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Cambridge Primary Progression Test

English mark scheme


Stage 6

© UCLES 2017
Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

The Cambridge Primary reporting strand and sub-strand is shown for each question.

The Reading reporting strand has four sub-strands:


• Rx Explicit meaning
• Ri Implicit meaning
• Rw Language and structure of a text
• Rv Purpose and viewpoint

The Writing reporting strand has four sub-strands:


• Wa Content/purpose and audience
• Wt Text structure and organisation
• Wp Sentence structure
• Ws Spelling

The curriculum framework code of the learning objective related to each question is also shown, e.g.
6Rx2.

Stage 6 Paper 1 – Mark Scheme

Section A: Reading (Non-fiction)

Question Answer Marks


1 How is the firefly different from the other members of its family? 1

Award 1 mark for answers that identify only that:

• it has wings.

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


2 How does a firefly control its light? 1

Award 1 mark for:

• (by controlling its) breathing.

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


3 What effect does the writer create by using a short sentence in line 10? 1

Award 1 mark for answers that identify one of the following effects relating
directly to the fireflies text:

• it introduces a surprising/shocking fact


• it emphasises the idea of the danger.

Do not accept generic answers (i.e. those that do not relate to the fireflies
text), e.g. it adds dramatic effect / it makes the text more interesting / it makes
the reader want to read on.

Rw [6Rw4]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Question Answer Marks


4 Explain in your own words how some female fireflies trick the males of 2
other species.

Award 1 mark for each of the following up to a maximum of 2 marks:

• some female fireflies copy the flashing pattern of other species / pretend
to be another species by using the same flashing pattern
• the female encourages a male to come close to them (so the female can
attack the male).

Do not accept quotations from the text, e.g. ‘Some female fireflies imitate the
blinking pattern of another species in order to attract a male.’

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


5 Complete the stages of a firefly’s life cycle in order. The first stage has 1
been done for you.

Award 1 mark for identifying the three correct stages after ‘eggs’:

[eggs]
larvae
pupae
adult (firefly).

Award no marks for only one or two correct stages.

Do not accept the wrong order.

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


6 ‘They are found in a variety of habitats.’ 1

What verb form is used in this sentence?

Award 1 mark for:

• (present (simple)) passive (voice / verb form).

Rw [6Rw11]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Question Answer Marks


7 Explain why a colon (:) has been used in the fourth paragraph. 1

Award 1 mark for answers that identify one of the following purposes relating
directly to the fireflies text:

• it comes before a list (of different types of habitat)


• the second part gives examples relating to the first part.

Do not accept generic answers (i.e. those that do not relate to the fireflies
text), e.g. it splits the sentence into two related parts.

Rw [6Rw13]

Question Answer Marks


8 Complete the fact file below using the information in the text. 3

Three features of a firefly’s Award 1 mark for any three of:


body • flat bodies
• large eyes
• short antennae
• wings
• (can) glow.
Two weather conditions Award 1 mark for both of the following:
popular with fireflies • warm
• humid.
Three colours of a firefly’s Award 1 mark for all three of the following:
glow • green
• orange
• yellow.

Accept answers written in sentences if the required information is given for


each section.

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


9 These subheadings belong to the text. Number the subheadings to 2
match the order of the paragraphs.

Award 1 mark for two correct answers or 2 marks for four correct answers:

The whole life cycle [3]


Patterns of light [2]
Flies, beetles or worms? [1]
Where’s home? [4]

Rw [6Rw8]

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PROGRESSION TEST

Question Answer Marks


10 Subheadings are a feature of reports. 2

Name two other features of reports as shown in Text A.

Award 1 mark for any of the following up to a maximum of 2 marks:

• third person
• present tense
• formal language
• facts
• technical/subject-specific language.

Do not accept generic features of all types of writing, e.g. paragraphs, titles.

Rv [6Rv3]

Question Answer Marks


11 Find one quotation that shows the writer thinks fireflies are fascinating. 1

Award 1 mark for one of the following:

• ‘Amazingly (even the eggs can glow!)’


• ‘It is difficult to believe (but firefly larvae then live underground for almost
two years.)’
• ‘The magic of fireflies’ [the title of the text].

Rw [6Rw1]

Question Answer Marks


12 Why has the writer used the modal verb ‘should’ in line 1? 1

Award 1 mark for answers which identify that the sentence gives advice
about the best thing to do, rather than an instruction that tells the reader what
to do (imperative), e.g.:

• to give advice
• to tell the reader the best thing to do.

Rw [6Rw1]

Question Answer Marks


13 In line 5, why do you think ‘DO NOT’ is written in capital letters? 1

Award 1 mark for an answer that identifies one of the following:

• to emphasise the importance of the instruction


• because the instruction is essential
• because the firefly will die if you ignore the instruction.

Ri [6Ri1]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
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Question Answer Marks


14 Write a sentence saying what will happen if holes are punched in the lid 1
of the jar. Start your sentence with the word ‘If’.

Award 1 mark for one of the following:

• If you punch holes in the lid, the air in the jar will/might/could dry out.
• If you punch holes in the lid, the firefly will/might/could die.

Do not accept: If you punch holes in the lid, the firefly will/might/could get
out.

Rw [6Rw5]

Question Answer Marks


15 What helps to keep the air in the jar damp? 1

Tick (9) one box.

Award 1 mark for correctly identifying:

• the piece of apple.

Do not accept answers where more than one option has been ticked.

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


16 How can you add new air to the jar? 1

Award 1 mark for:

• (unscrew the jar lid and) blow across the top (of the jar).

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


17 Why does the writer use short sentences in lines 11 and 12? 1

Award 1 mark for one of the following:

• to make the sentences clear / easy to read/understand


• to separate the instruction from the explanation.

Rw [6Rw4]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Question Answer Marks


18 Explain in your own words why it is not fair to keep a firefly in a jar for 1
more than two or three days.

Award 1 mark for one of the following:

• fireflies only live for a short time


• the firefly would spend most of its life in the jar
• the firefly would not be able to spend most of its life flying around
naturally.

Do not accept answers that only state that the firefly might die.

Ri [6Ri2]

Question Answer Marks


19 How is the main purpose of Text B different from the main purpose of 2
Text A?

Award 2 marks for answers that include both of the following:

• The purpose of the first text is to inform / tell you about something.
• The purpose of the second text is to instruct / tell you how to do
something.

Award 1 mark for answers that include only one of the above.

Rv [6Rv1]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Section B: Writing (Non-fiction)

Question Answer Marks


Notes to markers

• Use the marking grids on the next two pages.


• Marking should always begin from the lowest mark in each column and work upward.
• A ‘best fit’ judgement should be made in judging first in which box to place the response and
then, within that box, whether the higher or lower mark is appropriate.
• The lower mark within a box should be given if some of the criteria have been met but not all.

20 The second text explains how to care for a firefly.

Write about how to care for a different animal.

Remember to:

• choose an animal you know lots about, e.g. your favourite animal, a pet
• think about the important information you need to include
• think about extra information you can include to make your article more
interesting
• include instructions about how to care for the animal
• organise your article in paragraphs.

20 Content/purpose and audience (Wa) 8


Spelling (Ws) 3
Text structure and organisation (Wt) 7
Sentence structure (Wp) 7
[Total 25]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Section B: Writing grid

Content/purpose and audience (Wa) Spelling (Ws)


8 marks 3 marks
The response is wholly relevant with content
developed and a wide vocabulary well chosen
for the purpose / text type.

Features of the text type are clearly established.

A clear viewpoint with a consistent, engaging


style throughout.
7–8
A relevant response that has ideas and content
with some detail developed with deliberate
choices of vocabulary for the purpose / text type.

The main features of the text type are evident

A straightforward viewpoint, with a generally


appropriate and consistent style, which mostly
sustains the reader’s interest.
5–6
A relevant response with attempts to develop
basic information using a simple vocabulary
relevant to the purpose / text type. Spelling is generally correct throughout. (There
may be occasional phonetically plausible
General aspects of the text type are evident. attempts at complex words.)

The writer’s attitude to the subject may be Correct spelling of most, not all, polysyllabic
conveyed, with some attempt to engage the words e.g. appear, information, making,
reader. possible, probably, wondering.
3–4 3
The response includes some material that is Spelling of common words, including
relevant to the task. polysyllabic and compound words, is generally
accurate, e.g. another, around, because,
The vocabulary is simple and relevant. anything, something.

Some elements of the text type can be seen. Spelling of plurals and some past and present
words is generally accurate, e.g. boxes, clothes,
told, stopped, wanted.
2
Spelling of high frequency words is generally
correct, e.g. their/there, when, were, what,
some.
1–2 1
No creditable response. No creditable response.
0 0

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PROGRESSION TEST

Text structure and organisation (Wt) Sentence structure (Wp)


7 marks 7 marks
A clear structure with well-organised writing in The use of complex sentences provides clarity
paragraphs. and emphasis, e.g. by positioning of clauses,
using a wide range of connectives (although,
Chronological or logical links help the meanwhile), varying word order or detailed
development of ideas. expansion of phrases.

Cohesion within paragraphs is achieved using Grammar is almost always accurate throughout
devices such as connectives. the text.

Punctuation is used accurately to demarcate


sentences and for speech – errors may occur
where structures are ambitious.

Commas are always used in lists and usually to


mark clauses.
6–7 6–7
Paragraphs are used to help structure the text Some complex sentences are used to create
where the main idea is usually supported by effect, such as using expanded phrases to
following sentences. develop ideas (e.g. noun, adverbial, adjectival
and verb phrases), or a range of connectives
A logical sequence with attempts to link ideas (e.g. if, so, because, then).
evident, but not consistent.
Grammar in complex sentences is generally
Some use of organisational devices such as correct in terms of tense and verb form.
sub-headings, etc.
End of sentence punctuation is nearly always
accurate throughout the text. Capitalisation is
always correct.

Speech marks may be used around words


spoken but other speech punctuation may not
be accurate.

Commas are always used in lists and


occasionally to mark clauses.
4–5 4–5
Paragraphs/sections are evident with related A mix of simple and compound sentences.
points grouped together.
Compound sentences use simple connectives to
Some attempt to sequence ideas logically. join clauses, e.g. and, but.

Movement between paragraphs or sections may Generally correct grammar, i.e. subject and
be disjointed. verb generally agree. Past and present tense of
verbs are generally consistent.

Demarcation of straightforward sentences is


usually correct. Commas are often used in lists.
2–3 2–3

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Some basic sequencing of writing which is Mainly simple sentences.


grouped by content.
Some variation in sentence openings.

Generally correct grammar.

Simple sentences are usually demarcated


accurately, i.e. capital letters and full stops.
1 1
No creditable response. No creditable response.
0 0

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Stage 6 Paper 2 – Mark Scheme

Section A: Reading (Fiction)

Question Answer Marks


1 Describe in your own words how Sophie’s father holds her hand. 1

Award 1 mark for answers that reflect the idea of ‘clasping it tight’, e.g.:

• he holds her hand firmly


• he grips her hand.

Do not accept answers that quote the words ‘clasps’ or ‘tight’.

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


2 Give a quotation from lines 2–9 that shows where Sophie and her father 1
are when they see the cloaked figure.

Award 1 mark for one of the following:

• ‘(At) the edge of the trees (they stopped).’


• ‘the frozen silver forest’.

Do not accept longer quotations.

Rx [6Rx2]

Question Answer Marks


3(a) ‘... the snow fell like a heavy lace curtain.’ (line 8) 1

What is this an example of?

Tick (9) one box.

Award 1 mark for correctly identifying:

• simile.

Do not accept answers where more than one option is ticked.

Rw [6Rw2]

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Question Answer Marks


3(b) Explain in your own words two things that ‘fell like a heavy lace curtain’ 2
tells you about the snow.

Award 1 mark each for answers that identify the following:

• there is a lot of snow


• the snow is still delicate/beautiful/see-through (like lace).

Possible 2-mark answers include:

• It is snowing hard. The snow is like a delicate lace curtain in front of


them.
• The snow is falling fast. It is like looking through a lace curtain.

Rw [6Rw2]

Question Answer Marks


4 Look at lines 10–14. 2

Explain in your own words two ways the writer makes the young woman
seem mysterious.

Award 1 mark for any of the following, up to a maximum of 2 marks:

• Snowflakes seem to turn into diamonds when they touch the woman.
• The woman’s face can’t be seen.
• The woman is conjured up by Sophie’s father.

Ri [6Ri2]

Question Answer Marks


5 Why was Sophie unable to find out anything about the young woman? 2

Give two reasons.

Award 1 mark for each of the following:

• She couldn’t hear her father / her father’s answer.


• Her father was telling her a story and wouldn’t stop / ‘He wouldn’t stop
telling her the story.’

Rx [6Rx2]

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Question Answer Marks


6 Look at lines 19–20. 3

Give three ways the writer makes the father’s story sound scary.

Award 1 mark each for any of the following, up to a maximum of 3 marks:

• including Sophie’s feelings of fear (using dashes)


• use of an ellipsis (…) / the last sentence has not been finished / the story
ends on a dramatic revelation/cliffhanger
• introduction of the wolf / a threat
• use of italics for ‘a wolf’
• choice of vocabulary, e.g. ‘lost’, ‘tighten with fear’.

Rw [6Rw3]

Question Answer Marks


7 ‘Hold my hand, Sophie.’ (line 1) 1
‘She felt her father’s hand slip out of hers.’ (line 21)

Why are these two lines important in the story?

Award 1 mark for an answer that identifies one of the following:

• they mark the beginning and end of the dream


• Sophie feels safe when holding her father’s hand
• Sophie needs to be holding her father’s hand to be with him / in the
dream.

Rv [6Rv8]

Question Answer Marks


8 ‘And the sadness and the fear got mixed up with the snowflakes and 1
covered everything.’ (lines 23–24)

Explain in your own words what Sophie is feeling at this point in the
story.

Award 1 mark for an answer that identifies Sophie as being overwhelmed or


confused, e.g.:

• Sophie is overwhelmed by her feelings.


• Sophie is confused.
• Everything is unclear to Sophie.

Do not accept she was unhappy and/or afraid.

Ri [6Ri2]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Question Answer Marks


9 ‘She pressed her face into the pillow, trying to climb back into the 1
forest.’ (line 27)

What does this sentence tell you about Sophie?

Tick (9) one box.

Award 1 mark for correctly identifying:

• She is awake and wants to return to her dream.

Do not accept answers where more than one option has been ticked.

Ri [6Ri2]

Question Answer Marks


10 Give one way the writer shows how real the dream seemed to Sophie. 1

Award 1 mark for an answer that:

• explains how the writer uses the senses to show how Sophie feels in the
dream
or
• gives an example / quotation of how the senses are used by the writer,
e.g. ‘she could taste the cold, clear air …’, ‘feel the forest …’, ‘hear the
snow …’.

Rw [6Rw1]

Question Answer Marks


11 Give two things that Sophie doesn’t like about how her room looks. 2

Award 1 mark for any of the following, up to a maximum of 2 marks:

• the furniture / wardrobes / bedside cabinets / desks / chairs


• it’s cramped/small
• it’s ugly
• it’s plain/colourless/mean.

Rx [6Rx2]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
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Question Answer Marks


12 Look at line 45. 1

Explain in your own words what ‘just school’ suggests about Sophie’s
view of boarding school?

Award 1 mark for an answer that identifies that Sophie thinks of school as
lacking adventure, e.g.:

• It’s boring / not exciting.


• It’s not like her dream.
• It’s not as exciting as her dream.

Ri [6Ri2]

Question Answer Marks


13 In lines 38–45, how does the writer make it clear that these are Sophie’s 2
thoughts?

Give two ways.

Award 1 mark for any of the following, up to a maximum of 2 marks:

• It is as though Sophie is talking in her head.


• The ideas are incomplete / not in full sentences.
• There are unanswered/rhetorical questions / Sophie is asking herself
questions.
• There are ellipses (…) / pauses while Sophie is thinking.
• There is a list of thoughts.
• There is repetition (of the word ‘three’).

Rv [6Rv7]

Question Answer Marks


14 How do you know that Sophie hasn’t seen her father for a long time? 1

Award 1 mark for identifying:

• Sophie only thinks she can remember her father’s expression when she
looks at his photograph (lines 47–48).

Do not accept quotations from the text that do not include further
explanation.

Ri [6Ri2]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Question Answer Marks


15 Explain in your own words two things you learn about Sophie’s 2
character from the text.

Award 1 mark for answers that identify any of the following, up to a maximum
of 2 marks:

• She is adventurous / likes excitement.


• She likes to escape to her dream world.
• She likes beauty.
• She is imaginative/curious.
• She is positive/understanding towards others.

Do not accept quotations.

Ri [6Ri1]

Question Answer Marks


16 This text starts with a dream and is the opening to a longer story. 1

Do you think it is a good opening to the story? Explain your answer.

Award 1 mark for any answer that says yes/no and gives a justification
relating to this story, e.g.:

• Yes because the dream turns into a real-life story.


• Yes because it does not reveal straight away that it is a dream.
• Yes because the dream makes the reader want to find out if the
characters are real or not.

• No because dreams are not like real life.


• No because it does not explain the real events that are happening to the
main character.

Do not accept answers that refer only to the reader’s interest.

Rv [6Rv8]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Section B: Writing (Fiction)

Question Answer Marks


Notes to markers

• Use the marking grids on the next two pages.


• Marking should always begin from the lowest mark in each column and work upwards.
• A ‘best fit’ judgement should be made in judging first in which box to place the response and
then, within that box, whether the higher or lower mark is appropriate.
• The lower mark within a box should be given if some of the criteria have been met but not all.

17 Write your own opening to a longer story with the title The Forest.

Include descriptions of the characters and the setting to interest the reader.

Ideas to help you:

Characters • a narrator
• a wolf?
• anyone else?
Setting • the woods
• What time of year is it?
• What does the main character see?
• What is special about the woods? Is it a magical place?
Plot • Why is the main character in the woods?
• Does the main character meet anyone?
• Does anything go wrong? Is the main character frightened by
something?

Remember to include as much detail as you can. Try to make it exciting so that people
reading it will want to read on and find out what happens.

17 Content/purpose and audience (Wa) 8


Spelling (Ws) 3
Text structure and organisation (Wt) 7
Sentence structure (Wp) 7
[Total 25]

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Content/purpose and audience (Wa) Spelling (Ws)


8 marks 3 marks
The content is relevant and developed with
imaginative detail using a variety of techniques,
e.g. imagery and figurative language.

Features of the genre, if required, are clearly


established.

Uses adventurous and precise vocabulary.

Characterisation is shown through actions and


reactions during the story.

A clear, consistent relationship between writer


and reader is established and controlled.

Narrative viewpoint is clear, with the style


established to engage the reader’s interest
throughout.
7–8
Relevant content with some detail developed
using deliberate choices of vocabulary for the
task.

The main features of the genre are evident.

Characters are well described with actions


linked to key events.

A clear relationship between the writer and the


reader is established in parts of the story, which
engages the reader.

Straightforward viewpoint, with a generally


appropriate and consistent style.
5–6
Content is straightforward with an appropriate
balance, e.g. speech, action and description.

Vocabulary is simple, with some choices to Spelling is generally correct throughout. (There
create interest. may be occasional phonetically plausible
attempts at complex words.)
At least one event is described.
Correct spelling of most, not all, polysyllabic
General features of the genre, if required, are words e.g. appear, information, making,
shown. possible, probably, wondering.

Some attempt is made to engage the reader.


3–4 3

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Ideas are mostly relevant to the narrative, which Spelling of common words, including
has a simple plot. polysyllabic and compound words, is generally
accurate, e.g. another, around, because,
The vocabulary is simple and relevant. anything, something.

Spelling of plurals and some past and present


words is generally accurate, e.g. boxes, clothes,
told, stopped, wanted.
2
Spelling of high frequency words is generally
correct, e.g. their/there, when, were, what,
some.
1–2 1
No creditable response. No creditable response.
0 0

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PROGRESSION TEST

Text structure and organisation (Wt) Sentence structure (Wp)


7 marks 7 marks
Clear structure with well-organised ideas within Use of complex sentences to provide clarity
paragraphs. and emphasis, e.g. by positioning of clauses,
using a wide range of connectives (although,
Paragraphs are used to structure the narrative meanwhile), varying word order or detailed
e.g. there is an appropriate build up and expansion of phrases.
resolution of the main event.
Grammar is almost always accurate throughout
Chronological or logical links help the the text.
development of ideas.
Punctuation is used accurately to demarcate
Cohesion within paragraphs is achieved using sentences and for speech – errors may occur
devices such as connectives. where structures are ambitious.

Commas are always used in lists and usually to


mark clauses
6–7 6–7
Paragraphs are used to help structure the Some complex sentences are used to create
narrative, e.g. signal a change in time, place effect, such as using expanded phrases to
and/or focus on a different character, where develop ideas (e.g. noun, adverbial, adjectival
the main idea is usually supported by following and verb phrases), or a range of connectives
sentences. (e.g. if, so, because, then).

Logical sequence with evident but inconsistent Grammar in complex sentences is generally
attempts to link ideas with fitting openings and correct in terms of tense and verb form.
closings.
End of sentence punctuation is nearly always
accurate throughout the text. Capitalisation is
always correct.

Speech marks may be used around words


spoken but other speech punctuation may not
be accurate.

Commas are always used in lists and


occasionally to mark clauses.
4–5 4–5
Paragraphs/sections are evident with related A mix of simple and compound sentences.
points together or linked by time sequence.
Compound sentences use simple connectives to
Some attempt is made to sequence relevant join clauses, e.g. and, but.
ideas logically.
Generally correct grammar, i.e. subject and
Some opening and closing of narrative may be verb generally agree. Past and present tense of
evident. verbs are generally consistent.

Movement between paragraphs or sections may Demarcation of straightforward sentences is


be disjointed. usually correct. Commas are often used in lists.
2–3 2–3

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Cambridge Primary – Mark Scheme
PROGRESSION TEST

Some basic sequencing with story ideas is Mainly simple sentences.


evident.
Some variation in sentence openings.

Generally correct grammar.

Simple sentences are usually demarcated


accurately, i.e. capital letters and full stops.
1 1
No creditable response. No creditable response.
0 0

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PROGRESSION TEST

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