerequisite: MUS 311
orchestration and arranging. Organization of the effective
rehearsal with emphasis on the rearrangement of parts in Systematic approach to the art of composition. Emphasis
preparation for public performance. Reduction and sim- on popular and jazz idioms. Typical melodic, harmonic, and
plification of scores. Conducting techniques for the pit rhythmic devices are analyzed to provide an understanding
orchestra/band and the recording studio. of stylistic trends in contemporary popular music.
84
MUSIC BUSINESS

MUB 101 MUSIC BUSINESS CAREERS


3 Credits 3 Class Hours

Survey of music industry careers. Study of support func-


tionaries, such as talent and advertising agencies, publishers,
business managers, buyers, accountants, record producers,
and distributors. Performers' rights, copyrights, agency
contracts, financing and production agreements, licensing
and retailing.

MUB 102 RECORD PROMOTION AND


BROADCASTING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUB 101

Study of the radio station and record company as vehicles


for the promotion of record sales. The organization and
administration of a radio station: programming concepts,
market research, and payola . The structure and operation
of record companies and radio stations are examined.

MUB 201 MUSIC PUBLISHING AND COPYRIGHT


MUS 415 POPULAR SONGWRITING 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
2 Credits 2 Class Hours Prerequisite: MUB 102
Prerequisite: MUS 212
Music publishing from its roots in Tin Pan Alley. The music
Exploration of the fundamentals of commercial songwriting. publisher's operations: sources of income (domestic and
Analysis of the basis elements of a song: lyrics and music foreign), performing and mechanical rights organizations,
(melody, rhythm and harmony). Techniques and tools for copyright laws, contracts, and catalog development. The
finding and developing lyrical and musical ideas. The busi- publisher as producer and record company, unions, trade
ness aspects of songwriting—lead sheets, demos, copyright, organizations, publications, vocabulary, piracy, and the
music publishers, producers, contracts, and royalties. publisher/songwriter relationship.
MUS 431 PIANO ACCOMPANIMENT
2 Credits 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours MUB 202 MUSIC BUSINESS CONTRACTS
Prerequisite: MUS 332 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUB 201
Accompaniment techniques and skills for vocal workshops,
ensembles, music jury examinations and recitals, musical Contracts and other agreements between producers, direc-
theatre productions, and general music classes in grades K- tors, performers, writers, personnel managers, and booking
12. Emphasis on harmonization of melodies, modulation, agents are examined. Bargaining positions and negotiating
transposition, sight reading, and the development of keyboard techniques are discussed.
fluency and technique.
MUB 203 INDEPENDENT RECORD PRODUCTION
MUS 451 KEYBOARD HARMONY
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
2 Credits 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Prerequisite: MUS 232 The making and selling of a record by an independent
Musicianship training and keyboard facility. Harmonization producer. Planning and recording a "demo" and/or record
of melodies, modulation, transposition, and improvisation. company master. Budget and financing, selecting music and
Score reduction and accompaniment techniques. Contem- a recording studio. Technical requirements for manufacturing
porary chord voicings and alterations and their application processes, graphics, and packaging. Copyright registrations,
to the reharmonization of melodies. promotions, publicity, distribution, and sales.
85
MUB 301 ARTIST MANAGEMENT MUSIC EDUCATION
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUB 202 EDU 151-452 PRIVATE INSTRUMENT/VOICE 1-8
1 Credit 1 Lesson per week 4 Practice Hours
Establishing the artist-management relationship, planning Designed for students who are interested in improving their
and developing the artist's career utilizing a multi-media ap- performing skills. Special fee required.
proach; career maintenance and control; handling success.
EDU 241 MINOR INSTRUMENT
1 Credit 15 Field Experience Hours 2 Class Hours
MUB 302 CONCERT PRODUCTION AND PROMOTION An emphasis on the pedagogical aspects and instructional
3 Credits 3 Class Hours literature. Students will also develop a basic performing
Prerequisite: MUB 301 skill on the instrument that will enable them to participate
Study of music events including the legal, financial, political, in a laboratory performance ensemble.
and public relations issues that impact on public concerts.
EDU 311 METHODS OF GENERAL MUSIC EDUCATION
Emphasis on capital requirements, promotion, contracts,
3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours
marketing, advertising, publicity and the mechanics of
Prerequisite: MUS 232
corporate sponsorship.
Specific competencies are developed for the organization
and teaching of general music activities and programs that
MUB 401 MUSIC MARKETING include instruction for the special and alternative learner.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Methods and materials for the incorporation of computer-
Prerequisite: MUB 302 based instruction into the school music program. Lesson
planning for instruction in the reading and notation of music.
Study of the structure and operation of music marketing with State requirements for General Music are reviewed.
particular emphasis on its relationship with record promotion
companies, record manufacturers, wholesalers, jobbers, and EDU 312 METHODS OF CHORAL MUSIC EDUCATION
one-stops; the relationship with trade publication charts; 2 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 2 Class Hours
merchandising techniques; promotion, control of operations Prerequisite: MUS 232
and personnel management; single store operations; regional Specific competencies are developed for the organization,
and national chains. administration, and implementation of choral music activities,
programs, and performing groups in grades K-12. Methods
and materials for vocal ensembles such as chorus, choir,
MUB 402 Music Licensing and vocal jazz. Emphasis on rehearsal techniques, lesson
3 Credits 3 Class Hours planning and outcomes assessment.
Prerequisite: MUB 202
EDU 313 METHODS OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC
Focus on various music licenses including mechanical, EDUCATION
synchronization, grand rights, and print licenses. The roles 2 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 2 Class Hours
of Performing Rights Organizations and Mechanical Rights Prerequisite: MUS 232
Agencies in the distribution of royalties. The relationship
Specific competencies are developed for the organization,
of music licensing to applicable copyright laws.
administration, and implementation of instrumental music
activities, programs, and performing groups in grades K-
MUB 403 ADVANCED MUSIC PUBLISHING 12. Methods and materials for band, orchestra, wind and
3 Credits 3 Class Hours jazz ensembles. Emphasis on rehearsal techniques, lesson
Prerequisite: MUB 201 planning and outcomes assessment.

Focus on how digital technology, and the legal and EDU 314 LITERACY IN SCHOOLS
business issues surrounding it, has transformed the world 3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours
of music publishing, licensing and recording. Hit songs Prerequisite: PSY 301
are explored from the craft up to the ultimate financial The current methodologies, instructional techniques and ma-
opportunities responsible for the international surge in terials used to develop literacy skills in schools. Emphasis on
buying and selling copyrights. the teaching of reading, writing, listening and speaking.
86
EDU 321 INSTRUMENTAL TECHNIQUES MUH 102 POPULAR MUSIC IN AMERICA
2 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 2 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Basic performance techniques of brass, woodwind, string Popular Music in America since 1840. The styles of
and percussion instruments. The technical and pedagogical popular music: their musical characteristics, origins,
aspects of performance techniques are emphasized as well development, interaction with other styles, influence, and
as the standard literature for each instrument. artistic expressions.

EDU 331 SCHOOL AND SOCIETY


3 Credits 15 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours MUH 202 JAZZ HISTORY
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
The historical, philosophical and social foundations that have a
direct impact on educational theory and practice. The role that Sociological origins and history of the jazz idiom. Survey
contemporary education and the schools play in the shaping and analysis of the major schools and trends of jazz. In-depth
of society. The role of the school in providing active learning study of performers, bands, and smaller jazz combinations
opportunities for a diverse sociocultural community, special which have influenced twentieth century music.
learning needs and individual variations is explored.

EDU 421 STUDENT TEACHING—ELEMENTARY MUH 203 GOLDEN AGE OF JAZZ


AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS K-12 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
9-12 Credits 360 Field Service Hours Weekly Seminars Development of jazz between the two World Wars, from roots
Prerequisites: EDU 241-321, MUS 332, 393, 394, 441/442 in ragtime, the blues, and other traditions to the beginnings
of bebop. Study of two key decades: the 1920s, with such
A minimum grade point average of 3.0, demonstration of
towering figures as Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet, Earl
the competencies called for in the Qualifying Examination
Hines, Bix Beiderbecke, Coleman Hawkins, Adrian Rollini,
at a quality level satisfactory to a faculty jury, and approval
and Jack Teagarden, and the 1930s, period of intersection
of the Education Chair.
with popular music now called the Swing Era. The music
Education majors are placed in cooperating school districts of prominent soloists and bands such as Benny Goodman,
K-12 under the supervision of selected teachers and the Fletcher Henderson, Duke Ellington, Roy Eldridge, Count
Education Chair. They will have an opportunity to work Basie, Lester Young, Billie Holiday, Artie Shaw, Johnny
with the following student populations: socioeconomically Hodges, Benny Carter, Bunny Berigan and Jimmie Lunceford
disadvantaged students, students with disabilities, and Eng- are explored and analyzed.
lish language learners.

The supervised student teaching experience in music requires MUH 204 WORLD MUSIC
full-time service at an assigned elementary and secondary 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
school for at least 15 weeks. Candidates are required to
participate in all related local school activities such as Survey of the music of various genres, styles and cultures
conferences, meetings, and extracurricular activities. that represent the peoples of the world and their manifesta-
tions in the United States. The cultural forces that influence
The required weekly campus seminars focus on the integration music and how music influences the diverse cultures of past
of daily classroom observation and teaching experience with and present societies.
current educational theory and practice and the analysis,
understanding, and handling of special situations.
MUH 304 COMMERCIAL MUSIC STYLES
MUSIC HISTORY 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUH 101/102
MUH 101 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC
Study and analysis of American popular music with emphasis
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
on its major composers and performers. Social, economic,
Study of the elements, forms and styles of music, from the and historical contexts are examined. Classification
Medieval period through the Twentieth Century. Emphasis and comparison of often used syntax and popular styles.
on the historical and sociological contexts as a means of Emphasis on Jazz, Swing, Country, Broadway, Tin Pan
developing a sense of stylistic understanding. Alley, and the Rock genre.
87
MUH 401 AMERICAN MUSICALS TO 1940 MUH 406 HOAGY CARMICHAEL
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUH 101/102
The impact of Hoagy Carmichael’s music on the entertainment
Development of musical theatre in America from 1800 to world, including the motion picture industry, are explored
1940. Study of the cultures, social customs, production together with the socio-economic climate of the times. Songs
techniques and theatres that influenced music in this type of such as: Stardust, Lazy River, Heart and Soul, Two Sleepy
production. Emphasis on the works of George M. Cohan, People, Skylark, Small Fry, Lazy Bones and Georgia On My
Irving Berlin, Rodgers and Hart, George Gershwin, and Mind are used to analyze the special and enduring appeal of
Jerome Kern. his melodies, harmonies and lyrics.

MUH 402 AMERICAN MUSICALS AFTER 1940


MUH 407 CLASSICAL MUSIC TO 1840
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUH 101/102
Prerequisite: MUH 101/102
Development of musical theatre in America from 1940 to
Study of music from 1600 to 1840, with emphasis on vocal
present. Study of the cultures, social customs, production
and instrumental forms and historical, stylistic and aesthetic
techniques and theatres that influenced music in this type of
principles. Composers such as Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Haydn,
production. Emphasis on the works of Rodgers and Ham-
Mozart, and Beethoven are explored and analyzed.
merstein, Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, Frank
Loesser, Lerner and Lowe, and Andrew Lloyd Webber.
MUH 408 CLASSICAL MUSIC AFTER 1840
MUH 403 THE SWING ERA 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: MUH 101/102
Prerequisite: MUH 101/102
Study of the expressive art of the century after the birth of
Historical survey of the Big Bands that dominated American Schubert. Selected works of Brahms and other composers
music from the late 1920s to the early 1950s. The Count such as Berlioz, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt,
Basie, Benny Goodman, Woody Herman, Harry James, Stan Wagner and Verdi are explored and analyzed together with
Kenton, Guy Lombardo, and Artie Shaw bands are studied the music of composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky, Berg,
together with others whose distinctive styles and artistic cre- Hindemith, and Schoenberg.
ativity made significant musical contributions to the genre.
MUH 409 LEONARD BERNSTEIN
MUH 404 CLASSIC POP SINGERS
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: MUH 101/102 The impact of Leonard Bernstein on modern music, the-
atre and education. Study and analysis of the life of one
An exploration of the fascinating lives of the great singers,
of America's most prolific and diverse composers whose
such as Al Jolson, Louis Armstrong, Bing Crosby, Ethel Mer-
cultural achievements and influence affected the course of
man, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, and Barbra Streisand,
classical, contemporary, and popular music.
who gave life to classic popular music. Their influence
and role in America’s cultural history from the 1920s to the
present day are emphasized. MUH 411 JOHN LENNON
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
MUH 405 HISTORY OF ROCK AND ROLL
3 Credits 3 Class Hours The artistry of John Lennon and his influence on contemporary
Prerequisite: MUH 101/102 popular music. In depth analysis of his most enduring work;
pre and post Beatles. Songs such as: Imagine, Norwegian
Rock and Roll: sociological and folk/artistic roots, history and Wood, Revolution, In My Life, Mother, Lucy in the Sky With
widespread influence on twentieth century culture, society Diamonds, and others are used to illustrate his diversity as
and music. Emphasis on Rhythm and Blues Artists, Elvis a composer and lyricist; thus, exploring the wide range of
Presley, The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Beach Boys, James his influences. Investigation into his political activism and
Brown, Motown, and Stax Records. influence on social-issues during the 1960’s and 1970’s.
88
PHILOSOPHY

PHI 101 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 101
Introduction to the ideas and theories of the most influential
thinkers of the western world. Critical readings of works
by Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Aquinas, Descartes, Hobbes,
Spinoza, Kant, and Mill.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Study of the facts and theories concerning human behavior,
PSY 302 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY
including perception, motivation, personality, intelligence,
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
emotions, and attitudes. Consideration of how these aspects
Prerequisite: PSY 101
of the human being are formed within our social system and
how they are interrelated. Applications to learning problems, Theories of child development from birth to adolescence.
worker-employer relations, consumer behavior, and other Research findings will be analyzed in the areas of moral,
life situations. intellectual, emotional, sexual and cognitive development.

PSY 102 CHILD DEVELOPMENT PSY 321 PERSONALITY AND ADJUSTMENT


3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: PSY 101
Study of children's physical, emotional and intellectual
development and their impact on the learning process. So- Study of the genetic, developmental, and societal factors
ciocultural, family and community influence on the learning in personality development. Consideration of the different
process of children. Behavior and language development are approaches to the understanding of personality, includ-
chronicled from the prenatal period through childhood. ing the behavioristic, Gestalt, humanistic, psychoanalytic
viewpoints. The nature and determinants of mental health
PSY 211 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT are explored, along with the causes and correction of milder
3 Credits 3 Class Hours behavioral disorders.
Study of how human intellectual and emotional behavior
PSY 331 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
emerges in infancy and develops through various stages
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
from childhood through old age. The psychological and
Prerequisite: PSY 101
physiological needs and interests of the individual during
each phase of personality formation are examined. The Behavioral characteristics of individuals in small and large
relationship between the social system and individual de- groups. Measurement and assessment of interactions between
velopment is explored. the individual and society. The determinants of motives,
attitudes, and opinions are analyzed; individual roles, so-
PSY 301 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY cial norms, and group structures and processes are studied;
3 Credits 3 Class Hours factors making for effective leadership and communication
Prerequisite: PSY 101 are examined.
Study of the cognitive and affective dimensions of child
PSY 341 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
development and adolescent behavior. The analysis and
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
application of principles of learning and motivation. Topics
Prerequisite: PSY 101
include student behavior patterns in the school environment,
theoretical concepts of learning and personality, ESL impli- Study of the major causes, symptoms, treatments and pre-
cations for learning, and assessment of behavior. ventions associated with maladaptive behavior.
89
SCIENCE SOCIAL SCIENCE

SCI 101 INFORMATION LITERACY 1 The courses in the Social Science disciplines below may also
1 Credit 1 Class Hour be used to fulfill Liberal Arts course requirements.
ECONOMICS PSYCHOLOGY
An introduction to the skills required to locate, retrieve, HISTORY SOCIOLOGY
analyze and use information for both print and electronic
resources for application to research projects. Emphasis
is on the practical use of information characteristics and SOCIOLOGY
information literacy concepts.
SOC 101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
SCI 102 INFORMATION LITERACY 2
1 Credit 1 Class Hour A study of the principles of social structure and social inter-
Prerequisite: SCI 101 action. Application of the scientific method to the analysis
of group behavior, social change, and social institutions. An
Designed to develop advanced information literacy skills, examination of the major institutions and forms of social
including the ability to effectively evaluate, retrieve, rec- organization in American society.
ognize and analyze various information types and formats,
and to apply these skills to become proficient and ethical
users of information. SOC 211 AMERICAN MINORITY GROUPS
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
A study of the relations among dominant and minority
SCI 131 HUMAN BIOLOGY groups, principally in North America. Exploration of the
3 Credits 3 Class Hours historical, psychological, and sociological factors involved
in prejudice and discrimination. The nature and effects of
An introduction to human biology including discussions
intergroup conflict in education, housing, employment, law
of the normal structure of organs and systems, including a
enforcement, and other areas.
consideration of the more common diseases and dysfunctions
in each system. The course presents basic concepts so that
students may better understand problems of human concern SOC 321 SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY
resulting from recent scientific developments. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Nature and functions of the family, both traditional and non-
SCI 141 COMPUTER LITERACY traditional, in a sociological and anthropological perspective.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Factors important to the development of successful marriage
and parenthood will be examined. Major emphases include
An introduction to the architecture and operation of comput- the dynamics of pair interaction before and during marriage,
ers. Their uses in government, science, medicine, business, influence of the family on individual development, and
education, health, recreation, etc. Social issues dealing with interaction among family members.
individual rights in a computerized society. Familiarity
with computers to enable students to use software for self-
instructional purposes. SOC 351 SOCIAL PROBLEMS
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: SOC 101
SCI 211 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Social problems such as poverty, crime, violence, drug addic-
tion, intergroup tensions, disorganization of the family, the
Introduction to basic ecological principles; a multidisciplinary plight of the aging, alienation, etc. Global and environmental
survey of the environmental and ecological sciences. The issues such as the threat of nuclear war, population growth
evolution of the modern environment and the present human and famine will also be examined. The definition and the
condition; pollution and misuse of natural resources; environ- causes and effects of these problems, as well as proposed
mental problems, causes, and possible solutions. solutions, will be considered.
90
THEATRE ARTS

THE 111 INTRODUCTION TO STAGECRAFT


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Survey of the stagecraft components of scenic design,
construction, lighting and management that are essential to
the successful presentation of live theatre.

THE 131-232 STAGE MOVEMENT 1-4


1 Credit each 2 Class Hours
Exploration of movement for the actor. Study of body
awareness, relaxation, space, level, timing, physical
conditioning and various dance movements.
SOC 361 MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY
3 Credits 3 Class Hours THE 141 VOICE AND DICTION
Prerequisite: SOC 101 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Examination of current and classic theories of mass media Improvement of voice and diction (articulation), relaxation
such as those of Marshall McLuhan. The effects of media and breathing, resonance, phonation, volume and pitch, rate,
on people with respect to family life, education, work pat- emphasis and vocal quality. The sounds of American English
terns, leisure activities, and political behavior. Analysis of to create recognition of various vocal patterns.
current media coverage utilizing newspapers, magazines,
television programs, and radio newscasts. THE 151-452 PLAY PRODUCTION 1-8
1 Credit each 2 Class Hours 6 Lab Hours
SPEECH
Designed to provide students the opportunity to participate in
the production of a play. The Lab hours are spent working in
SPE 101 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH
a specific area of interest, after consultation and assignment
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
of responsibilities by the instructor. Specific areas available
Study of oral communication and its role in contemporary include: house manager, stage manager, acting (major roles),
society. Emphasis on listening, interpersonal communication, publicity, lights, properties, costumes and makeup, sound,
small group decision-making, and informative and persuasive stage crew, business manager, and producer.
speaking. Analysis of student speech patterns.
THE 161 ACTING FUNDAMENTALS
SPE 201 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Examination of the initial process of becoming an ac-
Prerequisite: SPE 101
tor. Through improvisation, scene and monologue work,
Introduction to techniques of interpretive readings: the students develop a basic knowledge of the theatre space and
narrative, poetry, drama, and essay. Practice in conveying basic theatre terminology.
information, projecting ideas, creating emotions, and inter-
preting from the printed page. Oral reading as a measure THE 162 ACTING METHODS
and means of developing literary discrimination. Critical 3 credits 3 Class Hours
listening encouraged in evaluating presentations.
Study of the most influential acting methods and theories,
with emphasis on their practical use and execution through
SPE 231 PUBLIC SPEAKING
exercises and analysis of scripts.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: SPE 101
THE 171-272 DANCE WORKSHOP 1-4
Study of the theory and practice of public speaking. The 1 credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
improvement of skills as public speakers, audience members,
and critics of public communication. Emphasis placed on the Dance performance techniques for the stage. Movement
informative speech, the persuasive speech, and the speech studies designed to familiarize students with a variety of mu-
for special occasions. sical theatre dance styles from selected historical periods.
91
THE 181-482 CHILDREN'S THEATRE 1-8 THE 315 THEATRE MANAGEMENT
1 Credit each 2 Class Hours 4 Lab Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Survey of theatre principles and practices in the various Study of skills, knowledge and expertise required for theatre
aspects of theatrical production for Children's Theatre. management. Emphasis on the organizational ability needed to
Participation in the production, rehearsal and performance manage all aspects of theatrical productions including box office,
of shows designed specifically for children. ticket sales, seating, public relations and physical plant.

THE 211 SET DESIGN THE 333 MODERN DANCING


3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
Scenic design skills and concepts related to the demands The body as an instrument for artistic expression. Emphasis
and requirements for the stage and cinema. on the development of coordination, strength, flexibility and
awareness of the principles of dance motion. The explora-
THE 213 STAGE MANAGEMENT tion of dance as an art form.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
THE 334 THEATRICAL DANCING
Study of the skills and knowledge required for stage 3 Credits 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
management. Organizational expertise needed to develop
Theatrical dancing using creative style as a basis. Body
rehearsal schedules, production meetings, performance
movement and techniques for actors. Composition, rhythm
calendars and the stage manager's prompt book. Emphasis
and choreography with emphasis on tap and swing dancing.
on the protocols of working with directors, actors, designers,
and crew members.
THE 335 ADVANCED THEATRICAL DANCING
3 Credits 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours
THE 261 REALITY IN ACTING Prerequisite: THE 333/THE 334
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Study of major dance genres and choreographic techniques
Exploration of Representational Acting as a foundation and which comprise the art of theatrical dancing for musicals.
primary form of acting used today to further develop the The works of choreographers such as Graciela Danielle,
actor’s instrument. Tommy Tune, Wayne Cilento, Susan Stoman, and Bob Fosse
provide the basis for inquiry and exploration.
THE 262 CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT
3 Credits 3 Class Hours THE 361 ACTING FOR CAMERA
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Designed to enable sutdents to develop an individual ap-
proach to creating deeper and more developed characters. Study of the creative collaboration between actors an direc-
tors, with special emphasis on acting techniques for film and
THE 311 STAGE LIGHTING television. Special attention to camera placement, sound
3 Credits 3 Class Hours and movement on a film/video set.
Prerequisite: THE 111
The art of lighting design including methods, script
interpretation and practical applications to the live stage
and studio.

THE 313 COSTUME DESIGN/MAKEUP


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: THE 111
Principles and practices of costume design, makeup and
technology. Emphasis on the design process, choice of
fabric, construction techniques and historical accessories.
Design, selection, application of special effects, prosthetics
and stage makeup.
92
THEATRE HISTORY

THE 101 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE


3 Credits 3 Class Hours
A survey course designed to acquaint the student with the
evolution and development of the theatre, playwrights,
technicians, and actors responsible for its growth and change.
THE 201 MODERN THEATRE
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
The evolution of theatre during the 20th century. Changes
in performance design and technology are covered through
the writing and works of Stanislavski, Meyerhold, Brecht,
Artaud, Grotowski, Brook, and Boal. Emphasis on the de-
THE 371 DIRECTING velopment of modern acting, writing and staging practice.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: THE 361 THE 301 EUROPEAN THEATRE
3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Principles and practices involved in directing plays and Prerequisite: ENG 102
musicals. Theory and techniques of directing with emphasis
Prominent theatrical works and stylistic development of
on script analysis and visual aesthetics. Practical application
theatre in Europe from the late 1800s to the onset of World
of script selection, auditioning, and staging techniques.
War II. The impact of social and political change on theatre
THE 373-474 BROADWAY BOUND 1-4 and culture as explored in the works of Ibsen, Strindberg,
1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Lab Hours Shaw, Chekhov, O’Casey, and Garcia Lorca.
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director
THE 302 AMERICAN THEATRE
Individualized instruction in a group setting. Professional 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
training for musical theatre/vocal majors interested in obtain- Prerequisite: ENG 102
ing a DVD highlighting their unique talents that will serve as Origins and development of the American Theatre experi-
an important marketing tool to advance their careers in the en- ence during the 19th and 20th Centuries. Emphasis on the
tertainment industry. Preparation for public performance. works of O'Neill, Odets, Wilder, Williams, Miller, Wilson
and Shepard.
THE 391-492 UPBEAT ENTERTAINMENT 1-4
1 Credit Each 2 Class Hours 6 Lab Hours THE 401 AMERICAN MUSICALS TO 1940
Permission of Director for Theatre/Vocal majors 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102
Designed to provide opportunities for students interested
in participating in the creation of a major film focusing on Development of musical theatre in America from 1800 to
the aspirations of theatre/vocal majors for a career in any 1940. Study of the cultures, social customs, production
aspect of the entertainment industry. techniques and theatres that influenced music in this type
of production. Emphasis on the works of composers and
THE 425, 426 SENIOR PROJECT 1, 2 lyricists such as George M. Cohan, Irving Berlin, Rodgers
3 Credits each 1 Class Hour 6 Lab Hours and Hart, George Gershwin, and Jerome Kern.
Students develop a theatre project with faculty approval THE 402 AMERICAN MUSICALS AFTER 1940
and supervision. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102
THE 461 THEATRE WORKSHOP
3 Credits 3 Class Hours Development of musical theatre in America from 1940 to
present. Study of the cultures, social customs, production
A workshop for the application of skills taught in a profes- techniques and theatres that influenced music in this type of
sionally targeted performance experience culminating in a production. Emphasis on the works of Rodgers and Ham-
theatre production or showcase. Designed to apply perfor- merstein, Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, Frank
mance techniques in acting, voice, and movement. Loesser, Lerner and Lowe, and Andrew Lloyd Webber.
93
Film/Video

VID 131 TELEVISION WORKSHOP 1


3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Lab Hours
Study of the ways in which video is used to present
information about people, ideas, processes, products,
and services. Multi-camera broadcast style videography
techniques are identified and demonstrated. Topics include
studio and location shoots, sound and lighting techniques,
basic editing, crew positions and coordination.

VID 132 TELEVISION WORKSHOP 2


3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
Prerequisite: VID 131
Focusing upon the place of television in society and
technology, students study advanced single camera
setups, electronic news gathering, electronic field
production and editing.

VID 145 Digital Photography


3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
Introduction to the art of digital photographic imaging
VID 232 FILMMAKING AESTHETICS
through the use of digital single-lens reflex cameras.
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Lab Hours
Topics for exploration include cameras, lenses, filters,
Prerequisite: VID 132
lighting, and composition. Industry standard digital
storage and cataloging systems, such as apple Aperture, Study of the art and aesthetics of narrative film pre-produc-
are utilized. Special emphasis on still life, portrait, motion, tion and production, including elements of scriptwriting,
and cityscape photographs. storyboarding, directing and cinematography. Analysis of
film and DV cameras, lenses, black and white film stocks,
framing, composition and lighting.
VID 202 Documentary Video Production
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour VID 233 NARRATIVE FILMMAKING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Lab Hours
Scripting, videotaping, and editing video documentaries
Prerequisite: VID 232
for cablecast. Essential elements of documentary produc-
tion, including selection and preparation of subject matter; Study of more complex production and post-production
Electronic News Gathering and Field Projection, portable narrative filmmaking elements, including composition,
audio and lighting techniques; production schedules, man- mobile staging, sound, budgeting, lighting, black and white
agement, and budget considerations. negative film stocks, and 16mm film cameras.

VID 302 AUDIO FOR VIDEO


VID 231 DIGITAL FILM EDITING 1 3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour Prerequisite: VID 233
Prerequisite: VID 132
Study and application of the techniques of sound capture
Theory and practice of motion picture editing utilizing and synchronization for film and television production.
non-linear digital editing systems and time code. Analysis Emphasis on the theory and practice of microphone
of editing styles and techniques including continuity and placement, machine synchronization and the aesthetics of
montage. soundtrack recording and mixdown.
94
VID 304 SCREENWRITING VID 336 TV COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 102 Prerequisite: VID 331
Writing for television and film with attention to the use of Study of the cinematic elements and techniques of the 30
dramatic language, character, plot and screen dynamics. – 60 second commercial spot advertisement, from concept
Emphasis on advanced script formats, terminology and development through post-production. Classic and con-
techniques. temporary TV commercials are analyzed from historical,
production, and promotion perspectives. Student-directed
VID 312 STAGE LIGHTING exercises refine their knowledge, skills, and dispositions
3 Credits 3 Class Hours regarding producing, directing, editing, and cinematogra-
Prerequisite: THE 111 phy for the short form.

The art of lighting design including methods, script VID 391-492 UPBEAT ENTERTAINMENT 1-4
interpretation and practical applications to the live stage 1 Credit Each 2 Class Hours 6 Lab Hours
and studio. Prerequisite: VID 233 for Film/Video majors
Designed to provide opportunities for students interested
VID 331 INTERMEDIATE CINEMATOGRAPHY
in participating in the creation of a major film focusing on
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
the aspirations of theatre/vocal majors for a career in any
Prerequisite: VID 233
aspect of the entertainment industry.
Study of cinematography. Lenses, complex camera angles,
compound filters, synch sound, color negative film stocks, VID 425 SENIOR PROJECT 1
dollies, and talent are considered. Students learn Arriflex 3 Credits 1 Class Hour 6 Lab Hours
Super16mm Advanced SR2, DV and other advanced Prerequisite: VID 332
camera operations. Students produce individual films that demonstrate
advanced skills. The cinematic project includes scripts,
VID 332 ADVANCED CINEMATOGRAPHY storyboards, budgets, and various other pre-production
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour elements. Students bring together cast and crew to produce
Prerequisite: VID 331 a 10-20 minute narrative sound motion picture.
The Arriflex Super 16mm Advanced SR2 camera provides
VID 426 SENIOR PROJECT 2
the environment for a study of complex camera movements
3 Credits 1 Class Hour 6 Lab Hours
and action shots. Period, mood, genre lighting techniques
Prerequisite: VID 425
and special film stocks are considered.
Production of a 10 – 20 minute narrative sound motion
VID 333 FILMMAKERS WORKSHOP picture project utilizing the Arriflex Super 16mm Advanced
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Lab Hours SR2, DV, or similar cameras. Post-production tasks include
Prerequisite: VID 132 editing, sound synchronization, foley, special effects,
titling and credits. Completed productions are evaluated by
Introduction to practical aspects of producing for short a faculty jury during the Annual Student Film Festival.
films including script analysis and breakdowns, budgeting
and scheduling, storyboarding, location scouting, direct- VID 432 INDEPENDENT FILMMAKING
ing, hiring crews and auditions. 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: VID 332
VID 334 DIGITAL FILM EDITING 2
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour Study of the career paths of leading contemporary
Prerequisite: VID 231 independent directors, editors, cinematographers and
other filmmakers. Provides the basis for analyzing the
More complex applications of digital film editing focusing methods and materials of independent film financing and
on post-production workflows from the perspective of the distribution. Topics include budgeting, publicity and
editor, director, and cinematographer. Motion, pacing, ad- promotion, marketing, financing sources and techniques,
vanced composting, dynamic effects and storytelling tech- and selected legal issues. Students prepare press kits to
niques are emphasized. publicize and promote senior projects for film festivals.
95
VID 441 COMICS TO FILM VID 443 ADVANCED FILM EDITING
3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour 3 Credits 3 Class Hours 1 Lab Hour
Prerequisite: VID 233 Prerequisite: VID 334
The superhero archetype is examined in relation to Advanced applications of digital video editing. Utiliza-
American society in a parallel study in both art and film tion of technical and aesthetic procedures to capture and
mediums. The history of comics and societal themes are manipulate digital video, and import/export graphic files.
explored. Students will create a hero, script, and shoot a Emphasis on the creation of distribution masters, chroma
short narrative of their creation. keying, color correction, use of plug-ins, and the techniques
of compositing images.

VID 442 ADVANCED PRODUCTION WORKSHOP VID 445 HORROR CINEMA


3 Credits 3 Class Hours 3 Lab Hours 3 Credits 3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: VID 132
Study of the genre and technique of horror film production
Study and practical application of non-fiction film/ beginning with the 1930 Universal Studios release of
documentary production, including expository, Dracula and Frankenstein, through the modern-day
observational, interactive, reflexive, and performative "slasher" film. The catalogs of Alfred Hitchcock, George
styles. Topics include selection and preparation of subject Romero, Wes Craven, and Eli Roth will be explored. Class
matter, Electronic News Gathering and Field Production, projects include screenplays, short film production, editing,
and special issues for documentary filmmakers. music and sound effects, and visual effects in this context.
96

Facilities and Equipment


The Five Towns College campus is equipped with the latest information technology and a wide variety of facilities that
support the College’s instructional program, student services and extracurricular activities. These state-of-the-art facilities
include three Audio Recording Studios, a Film/Television Studio, Piano Lab, MIDI Lab hosted by Apple G5 IMACs, Com-
puter Graphics/Video Editing Lab hosted by Apple G5 PowerMacs, PC Lab, as well as the College Library, Learning Center,
Music Rooms and Music Studios, Upbeat Café, Performing Arts Center and the College Bookstore. Multi-Strand Fiber optic
cabling is the College’s backbone for its Local Area Network (LAN). A 50Mbps Ethernet hand off provides access to the
World Wide Web. A Storage Area Network allows students archival and retrieval capabilities for their projects.

THEATRE Studio A is equipped with the SSL 9000J 72 channel re-


cording console, outfitted with an SSL SL959 5.1 monitor-
The College theatre provides the space and opportunity for a ing system for surround sound mixing. Dynamics are by
wide variety of cultural performances—by students, faculty Empirical Labs Distressor, Urei 1176, Aphex Gate, Aphex
and visiting artists. Performances are scheduled after regular Expressor, dbx 160vu, Manly opto Comp, and Tube Tech
class sessions and are as exciting as they are enlightening comp. FX include T.C. Elec M5000, Ensoniq DP4, Sony
for both the performers and the audience. D7, Lexicon 960 and Lexicon PCM 42. Non-linear systems
include ProTools HD3 utilizing three 192 interfaces provid-
The theatre provides students with the opportunity to ing 32 analog I/O, SYNC I/O, operating on Apple G5 or
perform, act, sing and participate in professional quality higher platforms. Playback and archiving devices include
productions and thereby experience the realities and joys Otari MTR-12 ¼”, Panasonic DS-555 SVHS, JVC SVHS
that draw individuals to the entertainment field. The theatre ET, Tascam 102 Cassette, Tascam DA-40 DAT, TEAC DV-
is equipped with a digital lighting system by Electronic H5000 DVD, and Panasonic 50” Plasma HDTV. Mutlitrack
Theatre Controls, digital 24-track sound reinforcement by recorders include Studer A827 2” 24 track analog recorder,
Tascam, a digital Barco 6300 projection system, and is a Otari MTR 90 24-track analog recorder, and three Tascam
fully wired production studio with links to the recording DA-98HR digital multi-track recorders. Amps and speakers
and film/television studios. include Genelec 1031 for left, right, rear and center chan-
nels, and Genelec 7060 12”Sub for subwoofer. Yamaha
NS-10 monitors, JBL LSR-32 Mains, QSC EX4000, and
Yamaha P2100 Cue Amp are also installed.

Additional representative outboard gear include BBE Maxi-


mizer, Aphex Big Bottom, and Tube Tech EQ. Represen-
tative microphones include AKG, Sennheiser, Neumann,
Audio Technica, Shure, Beyer Dynamic, and Crown. Head-
phones are by AKG and Fostex. Studio A is also equipped
with a Yamaha 6’ 7” grand piano.

Studio B is equipped with the ORAM BEQ 32 channel con-


sole. Dynamics are by dbx 160X, Aphex Expressor, Aphex
Compeller, Aphex Expander/Gate and Symetrix Expander/
Gate. FX include Aphex Aural Exciter Type C, Digitech
Time Machine, Lexicon PCM91, Lexicon MPX500, and
Sony D7. Multitrack Recorders are Tascam DA-98, Tascam
DA-78, Tascam DA-38 and Otari MTR-90 II. Playback and
AUDIO RECORDING STUDIOS archiving devices include Tascam DA-40 DAT, Tascam 112B
Cassette, Panasonic DVD RP82, JVC Super VHS ET, and
Located within The John Lennon Center for Music and Panasonic Video Machine DS555. Amps and Speakers in-
Technology, the audio recording complex was designed by clude QSC Power Amp EX2500 and Event Powered Monitor
studio architect John Storyk and contains eleven (11) studio/ 20/20. Monitors include Panasonic 42” Plasma HDTV and
control room spaces. Each studio is unique and geared for View Sonic V61816 Flat Panels. Non-linear editing systems
specific learning and recording purposes. include ProTools HD1 running on the Apple G5 platform.
97
FILM/TELEVISION STUDIO

Located within The John Lennon Center for Music


and Technology, the Film/Television Studio is a multi-
formatted suite consisting of a soundstage, editing lab,
control room, and classrooms. The soundstage is a
professional production facility equipped with lighting
grid, cyclorama, and green screen. The editing lab
utilizes Avid and Final Cut Pro non-linear editing systems
as well as the latest in effects and soundtrack software.
Representative cameras include Arriflex SR3 Super
16mm, SR2 Super 16mm, and S 16mm film cameras,
Panasonic HVX-200 HD P2 with Firestore, Canon XL2
miniDV, Sony DSR-390 and DSR-250 digicam, and JVC
GY-500 miniDV. Lighting equipment includes KinoFlo,
Arri, Mole-Richardson, Chimera, and Lowell, with a full
complement of Matthews and Bogen grip equipment.
Camera support equipment consists of Sachtler, Bogen,
Cartoni, and Worrall, as well as a car mount and an 18ft
remote control camera crane. Dollies include Moviola,
Matthews, and Fisher, as well as numerous curved and
straight track. Light meters by Sekonic and Spectra. Field
Studio C is an all-digital facility based upon the ProTools
audio recorders by Marantz, Shure, Fostex, and Audio
operating platform and utilizing the ProControl master
Technica. Microphones and lavalieres by Sennheiser,
control surface with two Fader Packs and one Edit Pack.
Sony, Shure and Audio Technica. Video monitors by
ProTools is v. HD3, which includes two 192 interfaces
JVC, Transvideo, and Marshall. HD-Video monitors by
providing 24 analog I/O, Sync I/O, Apple G5, ViewSonic
Sony. There is also a full complement of video and film
18” flat panel monitors, and Panasonic 42" Plasma HDTV.
lens filters, and a wide assortment of gels and diffusion
Dynamics include Empirical Labs Distressor w/English
by Rosco and Lee. In all, the Film/Television Studio
Mod, Manly opto Comp, Summit Audio TLA-100 Stereo
maintains enough equipment to fill several grip trucks.
Compressor, Orban Stereo Parametric EQ, Urei Stereo
Graphic EQ, PreSonus M80 – 8 ch. Mic Pre, ProTools HD
Pre-8 ch. Mic Pre, Focusrite Red 7 single ch. Mic Pre, Avalon ELECTRONIC MUSIC-MIDI LAB
ST-737 single ch. Mic Pre, and Amek 9098 single ch. Mic Pre
w/parametric EQ. Playback and archiving devices include The MIDI Lab is equipped with MacIntosh G-5 or faster
Panasonic DS-555 SVHS, Tascam 112 Cassette, Tascam computers with dual processors. Workstations are equipped
DA-40 DAT, Panasonic DVD, and Panasonic 50” Plasma with KORG Triton Keyboards and Pro Tools v 6.9 or higher.
HDTV. Amps and speakers include Genelec 1031 APM for Additional software packages include Digital Performer,
left, right, rear and center channels, and Genelec 7060 12” Reason Band in a Box, Office 2001 and Finale 2002. The
subwoofer, and Yamaha NS 10s. MIDI equipment includes MIDI Lab is equipped with an LCD projection system and
MIDIman Oxygen 8 Keyboard and MOTU MIDI Timepiece an HP color high-resolution network printer. All worksta-
AV. Multitrack recorder is Tascam DA-98HR. tions are connected to the FTC LAN and have access to the
Internet.
MUSIC STUDIOS

The College provides a limited number of music studios for STUDIO AND NEW SPACE THEATRES
individual and small group use. These studios may be used
by students who make application for their use, according Both the Studio Theatre and the New Space Theatre provide
to availability, at least one day in advance of the intended a more intimate setting for rehearsal and performances.
time of practice, and pay a fee at that time. Except for those These facilities are equipped with computerized lighting
rooms that have pianos, students are required to provide and and digital sound systems, dance surfaces, and a variety of
use their own instruments and equipment. specialized equipment.
98
COMPUTER GRAPHICS /FILM EDITING MAC LAB BOOKSTORE

The MAC Lab is equipped with Macintosh IMACS and The Campus Bookstore, located near the Student Lounge,
Pro MACs utilizing the latest in MAC operating systems. carries all of the materials that students require. From
Each computer is loaded with Final Cut Pro Studio, Adobe textbooks and sweatshirts, to score paper and backpacks,
Creative Suite which includes After Effects, Photoshop, the Campus Bookstore carries all items at discount prices,
Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Microsoft Office Suite, Frame and is open each day when the College is in session, from
Forge, and Final Draft. The Mac Lab is equipped with an orientation day through final examination week.
HD LCD projection system and an HP color high-resolution
network printer. All workstations are connected to the FTC Car Registration and Parking
LAN and have access to the Internet. All vehicles operating on the College campus must be regis-
tered with the Public Safety Office where registration forms
and parking stickers may be obtained, and a valid registra-
KEYBOARD LAB tion sticker must be properly displayed on the vehicle at
all times. Unregistered vehicles may be towed away at the
The Keyboard Laboratory contains electronic piano owner’s expense. Students must adhere to all posted traf-
keyboards and is used for the teaching of functional piano fic and parking regulations at all times. Vehicles parked on
skills. The Keyboard Lab is open on a convenient schedule to campus after 12:00 AM must have a resident student parking
facilitate student practice and progress. Additional keyboards sticker or a temporary overnight parking pass, which may
are available for student use in the Music Education Research be obtained from the Public Safety Office. Violations of
Center located in the Five Towns College Library. College Parking Regulations carry a fine.
Resident students with sophomore standing and higher may
PC LAB register a vehicle on campus. Freshmen may register a vehicle
with permission from the Dean of Students for good cause.
The PC Lab is equipped with computer workstations, each
equipped with a Pentium 4 or faster IBM platform PCs DINING FACILITIES
utilizing a Windows XP operating system. Representative
The Upbeat Café is located adjacent to the College Theatre.
software includes Adobe Acrobat Reader, Office 2007,
This dining facility is open from 8:00 a.m. each day, and
and McAfee Virus Scan Software. The PC Lab is
serves a wide assortment of hot and cold meals. For a full
equipped with an HP high-resolution network printer.
meal, or just a gourmet snack between classes, the Upbeat
All workstations are connected to the FTC LAN and have
Café is the ideal place to meet and eat on campus.
access to the Internet.
Internet Access
ATHLETIC FACILITIES Residential students are provided with access to the internet
via the FTC Network. Commuter students may utilize this
Five Towns College maintains various athletic facilities for Network, subject to availability at a variety of access points
use by members of the College community. There is a large on campus. Students who do not reside on-campus will
gymnasium and locker rooms for both men and women. It require an Internet Service Provider (ISP). It is preferable
also has a regulation size basketball/volleyball court with for the ISP to be a DSL or cable modem connection. While
bleacher seating for 400 persons. A dance studio, equipped dial-up access may be adequate, students may experience
with mirrored walls, and marley floor is used for dance, long delays when downloading much of the content-rich
aerobics, and martial arts. Softball fields are conveniently learning materials utilized by the faculty. Most of the
located and with alternate striping may be converted to soc- College campus is a wireless hot spot.
cer, lacrosse, and other sports.
MUSIC SKILLS CENTER
Students who have specific questions or need extra attention
in order to master course material in Keyboard, Harmony,
Sight Singing or Ear Training classes may obtain assistance
from a member of the music faculty in the Music Division
Office or Keyboard Lab.
99
STUDENT ACTIVITIES OFFICE

Located on the lower-level of Symphony Hall, the primary


purpose of the Student Activities Office is to improve
student services, related to both the educational and social
environments of the College, by increasing communication
and the flow of information between the Administration,
faculty and staff and the student body.
The major goal that stems from this purpose is the publicizing
and promotion of events, opportunities, happenings and
activities available on campus or in the community that are
worthwhile for student participation. The Office provides
train and bus schedules and a bulletin board to advertise
ride-sharing opportunities. Apple Standards for Film/Video and Audio Recording
Technology Students
The Student Activities Office is responsible for promoting
the social/cultural events that take place on campus and Hardware and Software for Film/Video and Audio Re-
serves as a clearing house for student activities. cording Technology
• Mac computer with at least 1.25 GHz or faster
Computer Requirements • 2GB of RAM
• Mac OS X v10.4.9 or later
Students should expect that college-level learning requires a • QuickTime v7.1.6 or later
personal computer. Although access to computer technology • DVD drive/burner
and the internet is provided in a variety of locations across • External Firewire Hard Drive 400/800
the campus, including wireless hot-spots, in order to fully • Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac
participate in the academic process, students are expected
to own or have unrestricted access to a computer and the Additional Hardware and Software for Film/Video
internet at their residence or where they prepare for class. Students Only
• AGP or PCI Express Quartz Extreme graphics card
Students enrolled in the Film/Video program leading to the • Display with 1024-by-768 resolution or higher
Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree or who have declared • Final Cut Pro Studio 2
Audio Recording Technology as their major area of concen-
tration are required to have a Mac-style computer that meets Additional Hardware and Software for Audio Recording
the minimum standards set forth below. All other students Technology Students Only
may utilize a Mac-style computer that meets these standards • MBOX Mini or higher
or they may utilize an IBM PC-style computer that meets the • ProTools LE v7.4 or higher
minimum standards set forth below for PC computers. • Reason 4 or higher

The College does not endorse any specific computer hard- PC Standards
ware or software supplier, and will support any computer
meeting the specifications listed below. However, when Hardware and Software
students plan to purchase a Mac-style computer, the College • Window XP or Windows Vista operating system
is pleased to recommend Apple Computers and advises that • 1 GHz 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
Apple provides an educational discount of 10% to college • 1 GB system memory
students generally. Five Towns College students receive • 40 GB hard drive with at least 15 GB of available
an additional 5% discount when they purchase computers space
online through the College’s website or by utilizing the • Support for DirectX 9 Graphics with WDDM Driver and
following hyperlink: http://store.apple.com/Catalog/US/Im- 128 MB of graphics memory
ages/routingpage.html • DVD-ROM Drive
• USB Flash Drive
The College reserves the right to make modifications to these • Microsoft Office 2007 (Standard Edition)
requirements from time-to-time in response to technologi- • Anti-Virus Software
cal advances. • Anti-Spyware Software
100
LIBRARY

The Five Towns College Library is an outstanding resource


for students and faculty alike. It is also utilized by other
libraries and researchers from around the world seeking
information about various disciplines for which it holds
specialized collections.

Library holdings include a collection of nearly 30,000


books, more than 500 print periodical subscriptions, and
approximately 8,000 sound recordings. The collection
includes over 2,500 scores/arrangements, several thousand
pieces of sheet music, and a growing collection of more than
3,000 video recordings on DVD and VHS.

The Five Towns College Library includes a variety of


COLLEGE RADIO STATION WFTU
outstanding online subscription databases, including the
International Index of Music Periodicals, EBSCO, ProQuest,
Five Towns College is licensed by the Federal Communications
Gale Literature Resource Center, the Kraus Curriculum
Commission to operate commercial radio station WFTU 1570
Development Library (KCDL Online), Bloom's Literature
AM. The main broadcast studio is located on the College
Reference, Grove Music Online, Naxos Music Library,
campus at Dix Hills. WFTU transmission facilities and an
Wilson Web, and the Vault Career Library. The Library
auxiliary studio are located at Riverhead, NY. WFTU is
also includes Ebrary, a digital collection of over 35,000 full-
licensed to serve the east end of Long Island with 1000 kW
text books and approximately 4,000 pieces of sheet music.
during the day and 500 kW at night. The broadcast signal
These resources are available to students and faculty both
of WFTU, which can be heard from Manorville to Montauk,
on campus and off.
Long Island, provides Five Towns College students with
hands-on broadcasting experience. WFTU also streams over
The Library provides students with the latest information
the Internet and can be heard online all over the world.
technology including online catalog, Macintosh and
PC computers with high-speed Internet access, music
WFTU also serves to promote the careers of students
listening stations, DVD and other multi-media players.
interested in broadcasting, and provides an outlet for music
majors interested in becoming professional performing
The Five Towns College Library is affiliated with the Long
artists.
Island Library Resources Council (LILRC). Through
LILRC’s Interlibrary and Research Loan Programs, Five
Towns College students and faculty have access to additional Television Station FTC TV
materials housed in libraries throughout the world.
Beginning in 2008, Five Towns College is the Entity respon-
Staffed by professional librarians, the Library is a major sible for administering the Verizon FIOS Cable Television
resource for curriculum and instruction at the College. To System Public Access and Educational Access Channels in
help students become more aware of the Library’s holdings the Town of Huntington. The Public and Educational Access
and more competent in using its resources, a Library Channels provide a number of opportunities for students to
Handbook is issued to all entering students. In addition, develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions in televi-
orientation visits are scheduled for freshman classes, sion production and broadcast operations, while also sup-
workshops are held on a variety of topics, and all students porting this important public service initiative. The College
are required to take courses on Information Literacy. strictly adheres to the rules and regulations of the New York
State Public Service Commission in its administration of
access channels. In addition, the Film/Video Division oper-
ates FTC-TV, which combines content from both the public
and educational access channels with content prepared by
students and faculty for streaming broadcast transmission
world wide over the internet.
101

Student Life DOWNBEAT CAFÉ

The Downbeat Café serves to enhance the educational


STUDENT ACTIVITIES environment and improve the quality of student life at the
College. It is a professional on-campus performance area
The College's activities program plays a vital role in student where students can gather and music majors can perform
growth and development. It is designed to provide a wide to increase and improve their music skills and related
variety of leisure-time experiences, enable students to orga- professional expertise.
nize groups to explore mutual interests, increase opportunities
for leadership and the development of administrative skills, The Café provides an attractive area for socialization where
and provide a positive and wholesome influence on student wholesome food and beverages are available at modest cost
life at the College. for faculty, staff, students and visitors.
The management of the Downbeat Café through its entertain-
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ment selection and mode of operation reflects commitment
to high standards, cultural variety, and maintains a clean,
The student government is composed of elected representa- efficient, and attractive environment that serves to promote
tives who serve on the Student Council. Student government school spirit and College recognition.
has the responsibility of providing student input on issues
that have a direct relationship to student life at Five Towns THE RECORD
College. It also serves as a means of improving communi-
The Record, the College newspaper, is issued periodically
cation within the College.
and features student-written articles about campus events
and activities.
The planning and carrying out of social and recreational
activities are the responsibility of student government. Such
STUDENT HANDBOOK
activities may take the form of an on-campus event, such as a
musical theatre production or jazz concert, or an off-campus A student handbook is distributed to all new student at Ori-
activity, such as a trip to Manhattan or a concert. entation. Students are required to familiarize themselves
with its contents.
STUDENT CLUBS
CAMPUS EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION SYSTEM
From time to time, different organized activities are carried Five Towns College utilizes the MR3 Campus Emergency
on in the form of clubs when varied groups of students evince Notification System to alert its community about important
an interest in business, photography, music, and other areas happenings on campus. When circumstances arise, voice
of personal involvement. and text messages are sent from the Public Safety Office
directly to enrolled telephone numbers. Most students elect
to receive emergency notifications on their cell phone and
COLLEGE YEARBOOK
on the land line located at their place of residence. Stu-
dents may also enroll additional numbers, with many elect-
The College Yearbook, produced by interested students
ing to have emergency notifications sent to the cell phones
with the cooperation of faculty advisors, serves as a record
of their parents, guardians, or spouses as well. Students
in pictures and words of the graduating class as well as a
are enrolled into the MR3 Emergency Notification System
vehicle for the literary, artistic, and photographic talents of
during the admissions process, during which they receive
all students. Students in the Journalism and Creative Writing
a discrete user name, password, and instructions on how to
classes generally contribute to this publication.
make subsequent changes to their enrollment information.
This is particularly important, as students have a respon-
FLYER sibility to remain informed and to keep the MR3 system
current, such as when they change cell phone or land line
The Flyer, a weekly newsletter distributed to students and fac- numbers. Additional information about the MR3 Emergen-
ulty members, keeps the College community abreast of campus cy Notification System, as well as technical assistance, is
activities, student responsibilities, administrative regulations, available from the Public Safety Office, or by dialing (631)
new courses, and other items of immediate interest. 656-3159 or 2186.
102
COLLEGE COMMITTEES MUSIC INDUSTRY CONFERENCE
At this event, students get the opportunity to speak firsthand
The participation of students in the work of selected College
with broadcast executives and entertainment attorneys. Career
standing committees is welcomed. Invitations to join these
decisions are explored, and students can find out directly from
committees are extended at the beginning of each semester.
the experts about trends in the music industry.
The committees meet four times each semester.
CAMPUS SAFETY/DRUG PREVENTION
Credit Card Marketing Policy The College campus is safe and secure. There have been
only a few minor instances, verbal disputes and drug/
The advertising, marketing, or merchandising of credit alcohol possession. All students are advised that the unlawful
cards to students on the campus of Five Towns College manufacture, distribution, possession or use of a controlled
is strictly prohibited. Any individual visitor, licensee, or substance is prohibited at the College. Conviction for
invitee found violating this policy shall be banned from violation of such prohibitions will result in dismissal from
the campus for a period of two years and any credit card the College.
issuer represented by said visitor, licensee, or invitee shall
be banned from the campus for a period of one year. Any In accordance with the regulations of the Drug-Free Workplace
student, faculty, or other staff found violating this policy Act of 1988, the College has established a Drug Prevention
shall receive a warning and be prohibited from any and all Program. Videos, books, and pamphlets describing the danger
future credit card marketing on the campus. of drug abuse are available to all students as well as referral to
appropriate agencies for drug counseling or rehabilitation.

Electronic Communication Devices DIX HILLS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER


Dix Hills Performing Arts Center at Five Towns College is a
The use of electronic communication devices in classes
home for the arts on Long Island. The Center plays an im-
without the express permission of classroom instructors is
portant role in the cultural education of College students and
prohibited, except when permitted by College regulation
it helps the College to enrich the lives of local residents.
such as to accommodate learning disabilities in furtherance
of the American’s With Disabilities Act (ADA). The During the past seasons, the Center has presented musical
use of cellular telephones, pagers, text-messaging, and performances including Great American Songbook, Guitar
other communication devices during class or during the Extravaganza, Guitar Festivals, Concert Band, Jazz Orches-
administration of any examination is strictly prohibited. tra, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Chorus and Choir, Chamber Music
Using such devices during an examination is deemed to Society, Cabaret and Musical Tributes. In theatre, the Center
be dishonorable conduct in violation of the Student Code presented productions of Broadway musicals, Broadway mu-
of Conduct, and may result in the voiding of test scores, a sical reviews, new theatrical comedies, children’s theatre and
failing course grade, and further disciplinary action. classic plays. Recent theatrical performances include Hamlet,
Fiddler on the Roof, The Secret Garden, Thoroughly Modern
Millie, Into the Woods, The Three Musketeers, Carousel,
CULTURAL HOUR PERFORMANCES Suessical and Disney’s High School Musical. The Center
also presented special events including John Lennon Center
These student performances in the College Theatre provide for Music & Technology concerts; regionally, nationally and
both entertainment and the opportunity for students to share internationally acclaimed performers; and magic, comedy
the performing skills developed in musical ensembles and and independent films to educate and entertain the public.
other classes at the College.
HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ BAND FESTIVAL
VISITING ARTIST CLINICS/CONCERTS The Five Towns College High School Jazz Band Festival is
held in the College Theatre. This event is both education-
Visiting artists such as Billy Joel, Phil Ramone, Don Grusin, ally worthwhile and enjoyable for all of the high school jazz
Bernard Purdie, Cyrus Chestnut and Randy Brecker have ensembles that participate. Past experience has shown that
performed at special clinics and events for the benefit of students enjoy and benefit from the opportunity to perform
the student body. The small intimate environment of these before an audience of other musicians. The adjudicators for
events enhances the educational value of interaction with the competition consist of distinguished professional musi-
these artists. cians and music educators. There are no fees of any kind.
103

Student Services
ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT

Located in Rooms 104 and 106, the Academic Support Cen- Academic planning and advisement are an integral part of the
ter is open to all Five Towns College students on a drop-in ongoing educational process at the College and begin as soon
basis. The Center provides tutoring, academic counseling, as the student is accepted. Each student is assigned to a faculty
learning strategy seminars, and a variety of other services member who serves as his her academic advisor. Conferences
designed to help each student reach his or her academic with their academic advisors provide opportunities for students
potential. The Center also administers the College’s HEOP, to plan their programs and review their academic progress.
PASS, SCOPE and MORE programs. Prior to each registration period academic advisors help stu-
dents to prepare their programs for the following semester.
• HEOP (Higher Education Opportunity Program) is de- Academic advisors may be consulted for individual needs
signed for academically and economically disadvantaged at any time throughout the academic year during a regular
students. If selected for the program, HEOP participants schedule of office hours. Although academic advisement
are required to attend a pre-freshman program during the is provided, students are solely responsible for their course
summer preceding fall entry. Advising, counseling, tutor- selections and for meeting degree requirements.
ing and financial assistance are provided for these students
for the duration of their degree programs if eligibility
requirements are continuously met. CAREER SERVICES AND EXPERIENTIAL
LEARNING CENTER
• PASS (Promoting Academic Success for Students) is
designed to provide academic support to those students The Career Services and Experiential Learning Center makes
who meet the academic requirements for HEOP but do not students aware of job opportunities and helps them acquire
qualify for financial assistance. PASS participants have the necessary skills in searching for jobs, preparing resumes
access to the same advising, counseling, and tutoring ser- and cover letters, and doing well in interviews.
vices that are essential to the success of HEOP students.
The selection of a career is one of the most crucial decisions a
student is called upon to make. The College's career education
• SCOPE (Serving Opportunity Program Students Edu-
program, which includes testing, guidance, and reading materi-
cationally) is designed to address the unique challenges
als, seeks to assist each student in making that decision.
faced by international students while attending the College.
Eligible foreign students receive advisement, counseling The Center also facilitates the internship, co-operative education,
and tutoring services tailored to their specific needs, which study abroard, and other experiential learning opportunities.
often includes programs to strengthen English language
skills and processing student visas and other governmental
documents. HEALTH SERVICES

• MORE (Motivated, Organized, Realistic and Enthusiastic) Information and help for students with emotional problems
is designed to provide support services and reasonable and referrals for professional psychological services are made
learning accommodations to students with documented available through the College Counseling Office. Lectures
learning disabilities. and literature are offered in such areas as sex, family, mar-
riage, nutrition, and personal health.

TUTORIAL SERVICES The College does not provide on campus medical services,
but does maintain a relationship with the Dolan Health Center
One of the forms of academic assistance given to students off campus for students. In addition, the College does require
who require help in their courses is the tutoring service pro- that students purchase mandatory health insurance through
vided by faculty members and peer tutors. A student can see the College, unless they present proof of health insurance
his/her instructors during office hours. A student can also through their own provider at the time of registration or
receive assistance in the Academic Support Center. re-registration.
104
HOUSING
Admission
The Living/Learning Center is a complex of four residence Five Towns College seeks applicants of high moral
halls. Each building has a variety of single and double rooms, character who have the interest and potential to benefit from
internet access, cable TV, telephone, and other services. A the educational opportunities afforded by its programs.
minimum mandatory meal plan is required. Students inter- The College encourages applications from students who
ested in on-campus living must file separate applications. will engage themselves fully in its creative community, and
If granted, a housing license is valid for the current academic who will contribute to the academic discourse with honor
year/semester. While every effort is made to accommodate and integrity. The College values students whose interests
the housing needs of continuing students, the College does reflect curiosity and commitment, as well as excitement for
not warrant that a subsequent license will be issued beyond the spirit of intellectual pursuits.
the current academic year/semester. In order to respond to Prospective students must submit a completed Undergraduate
the high demand for on-campus housing, students who have Admission Application, official school transcripts, two letters
resided on campus for six (6) semesters may only remain in of recommendation, a personal statement and any other needed
residence on-campus thereafter with the permission of the documentation. There is an application fee of $35. The SAT-1
Director of Residential Life. or ACT exam is required of all freshmen entering the College.
Students who reside on campus are required to attend classes In some cases, an interview may also be required.
on a full-time basis, and to carry a course schedule of classes
that meets five (5) days per week, except with permission PLACEMENT TESTS
of the Director of Residential Life. Placement tests may be required for some entering students
in order to place the student into the best academic setting.
NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION These tests are offered to students who may require more
New Student Orientation is designed to familiarize students specialized programs of study at the college such as MORE,
with the College and with the social and recreational re- HEOP, PASS or SCOPE.
sources in the area. The Entrance test consist of five parts: Reading Comprehen-
Orientation includes an introduction of the general education sion, Written Expression, Mathematics, Algebra and Essay
technological competency skills necessary to utilize various Auditions are another form of evaluation which are required of
learning technologies, including knowledge of computer students who wish to be considered for the music and theatre
hardware and software, file management, word processing, arts degree programs. The audition process is described in
spreadsheets, Internet, and email systems. It includes an the music and theatre audition requirement fact sheet.
overview of college policies and regulations, with emphasis
on the development of self-management, career planning, PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES
and decision making skills. A survey of students from the graduating class of 2009 was
Orientation events include a special schedule of informal conducted at the time of graduation. Of those who responded to
small group meetings where freshmen may share opinions and the survey, 79% reported that they were employed. Of those who
plans with other students and faculty members in a relaxed responded that they were employed, 27% responded that they
and comfortable environment. Students are encouraged to were employed full-time immediately following graduation, 33%
participate in varied campus activities so that they may become had obtained part-time employment, 8% were self-employed,
well-adjusted members of the College community. 7% were working in volunteer positions, and 4% responded that
a combination of these categories best represented their employ-
PERSONAL COUNSELING ment situation immediately following graduation. 19% of the
graduating class of 2009 responded that they planned to begin
The individuality of each student is a basic concern of the
graduate school in the next academic year, and 26% planned to
College. Every effort is made to provide an environment
begin graduate school in 1-3 years.
in which each student can develop his or her particular
capabilities and interests to the fullest. The College A survey of students from the graduating Class of 2007 was
Counseling Office provides personal counseling in a conducted as part of a three-year follow-up study. Of those who
confidential setting to assist students in making decisions responded to this survey, 70% reported that they were employed
related to personal and academic situations. Referrals to full-time or were self employed, 19% were working part-time,
outside professional agencies may be made in situations 11% were not employed. 42% of those responding to the survey
requiring more specialized counseling. indicated that they planned to further their education.
105
STANDARDS FOR UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS STUDENT RETENTION AND GRADUATION
As an institution with a significant performing arts
Of the first time freshmen who entered a baccalaureate pro-
component, the College recognizes that the results from
gram in the Fall 2003 semester, 74% completed the program
standardized tests and high school average grades do not
in 150% of the time normally allotted. Of those first time
necessarily predict the likelihood that prospective students
freshmen, 45% graduated from the College and 29% trans-
will be successful at Five Towns College. While the College
ferred to another College for which their coursework at Five
generally admits students who have attained the equivalent
Towns College provided substantial preparation.
of an 80 high school average and combined SAT-1 scores
of approximately 1400, the Admissions Office will consider Of the new students who transferred to a baccalaureate
the entirety of a candidate’s application before rendering a program at Five Towns College for the Fall 2003 semester,
decision on admissions. In some cases students with lower 56% completed the program by the end of the Spring 2009
scores may be admitted, and in some cases students with semester. Of those new transfer students, 34% graduated
higher scores may not. Students submitting GED scores from the College and 22% transferred to yet another College
of at least 2500 are also invited to apply for admission. for which their coursework at Five Towns College provided
substantial preparation.
The College is guided by a rolling admissions policy that
encourages applications for admission to be filed at any
time. Applicants seeking to begin their studies in any Fall Teacher Education Programs
semester are encouraged to file a complete application no Labor Market
later than May 1. Spring semester applicants should file by
January 1. All supporting materials, including auditions While a general shortage of teachers on a national and
and interviews, must be on file for an application to be state-wide basis currently exists, the supply and demand for
deemed complete. Admissions decisions are generally licensed teachers can vary greatly by subject, geographic
made within four weeks. area, and time period. Both the New York State Education
Department and the New York City Education Department
EARLY DECISION
post online information regarding the job market for licensed
Well-qualified students for whom Five Towns College teachers. Prospective, new and current students are advised
is their first choice, must submit their application, all to stay informed about the labor market supply and demand
supporting material, and meet audition and interview for licensed teachers in New York State by attending peri-
requirements on or before December 1. Students will be odic job market seminars sponsored by both the Education
informed of the admissions decision within two weeks of Division and the Career Services Office, and by visiting the
receipt of all materials. State and City Departments online at www.teachny.com
In order to apply for the Five Towns College Early Decision and www.highered.nysed.gov. Print versions of the data
Program, students must sign the Early Decision Agreement published on these websites are available in the Education
stating that if accepted early, all other college applications will Division Office. Additional workforce and industry data is
be withdrawn and the student will attend Five Towns College. available online from the New York State Department of
Students contemplating Early Decision are encouraged to Labor at www.labor.state.ny.us.
contact the admissions office to schedule an interview.

AUDITION AND INTERVIEW REQUIREMENT


Interviews may be required when the documentation supplied
by an applicant does not contain sufficient information upon
which an admissions decision can be made. Students will be
notified if an interview is required. Similarly, students who
believe that the documentation contained in their application
does not accurately reflect upon their readiness to pursue
a particular program of study may request an interview to
discuss their qualifications for admission. Interviews are
granted at the discretion of the College. Admission into any
music or theatre program may be contingent upon passing
an audition. The most current audition requirements are
available from the Admissions Office.
106

Academic Information GRADE POINT AVERAGE (G.P.A.)

Grade point averages are computed by multiplying the


The College makes available the finest quality of instruc- point value of each grade by the credits designated for each
tion. Students are expected to achieve appropriate levels of course. This gives the grade point total. The sum of these
academic performance, to be knowledgeable about prereq- totals divided by the number of credits attempted gives the
uisites for admission to specific courses, and to be aware of G.P.A. for the semester.
graduation requirements and College policies, procedures
and regulations in the College's offical publications. INCOMPLETE GRADES (I)

The Registrar's Office is responsible for the registration of "I" is a grade recorded for a course in which a student has
students and the maintenance of all academic records and failed to complete certain work or has been absent from the
credentials. Students should address all requests and/or peti- final examination because of circumstances beyond his/her
tions about matters of academic standing to the Academic control. The written approvals of the Chairperson and Dean
Standards Committee. are required before an "I" grade may be given. An incom-
plete not removed before the tenth week of the following
UNIT OF CREDIT semester becomes an "F". Responsibility for removing an
"I" within this time limit rests with the student.
The semester hour is the unit of credit used by Five Towns
College. One semester hour represents approximately three An "I" may also be awarded in any class where the level
hours of study per week for one semester. For example, a of proficiency in a core skill has not been demonstrated
course requiring three class recitations (50-minute periods) satisfactorily, in accordance with the Five Towns College
a week for a semester would receive three semester hours Student Learning Assessment Plan.
of credit. Credit for Major Instrument/Voice instruction is
based on one lesson a week plus a minimum of six hours of REPEAT GRADES (R)
individual practice.
"R" is a grade given in non-credit courses for course require-
ments not successfully completed.
GRADING SYSTEM
The College uses the following grading system: DISTANCE LEARNING/ONLINE COURSES
GRADE
Five Towns College reserves the right to offer a portion of
GRADE QUALITY OF ACHIEVEMENT POINTS
each degree program in an online course format. In such
A Excellent........................... 95-100 4.0
cases, the College expects that students registering for these
A- .......................................... 90-94 3.7 courses will supply their own computer and access to the
B+ .......................................... 87-89 3.3 Internet, as set forth in the Catalog section entitled “Computer
B Good................................. 84-86 3.0 Requirements.” The College also reserves the right to limit
B- .......................................... 80-83 2.7 the number of online courses that any student may pursue
C+ .......................................... 77-79 2.3 wholly online. In order to ensure the integrity of online
C Average............................. 74-76 2.0 courses, the College may require students enrolled in online
C- .......................................... 70-73 1.7 courses to present themselves at the College for a variety of
D+ .......................................... 65-69 1.3 reasons, including course orientation, and midsemester and
D Poor................................... 60-64 1.0 final examinations.
F Failure............................... 0-59 0.0
WU Unofficial Withdrawal...... 0.0 OFFICIAL EMAIL NOTICES
I Incomplete........................ —
All Five Towns College students are provided with an of-
W Official Withdrawal.......... —
ficial email address when they initially register for College.
P Passing (Non-credit courses) —
Students are expected to check their official email box
R Repeat (Non-credit courses) —
regularly for official notices and other important informa-
AU Audit (Not For Credit)...... — tion from the College. Students will be deemed to have
T Transfer Credit.................. — received notifications from the College transmitted to their
email address.
107
MAKE-UP FINAL EXAMINATIONS CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

All requests for make-up of final examinations must be Credit by Examination is a method by which academic credit
submitted in writing to the instructor for written approval. is awarded to recognize prior college-level learning. Credit
Should the instructor not be available, the Program by examination is not designed to merely recognize “life”
Chairperson or the Provost may give their written approval. experience. Credit by examination may only be awarded
Such requests for make-up of final examinations should be with the permission of the Vice President/Provost, and is a
submitted no later than two weeks after the date of the regular privilege available to full-time, matriculated students who
final examination. Permission to take a make-up examination have a significant record of accomplishment and competence
is given only for compelling reasons, such as illness, a death in a particular academic subject area taught at Five Towns
in the family, or a breakdown in transportation. College. Students seeking Credit by Examination must have
successfully completed a minimum of 15 credits at Five
Students with written permission to take a make-up
Towns College, have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better,
examination should report to the Bursar's Office with the
and be recommended by the Division Chair that offers the
required fee. The receipt marked "Paid" must be presented
course or sequence of courses. In addition, if approved, the
before the student is permitted to take a make-up examination.
student must successfully complete one of the following
The examination is held at a time and place designated by
examinations, with a minimum score as shall be determined
the administration.
by the Vice President/Provost of the College:
REPEATING COURSES
• Five Towns College Credit by Examination
Courses may be repeated once where a grade of F, WU, D+ The student must be able to demonstrate competence by
or D has been earned. In such cases, the higher grade will successfully completing, with a grade of B or better, a
be computed in the G.P.A. and the lower grade will remain comprehensive examination administered by the faculty
on the transcript without credit or being computed in the that encompasses the stated objectives of the subject
cumulative G.P.A. Students who fail to earn a passing grade course. There is a $50 fee for the administrative cost of
in a required course after two attempts may be required to these comprehensive examinations. Students who pass
withdraw from a program of study. such an examination shall be charged one-third of the
regular tuition for credits earned in this manner.
DISABILITY SERVICES
• Excelsior College Examination
Five Towns College students who have a physical, medical, Successfully complete an Excelsior College Examination
learning or psychiatric disability, either temporary or (ECE). Excelsior College examinations are available in
permanent, may receive reasonable accommodations in business, education, health, liberal arts and sciences, and
accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) nursing. Learn more about Excelsior College Examinations
and/or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. In order to at www.excelsior.edu.
establish eligibility for such accommodations, students
are required to identify themselves, provide appropriate • College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
documentation, to the Registrar's Office and collaborate CLEP offers five general examinations in English
with the Academic Support Center in a timely manner to Composition, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Sciences,
develop and follow an Accommodation Plan. Prospective and Social Sciences and History, which validate non-
students with handicapping conditions seeking admission traditional learning equal to what is usually taught during
to the College are urged to identify themselves early in the first year of college. Five Towns College may award
the application process, and to consult with the Academic transfer credit for CLEP scores of 50 or higher, when
Support Center to ascertain whether or not their needs can such an award is appropriate to the degree program being
be met by the College before reaching a decision. pursued at Five Towns College. Learn more about CLEP
at www.collegeboard.com/clep.
AUDITING COURSES
INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION
A student may audit a course by obtaining written permis-
sion from the Division Chair and registering for the course Individualized Instruction in a group setting is similar to
after paying the per credit fee. Audited courses may not be Independent Study and requires the same student effort
taken later for credit. hours as regular class instruction.
108
ACADEMIC STANDING GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

Students whose cumulative Grade Point Average falls below A student who believes that he or she has been personally ag-
a 2.0 will be placed on probation and may be limited to no grieved or discriminated against by a staff or faculty member
more than 12 credits per semester. Students will be removed should first seek to resolve the problem through discussion
from probation upon attaining the required G.P.A. A minimum with that individual. Failing a resolution of the matter, the
cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 is required for graduation. student may then bring the matter in written form to the at-
tention either of the chairperson of the program involved or
ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS (AP) the supervisor of the particular service or activity. A written
response will be made within two weeks. If the student is
Students may be eligible for credit for Advanced Placement dissatisfied with the decision, he/she may then appeal to the
(AP) examinations for which a grade of three (3) or better Vice President/Provost for redress.
has been achieved. Examinations are administered to high
school students in over a dozen different college subjects. INDEPENDENT STUDY
Prospective students who have taken AP examinations, must
provide the College with official score reports sent from the Independent Study is available only to Seniors who need a
College Board to the Admissions Office during the admissions specific required course to graduate within the senior year
process. The College will only consider requests for AP of study (the last 30/32 credits for the Bachelors Degree or
credit when made by new students for examinations taken the last 15/16 credits for the Associate Degree). The student
prior to matriculation. AP credit is not awarded to students is responsible for meeting the requirements listed on the
after they have matriculated. Independent Study Guidelines and for the initiation and
completion of the Independent Study Contract and Record,
ATTENDANCE obtainable in the Registrar's Office.
Each student is expected to attend classes regularly to achieve
maximum benefit from the educational program. He or MATRICULATION
she is responsible for all class work missed regardless of
the reason(s) for absence. Excessive, unexplained absence Students who have been conditionally accepted to the College
may result in a lowered grade, especially when it affects will be classified as matriculated for a degree after their
participation in class activities. Absence from more than transcripts from high schools and other Colleges (if any) are
twenty percent of the total class meetings of a course may received and verified by the Registrar's Office. Students who
result in a failing grade. interrupt their education by failing to register for any Fall or
Spring semester lose their matriculated status and are required
INTERNSHIP COURSES to file an Application for Readmission when they seek to
return unless they have filed for and have been approved for
Internship courses provide students with on-the-job train- a Leave of Absence.
ing experience in the world of business. Students enrolled
in BUS 471, 472 Internship 1, 2 spend at least 90 hours STUDENT CONDUCT
each semester as interns in the field and attend seminars at
the College where they share their experiences with other Five Towns College seeks to provide and maintain a secure and
students and the instructor. wholesome educational environment for its students, faculty,
Students enrolled in BUS 473 Internship 3 or THE 475 and staff. In order to guarantee this environment and to safe-
Theatre Internship spend 35-40 hours a week for a total of guard its ideals of scholarship, character, and student conduct,
at least 360 hours in a firm or theatre. the College reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any
student at any time. In this event, a refund of fees may be made
Students who wish to take this course must obtain the ap- in accordance with the refund schedule of the College.
proval of the Internship Coordinator.

TIME LIMITATION
Students are expected to complete their Bachelor degree
studies within a period of six years. Credit for courses
earned more than ten (10) years ago cannot be accepted to
meet degree requirements.
109
WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Students who find it necessary to withdraw from a course or Students who find it necessary to take a temporary leave of
courses are required to notify their academic advisors, secure absence must file a Leave of Absence Application and seek
their approval, and complete all necessary forms. Program approval of the Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
change fees must be paid in the Bursar's Office, and the Committee. Recipients of financial aid, in the form of
completed forms must be presented to the Registrar's Office grants, scholarships, or loans, are reminded that a leave of
before a student can be considered officially withdrawn from absence does not in and of itself constitute a waiver of the
a course or courses. College's Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress. A
waiver must be applied for separately in accordance with
Students may withdraw from courses without penalty until the published College policy. Students applying for a leave of
last day of class. During this time period, they will receive a absence for a semester in progress are cautioned to consult
"W," which is not computed in the grade point average. with the Financial Aid Office before making application. A
A student who has not filed an official Withdrawal Form and Leave of Absence may be granted for one or two semesters
who has been excessively absent will be assigned a grade depending on the circumstances. Returning students may
of "WU" (Unofficial Withdrawal), which is equivalent to be required to demonstrate continued proficiency in their
an "F" grade. major field.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE READMISSION

Students who find it necessary to withdraw from the College Students who have interrupted their studies for any length
are required to notify their academic advisor in writing of the of time without having been approved for a Leave of Ab-
reason(s) for withdrawal and complete the required Withdrawal sence or who do not resume their studies at the expiration
Form. This form is available in the Registrar's Office. of an approved Leave of Absence are deemed to have sur-
rendered their matriculated status. Students who have lost
Failure to carry out the clearance procedures contained in their matriculated status in this manner, or who have previ-
the form will result in the withholding of all student records. ously been dismissed from the College for any reason, must
Transcripts, information, and/or employment references will file an Application for Readmission if they seek to return
not be furnished until the Withdrawal Form has been com- to the College. Unless permission is otherwise granted, re-
pleted and official withdrawal status has been granted. admitted students are governed by the College Catalog in
Official withdrawal status is based on the date of receipt and publication at the time of readmission.
approval of a completed Withdrawal Form and not on the
last date of attendance. SUBSTITUTION/WAIVER POLICY

Students who withdraw from the College will receive grades Students may request permission to substitute or waive a
in accordance with the procedures detailed above under degree program requirement. Approval of such a request is
Withdrawal From Courses. Returning students must file generally limited to situations where the substitute course
an Application for Readmission, and will be required to contains the same or similar learning objectives as that
satisfy the degree requirements set forth in the most recent offered by the required course, or where the application of a
College Catalog. specific policy causes an unreasonable hardship with limited
educational benefit. Course substitutions or waivers of other
PROGRAM CHANGES degree program requirements may also be requested in order
to accommodate a documented learning disability.
Students may apply for program changes for valid reasons
at the beginning of a semester. In order to process a substitution or waiver request, the
student must complete an Academic Waiver/Course
To change a program, students are required to secure the Substitution Request form, have it signed by their Academic
approval of their academic advisor, complete an official Advisor, and return the form to the Registrar’s Office
Change of Program Request, pay the designated fee in the together with supporting documentation. The request
Bursar's Office, and file the completed form in the Registrar's will then be reviewed by the Curriculum, Instruction, and
Office. Such changes are not recorded on the transcript, and Assessment Committee. Requests of this nature may be
no change of program may be made after the first week of approved solely at the discretion of the College, in the
a semester. exercise of its educational judgment.
110
TRANSCRIPTS FULL-TIME COURSELOAD
Students who register for 12 or more credits are considered
A student copy of a Transcript of Record indicating scholastic
to be full-time students for that semester. Students who wish
standing is mailed to the student's home at the end of each
to register for more than the number of credits contained in
semester. An official transcript bearing the seal of the Col-
the Recommended Sequence of Courses must obtain permis-
lege and the signature of the Registrar is mailed directly to sion in advance, unless they have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0
institutions or persons at the student's written request. or are registering for their final semester. This regulation
does not apply to one (1) credit Performance Ensembles.
Except for performance ensembles, students will be charged
Student Rights Under the Family the part-time student per credit charge for each credit above
Educational Rights and Privacy Act that published in the Recommended Sequence of Content.
(FERPA) Students are advised to consult with the Bursar for exact
charges prior to registering for extra-credits.
Five Towns College fully complies with the federal Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). The purpose TRANSFER CREDIT
of the Act is to protect the rights of students and to insure
Generally, the Registrar evaluates credit earned at other insti-
the privacy and accuracy of education records. Generally, tutions soon after admission. To be eligible, final transcripts
students have the right to inspect and review certain of their from all post-secondary institutions previously attended must
education records within 45 days of the day the College re- be received before students have completed their first semester.
ceives a request for access. They have the right to request For credit earned through traditional classroom work, evalu-
the amendment of their education records that the student ation is conducted on a course-by-course basis for all work
believes is inaccurate or misleading. Also, FERPA gives in which grades of “C” or above have been earned.
students the right to consent to disclosures of personally
Five Towns College routinely accepts credit from regionally
identifiable information contained in the student’s educa-
accredited institutions of higher education. The College will also
tion records, except to the extent that the law authorizes
accept credits earned at institutions which are not regionally
disclosure without consent.
accredited on a case-by-case basis. In these instances, students
must also furnish the College with a copy of the course descrip-
FERPA permits the release of directory type information tion for each course they seek to transfer, a copy of the transfer-
without the written consent of the student, provided the ring institution’s catalog, and such other information as may be
student has been given the opportunity to withhold such reasonably necessary to determine course equivalency.
disclosure. Five Towns College considers the following to
be directory type information: name, email address, address Once matriculated at Five Towns College, students do not
and telephone number (including local and permanent), have the right to transfer credits to the institution, except
as set forth herein. An undergraduate student who seeks to
date and place of birth; major field of study, participation
transfer credit from another institution after matriculation
in officially recognized activities, dates of attendance, de-
at Five Towns College must request approval in advance.
grees and awards received, the most recent previous edu- Students should file a written request for permission to take
cational institution attended by a student, student level and courses at another institution with the Registrar at least six
full/part-time status. Students who do not want this infor- (6) weeks in advance. Such request should contain the
mation released must give written notification to the Office rationale for taking courses at another institution, as well
of the Registrar. as a description of the course description as published by
the school the student wishes to attend. No credit will be
Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. transferred without prior approval, nor will credit transfer
Department of Education concerning alleged failures by for coursework with a grade below a “C”.
Five Towns College to comply with the requirements of Credit may be available for courses sponsored by organizations
FERPA. The College provides annual notification to stu- which are recommended in the “Guide to Educational
dents of their rights under FERPA each year in the Col- Programs in Non-Collegiate Organizations” of the State
lege’s catalogs and on the College website. Further, more University of New York. The decision to award credit in such
information about FERPA is made available at the Office cases may be determined by the Vice President for Academic
of the Registrar. Affairs or the Curriculum and Instruction Committee.
111
GRADUATE CREDITS FOR BACHELOR'S DEGREE STUDENT LEARNING ASSESSMENT
Qualified seniors (those with a 3.25 or higher cumulative The College recognizes that grades earned by students for
G.P.A.) may take graduate courses at the undergraduate completing coursework are composite scores that reflect student
tuition rate to complete the requirements for the bachelor's efforts in a wide-range of course-based initiatives assigned
degree. A qualified student must have his/her advisor's and by faculty members each semester.
division chair's approval at the time of registration. The
credits earned in these courses may not subsequently be As it fulfills its mission, goals and objectives, the College also
applied toward graduate study. seeks to specifically assess student proficiencies (e.g. Written
and Oral Communication) in a narrower range of course-based
Graduate courses require a significant increase in student activities. The proficiencies that the College seeks to assess
effort hours that include, but are not limited to, more rigorous, in this manner are more fully described in the Five Towns
expansive and demanding research projects and papers than College Student Learning Assessment Plan, which is linked
courses taken for undergraduate credit. directly to the program-level mission and goals.

GRADUATE COURSES  Regardless of course grade average, every student must


Qualified seniors who need less than a full program to successfully demonstrate their proficiency in each of the
meet the requirements for the bachelor's degree may take, skills identified in the Student Learning Assessment Plan
concurrently with their undergraduate program, a limited before a final course grade is awarded. Those students who
number of graduate courses for credit toward a graduate have not successfully demonstrated proficiency with any skill
degree. These students must (1) fill out an application for specifically assessed by the Student Learning Assessment Plan
admission (2) be accepted provisionally (3) declare their may be awarded a grade of “I” for the course and required to
intention to take such courses for graduate credit. demonstrate the required proficiency in a manner acceptable
to the faculty before course credit is awarded.
RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT Before entering into any program of study, students should
Students must complete their last 30 credits in residence in familiarize themselves with the Mission and Goals of the
order to be eligible for an Associate Degree and 60 credits College, as well as the Mission and Goals of each program
for a Baccalaureate Degree. of study they plan to pursue. The Five Towns College Student
Learning Assessment Plan is available in the College Library
SOPHOMORE STANDING and online at www.ftc.edu/SLAP.
Sophomore standing—that of a second-year student—is
attained when a student has successfully completed a mini- ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIOS
mum of 27 credits. All students entering into Five Towns College as of the Fall 2008
semester must maintain an electronic portfolio that documents
JUNIOR STANDING the attainment of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions
Junior standing—that of a third-year student—is attained required by the Student Learning Assessment Plan. Students are
when a student has successfully completed a minimum of assessed a one-time fee for an Electronic Portfolio when they
54 credits. register for SCI 101 Information Literacy 1. The Electronic
Portfolio will be maintained for a period of seven years. After
SENIOR STANDING that time, alumni may arrange to continue maintaining their
Senior standing—that of a fourth-year student—is attained Electronic Portfolio directly with the College’s third-party
when a student has successfully completed a minimum of service provider for an additional fee.
87 credits.
Instructional Technology
SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS The College utilizes a variety of instructional technology appli-
Students who do not attain the minimum G.P.A. after two cations in the delivery of its educational programs and services.
consecutive semesters will be considered not to be making Nearly all courses utilize a hybrid instructional approach that
satisfactory academic progress. Such students are subject to loss blends traditional teaching methods with new online technologies.
of matriculated status or dismissal unless a waiver is granted by the Not only does this hybrid approach improve the quality of the
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Committee. Students academic program, but it helps develop in students the knowledge,
who seek to return to the College after a loss of matriculated skills, and dispositions necessary to engage in life-long learning.
status must file an Application for Readmission. If approved, To meet this goal, the College couples Blackboard Learning Sys-
readmitted students are subject to the provisions of the College tems with Smart Board Technologies in its classrooms. Electronic
Catalog in effect at the time of readmission. Portfolios are maintained by Pass-Port Learning Systems.
112
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The requirements for graduation are as follows:

• Establishment of matriculation for a degree. Students are


responsible for having transcripts from high schools and
other colleges (if any) sent to the College.

• Completion of the minimum number and appropriate distri-


bution of credits required for the particular degree sought,
including capstone experiences, senior projects, music
juries and recitals, and student teaching experiences that
are designed so that students demonstrate well developed
content expertise and General Education skills prior to
graduation.

• A minimum cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.0. PHI SIGMA ETA HONOR SOCIETY

• Settlement of all College financial and other obligations Phi Sigma Eta is a national honor society dedicated to rec-
• Filing of an Application for Graduation with appropriate ognizing the academic achievements of students from small
fee in the Registrar's Office at the time of registration for private colleges. The Society accepts as members, students
the final semester who have achieved a 3.5 G.P.A. after earning a minimum of
54 credits towards a Baccalaureate degree.
HONORS AND AWARDS
Candidates for membership are reviewed each year by a
DEAN'S HONOR LIST faculty committee chaired by the Vice President/Provost
who serves as Advisor to the Eta Chapter at Five Towns
Matriculated students merit placement on the Dean's Honor College.
List if they achieve a 3.5 G.P.A. or higher for a semester
without failures or incomplete grades, having carried a JANUARY INTERSESSION
minimum of 12 credits and have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.5.
This list is compiled after the close of each semester, and the The January intersession is a period during which students
achievement is noted on the student's record. are free to pursue personal interests. It is a time for travel,
study, and independently oriented projects.
ACADEMIC AWARDS
SUMMER SESSIONS
Special awards are presented at Commencement to graduat-
ing students who have demonstrated academic excellence The College calendar includes Summer Sessions that pro-
in the following areas: vide opportunities for make-up or advanced study. These
courses also enable entering students with special prepara-
Accounting Mass Communication
tory requirements to commence full College programs with
Business Music
their classmates in the Fall semester. A Summer Sessions
Film/Video Music Business
schedule is issued during the Spring semester.
Childhood Education Music Education
Audio Recording Technology Theatre Arts
PUBLICITY RIGHTS
Computer Business Applications
Five Towns College students, by performing and/or partici-
GRADUATION WITH HONORS
pating in the programs, showcases, and events of any kind,
College Honors are conferred on graduating seniors with live and/or recorded, consent to the inclusion of their name,
Baccalaureate degrees who meet the following standards: photograph, likeness and/or biographical information in all
Academic average of 3.9 - summa cum laude promotion or advertising for these events and for the com-
Academic average of 3.7 - magna cum laude mercial release of any recordings, films or programs created
Academic average of 3.5 - cum laude by the College or Upbeat Entertainment.
113

Tuition and Fees


Tuition and fees are payable in accordance with the Sched- STUDENT ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE
ule of Payments set forth below, unless a Monthly Payment
Plan has been approved by the Bursar. Checks and money Full time students are required to have sickness and accident
orders should be made payable to Five Towns College. The insurance. They are automatically enrolled in the College
privileges of the College are not available to the student until Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan. Enrollment
completion of registration and the payment of all fees and in the College plan can be waived by completing a waiver
tuition. College policy does not permit a student to register form, with a copy of a valid medical insurance ID card. A
for a subsequent semester if the student is in arrears for a brochure is available in the business office.
prior semester. The Trustees of the College reserve the right
to make changes in fees, tuition, curriculum, and regulations MONTHLY PAYMENT PLAN
and to charge for additional services whenever such action This plan, available through TuitionPay (Sallie Mae Business
is deemed advisable. Office Solutions) for a $55 annual fee, enables students to pay
tuition and fees in ten monthly installments commencing June
APPLICATION FEE 15. TuitionPay can be contacted directly at (800) 635-0120
A non-refundable fee of $35 is required at the time of or www.tuitionpay.com for additional information.
application to process an application.
SPECIAL FEES
FULL-TIME TUITION
Students taking 12 or more credits are full-time. Application for Readmission................................... $35
Audio Recording Technology Lab........................... 50/400
Full-Time Undergraduate Tuition per semester........$9,200
Auditing a course, per credit.................................... 765
PART-TIME STUDENTS and EXTRA CREDITS Computer Lab, per course........................................ 50
Students taking less than 12 credits are part-time. Degree/Program Change.......................................... 25
Electronic Portfolio.................................................. 110
Part-time students and those taking extra credits above that Film /Video Lab, per semester................................. 100/400
which is published in the Recommended Sequence of Con- Graduation (payable at registration)........................ 50
tent for each program will be charged per credit for each
Identification Card replacement............................... 25
registered credit or extra credit.
Independent Study, per course plus tuition.............. 350
Undergraduate Tuition per credit.................................$765 Keyboard Lab, per semester.................................... 10
Late Registration...................................................... 50
COLLEGE FEE PER SEMESTER Major Instrument/Voice, per semester
12 + Credits ....................................................... $150 45 minute private lesson per week....................... 775
7-11 Credits ....................................................... 120 Make-Up Final Examination/Recital....................... 40
4- 6 Credits ....................................................... 60 MIDI Lab, per semester........................................... 75
1- 3 Credits ....................................................... 30
Music Studio, per hour............................................. 1
STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE PER SEMESTER Parking for unregistered car, per day....................... 10
This $25 fee is administered by the Student Council and is Photographic Equipment.......................................... 100
used for student activities. Private Instrument/Voice, per semester
30 minute private lesson per week....................... 525
TUITION DEPOSIT Program Change (each)............................................ 5
A tuition deposit of $500 is required within two weeks after Qualifying Examination (student teaching)............. 40
acceptance in order to reserve a place in class. Returned Check service charge................................ 35
Transcript - High School/College............................ 10
SCHEDULE OF PAYMENTS Transcript - Academic Record................................. 10
Fall tuition balances are due on or before July 1. Spring
tuition balances are due on or before January 3. LATE PAYMENT
CREDIT CARDS Unpaid balances of student accounts are subject to interest
Mastercard, Discover Card and Visa are accepted for pay- charges of 12 percent per annum from the first day of class
ment of tuition and fees. until payment is received.
114
RESIDENTIAL LIFE FEES

The costs for students who reside in the Living/Learning


Center on campus are listed below per semester.

Single Occupancy................................................. $4,800


Double Occupancy................................................ 4,000
Refundable Security Deposit................................ 300
Dormitory Council................................................ 30
Monthly Telephone Service (optional) plus usage... 5
Refundable Telephone Service Deposit................ 50

MANDATORY MEAL PLAN


REFUND POLICY
This plan is provided to all students who reside in the Living/ Refunds are made solely at the option of the College for
Learning Center. A dinner meal is provided seven days a conditions beyond the student's control such as military
week. In addition, a declining fund balance in the amount service, serious personal illness, or other emergencies ac-
of $1,050 is provided to make purchases for breakfast, lunch ceptable to the Committee on Refunds. All requests must
and snacks. be accompanied by appropriate certifications.

The Hours of Operation for the Upbeat Café and the Downbeat Refunds will be based on the date of receipt of written noti-
Lounge are posted in each facility. fication of withdrawal. Nonattendance in a course does not
constitute an official withdrawal. Students are responsible for
Seven Day Meal Plan............................................ $2,200 payment for all tuition and fees until an official withdrawal
is presented to the Registrar.

Withdrawal from the College on or before the first day of


CHANGE OF PROGRAM classes — 100% of tuition and fees less an administrative
fee of $100.
A fee will be charged each time a program change is made
after registration is completed. The charge will cover one Withdrawal from the College between the second day of
or more changes made at the same time. classes and the end of the first week of classes — 90% of
tuition and fees less an administrative fee of $100.
The following actions initiated by the student require pro-
gram change fee: Withdrawal from the College during the second week of
classes — 80% of tuition and fees less an administrative
Addition of a course or courses fee of $100.
Changing from one section of a course to another sec-
tion of the same course Withdrawal from the College during the third week of classes
Dropping a course — 60% of tuition and fees less an administrative fee of $100.
A change of program fee is not applicable when: Withdrawal from the College during the fourth week of
a course cancelled or withdrawn; classes — 40% of tuition and fees less an administrative
a course is rescheduled; fee of $100.
a student is transferred to another section of the same
Withdrawal from the College during the fifth week of classes
course;
— 20% of tuition and fees less an administrative fee of $100.
registration of a student is cancelled for any reason; and
a student withdraws after completion of registration and After the completion of the fifth week of classes there will
has paid the tuition deposit. be no refunds granted.

The application fee is non-refundable.


115

Financial Aid
Five Towns College recognizes that many students who are FINANCIAL AID PAYMENTS
qualified and deserving may hesitate to apply for admission
because of economic circumstances. However, no student The College will defer tuition payments for a student who
or prospective student who wishes to enroll at the College has established eligibility for a grant or loan of equal amount.
should fail to apply for this reason. After discussing the Moneys received by the College on behalf of a student will
matter with the College's financial aid administrator, the first be applied towards the student's tuition and housing.
student may discover that a way can be found to overcome After the student's tuition and housing is paid in full, he/she
the problem of inadequate funds. will receive any balance. This arrangement does not apply
to students on the Financial Aid Budget Plan.

A student's financial need is determined by subtracting The Financial Aid Budget Plan is an arrangement between
the amount of the family's resources available for college the College and students receiving financial aid. Under
expenses from the estimated cost of attending the College. this arrangement money is advanced on a monthly basis
In order to meet a student's financial need, the financial aid for direct education expenses. These expenses are limited
administrator may suggest a package of aid that includes a to transportation, food, rent, and other items that enable a
scholarship, a part-time job, and a loan or grant from the student to attend a college.
state or federal governments.
FREQUENCY OF FINANCIAL AID PAYMENTS
To help prospective students understand the various kinds
of assistance that may be available to them, descriptions of The sooner a student applies for financial aid, the sooner it
the three types of sources of financial help are given below. may be credited to him/her or disbursed. The recommended
Prospective students should read these carefully to see how filing date for returning students is March 31st for the Fall
they apply in individual cases. Knowing the facts, they will semester. All other students are urged to apply at least eight
be in a better position to discuss their problem of financial weeks prior to the beginning of the semester of attendance.
need with the College's financial aid administrator and to Money from entitlement programs such as Federal Pell,
find a solution to their problem. ACG, TAP and Federal SEOG are usually credited to a
student once each semester. Loans are always disbursed in
two payments for each loan period.

ESTIMATED EXPENSES REFUNDS INVOLVING FINANCIAL AID

Students should make a realistic estimate of the expenses for When a refund request is approved by the College Commit-
the academic year. These expenses should include tuition, tee on Refunds for a student who has received financial aid,
fees, transportation, food, housing, and personal and recre- portions of the financial aid obtained must first be returned
ational costs. A typical budget for a commuter student living by the College to the appropriate agencies.
at home would be $31,714 while that for students living in In such a disbursement, moneys received from Title IV
the dorm or on their own could approximate $37,264. programs, such as Federal Direct Loans, Pell, and FSEOG,
must be returned to the appropriate Title IV programs and
In the above estimated budgets, about $1,200 is set aside will be calculated as follows:
for textbooks, manuals, and consumable supplies, such as
Title IV Financial Aid Earned
notebooks and score paper for the academic year.
multiplied by (X)
% to be retained (based on completed number of days)
Resident students should be prepared to spend approximately AMOUNT RETAINED BY SCHOOL
$4,000 for a double room each semester. A minimum manda-
tory food plan will cost approximately $2,200 per semester. Title IV Financial Aid Disbursed
subtracted by (—)
Resident students should expect to pay approximately $400
Financial Aid Retained
per semester for additional related fees.
AMOUNT DUE TITLE IV PROGRAMS
116
STANDARD OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC the student. The student may continue to receive financial
PROGRESS — FOR THE PURPOSE OF assistance during the probationary period. At the end of the
DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR STUDENT AID probationary period the student will:
Students who are not maintaining satisfactory academic • Be removed from probationary status because both cumula-
progress and pursuit of program according to established tive GPA and completion rate standards are met; or
guidelines are not eligible for Federal Title IV, New York State • Be suspended from receiving assistance from federal and
financial aid and some private scholarships administered by institutional sources and will receive a Financial Aid Sus-
Five Towns College. Federal Title IV aid includes the Federal pension Letter. The students will no longer be eligible for
College Work-Study, Federal Direct Loan (subsidized and Federal Financial Aid until they have taken classes, using
unsubsidized), Federal Parent Loan (PLUS), Federal PELL their own funding, and have raised their cumulative GPA
Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and Federal and completion rate to meet the necessary standards.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG). New
York State awards include Tuition Assistance Program (TAP), NEW YORK STATE CRITERIA AND
the Higher Educational Opportunity Program (HEOP) and REQUIREMENTS
all other programs through New York State Higher Educa- Satisfactory Academic Progress/Program Pursuit – TAP
tion Services Corporation.
Full-Time Student in a Baccalaureate Program
FEDERAL CRITERIA AND REQUIREMENTS
Before being A Student must have With at least
Upon matriculation at the College, a student must make satisfac- Certified for this accrued at least this this Grade
tory academic progress consistent with the College’s Catalog and TAP payment many credits Point Average
the U.S. Department of Education regulations. Every semester 1 0 0
is taken into account when measuring a student’s progress, 2 6 1.5
whether they received Federal Financial Aid or not. 3 15 1.8
4 30 2.0
Students are expected to complete their program of study
5 45 2.0
within 150% of the time required as published in the College
6 60 2.0
Catalog. At the end of each semester a student must have
7 75 2.0
earned hours equal to at least 67% of the cumulative hours
8 90 2.0
attempted. After attempting more than 48 credits a student
*9 105 2.0
must have a cumulative CGPA of 2.0.
*10 120 2.0
• Attempted hours are defined as the hours for which the stu-
dent is enrolled and charged by the 7th day of the semester. * HEOP Student Only
All credits attempted whether transfer credits or due to a It should be noted that when using the chart, only semesters
change of major are taken into consideration. that a student receives a TAP payment are considered. Also,
• Earned hours are defined as the sum of hours which a student students who have received four semester payments of New
has earned a grade of A, B, C, or D. Withdrawals, Incompletes, York State TAP (24 payment points) MUST have a 2.00
Audits and Failures are not earned hours. An ‘Incomplete’ cumulative index. This includes students who may have
must be graded prior to the start of the next semester to be received TAP payments at another college prior to enrolling
considered earned for Federal Financial Aid purposes. at Five Towns College. Students who are denied an award for
• The higher grade of a repeated ‘F’ or ‘WU’ will be consid- failing to achieve a cumulative GPA of C can regain award
ered in calculating the student’s CGPA. eligibility by completing appropriate coursework—without
As the student progresses in their degree program, the stu- state support—to achieve a cumulative GPA of C. Students
dent must remember that credits not earned each semester cannot regain eligibility by remaining out of school for a
according to the overall required timeframe (i.e., six years period of time.
for Baccalaureate programs) will make it increasingly dif- Repeated Courses and Financial Aid
ficult to complete their program of study on time and not New York State regulations mandate that if a student repeats
possible to withdraw from any future courses for which that a course in which a passing grade acceptable to the institution
student is registered. has been received previously, the course cannot be included
A student who fails to maintain the needed cumulative GPA as part of the student’s full-time course load for New York
or meet the completion rate requirements is placed on finan- State financial aid purposes. However, when a failed course
cial aid probation for one semester. A letter will be sent to is repeated it may count toward full-time study.
117
Withdrawals and Leaves of Absence and Financial Aid NEW YORK STATE PROGRAMS
Students who received New York State aid for a semester
from which they withdraw or take a leave of absence and do TUITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (TAP)
not earn any academic credit are not considered to be meet- http://www.hesc.com
ing the state’s pursuit of program requirements and will not After filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
be eligible to receive state aid the following semester. The (FAFSA) New York State will send either a TAP Award
courses taken by a student that withdraws or takes a leave of Certificate/Change form or a TAP application. The application
absence during a semester is considered attempted but not deadline for the 2010-2011 academic year is June 30, 2010.
completed in determining Federal aid eligibility. The New York State Higher Education Services Corporation
determines the applicant's eligibility and mails an Award Cer-
Incomplete Grades and Financial Aid tificate directly to the applicant. It is the applicant's responsi-
A student with incomplete courses at the end of the semester bility to check for any errors. The Award Certificate should be
must complete the coursework prior to the start of the next presented to the Financial Aid Office at the time of receipt.
semester or may lose federal or state financial aid eligibility.
If a student completes these courses during the next semester Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards: Tuition
and regains academic progress, federal and state aid may be Assistance Program is an entitlement program. There is neither
reinstated upon student request. a qualifying examination nor a limited number of awards.
Students registered in a 2 year program are limited to 3 years
FINANCIAL AID APPEAL PROCEDURE of TAP all other students are eligible for 4 years of TAP.

If it has been determined that a student is not maintaining Who is Eligible?


satisfactory academic progress and/or pursuit of program To be eligible for TAP, a student must:
because the student failed to meet one or all of the institu- • Be a United States citizen or eligible non-citizen.
tion’s requirements, the student must obtain a waiver form • Be a legal resident of New York.
from the registrar’s office. After completing the form and • Study full-time (at least 12 credits per semester) at an
submitting it with necessary documentation, the Academic approved postsecondary institution in New York.
Standards Committee will review the appeal and the student • Have graduated from high school in the United States,
will be notified of the decision. The following types of earned a GED, or passed a federally approved "Ability to
information may be considered in determining whether the Benefit" test as defined by the Commissioner of the State
student is eligible to be considered for a waiver: Education Department.
• Be matriculated in an approved program of study and be
• serious illness to student or immediate family
in good academic standing.
• death of immediate family member
• Have, at least, a cumulative "C" average after receipt of
• extreme personal emotional stress
two annual payments.
• serious and/or unusual personal circumstances (not already
• Be charged at least $200 tuition per year.
mentioned above)
• Not be in default on a student loan guaranteed by HESC
Documentation must be provided of the unusual or or any repayment of a State award.
extraordinary circumstance that caused the student to not • Meet income requirement.
meet the necessary SAP criteria.
AID FOR PART-TIME STUDY (APTS)
A student may provide a statement from an academic advisor Application Procedures: Application is made through the
supporting the plan for academic recovery. College Financial Aid Office, which is responsible for deter-
mining who receives an APTS award and the amount.
A student is allowed only one New York State TAP waiver.
A student failing to meet Federal SAP requirements may Eligibility Requirements: To be considered for an award,
appeal once. a New York State resident student must not have exhausted
TAP eligibility for full-time study; be matriculated in an
The committee may recommend to the student that he/she seek approved program; be enrolled for at least 3 credits; be in
to regain eligibility without the use of a waiver by registering good academic standing; meet the citizenship requirements;
in one or more selected courses to increase the number of ac- and be within the required income guidelines.
crued credits and/or the grade point average. This procedure Award Schedule: Awards may not exceed $1000 per se-
requires that tuition be paid for with personal funds. mester or the amount of student tuition.
118
SPECIAL PROGRAMS FEDERAL PROGRAMS
New York State has other Scholarships and Awards for Five Towns College Federal School Code: 012561
students with special qualifications or circumstances. Get
more information if you think you are eligible by contacting Application Procedures: Students must complete a Free
New York State Higher Education Services Corporation at Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in order
http://www.hesc.com. to receive any Federal or New York State aid. It is
• Flight 587 Memorial Scholarship recommended that you file the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.
ed.gov. The Department of Education can be reached at
• Military Service Recognition Scholarship (MSRS)
1-800-4FED-AID (1-800-433-3243). The filing deadline
• New York Lottery-Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship date is June 30th or the last day of attendance which ever
is earlier.
• NYS Memorial Scholarships for Families of Deceased
Firefighters, Volunteer Firefighters, Police Officers, &
Apply for your PIN, a personal identification number. www.
Emergency Medical Service Workers
pin.ed.gov. It lets you apply,” sign” your online FAFSA.
• NYS Scholarships for Academic Excellence
• NYS Volunteer Recruitment Service Scholarship FEDERAL PELL GRANTS

• NYS World Trade Center Memorial Scholarship Selection of Recipient and Allocation of Awards:
• Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship The Federal Pell Grant Program eligibility and award
amount is based on need rather than academic achieve-
• NYS Aid to Native Americans ment. The applicant must: (1) be a U.S. Citizen or eligible
• NYS Regents Awards for Children of Deceased & Dis- non-citizen; (2) be an undergraduate enrolled as a matricu-
abled Veterans lated student at an eligible institution; (3) not be in default
or refund status for any federal Title IV aid at any insti-
• Segal AmeriCorps Education Award tution; and (4) if applicable, be registered with Selective
• Veterans Tuition Awards Service.

Financial need is determined by a formula applied to all


VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION applicants. This formula is written into federal law.

Application Procedures: Persons with disabilities may Students receiving the Federal Pell Grant for the first-time
obtain a list of local VESID offices at http://www.vesid. on or after the academic year 2008-2009 are limited to 18
nysed.gov/. semesters of Pell Grant.

Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards: Any Award Schedule: Currently awards range from $555 to
Disabled person with a substantial employment handicap, who $5,550. The amount of the award will be affected by costs
can become employable within a reasonable period of time of attendance and full or part-time enrollment status. The
may be eligible. VESID serves those having any physical, Federal Pell award is not duplicative of State awards.
emotional, or mental disability except blindness.
ACADEMIC COMPETITIVENESS GRANT
The legally blind are served by the Commission for the Blind
and Visually Handicapped, State Department of Social Services, This is a federal grant program for undergraduate students
40 North Pearl Street, Albany, NY 12243. enrolled at least half-time and who receive a Federal Pell
http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/cbvh/ Grant. Students also must have completed a rigorous sec-
ondary school program of study and be enrolled in at least
a two-year academic program acceptable for full credit to-
ward a bachelor’s degree.
119
FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATION WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT LOAN
OPPORTUNITY GRANTS (FSEOG) PROGRAM

Application Procedures: Application is made through Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards: Stu-
the College Financial Aid Office, which determines who dents may qualify for a "subsidized" loan, which is based on
receives a Supplemental Grant and the amount. The Free financial need. Students may also obtain an "unsubsidized"
Application for Federal Student Aid is used to apply for loan regardless of need—that is, regardless of their fam-
this grant. ily's income. To be eligible for a guaranteed loan a student
must be: (1) a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien; (2)
Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards: FSEOG enrolled in or admitted as a matriculated, at least half-time
grants are available to exceptionally needy full-time and student at an approved college, university or other postsec-
part-time (at least half-time) students, who have the lowest ondary institution; (3) have been determined to be eligible
expected family contributions as determined by the students' or ineligible for a Federal Pell Grant; (4) in good academic
financial aid application. standing and making satisfactory academic progress; (5)
not in default of a previous student loan; (6) if applicable,
Award Schedule: The award for a full academic year registered with selective service; and (7) assigned a social
ranges from $100 to $4,000. Normally an award may security number.
be paid for up to four years, or for five years for certain
courses of study. Loan Schedule: A freshman may borrow up to $3,500. A
sophomore may borrow up to $4,500. Juniors and seniors
Rights and Responsibilities of Recipients: The student may borrow up to $5,500 per year. All undergraduate
must continue to make satisfactory academic progress as students may borrow an additional $2,000 unsubsidized
defined in the College catalog. loan per year.

FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS (FWS) Independent students may borrow an additional unsubsidized loan
of $4,000 per year during their freshman and sophomore years,
Application Procedures: Application is made through the and $5,000 per year during their junior and senior years.
College Career Center and the College Financial Aid Office. Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans—The federal
Eligibility is determined and work arrangements are made government pays the interest on a subsidized loan while the
at this point. student is in school and during specified deferments. Students
must demonstrate financial need to receive loans.
Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards: The
applicant must be enrolled at least half-time in an approved Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans—Students
post-secondary institution. can get unsubsidized loans regardless of need but will have
to pay all interest charges.
An institution must make employment reasonably available
to all eligible students in the institution who are in need of Online Direct Loan Servicing: Keep track of your Direct
financial aid. In the event that more students are eligible for Loans. studentloans.gov
FWS than there are funds available, preference is given to
Responsibilities of All Student Loan Recipients:
students who have great financial need and who must earn
Repayment by the student begins 6 months after the student
a part of their educational expenses.
has graduated or ceased to be enrolled at least half-time, that
Award Schedule: The postsecondary institution arranges is, for at least 6 credits. You may choose to repay Direct
jobs both on campus and off campus with public or private Subsidized Loans and/or Direct Unsubsidized Loans through
nonprofit agencies, such as libraries and hospitals, for up to one of these four repayment plans:
20 hours per week. • Standard Repayment Plan,
• Extended Repayment Plan,
Factors considered by the Financial Aid Office in determining
• Graduated Repayment Plan, or
whether, and how many hours, the recipient may work under
• Income Contingent Repayment Plan
this program are: financial need; class schedule; academic
progress; and health status. You must repay all your Direct Subsidized and Direct Un-
subsidized Loans under the same type of repayment plan.
Level of salary must be at least the minimum wage, maximum If you do not choose a repayment plan, your loans will be
wage is dependent on the nature of the job and applicant placed in the Standard Repayment Plan. A minimum repay-
qualifications. ment of $50 plus interest per month is required.
120
Direct Subsidized Loan interest rates for undergraduate VETERANS ADMINISTRATION (VA) EDUCATION-
borrowers with a first disbursement between 7/1/2010 and AL BENEFITS
6/30/2011 will have a fixed interest rate os 4.5%.
Many programs of educational assistance benefits are avail-
The reduced rate apply only to Direct Subsidized Loans able to those who have served in the active military, naval or
made to undergraduate students; any Direct Unsubsidized air service and to their dependents. Detailed information on
Loan for all undergraduate borrowers would continue to be all veterans' benefits and assistance in applying for benefits
made at 6.8%. can be obtained from offices of the Veterans Administration.
http://www.gibill.va.gov
Students who graduate or fail to maintain at least half-time
status and who have participated in the Federal Family OTHER FEDERAL STUDENT FINANCIAL AID
Education and/or William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan PROGRAMS
Program must have an exit interview. This interview will
There are a variety of special-purpose Federal programs:
include but will not be limited to, information concerning
direct aid, scholarship, loans, traineeships. Many are ad-
terms of repayment, debt management, counseling, and
ministered through specific institutions of postsecondary
deferment eligibility.
education, and for this reason the financial aid office is the
best single source of information on the subject.
PARENT LOANS FOR UNDERGRADUATE
STUDENTS Information about additional federal programs are listed on
the Web at http://www.studentaid.ed.gov and http://www.
Federal Direct PLUS Loans—Parents with good credit ed.gov or are available from the U.S. Department of Educa-
histories, who want to borrow on behalf of their dependent tion, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 10102-0498
students, may apply for a PLUS Loan. or by calling 1-800-USA-LEARN.
Parents of financially dependent students may now borrow
PERFORMING ARTS FOUNDATION
up to the difference between the Cost of Education and any
estimated Financial Aid to be received. The interest rate for The Dix Hills Center for the Performing Arts Foundation, Inc.
new parent loans is 7.9% with a 9% cap. Financial need is is a nonprofit, tax-exempt corporation organized to benefit
not a requirement for a PLUS loan. However, the amount and enhance the quality of services to students at the College.
borrowed in any year cannot exceed educational costs less Charitable contributions to the Foundation, both monetary
all other financial aid received. and non-monetary, are tax deductible in accordance with IRS
guidelines. These resources are used to fund scholarships,
Application Procedures: To apply for a Federal Direct provide cultural programs, and other educational activities.
PLUS loan, the dependent student's parents must complete a
separate Federal Direct PLUS application and sign a Master
Promissory Note, available at https://studentloans.gov. Par-
ent PLUS loan borrowers whose funds were first disbursed
on or after July 1, 2008, have the option of delaying their
repayment on the PLUS loan either 60 days after the loan
is fully disbursed or six months after the dependent student
is not enrolled at least half-time. During this time, interest
may be paid by the parent or capitalized.

Rights and Responsibilities of Recipients: Satisfactory


academic progress must be maintained as defined in the
College catalog for all Federal Programs.
Because of continuing changes in Federal and State
regulations, students should check with the Financial Aid
Office regarding the latest official information about these
programs, or when they have any question or concern
about eligibility criteria.
121
COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS Lorraine Cohen Memorial Scholarship
Established to honor the memory of a business educator
The College offers assistance to students in the form of and co-founder of the College who, by virtue of her dedi-
awards, scholarships and part-time employment. cation, expertise, compassion for students and work ethic
during her more than thirty years of service at the College,
For incoming students the selection of Scholarship recipi- was responsible for much of its growth and development.
ents is determined at the time of acceptance to Five Towns This scholarship is awarded to a female student majoring
College. Scholarships are based on the student’s academic in a business program who exemplifies the qualities of this
achievement and/or talent. Students receiving scholarships outstanding educator.
must be full-time. Certain scholarships require students to
be registered in designated majors.
Mel Fuhrman Memorial Scholarship
Established in honor of a major record industry executive
All scholarships are contingent upon the student filing the
who helped develop the Music Business curriculum at the
FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) and
College. This award is made at a special ceremony hosted
completing the Financial Aid process.
by the B'nai B'rith—Music, Entertainment, and Media Unit
in New York City. The recipient is selected on the basis of
Continuing students that would like to apply for a scholar-
ability and academic achievement.
ship must complete a scholarship application, have a recom-
mendation from two teachers, be full-time, and complete the
Financial Aid process. Returning students have a deadline Joan Caleca Memorial Scholarship
of April 30th to apply for a scholarship for the upcoming Established to honor the memory of an outstanding Direc-
fall semester. tor of the College Library who, by virtue of her diligence,
expertise, and dedication, was responsible for much of the
Five Towns College Grants based on need are determined at progress made by the Library during her many years of
the time the student’s Financial Aid application is completed service. The award is made to an individual who best ex-
and packaged. emplifies the qualities of this wonderful educator.

Ervin Drake Award


SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS Established in honor of a former President of the Songwriter's
Guild of America and a current Vice President of the Song-
Dr. George Alterman Award
writers Hall of Fame, who helped establish the Composer-
Established in the name of the first Chairperson of the Five
In-Residence program at the College. This scholarship is
Towns College Board of Trustees, this $2,000 tuition grant
awarded to a Bachelor of Music student who best exemplifies
is awarded annually to a student on the basis of academic
the virtues of this gifted composer and songwriter.
achievement.

Joseph Monk Memorial Scholarship Al Feilich Memorial Scholarship


An award of up to $1,000 per academic year to a guitar Established in the memory of a former Distinguished Profes-
student who demonstrates academic potential and need in sor of Music Business at the College who served the Enter-
memory of this talented jazz guitarist and teacher. tainment Industry in many capacities as Vice President of
Broadcast Music, President of the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame,
Ida and Benjamin Cohen Memorial Scholarships and President of the Music and Performing Arts unit of B’nai
A limited number of scholarships, awarded each academic B’rith. He was a committee member of the Music Division
year to students in a bachelor degree program, who demon- of the UJA, Entertainment Division of Cerebral Palsy and
strate academic potential and/or economic need. served as a member of the New York State and American
Library Associations (ALA), Country Music Association
Leo and Alice Kleinman Memorial Scholarships
(CMA), National Association of Recording Merchandisers
A limited number of scholarships, awarded each academic
(NARM), National Academy of Popular Music (NAPM),
year to students, who demonstrate academic potential and/or
and the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
economic need.
(NARAS). This scholarship is awarded to a Music Business
student who best exemplifies the virtues of this outstanding
and respected music industry executive.
122
Skitch Henderson Scholarship Sam Turk Memorial Scholarship in Music
Established in honor of the talented pianist, founder and An award of up to $1000 per academic year to a performing
director of the world renowned New York Pops, an orchestra music student who demonstrates academic potential and/or
which performs regularly to enthusiastic audiences at economic need.
Carnegie Hall, which is considered to be the premier concert
venue in the nation. He was awarded an Honorary Doctor Collaborating School District Scholarships
of Music Degree (Mus.D.) at a recent Special Convocation These Education Division scholarships have been established
in 2005 for outstanding artistic and musical achievement. for students with potential and need recommended by
The scholarship is awarded to a music student who best Superintendents of school districts that have entered into a
exemplifies the virtues of this gifted and dedicated professional collaboration agreement with Five Towns College.
musician.
Ray Alexander Memorial Scholarship
An award of up to $1,000 per academic year to a percussion
Sam Hochberg Memorial Scholarships
student who demonstrates potential and need in memory of
Established in the memory of a founder of the College, a
this talented vibraphonist and gifted musical performer.
scholarship in Liberal Arts and Business Administration,
awarded on the basis of academic potential to a high school Morton Vogel Scholarship
senior who has been recommended by his/her principal or Established in honor of a beloved and respected Professor
guidance counselor. of Music who founded and developed the Music Instrument
Technology Program at the College. The award is made to
Sy Kogan Memorial Award a music student who exemplifies the virtues of this talented
Established in memory of this accomplished clarinetist, and dedicated musician and educator who played a significant
orchestra leader and friend of the College, this $1,000 grant role in establishing the Jazz/Commercial Music program.
is awarded annually to a Jazz/Commercial Music student. George David Weiss Award
Established in honor of a past President of the Song Writ-
Jane Leslie Scholarship ers Guild of America, this $2000 grant is awarded to that
Established in honor of a beloved and respected Professor Bachelor of Music student who best exemplifies the virtues
of Language, who instituted and developed the American of this gifted composer and songwriter.
Sign Language Curriculum at the College. Her credentials
Margaret Whiting Scholarship
and qualifications include the following: B.S., Syracuse
Established in honor of the President of the Johnny
University; M.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Hunter
Mercer Foundation, these scholarships are awarded to
College, CUNY. Advanced Studies, Gallaudet Univer-
vocal music majors who plan to enroll in the Jazz/Com-
sity. Consultant-Deaf Culture, American Sign Language
mercial Music Program leading to a Bachelor of Music
Interpreter, Professional Diagnostician and Lecturer. This
Degree (Mus.B.) or the Theatre Arts Program leading to
scholarship is awarded to a Childhood Education student
a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (B.F.A.). The scholar-
who best exemplifies the virtues of this dedicated, energetic
ships are awarded to students on the basis of potential
and caring member of the College Faculty.
and need who best exemplify the virtues of this gifted
vocal performer and artist who is the winner of numer-
Mickey Sheen Memorial Scholarship ous awards including the American Eagle Award for the
An award of up to $1000 per academic year to a percus- advancement of American Music as an art form and her
sion student who demonstrates academic potential and/or dedication to preserving the legacy of the Great American
economic need. Songbook for future generations.
Maury Yeston Scholarship
Charles Strouse Scholarship Established in honor of the talented pianist, songwriter
Established in honor of the gifted pianist, songwriter and and composer of Grand Hotel, Titanic, and Nine who was
composer of Bye Bye Birdie, Annie, Golden Boy, Nick and awarded an Honorary Doctor of Music Degree (Mus.D.) for
Nora, and Rags, who was awarded an Honorary Doctor of his award winning musical achievements. The scholarship
Music Degree (Mus.D.) for his outstanding artistic and musi- is awarded to a Bachelor of Music student who has demon-
cal achievement. The scholarship is awarded to a Bachelor strated potential for a successful career in music and best
of Music student who best exemplifies the virtues of this exemplifies the virtues of this energetic, gifted and dedicated
talented and dedicated professional musician. professional musician and educator.
123

Board of Trustees Administration (As of August 3, 2010)


STANLEY G. COHEN, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.
JOHN D. QUINN, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., Chair
President
MILTON HIRSHFIELD, B.S., C.P.A.
ROGER SHERMAN, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
MARION FLEMING, B.S., M.A. Provost/Dean of Academic Affairs
KATHRYN OLIVA, B.A., M.S.
BRUCE RENSING, L.H.M.
Assistant to Provost
PATRICIA L. SCHMIDT, B.A., M.A., M.S., P.D., Ed.D.
DARLENE DiCICCO, B.A., M.B.A.
PHILLIP SMITH, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.
Business Chair
SAM TEICHER, B.S. ROBERT DiGIACOMO, B.F.A.
Film/Video Chair
STANLEY G. COHEN, B.S., M.A., Ed.D., Ex Officio RICHARD KELLEY, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Liberal Arts Chair
JOSEPH KUHL, Mus.B., M.M.

Advisory Council
Audio Recording Technology Chair
JEFFREY LIPTON, B.M., M.M.
Music/Theatre Chair
ERVIN DRAKE, Chair JOHN MACHADO, Mus.B., M.M.
Vice Chairman, Songwriters Hall of Fame Audio Recording Technology Co-Chair
Broadway Musical, What Makes Sammy Run? JILL MILLER, B.M., M.M., D.M.A.
Graduate Music Director
ED CRAMER, ESQ. GERRY SAULTER,
Leading Copyright Attorney Private Music Instruction Director
PATRICIA SCHMIDT, B.S., M.A., M.S., Ed.D.
Education Chair
JOSEPH E. FERRER
SAL SOMMA, B.A., M.S.
President, Sunset Entertainment Group, Inc.
Music Education Director

STEWART LANE
Palace Theater on Broadway, Co-owner and Operator MARTIN L. COHEN, B.A., M.B.A., J.D.
Dean of Administration
ROBERT SHERMAN, B.S.
JO SULLIVAN LOESSER
Chief Business Officer
President, Frank Loesser Enterprises
CAROL BERGH, B.S., C.P.A.,
Female Lead, Most Happy Fella
Staff Accountant
RUTH GIPP
PHIL RAMONE Bursar
Legendary Producer
GEORGIA SALAMINA, B.P.S.
Accounts Payable Manager
CHARLES STROUSE ELLEN VOULGARIS, B.S.
Composer/Lyricist Payroll Manager
Broadway Musicals, Bye Bye Birdie, Annie, Rags KAREN FRIEDRICH, B.A.
ROSEMARIE MARZANO
MAURY YESTON Administrative Assistants
Composer/Lyricist STEVEN WADE, A.A.S.
Broadway Musicals, Grand Hotel, Titanic, Nine Campus Store Manager
124
JEROME KOHN, B.M.E., M.S., M.B.A. JERRY L. COHEN, B.S., M.S.
Associate Dean of Administration Dean of Enrollment
MARK SHAUGHNESSY KELLY HAYES MOLLICA, B.A., M.M.
Director of Buildings and Grounds Director of Recruitment
HENRY SAWICKI PATRICIA IULIUCCI, B.P.S.
Director of Public Safety Coordinator of Recruitment
CYNTHIA CATALANO, A.A.S.
KRYSTI O’ROURKE, B.S., M.P.A. DAVID LEMAIRE, B.P.S.
Director of Career Services CHRISTINA LOFASO, B.P.S.
NANCY ATKINSON, B.S., M.A. SAMANTHA MANCUSO, B.A.
CAROLYN MILLER , B.S., M.A. Admissions Representatives
JACKLYN D'ALLEVA, B.P.S., M.B.A.
Career Counselors and Job Developers
JAMIE EPSTEIN, A.A.S., B.S.
MARA MALTZ, B.A. KIM PERSCHE, B.S., M.S.
Registrar Administrative Assistants
Director of Academic Advisement
RIVA MEYER, B.S. MARY VENEZIA, B.S.
Assistant Registrar Director of Financial Aid
KATHY BERG CAROLYN NEWMAN, B.S., M.S.Ed.
Administrative Secretary College Counselor
ROSE AMATO HEATHER DeRamus, B.A.
STEPHANIE WEEKS, B.P.S. Assistant Director of Financial Aid
Administrative Assistants LYNDSAY JOHNSON, B.A., M.A.
TARA WHALEN, B.P.S.
Financial Aid Counselors
JOHN VANSTEEN, B.A., M.L.S.
MARION BURNS
Director of Library
Administrative Assistant
KAREN FLANAGAN, B.A., M.L.S.
CATHERINE FRANK, B.A., M.L.S.
ANGELA JASUR, B.S., M.S.
ANDREW GIBSON, B.A., M.L.S.
Associate Dean of Students
ROBBI SCHWEIGERT, B.S., M.S.Ed., M.L.S.
Director of Residential Life
Associate Librarians
THOMAS O'BOYLE, B.A., M.B.A.
CONNIE DUSSETSCHLEGER
Assistant Director of Residential Life
PHYLLIS LICHTENSTEIN
DANIEL LAUTERMAN, B.A., M.S.
MAUREEN McKENNA, B.P.S.
Director of Alumni Affairs
HOLLY SICKINGER, Mus.B.
DAVID GRAUPMAN, B.S., B.S.
FRANK WARREN, B.A
ALEXANDRA ROSSETT, B.A., M.S.
Library Paraprofessionals
ALICIA HAASE, B.A.
SUSAN BARR, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. Residential Life Personnel
Dean of Students/HEOP Director
JENNIFER ALBERT, B.A., M.A., A.B.D. CRAIG HEALY, A.O.S., M.C.S.E.
Associate Director, HEOP Information Technology Director
STACEY DeFELICE, B.A., M.S. ROBERT LYNCH
Director of Disabilities Services ROBERT SANNUTO, B.A.
Laurie Montalto, B.A., M.S.Ed. Network Administrators
JAMES RYAN, B.A., M.S.Ed. DANIEL FERRANTE, B.A., M.C.P., A+
Higher Education Opportunity Program Counselors Desktop Support Specialist

RICHARD POLLARD, B.S, M.S. MICHAEL KANNENGIESER, M.C.S.E, M.C.P.


Assessment/Institutional Research Director Instructional Technology Administrator
ANDREW SANCHEZ, B.A. CHRISTOPHER BARRIO, B.F.A.
Assessment/Institutional Research Specialist Instructional Technology Specialist
125

Audio Faculty Business Faculty


Kathryn Dalia, Assistant Professor JOHN BLENN, Associate Professor, Music Business
Mus.B., Five Towns College
Producer, actor, director and published playwright with more
Accomplished vocalist, songwriter, music producer, and than 50 productions. President, Middle Class American
professional independent audio recording engineer and Productions, former General Manager, Westbury Music Fair,
educator. Member: Audio Engineering Society. founder and publisher of Long Island Entertainment.

JOSEPH KUHL, Associate Professor MARTIN COHEN, Professor, Business


Audio Recording Technology Division Chair Dean of Administration
Mus.B., M.M., Five Towns College B.A., Queens College
2010 winner of the Lorraine Kleinman Memorial Award for M.B.A., Hofstra University
Excellence in Teaching. Freelance Audio Engineer/Producer J.D., Touro Law School
MIDI Programmer. Recorded and mixed for RCA Records
and various indepentdent labels. DARLENE DiCICCO, Associate Professor, Business
Business Division Chair
JOHN MACHADO, Associate Professor B.A.,Queens College
Audio Recording Technology M.B.A., St. John's University
Mus.B., M.M., Five Towns College
Former financial services industry manager. Experienced
Professional audio engineer with 20 years' experience working teacher of economics, business law, finance, insurance, and
in the world of audio recording technology. Engineer/ business math. Former adjunct professor at the Hofstra
producer on many projects that range from independent University Frank G. Zarb School of Business.
recordings to major and indie label recordings, and post
production for movies, television, radio, and theatre. JEROME KOHN, Assistant Professor, Business
Associate Dean of Administration
Adjunct Audio Faculty B.E., City College of New York
M.S., New York University
ERIK DODENHOFF, Instructor M.B.A., Adelphi University
Mus.B., Five Towns College Professional Engineer (P.E.)
Freelance recording engineer, live sound engineer, pianist,
and thereminist. Has recorded notable jazz artists, mixed a MARY LOBIONDO, Associate Professor, Business
Broadway show, and composed music for several television B.S., M.B.A., St. John's University
commercials.
KRYSTI O'ROURKE, Assistant Professor, Business
B.S., Ithaca College
M.P.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post College

SHANNON QUINN, Associate Professor, Business


B.B.A., Hofstra University
M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College

EDWIN SCHULTHEIS, Professor Emeritus, Business


B.S., Hofstra
M.B.A., Ed.D., New York University

SOL SIEGEL, Professor Emeritus, Business


B.S., City College of New York
A.M., Columbia University
Ph.D., New York University
126

Adjunct Business Faculty


Michelle Alvarez, Assistant Professor, Business
B. S., New York Institute of Technology
M.S. SUNY Stony Brook

NORMAN BERKOWITZ, Associate Professor,


Music Business
B.A., Brooklyn College
Former Editor of Billboard Magazine and Advertising and
Creative Director for Mercury Records.

Mark Carpentieri, Instructor, Music Business


B.A., Queens College
Founder and President of M.C. Records.

BRUCE COLFIN, Associate Professor, Business


B.A., Queens College
J.D., New York Law School
Partner in the Law firm of Jacobson & Colfin, P.C., special-
SAM TEICHER, Distinguished Visiting Professor, izing in Entertainment Law, Copyright, Trademark, Video,
Music Business Comics and Toys, Literary Property, Theater and Intellectual
B.S., New York University Property Law.
Post Graduate Education, Hofstra University, New York
University, University of Puerto Rico, and American Film DAVID DOIG, Associate Professor, Business, Music
Institute for Advanced Film Studies. Studied portrait B.A., M.S., MM., DMA., SUNY Stony Brook
photography with internationally recognized photographer
Phillipe Halsman at the New School. Past President and
current Vice President of the New York Sheet Music Society NANCY ELLIS, Associate Professor, Business
and Associate Editor of Sheet Music Magazine. Instructor B.A., M.A., SUNY Stony Brook
New York City Board of Education Elementary, Junior, M.B.A., Dowling College
Senior Academic, Technical and Vocational High Schools. J.D., Touro College
Coordinated and Supervised audio visual programs in film,
video and curriculum specialist with: Bureau of Audio Visual
Instruction, Office of Library Media, Division of Special Susan Gaide, Associate Professor, Music Business
Education and Office of Pupil Personnel Services. Produced B.S., Hofstra University
educational filmstrips, films and videos in cooperation with M.B.A., Adelphi University
the Bureau of Audio Visual Instruction and the Division of
Professional writer/editor with extensive experience in the
Special Education.
music, professional audio/video, and online education. Co-
Writer and official photographer of all Songwriters' Hall of owner of Chrome Orange Music: an independent music
Fame (SHOF) events for Presidents Sammy Cahn, Bobby production, publishing (ASCAP) and management com-
Weinstein, Al Feilich and music organizations such as (SHOF, pany. Publications include articles for Pro AV and Distance
ASCAP, BMI, SESAC, SGA), and many other trade and Education Report.
educational publications. Professor Teicher was formerly
a partner in Lenart Music and is currently representing an
interest in Marlong Music.
127
MELVIN GLAZER, Assistant Professor, Music Business JOHN MASSERWICK, Associate Professor, Business
B.S., Rutgers University B.B.A., Pace University
M.B.A., Adelphi University
Publishing and songwfiter credits include recordings by Certified Public Accountant (C.P.A.)
Etta James, Robert Plant, Elvis Presley, and Static-X.
Collaborations with Carole King, Sammy Fain, and Aaron
Schroeder. CAROLYN MILLER, Instructor, Business
B.S., St. John's University
JEFFREY JACOBSON, Assistant Professor, Business M.S., Dowling College
B.A., Fordham University
J.D., New York Law School Former media buyer and account executive for a national
advertising media research firm. Experience in sales/mar-
SANDRA JOHNSON, Instructor, Accounting keting and ad agency tracking.
B.S., SUNY Old Westbury
Certified Public Accountant (C.P.A.)
FRANK ZINGALE, Professor, Marketing/Theatre
B.A., City College of New York; M.F.A., Hunter College
DONNA LA TORRE, Assistant Professor, Business
B.A., M.B.A., St. John's University Former Senior Vice-President for Broadcast Programming
and Purchasing at Young & Rubicam New York.
Judith Lipner, Assistant Professor, Business
B.A. George Washington University
M.Phil., Columbia University
J.D., Yeshiva University
128

Education Faculty
SUSAN BARR, Associate Professor
B.A., Hunter College
M.S., Hofstra University
Ph.D., Capella University
Professional with dual New York State certification in special
education and levels K-6, and former teacher in the U.S. Virgin
Islands, Dr. Barr has worked with multicultural populations
at all levels of education. Member of HEOPPO-Long Island
Region, National Association for Developmental Education
(NCADE), and Adults and Children with Learning and
Developmental Disabilities, Inc. (ACLD).

ANN SCHEREL HELLER, Associate Professor


B.A., Queens College
M.A., Hunter College
P.D., Hofstra University
District Reading Director, Uniondale Public Schools. Recipi-
ent Reading Administrator/Supervisor Award New York State
Reading Association, Syracuse, New York 2000; Conven-
tion Speaker New York State Reading Conferences 1988,
1991, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000; Presenter International
Reading Association Conference, 1992.

RICHARD KELLEY, Professor, English


Liberal Arts Division Chair
PATRICIA SCHMIDT, Professor
B.A., St. Bonaventure University
Education Division Chair
M.A., Ph.D., SUNY Stony Brook
B.A., M.A., P.D., Queens College
2009 winner of the Lorraine Kleinman Award of Excellence M.S., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University
in College Teaching. Over forty years experience in the high
Experienced teacher-trainer, curriculum supervisor, bilingual
school and college classroom. Presented his work before
coordinator New York City Board of Education. Member:
the Popular Culture Association and The New York State
Higher Education Task Force on Quality Inclusive Educa-
Council for Social Studies. His work on Thoreau, Parkman,
tion; NYSATEYFT.
Whitman and other 19th-century American figures has been
acknowledged by a number of scholars in the field of American
studies, including the well-known critic Alfred Kazin. Sal Somma, Associate Professor
Director of Music Education
B.A., M.S., CUNY Queens College
Marianne Mccreery, Professor
District Director of Music, Plainview-Old Bethpage Central
Director of Graduate Education Studies
School District; Assistant Principal for Supervision: Music
B.A., Hunter College; M.A., City College
and Director of Performing Arts, Edward R. Murrow High
Ph.D., Union Institute
School; Performing Arts Program Coordinator, Adlai E.
School Principal, Babylon, New York. Post-doctoral Re- Stevenson High School, Music Teacher, Michelangelo
search Scientist, State University of New York at Stony Intermediate School; Summer Music Program Coordinator,
Brook. New York State School District Administrator. Glen Cove City School District.
129
Adjunct Education Faculty
KATHLEEN BANNON, Assistant Professor JULIA A. RAGONESE, Assistant Professor
B.A., SUNY Old Westbury; M.S., P.D., Dowling College B.S., M.S. in Ed., Long Island University
Ed.D., St. John's University P.D. Educational Leadership, Dowling College
Ed.D., Walden University/University of Indiana
Assistant Superintendent Curriculum & Instruction,
Copiague. Experienced Special Education teacher. A.B.A. certified.

DOUGLAS BORSUK, Assistant Professor STEVEN V. RAND, Assistant Professor


B.S., Rider College; M.S. Adelphi University B.S., SUNY Old Westbury
P.D., Long Island University: C.W. Post College M.S. in Ed., Five Towns College

Brentwood and New York City public school teacher. Hockey, Basketball, Tennis Coach. Member: Huntington
Historical Society; Greater Long Island Running Club.
JEFF DAILEY, Associate Professor
B.A., Wagner College JOHN SHORTER, Associate Professor
M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., New York University B.A., State University College at Geneseo, NY
M.A., New York University
Director of Fine and Performing Arts, Deer Park. Expanded
Former Secondary School Theatre Program Coordinator at
school district theatre program; developed partnerships with
Manhasset High School. Contributor to and developer of the
several theatre companies and the NYC Student Shakespeare
New York State Learning Standards for the Arts and Content
Festival; began The Puppet Project, a program to increase
Area Specialty Test for Theatre Certification. Item reviewer,
reading and writing proficiency in elementary schools.
developer, and scorer for ASSETS Theatre Arts Assessment.
Former President of, and current Board Trustee for, the New
JOSEPH DEL GIUDICE, Assistant Professor
York State Theatre Education Association. President of the
B.S., M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College
Long Island Theatre Education Association.
Mathematics teacher, Half Hollow School District. Coached
American Computer Science League teams. MARIANNA STEELE, Assistant Professor
B.A., Transylvania University
ROSE HUTCHERSON, Assistant Professor M.A., Georgetown College
B.S., M.A., SUNY Binghamton SAS/SDA College of New Rochelle
M.S.Ed., SUNY Albany Ed.D., St. John's University
Ed.D., Hofstra University Assistant Superintendent for Secondary Curriculum,
Director of 21st Century Grant, Amityville, UFSD. Former Hempstead, UFSD; New Teacher Mentor; science teacher.
Associate Director Long Island Regional School Support Member: ASCD, NADCO, NABSE, LIASCD, SAANYS
Center at Eastern Suffolk BOCES. Consultant to NYSED and PDK.
in Office of K-12 Initiatives.
LINDA STOLLOW, Assistant Professor
MADELINE NELSON, Assistant Professor B.S., SUNY Old Westbury
B.S., North Adams State College M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College
M.S.Ed., Hofstra University
Science teacher-Syosset Central School District. Coach for
Experienced reading teacher, West Islip School District. Western Long Island Regional Science Olympiad.
East Islip Teacher Center in-service instructor.
NYLES TEICHER, Assistant Professor
NINA PRASSO, Associate Professor Director, Distance Learning
B.A., M.S.Ed., Specialist Diploma, CUNY Queens College B.A., Queens College
Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University M.A., M.ED., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University
District Coordinator of Music and the Arts, Garden City Experienced public school educator, former faculty member
UFSD. Pi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society, at Columbia University, Distance Education developer
Kappa Delta Pi National Educational Honor Society. since 1993.
130

Film/Video Faculty
KAROLINA BUDNA, Assistant Professor Robert DiGiacomo, Associate Professor
B.A.S., University of Lethbridge Film/Video Division Chair
B.F.A., Five Towns College B.F.A., Cornell University
Creator of TV commercials airing on major networks Member, International Cinematographers Guild, Local 600
(Time Warner, Cablevision, Via Media, and MTV) to pro- IATSE. Formerly, National Academy of Television Arts and
mote FTC and advertise events at Dix Hills Performing Sciences, Emmy Award Judge–Documentary Film category.
Arts Center. Creator of FTC web ads and commercials Extensive commercial photographic and cinematographic
appearing in music/film industry online publications: EQ, experience in feature and commercial film production,
Mix, Keyboard, and ICG. Credits include work for Atlas advertising and editorial photography, and stock film and
Media, doing post-production on TV shows for the Sci- photography production. Credits include feature film work
ence Channel, Food Network, Travel Channel, Biography with directors Ang Lee, Joel Schumacher, Michel Gondry,
Channel, and History Channel. Credits also include work Udi Aloni, and Tim Burton. More than 300 television
at New York City’s NuMedia Studios as assistant engineer commercials for such clients as Maybelline, Cingular,
to Grammy-award-winning mixer/producer Bassy “Bob” Dodge, Guidant, Mercedes Benz, Target, Sears, Revlon,
Brockman, mixing recordings for Herbie Hancock, Timba- Cablevision, Moving Out, Nike, Adidas, AT&T, The Gap,
land, TLC, Nelly Furtado, Mary J. Blige, and Cottonbelly. and Motorola. Music video work with Joss Stone, U2, Bon
Jovi, The Zutons, Jay Z, LL Cool J, Mario, Carole King, and
DanIEL DERAMUS, Assistant Professor Britney Spears, featuring Madonna, Elvis Costello, Kanye
A.A.S., Suffolk Community College West, 50 Cent, Ashante, and Alicia Keys. Was part of the
B.F.A., Five Towns College team that won the 2009 Best TV Public Service Ad from the
Experience in all aspects of filmmaking: cameras, lighting, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP).
photo lab, audio, film editing, and grip. Assistant Staff Edi-
tor for recording, editing, and outputting video of perfor-
mances at FTC Main Stage Theatre.
131
DEAN MARTINEZ, Assistant Professor
A.A., Nassau Community College
B.F.A., Five Towns College
Member, International Cinematographers Guild, Local 600
IATSE. Technocrane technician for Paramount Pictures
feature film, Morning Glory, starring Harrison Ford, and for
Universal Pictures feature film, The Adjustment Bureau, star-
ring Matt Damon. Credits include: 16mm shorts, The Deer
(director/cinematographer) and Draw (gaffer/jib operator);
and 35mm shorts, Ghost Eye Tree (first camera assistant/jib
operator) and The Bay Ridge Boys (assistant director). Credits
also include HD commercial, Milton Bradley Board Game
(jib operator), and 35mm commercial, Subway $5 Footlong
(jib operator). Expert in the use of RED One, Sony EX3,
Panavision, and Arriflex motion picture cameras.

Adjunct Film/Video Faculty


ELIZABETH FOLEY, Associate Professor
B.A., Smith College
M.F.A., Columbia University
SOL NEGRIN, Distinguished Professor
Film and television writer, director, and producer. Directed
Director of Cinematography
award-winning short film about Joan of Arc, Jeanne and
D.F.A. (Hon.), Five Towns College
Hauviette. Producing credits include: The It Factor; a Bravo
television series; projects for Cinemax, Ikea, Florentine Member, American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).
Films, and Lear Television; and numerous award-winning Past President of International Photographers Guild/Local
shorts. Producer/director of Saving Children’s Lives; Building 644, and past National Vice-President of the International
Children’s Futures, a UNICEF documentary narrated by Julia Cinematographers Guild, IATSE, Local 600. Recipient of five
Ormond (Sabrina, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button). Emmy Award nominations: three for his work on the TV series,
Currently in post-production on a feature film starring Rip Kojak, one for his work on Baker’s Dozen, and one for his work
Torn (30 Rock, Men in Black, and Dodgeball). Teacher of on the TV feature, The Last Tenant. Winner of four CLIO awards
directing, screenwriting, fiction, and drama at FTC, as well for outstanding TV commercials, including spots for Pepsi
as film history, producing, and directing at Queens College Cola, American Tourister, and Savarin Coffee. Additional TV
and New York Film Academy. credits include: Matlock, Dear John, Bronx Zoo, Our Family
Honor, Fame, St. Elsewhere, Taxi, Rhoda, Ellery Queen, and The
DAN GALIARDI, Assistant Professor New Odd Couple, among others. Feature film credits include
B.S., B.A., SUNY Buffalo Superman, RoboCop, and Proof of the Man.
M.S., Hofstra University
Member, International Cinematographers Guild/Local 600 TONY WALTON, Distinguished Visiting Professor
IATSE, Hollywood, California. Film industry professional L.H.D. (Hon.), Five Towns College
camera assistant, proficient in the use of various motion Tony Walton has designed in films for 20 years, for
picture cameras (both 16 mm and 35 mm): Panavision, Ar- directors Bob Fosse, Sidney Lumet, Paul Newman, Mike
riflex, Aaton, Moviecam, and Photosonics. Expert in studio Nichols, Ken Russell, Volcker Schlondorf, and Francois
and location filmmaking techniques. Has administered the
Truffaut. These include: Mary Poppins, Murder on
Guild’s entrance exam on several occasions. Major motion
the Orient Express, Fahrenheit 451, The Wiz, The Boy
picture credits include: Batman Forever, Major Payne,
Conspiracy Theory, Independence Day, The Truman Show, Friend, All That Jazz, Death of a Salesman, The Glass
Jungle 2 Jungle, and others. Network television credits Menagerie, Regarding Henry, and Deathtrap. His graphic
include: Law & Order, NYPD Blue, Time of Your Life, etc. work includes many book and magazine illustrations,
National commercial campaign credits include: AT&T, Smith caricatures for Playbill, Theatre Arts, Vogue, etc. and
Barney, Avon, and more. posters for many Broadway and West End shows.
132

Liberal Arts/General Adjunct Liberal Arts/General


Education Faculty
Education Faculty
JOANNE BAGSHAW, Assistant Professor, Psychology
SUSAN BARR, Associate Professor B.A., Long Island University: Southampton College
Dean of Students M.A., John Jay College
Director, HEOP Program
JANE BETTER, Assistant Professor, Spanish
B.A., Hunter College; M.S., Hofstra University
B.A. University of Rochester; M. A., University of Wisconsin
Ph.D., Capella University
STACEY DeFELICE, Instructor, English
TONI BRETT, Associate Professor, English B.A., SUNY Stony Brook; M.S., Dowling College
B.S., SUNY Oneonta; M.F.A. Sarah Lawrence College
JAMES FAGAN, Associate Professor
LAWRENCE BRITTAIN, Professor, English Mass Communication
B.A., SUNY Stony Brook; M.F.A., Brooklyn College L.L.M., Columbia University; J.D., St. John’s University
M.A., Seminary of Immaculate Conception
JERRY COHEN, Associate Professor, Science M.P.A., B.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post
Dean of Enrollment
B.S., Ohio University; M.S., Hofstra University Law Clerk to New York State Court of Claims and Su-
preme Court, Assistant Professor of Law, St. John’s Uni-
NAVID GHANI, Professor, Sociology versity, Administrative Law Judge, New York State Dept.
M.A., University of Oslo; M.A., Ph.D., SUNY Stony Brook of Social Services, Law Research Assistant, New York Su-
preme Court Appellate Division, Third Dept., Law Review
ANNA KAPLAN, Professor, Speech articles on various topics including Media Law.
B.A., M.S., Brooklyn College
ALICIA GRANDE, Instructor, Psychology
RICHARD KELLEY, Professor, English B.A., Wilkes University; M.A., SUNY Stony Brook
Liberal Arts Division Chair
B.A., St. Bonaventure University; M.A., Ph.D., SUNY Stony Brook ANGELINA LIBARDI, Assistant Professor, Science
B.S., M.S., Adelphi University
2009 winner of the Lorraine Kleinman Memorial Award for
Excellence in Teaching. His work on Thoreau, Parkman, ROSEMIREL MANDEL, Assistant Professor, Sign
Whitman, and other 19th-century American figures has been Language
acknowledged by a number of scholars in the field of American B.S., New Jersey State Teachers College
studies, including the well-known critic Alfred Kazin. M.A., Columbia University

RICHARD POLLARD, Assistant Professor, Mathematics


B.S., M.S., SUNY Stony Brook

DAWN SALIBA, Assistant Professor, English


B.A., SUNY at Purchase
M.F.A., New York University

JENNIFER SHEA, Assistant Professor


Mass Communication
B.A., B.F.A., M.F.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post College

ROGER H. SHERMAN, Professor, Sociology


Provost/Dean of Academic Affairs
A.B., Brown University; M.A., Trinity College
Ph.D., Columbia University
133

Music Faculty
SCOTT BALLIN, Assistant Professor
Mus.B., M.M., Five Towns College
Jazz pianist and the accompanist for the Great American
Songbook, Musical Director for the Rat Pack Show at the
Rainbow Room. Has appeared at jazz venues such as Bird-
land, Iridium, and the Metronome.

STANLEY G. COHEN, Distinguished Professor


President of the College
B.S., New York University; M.A., Queens College
Ed.D., New York University
Music Director and Arranger at the Lake Placid Club, the
Crossman and Concord Hotels in New York State, and
the Plantation Supper Club in North Carolina; Lincoln
Center Performance Chairman; former Assistant Principal,
ROBERT PLATH, Assistant Professor, English Supervisor of Music; New York Society of Experimental
B.A., SUNY Stony Brook Study for Education; Assistant Director of Music License,
M.F.A., CUNY Brooklyn College New York City Board of Education.
Kerouac scholar, student of Allen Ginsberg, aficionado of ANGELO DIPIPPO, Professor Emeritus
all things beat and off beat, Professor Plath has published B.A., Holy Cross College
his poems widely in dozens of journals. M.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post College
Composer, arranger of more than 75 record albums including
NORMAN PRUSSLIN, Associate Professor, Mass
Lost Horizons and The Godfather. Recording artist with
Communication
Peggy Lee, Billy Eckstein, Mitch Miller, Rudy Vallee and
B.A., SUNY Stony Brook; M.A., CUNY Queens College
Connie Haines. Appeared in the films The Godfather and
Lovers and Other Strangers. Internationally prominent jazz
JOHN SHORTER, Associate Professor
accordion soloist with own trio at Newport Jazz Festival.
B.A., State University College at Geneseo, NY
Music director for Roberta Peters and Robert Merrill.
M.A., New York University
ERVIN DRAKE, Distinguished Visiting Professor
LYNN G. SIMON, Professor, Psychology B.S., M.A., Composer-in-Residence
CUNY Brooklyn College Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center B.S., City College of New York

ROBERT STERN, Assistant Professor, Broadcasting Ervin Drake, Vice Chairman, Songwriters Hall of Fame, has
College Radio Station WFTU General Manager been writing popular songs for over fifty years. His I Believe
was recorded by Barbra Streisand and LeAnn Rimes, and even
Veteran Metro-New York commercial radio personality though Frank Sinatra made It Was A Very Good Year a hit years
and program director. Broadcasting credits includes more ago, the song was more recently recorded by Ray Charles and
than three decades with WNEW, WEVD, WNCN, WGSM, Willy Nelson. Other popular songs include Good Morning
and WLIM. Numerous articles published by Musical Heri- Heartache, Tico Tico and Now That I Have Everything. He
tage Review on musicology and music history. has also composed and produced over 700 primetime telecasts,
including the famous Timex Comedy Hour, which was hosted by
RICHARD WALSH, Assistant Professor, English talk show legend Johnny Carson. He has worked with leading
B. A., SUNY Stony Brook artists of the time, including Perry Como, Ethel Merman, and
M.A., Long Island University: C. W. Post College Andy Williams. Ervin Drake's popularity and success is at an all
time high with Barbra Streisand's recording of One God, Tony
MARIA WOLFROM, Instructor, Mathematics Bennett's recording of Good Morning Heartache with Sheryl
B.S., Polytechnic University, Brooklyn Crowe, and Robbie Williams recording of It was a Very Good
M.S., Hofstra University Year — all of which have reached platinum status.
134
LEE EVANS, Professor Emeritus JOSEPH D. LA ROSA, Professor Emeritus
B.A., New York University; B.S., M.S., New York University; D.M.A., University of Arizona
M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University
Conductor of choral, orchestral and operatic music.
Conductor/Pianist for Engelbert Humperdinck and Carol Former Director of Performing and Fine Arts, Mineola
Channing. Music Contractor for Tom Jones, Cat Stevens, Public Schools.
Gilbert O'Sullivan, and Emerson, Lake, and Palmer. Seven
LPs on Capitol, Command, and MGM Records. Former JEFFREY LIPTON, Professor
Music Director, Americana Hotel. Author of more than Music Division Chair
eighty piano books published by Hal Leonard. Director of the Choir and Great American Songbook
B.M., SUNY Potsdam; M.M., Bowling Green State University
STEPHEN GLEASON, Associate Professor Professional Choral Director, Performances at Avery Fisher
Director of Vocal Jazz Hall in Lincoln Center and Saint Peter's Cathedral in New
Mus.B., Mus.M., Five Towns College York City. Choir Director, Mineola Choral Society. Studied
Professional musician, vocalist and choral conductor. conducting with Robert Spano, Music Director of the Atlanta
Extensive experience with a cappella vocal groups. Currently Symphony Orchestra. Active as a guest conductor and
working in New York's premiere top 40 band The Touch as clinician in the New York Metropolitan Region.
a singer/guitar player and as a session player for selected
artists' recordings at Jellybean and Arista records. JILL MILLER, Professor
Director of Graduate Music Studies
WAYNE GRIMMER, Assistant Professor Coordinator of Piano Lab
Mus. B., Five Towns College B.M., M.M., Ithaca College; D.M.A., Temple University
Composer of two symphonies, various chamber works
Conductor of the Long Island Sound Men's Chorus, member
and piano music. Composition studies with Karel Husa,
of the award winning barbershop quartet 'Round Midnight
Pulitzer Prize winning composer at Cornell University.
and conductor of the Twin Shores Chorus.
Lecturer at Muhlenberg College and Temple University.
Synthesizer performer at Theatre Three in Port Jefferson.
DEAN KARAHALIS, Associate Professor
Board member of the Pennsylvania Sinfonia Orchestra and
Director of Instrumental Music
Chairperson for Concert Competition.
Mus.B., Mannes College of Music
M.A., Queens College; P.D., Hofstra University
HOSUN MOON, Associate Professor
Founder of The Concert Pops as well as the conductor and Director of Theatre Orchestra
music director. He has performed with the Radio City music B.M., Yon-Sei University, Korea
Hall Orchestra, New York Lyric Opera, Goldovsky Opera M.M., Manhattan School of Music; D.M.A., SUNY Stony Brook
and is Musical Director/Founder of the New York Brass
Professional harpsichordist and pianist. Performances at the
Choir. He is an Artist-Clinician for the Conn/Selmer Musical
92nd Street Y, Merkin Concert Hall, Columbia University
Instrument Company and has performed extensively as a
and LeFrak Concert Halls with the New York Bach En-
guest conductor and soloist throughout the United States.
semble and South Shore Philharmonic. Director of Music
Conducting highlights have included performances at the
at Central Presbyterian Church in Huntington, NY and North
United States Figure Skating Championships, U.S. Air
Country Reform Temple in Glen Cove, NY.
Force Band, Washington, D.C. and a Night at the Opera
with Metropolitan Opera star Robert Merrill.
CHUCK MYMIT, Professor
In 1992, he was appointed Conductor-Musical Director for Editor of Five Towns College Press
The Eglevesky Ballet and is currently musical consultant B.M., Berklee College of Music; M.A., New York University
to the Moscow Festival Ballet, Ballet de Bordeaux and Jazz/Commercial Pianist, composer, arranger, and conduc-
has extensive guest-conducting schedule. The Concert tor. Author, A Beginner's Approach to Jazz Improvisation,
Pops have performed concerts throughout the east coast in Club Date Pianist, Introduction to Small Band Arranging,
their "Pops Under the Stars" series. Some highlights are and Contemporary Harmony 1, 2. Recipient, Tisch School
performances with guest soloists, Marvin Hamlisch, The of the Arts award for Film Scoring. Composer and Musical
Manhattan Rhythm Kings, Broadway's Tommy Tune, Betty Director for the Off-Broadway production of Night Visions.
Buckley, Enzo Stuarti, Joel Gray, and Robert Merrill. Recording artist, The Romantic Piano.
135
JIM ODRICH, Professor, Emeritus DEMETRIUS SPANEAS, Assistant Professor
B.S., Queens College B.M., M.M., New England Conservatory of Music
M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University
Saxophone soloist, composer, recording artist. Has com-
Performed with United States Air Force Airmen of Note. missioned, recorded, and premiered works by John Cage,
Composer, synthesist for video industrial films, Marc Brown John Harbison, Donald Martino, Bernard Rands, and
Productions, and Ann Margaret. Special arranger for school Gunther Schuller. Has performed with the Funk Brothers,
band publishers, Kendor and Cherry Lane Music. Piano Ray Charles, and Aretha Franklin. Founder and leader of
soloist and recording artist for Music Minus One Records. World Music Ensemble. Former Composer-in-Residence
with the Bay Area Chamber Symphony in California.

Adjunct Music Faculty


JUDITH R. ALSTADTER, Professor
B.S., Juilliard School of Music
M.M.A., D.M.A., Yale University
Concert Pianist and recording artist with appearances
at Lincoln Center. Soloist with prominent symphony
orchestra and chamber groups. Studied in France with
Jeanne-Marie Dorre, in New York with Rosina Lhevinne,
Sascha Gorodnitzki, and Volya Cossack, and in New
Haven with Ward Davenny. Her Alice Tully Hall series
at Lincoln Center devoted to the complete piano works
of Gabriel Fauré was widely acclaimed for her keyboard
command, sensitivity and color, imagination and dramatic
flair. Dr. Alstadter is a lecturer, coach, and clinician for
music organizations, libraries, elder hostels, and community
groups and is a Steinway Piano Artist whose recordings
include: The Poetic Piano, Spirituality and Music, Women
Composers: Romantic to Ragtime and the Piano Music
of Gabriel Fauré.
PETER M. ROGINE, Professor
Coordinator of Guitar Studies
PAUL M. BARKAN, Assistant Professor
B.A., Queens College; M.A., Long Island University
B.A., SUNY Stony Brook
Professional guitarist with extensive recording and TV M.M., Five Towns College
experience. Performances with Bob Florence, Cab Calloway,
Al Martino, Four Aces, Four Lads, Patti Paige, and such Professional musician, sound engineer and studio designer;
Broadway shows as "They're Playing Our Song." Columnist composer, arranger, conductor and producer of professional
for Just Jazz Guitar magazine. caliber music in the studio and for musical theater. Specialist
in computer music notation and technology.
GERRY SAULTER, Associate Professor
Director of Private Instruction Melanie Birnbaum, Assistant Professor
B.A., SUNY Stony Brook B.F.A., SUNY Purchase
M.M., Five Towns College M.M., Manhattan School of Music
D.M.A., SUNY Stonybrook
Guitar instructor and performer. Classical guitarist of the
multi-award winning flute and guitar duo, Serenade. Per- Lyric Soprano. Active performer and teacher. Performances
formances at CarnegieHall and Merkin Concert Hall. Con- at Carnegie Hall and throughout the United States and Eu-
tributing author for 20th Century Guitar Magazine. Member rope. Winner of the Young Artists Concert Auditions, and
of Chamber Music America and the Guitar Foundation of National association of teachers of singing competition.
America. Concert performances throughout Puerto Rico, Festivals participated in include Tanglewood, and Aspen.
Europe and the USA. SCEMEA member.
136
AZANDE CUMMINGS, Assistant Professor
Coordinator of Percussion Studies
B.A., SUNY Old Westbury
M.M., Five Towns College
Percussionist with the Duke Ellington Jazz Ensemble,
American and Harlem Dance Theatres. Extensive musical
theatre experience playing shows such as West Side Story,
Cabaret, Kiss Me Kate, Ain't Misbehavin, Sound of Music,
Oklahoma, Oliver, The Wiz, Gigi, Annie, Zorba, Fiddler on
the Roof, Guys and Dolls, Mame, and Music Man.

JEFF DAILEY, Professor


B.A., Wagner College
GREG BOBULINSKI, Assistant Professor M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., New York University
B.M., North Texas State University District-wide Director of Fine and Performing Arts, Deer
Jazz trumpet; widely recognized virtuoso; recording and Park, New York. Former music director for St. John's
performing experience with Clark Terry, Chris Woods, Carman University theatre program. Musicological consultant
McRae and Johnny Hartman. Recipient of National Endowment for orchestras and opera companies including the Czech
For The Arts and American Music Center Fellowships. Philharmonic, Hong Kong and Mississippi Operas, and
the Boston Music Academy. Professional bassoonist.
BRYAN CARROTT, Assistant Professor
B.A., William Paterson College DAVID DOIG, Associate Professor
B.A., M.S., M.M., D.M.A., SUNY Stony Brook
A native New Yorker, Mr. Carrott has toured and recorded
throughout the U.S., Europe and Japan, with Ralph Professional guitarist and recording artist. Concert tours
Peterson, Henry Threadgill, Butch Morris, Dave Douglas, with performances at U.C.L.A., Universities of Arizona
The Jazz Passengers and Charlie Hunter. He is a two-time and Santa Barbara, University of Colorado at Boulder,
recipient of New York's Meet The Composer Award and Carnegie Hall, Merkin Hall and Lincoln Center. Numer-
has been cited for several years in Down Beat Magazine's ous publications such as Popular Guitar Classics and Solo
International Critics' Poll. He has also been featured on Music for Acoustic Guitar.
BET's Jazz Central, on the film soundtrack, 3 A.M. with
Branford Marsalis, and as a mallet/multi-percussionist for KENNETH FRIESE, Associate Professor
Disney's Lion King on Broadway. As a clinician for Ross B.S., SUNY Potsdam
Mallet Instruments, Bryan has led performances at the M.M., Boston University
International Association of Jazz Educators (IAJE) and the Former choral director, clinician, organist, accompanist and
Percussive Arts Society Conventions. He was a featured vocal coach, at Plainview Old Bethpage/John F. Kennedy
soloist with Cologne, Germany's WDR Orchestra conducted High School. Organist/director of music at Old First Pres-
by Gunther Schuller. byterian Church and Temple Beth-El both in Huntington.

KENNETH E. COOK, Associate Professor PETER HANSEN, Assistant Professor


Mus.B., SUNY Potsdam and Music Technology
M.M., University of Michigan B.A., Queens College
Ph.D., Michigan State University M.S., Hofstra University
Saxophone soloist, chamber musician and private instrumental Music educator, Soundtree/Korg MIDI-Lab expert, profes-
music teacher. Professional affiliations include, but are not sional affiliations include MENC, NYSSMA, NCMEA,
limited to, the Music Educators National Conference, North IAEKM, GMS and NCMEA.
American Saxophone Alliance and Parliamentarian for the
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Music Fraternity. Research Assistant, ROBERT HINZ, Assistant Professor
Entrepreneurial Education Resource Center, SUNY College of B.A., SUNY Stony Brook
Technology at Utica/Rome, certified adjudicator for New York MM., University of Rochester: Eastman School of Music
State School Music Association (NYSSMA) solo festivals. Ph.D., New York University
137
STEPHEN PAGANO, Associate Professor ARTHUR ROMEO, Assistant Professor
A.A.S., Nassau County Community College B.S., Hofstra University
B.A., CUNY Queens College M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College
M.A., Long Island University
Music Educator and jazz/commercial pianist with appearances
Former director of the vocal program and musical theatre in the New York City Metropolitan area. Performances in
productions at Freeport High School. He has conducted the Broadway productions of Irma La Douce, Fiddler on the
vocal groups and performed at Carnegie Hall, Shea Stadium, Roof, Zorba, Carnival, and Cabaret.
St. Patrick's Cathedral, Ellis Island, West Point, and the
DisneyWorld Choral Festival in Orlando, Florida.
BERNARD ROSE, Associate Professor
MATTHEW PIERCE, Assistant Professor Mus.B, Manhattan School of Music
B.M., M.M., The Johns Hopkins University: Peabody Mus.M., Ph.D., University of North Texas
Conservatory of Music Post Doctoral Study, Eastman School of Music
Gemini Youth Orchestra Music Director, Metropolitan Featured soloist on saxophone and clarinet. Member of
Youth Orchestra Assistant Conductor/String Specialist. Prior the U.S. Army Field Band, and the Spokane and Winnipeg
teaching experience includes Montclair State University, Symphony Orchestras. Performances with Mel Torme,
The Julliard School, and Peabody Conservatory of Music. Louis Bellson, Ed Shaughnessy, Pearl Bailey, Steve
Mary Tiller Award for Excellence (Peabody Conservatory). Lawrence and Edie Gorme, Louise Mandrell, Milt Hinton,
Performers Certificate (Mannes College of Music), Conduc- Bob Crosby, Shirley Jones, Leslie Uggams, Bob Hope,
tors Institute (Bard College of Music). Conducting studies George Burns, Carol Channing, Debbie Reynolds and
with Frederick Prausnitz, Harold Farberman, and Raphael Arturo Sandoval. Reviewer for the Council for Research
Faraco. Violin performance credits include Jewel, Sheryl in Music Education (CRME) at the University of Illinois at
Crow, Suzanne Vega, and Philip Glass. Urbana-Champaign.

NINA PRASSO, Associate Professor


B.A., M.S.Ed., Specialist Diploma, CUNY Queens College JON TRASK, Assistant Professor
Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University B.A., Alfred University
Mus.B., Mus.M., Five Towns College
Director Coordinator of Music and the Art, Garden City
UFSD. Pi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society, Certified Instructor for the Technology Institute for Music
Kappa Delta Pi National Educational Honor Society. Education (TI:ME) - Computer Assisted Instruction, Music
Notation, Sequencing, Multi-Media, and Administration.

MAURY YESTON, Distinguished Visiting Professor


B.A., M.A.,Clare College, Cambridge
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University
Composer/Lyricist – Concert: An American Cantata: 2000
Voices; for Orchestra, Double Mixed Choir, Boys Choir and
Gospel Chorus (Kennedy Center Commission, National
Symphony, L. Slatkin Conductor). December Songs – A Song
Cycle (Carnegie Hall Centennial Commission). Concerto
For Cello and Orchestra (Yo Yo Ma Soloist, Gilbert Levine
Conductor); Broadway: Nine 2003 Broadway Revival (Tony
Award, Best Revival of a Musical, Grammy Nomination),
Titanic (Tony Award: Best Score, Best Musical, Grammy
Nomination). Nine (Tony Award: Best Score, Best Musical;
Two Drama Desk Awards – Music and Lyrics; Grammy
Nomination, Olivier Award Nomination). Grand Hotel with
Wright & Forrest (Tony and Drama Desk Nominations).
138

Major Instrument/Voice Faculty


Private Instruction is provided by the music faculty listed PENELOPE GROVER, Voice
below and in the preceding pages. B.M., Boston University

STEVE BRIODY, Guitar Lyrical Soprano. Co-Founder and performer of "A small
Mus.B., SUNY Potsdam company in America" theatre in residence at New York
M.M., Five Towns College Institute at SUNY Old Westbury. Thirty years of private
instruction experience.
Professional jazz guitarist. Performed/recorded with Dave
Valentin, Jeff Lorber, Eric Marienthal, Mario Cruz, Sean
Grace, Don Grusin, Funk Filharmonik, Bucky Pizzarelli, ARNIE GRUBER, Voice
Greg Adams, Paula Atherton, Randy Brecker, Carl Fischer, B.S. CUNY Queens College
and Bernard Purdie. Nationally released contemporary-jazz
CD "Keep On Talkin" (2007). "Funk" guitar lesson column Professional pianist and vocalist. Swing Band Leader with
in Guitar Player magazine. Author of book Jazz Guitar more than ten years experience with Hank Lane Music. Re-
Lines of the Greats due in Winter 2010. Guitarist for the gional appearances include The Rainbow Room and the Dix
Long Island Music Hall of Fame band. Hills Performing Arts Center. Additional graduate studies
at Queens College and New York University.
CHASEY DEAN, Woodwinds
B.S., Hofstra University
M.A., Long Island University: C. W. Post College HEIDI HEPLER-RAMO, Voice
Woodwind soloist and studio recording artist. Member of Featured performer at the Festival Jazz di Roma (1990- 94).
the Charlie Barnet, Elliot Lawrence and Pete Rugulo bands Representative collaborations and festivals include Archie
with Peggy Lee and Billy Eckstine. Performed with the Schepp, Ornette Coleman, The Manhattan Transfer, Dizzy
Xavier Cugat orchestra and Abbe Lane. Four years with the Gillespie, Miles Davis, Pat Methany, James Moody, John
Copacabana show band and Broadway theatre orchestras for Faddis, Tower of Power and others. Representative perfor-
productions such as Fiddler On The Roof with Carol Burnett. mances include Bird Land, Iridium Jazz Club, Weill Recital
Featured soloist at the Birdland Jazz Club in Manhattan. Hall at Carnegie Hall, and the Village Gate Jazz Club.
PETER DESALVO, Percussion
Mus.B., SUNY Potsdam KELLY HORSTED, Voice, Piano
M.S., Long Island University: C. W. Post College B.M., Applied Piano, Eastman School of Music
Professional credits include performances with Aaron Co- M.M., Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music, Eastman
pland, Clark Terry, Milt Hinton, Marion McPartland, Peter School of Music
Eldridge, Darmon Meader, Hilary Cole, Ann Hampton Cal-
Professional pianist, accompanist, music director, and vocal
laway, Gerry Niewood, and Ray Anderson.
coach, specializing in new opera, art song, and role prepara-
JOHN DEWITT, Bass tion. Has performed with American Opera Projects; Chelsea
Coordinator of Bass Studies Opera; Friends and Enemies of New Music; Guggenheim
B.S., M.M.E., Cornell University Museum’s Works and Process Series; Harrisburg, PA’s Opera
Diploma, Marines College of Music in the Park; Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center
M.A., CUNY Queens College Festival, Merkin Concert Hall, NBC’s Weekend Today Show;
New Jersey Opera Theatre; Opera Company of Brooklyn;
Performances with the Sound Symphony, Nassau Symphony, Wall-to-Wall Bernstein at Symphony Space; Weill Recital
The New Orchestra of Long Island, I Solisti da Camera, and Hall at Carnegie Hall; and the Wintergreen Festival.
Lyra Chamber Players. New Music with Lothlorien, with
performances on National Public Radio. Pit orchestras, Radio
City and Broadway shows. Extensive j azz and popular music JOHN KELLY, Guitar
performance experience. Concert and festival performances Mus.B., Five Towns College
vith David Amram. Author: Rhythmic Figures for Bassists,
Volumes I and II, Everyone Plays the Classics, and Scale Professional guitar and mandolin performer and recipient
Studies for the Jazz Bassist. of the Tony Mottola Award.
139
LILLIAN LABARBARA, Voice HOLLY SICKINGER, Voice
Mus.B., Manhattanville College Mus.B., Five Towns College
M.S., Long Island University: C. W. Post College
Spoleto Vocal Arts Symposium (Spoleto, Italy). Representative
Professional pianist, choral director, accompanist and vocal operatic credits include Princess Ida and HMS Pinaofre (Gilbert
coach. Former director of chorus atNorthportHigh School, and Sullivan Light Opera Company of L.I.), Iolanthe and The
Northport, NY. Director of choir at Our Lady Queen of Old Maid and the Thief (A Small Company In America).
Martyrs Church, Centerport, NY.
WILL SPRAGUE, Trombone
MICHELLE LAPORTE, Flute Mus.B., SUNY Fredonia
Coordinator of Woodwind Studies M.M., SUNY Stony Brook
B.A., SUNY at Stony Brook
M.A., Long Island University: C. W. Post College Certified music educator with more than 30 years experience
with the Sayville UFSD. Member SCEMEA, NYSSMA, and
Flute educator and performer. Flutist of the multi-award Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society. SUNY Fredonia President's
winning and guitar duo, Serenade and Miyazawa Performing Scholar Award and Performer's Certificate for Excellence in
Artist. Concerts performances at Carnegie Hall and Merkin Applied Music.
Concert Hall. Member of the National Flute Association,
New York Flute Club, Chamber Music America, and Long VALERIE SULZINSKI, Woodwinds
Island Flute Club. Concert performances in Puerto Rico, B.F.A., SUNY Purchase
Europe and the USA.
Professional credits include Atlantic Wind Symphony, The
AUDRA MORICCA, Voice Garden City Cathedral Orchestra, Long Island Gilbert &
Coordinator of Vocal Studies Sullivan Light Opera Theatre Company, Manhattan Chamber
Mus.B., Mannes College of Music Orchestra, Nassau Symphony Orchestra, Queens Philharmo-
M.A., CUNY Queens College nia, and St. Martins Symphony Orchestra.
Additional studies with Steven Crawford, Richard Critten-
CHRISTOPHER TIBALDI, Percussion
den, Joanna Levy, Leo Lozito, Gary Norden, Daniel Ragone,
B.B.A., Hofstra University
and Elisabeth Vrenios. Credits include Leonora in both Il
Trovatore and La Forza del Destino, Amelia in Un Ballo in Additional studies at Five Towns College and Berklee College
Maschera, and the title roles in Tosca and Ariadne aufNaxos. of Music. Endorser for GMS Drum Company, Rhythm Tech
Recent appearances include James Marvel's Marriage of Percussion, and HQ Percussion. Endorser and Clinician for
Figaro with North Arkansas Symphony Orchestra. Sabian Cymbals and Vie Firth. Session Experience for Deep
Wave, Killingsworth, Sabella, and Cove City Studios.
STEPHEN PAGANO, Voice
A.A.S., Nassau County Community College
B.A., CUNY Queens College
M.A., Long Island University
Former director of the vocal program and musical theatre
productions at Freeport High School. He has conducted
vocal groups and performed at Carnegie Hall, Shea Stadium,
St. Patrick's Cathedral, Ellis Island, West Point, and the
DisneyWorld Choral Festival in Orlando, Florida.

TONY ROMANO, Guitar


Mus.B., Five Towns College
M.A., CUNY Queens College
Versatile Jazz, Latin and Pop guitarist. Professional credits
include Randy Brecker, Joel Frahm, Stanley Jordan, Antonio
Hart, Brit Woodman, Joe Bataan, Candido, Yomo Toro, Deb-
bie Gibson, Alex Gemignani, and the Broadway musical It
Ain't Nothin' But The Blues.
140
BILL TROIANO, Tuba DEANA VERONE, Voice
Mus.B., SUNY Ferdonia B.A., Molloy College
M.Mus., University of Rochester M.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post
Professional credits include performances at Carnegie Professional credits include vocal performances with the
Hall and at the Mozart Festival (VT) with Harvey Phillips. Concert Pops of Long Island and the Boca Pops (Boca
Former member of the Guy Lombardo Orchestra. Member Raton, FL). NYSSMA Vocal Adjudicator. NYS Profes-
of the Atlantic Wind Symphony, the Old Bethpage Village sional Music Education Certification (K-12). Yamaha MIDI
Restoration Brass Band, and the Long Island Tuba Quartet. Keyboard Clinician.
Member of the Suffolk County Music Educators Association
(SCMEA) Executive Board.

FRANK VERBSKY, Cello, Violin


B.A, CUNY Queens College
M.A., Hofstra University
Recent concerts with Five Towns College Chamber Society,
Island Senior String Orchestra, and Queens Festival
Orchestra.

MARK VERDINO, Electric and Acoustic String Bass


Mus.B., SUNY Potsdam
MM., Manhattan School of Music
Award winner at the 1 999 Notre Dame Jazz Festival. Studied
with Harvie Swartz and Dave Liebman. Broadway credits
include Jersey Boys, Spring Awakening, Mary Poppins,
Young Frankenstein, Movin' Out, and The Pirate Queen. Drs. Lee Evans, Judith Alstadter, and Bernard Rose

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION FACULTY


BRASS VOCAL STRING
Greg Bobulinski, Trumpet* Melanie Birnbaum, Soprano Matthew Pierce, Violin*
Will Sprague, Trombone Kita DeSesa, Soprano Frank Verbsky, Cello, Violin
Bill Troiano, Tuba Kenneth Friese, Baritone PIANO
PERCUSSION Wayne Grimmer, Tenor Scott Ballin
Bryan Carrott* Penelope Grover, Soprano Robert Hinz
Azande Cummings Arnie Gruber, Baritone Jill Miller
Peter DeSalvo La Tanya Hall, Mezzo-soprano Chuck Mymit
Christopher Tibaldi Heidi Hepler-Ramo, Soprano Hosun Moon*
WOODWIND Kelly Horsted, Tenor Arthur Romeo
Kenneth Cook, Saxophone, Oboe Lillian LaBarbara. Soprano Yuki Yamaguchi
Chasey Dean, Saxophone, Clarinet Jeffrey Lipton, Baritone GUITAR
Michelle LaPorte, Flute* Audra Moricca, Soprano* Steve Briody
Demetrius Spaneas, Saxophone Stephen Pagano, Tenor Steven Gleason
Valerie Sulzinski, Clarinet, Oboe Holly Sickinger, Soprano John Kelly
BASS Deana Verone, Soprano Peter Rogine*
John DeWitt* Lynnen Yakes, Mezzo-soprano Tony Romano
Gene Santini Gerry Saulter**
Mark Verdino * Coordinator ** Director
141

Theatre Arts Faculty


JAMES BENEDUCE, Assistant Professor
A.A.S., Suffolk County Community College
M.F.A., University of Delaware
Member: Society of American Fight Directors. Stage com-
bat training with top combatants such as Drew Fracher and
Stuntman Hall of Fame inductee David Bouschey. Fight
Choreographer and Fight Captain for the University of
Delaware and the Long Island Shakespeare Festival. Win-
ner of the 2000 ACTF Region 2 Irene Ryan Award.

JEANINE ECKLUND, Instructor STEWART F. LANE, Distinguished Visiting Professor


A.A.S., Suffolk County Community College L.H.D. (Hon.), Five Towns College
Director, choreographer, professional dancer, and dance Stewart F. Lane, President and Chief Executive Officer of
educator at the Floral Park, Massapequa, Central Islip, Stellar Productions International, Inc., is a four-time Tony
and St. John the Baptist High Schools and Eastern Suffolk Award winner, as Producer for Jay Johnson: The Two &
BOCES. Staff choreographer at the Hampton Playhouse Only, Thoroughly Modern Millie, The Will Rogers Follies
in New Hampshire for sixteen professional Equity musi- and La Cage Aux Folles, as well as a nine time nominee
cals. Show experience includes: Brigadoon; Fiddler on including: Fiddler on the Roof (revival) starring Alfred
the Roof; Guys & Dolls; West Side Story; Bye, Bye, Birdie; Molina, Gypsy (revival) starring Bernadette Peters, The
You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown; Anything Goes; Les Goodbye Girl starring Martin Short and Bernadette Peters
Miserables; Once Upon a Mattress; Crazy for You; Oliver; and Woman of the Year starring Lauren Bacall.
Children of Eden; Thoroughly Modern Millie; and all the
favorite children’s musicals. ROBERT STERN, Assistant Professor

MICHAEL JOHNSON, Jr., Instructor Former director of theatre, technical director, and designer
B.P.S., Five Towns College of lighting and sound systems for musical productions at
St. Joseph’s College. Director of five productions each
Technical Director and Resident Stage Manager at the season, including all technical facets of lighting, sound, and
Dix Hills Performing Arts Center (DHPAC). From 2006 management of stage crews, and all aspects of costuming
to 2008, was DHPAC stage manager, lighting crew chief, and scenic design at the Lakota Arts Playhouse and the
and technical supervisor. From 2007 to 2008, was assistant Woodstock Little Theatre. Music major at Brooklyn College
stage manager, prop master, spot technician, and carpenter and Theatre major at New York University. Director of
at the Bellport Gateway Playhouse for such productions as children’s theatre and general audience theatre productions.
Dreamgirls, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Will Rogers Fol-
lies, Forbidden Broadway, Beauty and the Beast, Show- TONY WALTON, Distinguished Visiting Professor
boat, The Wedding Singer, and The Producers. Was car- L.H.D. (Hon.), Five Towns College
penter, rigger, and spot technician for a 2008 international
tour of Phantom of the Opera. Tony Walton has designed in films for 20 years, for
directors Bob Fosse, Sidney Lumet, Paul Newman, Mike
SHERRY KFARE, Assistant Professor Nichols, Ken Russell, Volcker Schlondorf, and Francois
B.A., Pace University Truffaut. These include: Mary Poppins, Murder on
M.A., Brooklyn College the Orient Express, Fahrenheit 451, The Wiz, The Boy
Professional costume designer at the Stage Theater Friend, All That Jazz, Death of a Salesman, The Glass
Company. Her shows include: Amadeus, Anything Goes, Menagerie, Regarding Henry, and Deathtrap. His graphic
Oliver, South Pacific, Music Man, Working, Fiddler on the work includes many book and magazine illustrations,
Roof, Godspell, The Man Who Came To Dinner, and The caricatures for Playbill, Theatre Arts, Vogue, etc. and
Three Sisters. posters for many Broadway and West End shows.
142

Adjunct Theatre Faculty LUKE FOCO, Instructor, Theatre Arts


B.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth University
JEFF DAILEY, Professor Scenic designer and technical production director. Credits
B.A., Wagner College include productions of: Guys and Dolls, Cabaret, Dracula,
M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., New York University Smokey Joe’s Café, Shakespeare in Hollywood, Raisin in
the Sun, and The Glass Menagerie.
Director of Fine and Performing Arts, Deer Park UFSD.
Expanded school district theatre program to include a se-
AARON GANDY, Assistant Professor
quence approved by the NY State Education Department;
B.M., Florida State University
developed partnerships with education programs at several
theatre companies and with the New York City Student Conductor, pianist, music director specializing in Ameri-
Shakespeare Festival; began The Puppet Project, a program can musical theatre and American popular song. Broadway
to increase reading and writing proficiency in elementary credits include Disney’s The Lion King, Urinetown, and
school students through the use of puppets. Dora the Explorer Live! at Radio City Music Hall. He has
concertized with the Chamber Music Society at Lincoln
GARY DeSESA, Associate Professor Center, The Chicago Humanities Festival, The Coolidge
B.M., B.S., M.M., The Juilliard School Auditorium at the Library of Congress, The Museum of
Ph.D., New York University Broadcasting, Symphony Space, and the Tribeca Perform-
Pianist, conductor, composer, and educator, with per- ing Arts Center. Aaron restored the original film orches-
formances at Alice Tully, Carnegie, and Merkin Concert trations for Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The King and I
Halls. Appearances at the Caramoor, Ambler, Aspen, Ver- and Irving Berlin’s White Christmas. His restoration of the
bier, and Siena summer music festivals. Former choral and original film orchestration for Oklahoma! was performed
theatre director in the Half Hollow Hills School District. by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra in 1997. He has per-
He is certified by the New York State Education Depart- formed with Dick Hyman, Leslie Uggams, Glenn Close,
ment (NYSED) in both Theatre and Music. and Christine Ebersole. He is the curator for the Vincent
Youmans’ estate.
KITA DeSESA, Assistant Professor JODI GIBSON
B.S., Empire State College (SUNY) B.A., Idaho State University
M.S., Long Island University Ph.D., Arizona State University
Experienced professional vocalist with major roles in
Professional actress, costume designer, director of theatrical
classical (opera) and popular music (musical theatre).
productions, and educator, with teaching experience at all
Former soloist with Radio City Music Hall for seven years;
levels in Idaho, Arizona, and New York. Workshop leader,
made her Broadway debut in Desert Song. Has made TV
invited lecturer, conference leader, with many academic af-
commercials and films; her soap opera credits include One
filiations that include the American Alliance for Theater in
Life to Live and All My Children. Has been directing and
Education, the Association of Theatre in Higher Education,
choreographing shows in the Half Hollow Hills, Hicksville,
and the American Society for Theatre Research.
and Bellmore-Merrick School Districts for many years and
is a NYSSMA adjudicator.
JENNIFER HART, Assistant Professor
B.S., Syracuse University
M.A., University of Central Florida
M.F.A., New School for Drama
Theatre historian, actress, and director. Professional exper-
tise includes casting for film, television, and theatre; stage
management, non-profit theatre management; improvisation
and environmental theatre and corporate theatre management.
Ticket Office Manager; initiated computerized system for box
office and generation of financial reports of ticket sales, season
subscriptions, and donations. Former Entertainment Manager
at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida and Master Class
Instructor at the New York Film Academy.
143
JOHN SHORTER, Associate Professor FREDERICK SPRAUER, Associate Professor
B.A., State University College at Geneseo, NY A.A.S., SUNY at Farmingdale
M.A., New York University B.F.A., Ohio University
Former Secondary School Theatre Program Coordinator Theatre technician and designer with more than 30
at Manhasset High School. Contributor to and developer years of extensive experience in stagecraft. Professional
of the New York State Learning Standards for the Arts expertise in lighting, set design, execution, directing, and
and Content Area Specialty Test for Theatre Certification. consultation for theatre productions. Record of quality
Item reviewer, developer, and scorer for ASSETS Theatre technical productions for professional, regional, and high
Arts Assessment. Former President of, and current school groups that include the Arena Players Repertory
Board Trustee for, the New York State Theatre Education Company, Five Towns College, Suffolk YM-YWHA,
Association. Lincoln Center workshop participant and Hauppauge School District, Knox School, Township
president and co-founder of the Long Island Theatre Theatre Group in Huntington, and the Theatre Department
Education Association. at Ohio University.

SPRING IS HERE
Richard Rodgers and Larry Hart wrote this musical in 1928. It was updated
and directed by Tony Walton and the music rescored for two pianos by Aaron
Gandy. This is the first and only revival of this musical, which featured With
a Song in My Heart. It was presented recently in the College Theatre.
144
Academic Calendar 2010-2011
FALL SEMESTER 2010 SPRING SEMESTER 2011
MARCH 15– APRIL 9 Monday-Friday NOVEMBER 1–30 Monday-Tuesday
Registration Registration
APRIL 12-JULY 30 Monday-Friday DECEMBER 1–JANUARY 7 Wednesday-Friday
Late Registration Late Registration
AUGUST 23 Monday JANUARY 24 Monday
Residence Halls Open – New Students Residence Halls Open – All Students
New Student Orientation – 9:00 a.m.
AUGUST 24, 25 Tuesday, Wednesday
JANUARY 25 Tuesday
Orientation – New Students
Classes Begin
AUGUST 25 Wednesday JANUARY 31 Monday
Residence Halls Open – Continuing Students Last Day for Program Changes and
AUGUST 26 Thursday Application for May Graduation
Classes Begin FEBRUARY 21 Monday
SEPTEMBER 3 Friday Presidents Day – No Classes
Last Day for Program Changes and MARCH 22 Tuesday
Application for December Graduation Faculty Development Days – No Classes
SEPTEMBER 6 Monday Long Island Media Arts Show
Labor Day – No Classes MARCH 25 Friday
SEPTEMBER 9 Thursday Residence Halls Close
Rosh Hashanah – No Classes MARCH 26-APRIL 3 Saturday-Sunday
SEPTEMBER 18 Saturday Spring Recess – No Classes
Yom Kippur – No Classes APRIL 3 Sunday
OCTOBER 11 Monday Residence Halls Reopen
APRIL 8 Friday
Columbus Day – Classes in Session
Last Day to Remove “Incomplete” Grades
NOVEMBER 2 Tuesday
MAY 11 Wednesday
Election Day – Classes in Session
Last Day to Withdraw from Classes with a Grade of “W”
NOVEMBER 5 Friday MAY 12–17 Thursday-Tuesday
Last Day to Remove “Incomplete” Grades Final Examinations
NOVEMBER 11 Thursday MAY 18 Wednesday
Veterans Day – No Classes Graduation Rehearsal 10 AM
NOVEMBER 23 Tuesday Spring Picnic 12 Noon
Residence Halls Close Residence Halls Close – Except Graduates
NOVEMBER 24-28 Wednesday-Sunday MAY 21 Saturday
Thanksgiving Recess – No Classes 37th Annual Commencement Exercises, 9:30 AM
NOVEMBER 28 Sunday Residence Halls Close – Graduates
Residence Halls Reopen MAY 30 Monday
DECEMBER 15 Wednesday Memorial Day – No Classes
Last Day to Withdraw from Classes with Grade of “W” JULY 4 Monday
DECEMBER 16-21 Thursday-Tuesday Independence Day Observed
Final Examinations SUMMER SESSIONS 2011
December 22 Wednesday
Undergraduate:
Residence Halls Close Session 1 U1 MAY 24 - JUNE 10 Tuesday- Friday
JANUARY INTERSESSION 2011 Session 2 U2 JUNE 14 - JULY 1 Tuesday-Friday
Session 3 U3 JULY 5 - 22 Tuesday-Friday
JANUARY 3-23 Monday - Sunday Graduate:
JANUARY 17 Monday Session 1 G1 JULY 5 - 22 Tuesday-Friday
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – No Classes Session 2 G2 JULY 26 - AUGUST 12 Tuesday-Friday
145

INDEX
A College Committees, 102
College Fees, 113
Academic Advisement, 103 College Honor Societies, 112
Academic Calendar, 144 College Radio Station WFTU, 100
Academic Information, 106 College Yearbook, 101
Academic Standing, 108 Composition/Songwriting, 11­, 14­, 17
Academic Support Center, 103 Computer Business Applications, 68
Accreditation, 5 Computer Graphics Mac Lab, 98
Administration, 123–124 Computer Requirements, 99
Admission, 104 Course Descriptions, 60
Advanced Placement Examinations, 108 Credit by Examination, 107
Advisory Council, 123 Credit Card Marketing Policy, 102
Affirmative Action Policy, 4 Credit Cards, 113
Application Fee, 113 Critical Analysis and Reasoning, 10
Applied Music, 74 Cultural Hour Performances, 102
Art History, 60
Associate Degree Programs, 7­, 46­, 47–59 D
Associate in Applied Science Degree, 51
Degree Programs, 7
Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree, 49
Dining Facilities, 98
Athletic Facilities, 98
Directions to the College, 148
Attendance, 108
Disability Services, 107
Audio Faculty, 125
Distance Learning/Online Courses, 106
Audio Recording Studios, 96
Dix Hills Performing Arts Center, 102
Audio Recording Technology, 11­, 14­, 19­, 38­, 39­, 41­, 51­,
Downbeat Café, 101
52­, 54­, 61
Drug Prevention Program, 102
Auditing Courses, 107
Audition and Interview, 105 E
B Early Decision, 105
Economics, 68
Bachelor Degree Programs, 7, See also 11-45
Educational Relevance, 6
Bachelor of Music Degree, 13
Education Faculty, 128­, 129
Bachelor of Professional Studies Degree, 43
Electronic Communication Devices, 102
Band Ensembles, 76
Electronic Music-MIDI Lab, 97
Basic Educational Skills, 62
Electronic Portfolios, 111
Board of Trustees, 123
English, 69
Bookstore, 98
Experiential Learning Center, 103
Broadcasting, 12­, 28­, 29
Business Administration, 50 F
Business Course Descriptions, 62
Business Degree Programs, 49 Facilities and Equipment, 96
Business Faculty, 125–127 Faculty, 6, See also 125-143
Business Management, 12­, 38­, 39­, 41–45­, 51–57 FERPA, 110
Film/Television Studio, 97
C Film/Video, 12­, 36­, 37­, 93
Film/Video Faculty, 130–131
Campus, 6
Financial Aid, 115–122
Campus Emergency Notification System, 101
Flyer, 101
Career Services Center, 103
Full-time Courseload, 110
Car Registration and Parking, 98
Full-time Tuition, 113
Change of Program, 114
Childhood Education (1-6), 12­, 25–27­, 65
146

G M
General Education, 8 Major Instrument / Voice, 79
General Education Core Curriculum, 8 Make-Up Final Examinations, 107
Goals of the College, 5 Mass Communication, 12­, 28–30­, 72
Grade Point Average, 106 Mass Communication Program, 12­, 28
Grading System, 106 Mathematics, 73
Graduate Courses, 111 Matriculation, 108
Graduate Credits for Bachelor's Degree, 111 Meal Plan, 114
Graduation Requirements, 112 Mission Statement, 5
Grievance Procedure, 108 Monthly Payment Plan, 113
Music, 74
H Musical Theatre/Vocal, 11­, 14­, 18
Health Services, 103 Music Business, 11­, 14­, 21­, 38­, 39­, 45­, 51­, 52­, 57­, 84
High School Jazz Band Festival, 102 Music Education, 12­, 22­, 23­, 85
History, 71 Music Faculty, 133–137
Honors and Awards, 112 Music History, 86
Housing, 104 Music Industry Conference, 102
Music Skills Center, 98
I Music Studios, 97
Incomplete Grades, 106 N
Independent Study, 108
Individualized Instruction, 107 New Student Orientation, 104
Information Literacy, 8
O
Instructional Technology, 111
Internet Access, 98 Official Email Notices, 106
Internship Courses, 108 Oral and Written Communication, 9
J P
January Intersession, 112 Parking, 98
Jazz/Commercial Music, 11­, 59, See also 13-21 Part-time Students, 113
Journalism, 12­, 28­, 30 PC Lab, 98
Junior Standing, 111 Performance, 11­, 14­, 15
Performance Ensembles, 76
K Performing Arts Foundation, 120
Keyboard Lab, 98 Personal Counseling, 104
Philosophy, 88
L Phi Sigma Eta Honor Society, 112
Language, 72 Placement of Graduates, 104
Late Payment, 113 Placement Tests, 104
Leave of Absence, 109 Private Instruction Faculty, 138–140
Liberal Arts, 8­, 46–48 Program Changes, 109
Liberal Arts/General Education Faculty, 132–133 Psychology, 88
Library, 100 Publicity Rights, 112
Literature, 47­, 48
Long Island Metropolitan Region, 6
147

R T
Readmission, 109 Table of Contents, 3
Refund Policy, 114 Teacher Education Programs, 105
Refunds Involving Financial Aid, 115 Teaching Assistant, 47­, 48
Repeat Grades, 106 Technological Competency, 8
Repeating Courses, 107 Television Station FTC TV, 100
Residency Requirement, 111 Theatre, 96
Residential Life Fees, 114 Theatre Arts, 12­, 32­, 33­, 90
Theatre Arts Faculty, 141–143
S Theatre Education, 34­, 35
Satisfactory Academic Progress, 111 Theatre History, 92
Schedule of Payments, 113 The Long Island Metropolitan Region, 6
Scholarships and Awards, 121­, 122 The Record, 101
Science, 89 Time Limitation, 108
Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning, 9 Transcripts, 110
Senior Standing, 111 Transfer Credit, 110
Social Science, 89 Tuition and Fees, 113
Sociology, 89 Tuition Deposit, 113
Sophomore Standing, 111 Tutorial Services, 103
Special Fees, 113
U
Speech, 90
Standards for Undergraduate Admissions, 105 Unit of Credit, 106
String Ensembles, 77
Student Accident and Sickness Insurance, 113 V
Student Activities, 101 Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives, 10
Student Activities Office, 99 Visiting Artist Clinics/Concerts, 102
Student Activity Fee, 113 Vocal Ensembles, 77
Student Body, 6
Student Clubs, 101 W
Student Conduct, 108 Withdrawal from College, 109
Student Government, 101 Withdrawal from Courses, 109
Student Handbook, 101
Student Learning Assessment, 111
Student Life, 101
Student Retention, 105
Student Rights, 110
Student Services, 103
Studio A, 96
Studio and New Space Theatres, 97
Studio B, 96
Studio C, 97
Substitution/Waiver Policy, 109
Summer Sessions, 112
148

LOCATION OF THE COLLEGE


The College is located in Dix Hills, Long Island, on the North Service Road of the Long Island Express-
way (Route 495) between Exits 50 Bagatelle Road and 51 Deer Park Avenue.
DIRECTIONS TO THE COLLEGE
AUTOMOBILE
From the East
Long Island Expressway (Rte. 495) to Exit 51 Deer Park Avenue (Rte. 231). Continue west on the North
Service Road for 1.5 miles to Burr's Lane. Turn right and proceed to College entrance on right.
From the West
Long Island Expressway (Rt. 495) to Exit 50 Bagatelle Road. Turn left onto Bagatelle Road and right
at Half Hollow Road. Proceed to College entrance on right.
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Long Island Railroad to the Babylon Station. Suffolk County Bus S-23 from the Babylon Station or
Walt Whitman Mall on Route 110 to the College. The following buses connect with the S-23 Bus:
Walt Whitman Mall Babylon L.I.R.R.
S-1, S-54, N79, H-4, H-9 S-20, 25, 27, 29, 40, 42, N19, N72
For public bus information, call the Suffolk County Transit Information Service at (631) 852-5200.
For Nassau County bus information, call the Metropolitan Suburban Bus Authority at (516) 766-6722.