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STATE FOREST REPORT

WEST BENGAL
2011- 2012

GOVERNMENT OF WEST BENGAL


DIRECTORATE OF FORESTS
OFFICE OF THE PRINCIPAL CHIEF CONSERVATOR OF FORESTS,
HEAD OF FOREST FORCE
KOLKATA
CONTENTS
Page No.

1. DEMOGRAPHY 2-4

1.1 Population of West Bengal, since 1901 .................................................................... 2


1.2 Area, Population Density in West Bengal (Census, 2011) ......................................... 2
1.3 Population’s rural & urban area figures at a glance in West Bengal ............................. 3
1.4 Livestock Population .............................................................................................. 4

2. LANDUSE, CLIMATE AND SOIL 5-11

2.1 Land Use, Climate and Soli ..................................................................................... 5


2.2 Average of daily Maximum and Minium Temperature in West Bengal ....................... 7
2.3 Annual Rainfall in West Bengal by District. .............................................................. 8
2.4 Agro Climatic Zones of West Bengal ........................................................................ 9
2.5 Soil Problems in West Bengal .................................................................................. 9

3. FOREST LAND, FOREST COVER AND VEGETATION 12-18

3.1 Legal Status of Forests in West Bengal since 1901 ..................................................... 12


3.2 Districtwise Area under Forests by Legal Status in West Bengal ................................. 13
3.3 Districtwise distribution of Geographical and Recorded Forest Land in W. Bengal ...... 14
3.4 Comperative statement of forest cover as enumerated through GIS .......................... 15
3.5 Land Use Status of West Bengal .............................................................................. 15
3.6 Principal species under Major Forest Types in West Bengal ....................................... 16
3.7 A note on Major Forest Types of West Bengal ........................................................... 16
3.8 Degraded notified Forest Land in West Bengal ......................................................... 18

4. DIVERSION OF FOREST LAND UNDER FOREST (CONSERVATION) 19-21


ACT, 1980

4.1 Diversion of Forest Land in West Bengal for Non-Forest use since the enforcement
of Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 .......................................................................... 19
4.2 Statement showing the position of cases approved for Diversion of Forest Land,
under FCA, 1980 and Compensatory Afforestation done upto March, 2012 ............. 20
4.3 Location details and fund released for Compensatory afforestation under State
CAMPA for the year 2011-12 .................................................................................. 21

5. FOREST ORGANISATION IN WEST BENGAL 22-32

5.1 Organisational Structure of Forest Directorate .......................................................... 22


5.2 IFS and WBFS Cadre strength in West Bengal .......................................................... 24
5.3 Categorywise number of sanctioned posts in the Directorate and present strength ..... 27
5.4 Administrative units under the Forest Directorate ..................................................... 30
5.5 Number of Ranges and Beats under Forest Directorate ............................................. 31
6. REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE 33-45

6.1 Revenue from major heads during 2011-12 ............................................................. 33


6.2 Expenditure under major Heads during 2011-12 ..................................................... 33
6.3 Statement showing unit-wise Revenue for 2011-12 ................................................. 34
6.4 Statement showing unitwise expenditure for the year 2011-12 ................................. 36
6.5 Statement showing schemewise expenditure for the year 2011-12 ........................... 40
6.5.1 State Plan Schemes 2011-12 .................................................................................. 40
6.5.2 Centrally Sponsored and Central Sector Schemes 2011-12 ...................................... 42
6.5.3 Non Plan Development 2011-12 ............................................................................ 42
6.5.4 Non Plan Schemes 2011-12 ................................................................................... 43
6.6 Actual Expenditure under Major heads during 2007-2008 to 2011-12 ...................... 45

7. FOREST PROTECTION, FIRE AND ENCROACHMENT 46-49

7.1 Number of Illicit felling cases detected, seizures done and persons arrested ................ 46
7.2 Forest Fire Report 2011-12 ..................................................................................... 47
7.3 Status of Encroachment of Forest Land in West Bengal as on 31.03.2012 ................. 49

8. WORKING PLAN AND GIS 50-56

9. AFFORESTATION AND FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT SCHEMES 57-64

9.1 Afforestation Activities 2011-12 (Schemewise) ........................................................ 63


9.2 Progress of Afforestation through successive Plans ................................................... 64

10. JOINT FOREST MANAGEMENT 65-77

10.1 Forest Protection Committees in West Bengal .......................................................... 70


10.2 Eco-Development Committees in West Bengal ........................................................ 71
10.3 Performance for consolidation of Joint Forest Management in South Bengal ............. 72
th
10.4 Operational guidelines for the 11 five year Plan ...................................................... 73
10.5 Status of Forest Development Agencies till 31.03.2012 ............................................ 75
10.6 Self Help Groups in Forest Fringe Villages ................................................................ 76

11. WILD LIFE & BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION 78-86

11.1 Status of Management Plans of Protected Areas/Tiger Conservation Plan ................. 78


11.2 Protected Areas in West Bengal ............................................................................... 79
11.3 Tiger population in West Bengal .............................................................................. 80
11.4 Population of Major Flagship Species ...................................................................... 80
11.5 Census Figures of Major Wild Animals ..................................................................... 81
11.6 Details of Persons killed / injured by wild animals during 2011-12 ............................. 81
11.7 Death of Wild Animals during 2011-12 .................................................................... 82
11.8 Seizure of wild animals and anomal body parts ........................................................ 83
11.9 Details of animals rescued in West Bengal during 2011-12 ........................................ 83
11.10 Chemical immobilization of elephant and Tiger tranquilisation done upto 2011-12 ... 84
11.11 Leopard Immobilisation and rhino tranquilisation done upto 2011-12 ..................... 86

12. SOIL CONSERVATION 87-105

13. FORESTRY RESEARCH 106-108

14. FORESTRY TRAINING 109-110

15. West Bengal Forest Development Corporation Limited 111-116

16. MONITORING 117-122

17. MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 123-135

17.1 Outturn of Timber and Firewood ............................................................................ 123


17.2 Outturn of Minor Forest Produce(MFP) ................................................................... 124
17.3 List and Location details of Forest Rest Houses ......................................................... 125
17.4i District and Division wise Saw Mills and other Wood Based Industries of W. B. ........... 129
17.4ii Length of Forest Roads in West Bengal .................................................................... 131
17.5 Parks and Garden maintained by the DFO, Parks & Gardens (North) ........................ 132
17.5i Parks and Beautification areas under the control of U. R.F. Division ........................... 133
17.6 Supreme Court on Forest Conservation ................................................................... 134
INTRODUCTION
West Bengal( Area 88,752 Sq K.M. Comprising of 19 Districts ) is the only Indian State to have a
coastline as well as the Himalayas and is situated between 21º20' and 27º32' N latitude and 85º50' and
89º52' E longitude, bordering Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan. The State supports approximately 7.54% of
the population of India on only 2.69% of the country's geographical area. The State has the highest population
density of 1029 persons per sq. km. 72% of the population resides in rural areas whereas 28% resides in urban
areas of the State.
The demand of forest produce for this huge population on the limited natural resources e.g the land
and forests, makes it almost impossible to be met from the notified forest area, which is only 13.32%. To cope
up with the situation, efforts have been taken by the Forest Department to increase the forest and tree cover
through promotion of Social Forestry, Farm Forestry, Agro Forestry, Community Forestry& afforestation on
wasteland, panchayet land, Private land, tea gardens etc. outside the notified Forest area. Keeping this in view,
the Planning Commission of India has set the target for achieving the National goal of 33% of Forest and tree
cover of the total geographical area of the State by 11th Five Year Plan period i.e 2012. There has also been a
conscious effort to enhance the forest productivity by improving of planting stock through Modern Nursery
hycopot seedlings and by the use of clonal technology etc.
The state has two distinct natural divisions; the North Himalayas and the South Alluvial Gangetic
plains.
A large number of Rivers cut through the state of West Bengal. On their way they gift some of the most
fertile and rich land areas to the state. River Ganga is the most important among the Rivers that flows through
the state of West Bengal. In the northern part the hills of Darjeeling and its surrounding regions are cut by deep
gorges of the gushing Teesta river.
Apart from Teesta the other important Himalayan Rivers that flow through the northern part of the
state are the Torsha, the Jaldhaka, the Raidakh and the Sankosh. Among them the Torsha is the most
riotous one. Another important river of the northern part of the state is the Mahananda. It rises from the
springs near the Darjeeling town. It flows downward to water the central part of the state as well.
Apart from the Mahananda the other Rivers in the central region of the state are Atrai, Punarbhava and
the Tangan. While Atrai flows to join the Padma River of Bangladesh the other two flow into the Mahananda
river. Another important river that flows in this part of the state is Mayurakshi. It is fed by the tributaries such as
Bakreswar, Kopai, Dwarka and Brahmani. Damodar is also a major river here. Originating from the hills of
Bihar, it flows towards the east to join the River Hoogly, which is one of the most important Rivers of West
Bengal.
The main channel of River Ganga in this part of the country is the Bhagirathi. It joins the Padma in
Bangladesh. The Ganga drains into the Bay of Bengal forming the famous delta of Indian Sundarbans.
Two other very important Rivers in West Bengal are Subarnarekha and Rupnarayan.
The State has a diverse climate, varying from moist-tropical in south-east to dry-tropical in the
south-west and from sub-tropical to temperate in the mountains in north. Annual rainfall varies from
900mm in south-west to about 5000mm in northern parts of the State. The temperature also ranges
between below zero degree centrigrade in the Darjeeling hills during the winters to about 46ºC in Purulia
during summer.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 1


CHAPTER - 1

Demography
Salient feature of the State in relation to population, density & livestock etc.
Table 1.1
POPULATION OF WEST BENGAL, SINCE 1901.
Year Population in millions
All India West Bengal
1 2 3
1901 238.4 16.9
1911 252.1 18.0
1921 251.3 17.5
1931 279.0 18.9
1941 318.2 23.2
1951 361.1 26.3
1961 439.2 34.9
1971 548.2 44.3
1981 685.2 54.6
1991 846.3 68.0
2001 1027.0 80.2
2011 1210.1 91.3
2012 1210.1 91.3

Table 1.2
Area, Population and Density in West Bengal
Area, Population, Decennial Growth Rate and Density for 2001 and 2011 at a glance for West Bengal
and the Districts
Sl. District Area Population 2001 Population 2011 Decennial Population
No. Growth Density Per
Rate(%) Sq. Km.
P M F P M F 1991- 2001- 2001 2011
2001 2011
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
West Bengal 88,752 80176197 41465985 38710212 91347736 46927389 44420347 17.77 13.93 903 1029
1 Darjeeling 3,149 1609172 830644 778528 1842034 934796 907238 23.79 14.47 511 585
2 Jalpaiguri 6,227 3401173 1751145 1650028 3869675 1980068 1889607 21.45 13.77 546 621
3 Cooch Bihar 3,387 2479155 1272094 1207061 2822780 1453590 1369190 14.19 13.86 732 833
4 Uttar Dinajpur 3,140 2441794 1259737 1182057 3000849 1550219 1450630 28.72 22.9 778 956
5 Dakshin 2,219 1503178 770335 732843 1670931 855104 815827 22.15 11.16 677 753
Dinajpur
6 Maldah 3,733 3290468 1689406 1601062 3997970 2061593 1936377 24.78 21.5 881 1071
7 Murshidabad 5,324 5866569 3005000 2861569 7102430 3629595 3472835 23.76 21.07 1102 1334
8 Birbhum 4,545 3015422 1546633 1468789 3502387 1791017 1711370 17.99 16.15 663 771

2 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


9 Barddhaman 7,024 6895514 3588376 3307138 7723663 3975356 3748307 13.96 12.01 982 1100
10 Nadia 3,927 4604827 2366853 2237974 5168488 2655056 2513432 19.54 12.24 1173 1316
11 North Twenty 4,094 8934286 4638756 4295530 10082852 5172138 4910714 22.69 12.86 2182 2463
Four Parganas
12 Hoogli 3,149 5041976 2589625 2452351 5520389 2819100 2701289 15.77 9.49 1601 1753
13 Bankura 6,882 3192695 1636002 1556693 3596292 1840504 1755788 13.82 12.64 464 523
14 Puruliya 6,259 2536516 1298078 1238438 2927965 1497656 1430309 14.02 15.43 405 468
15 Hawrah 1,467 4273099 2241898 2031201 4841638 2502453 2339185 14.57 13.31 2913 3300
16 Kolkata 185 4572876 2500040 2072836 4486679 2362662 2124017 3.93 -1.88 24718 24252
17 South Twenty 9,960 6906689 3564993 3341696 8153176 4182758 3970418 20.85 18.05 693 819
Four Parganas
18 Paschim 9,345 5193411 2648048 2545363 5943300 3032630 2910670 15.76 14.44 556 636
Medinipur*
19 Purba 4,736 4417377 2268322 2149055 5094238 2631094 2463144 14.87 15.32 933 1076
Medinipur*

Table: 1.3
Populations rural & urban areas figures at a glance in West Bengal

2001 2011 Percentage of


No of Districts 18 19 urban
No of CD Blocks 341 341
No of Towns 378 909 2001 2011
No of Statutory Towns 123 129
No of Census Towns 255 780
27.97 31.89
No of Villages 40,782 40,203

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 3


Total Rural Urban
Persons 91,347,736 62,213,676 29,134,060

Population Male 46,927,389 31,904,144 15,023,245


Female 44,420,347 30,309,532 14,110,815
Decadal Absolute Percentage
Population Growth
Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban
Persons 11,171,539 4,464,730 6,706,809 13.93 7.73 29.90

Male 5,461,404 2,288,135 3,173,269 13.17 7.73 26.78


Female 5,710,135 2,176,595 3,533,540 14.75 7.74 33.41
Sex Ratio 947 950 939
Population in the Age Absolute Percentage to total
Group 0-6 Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban
Persons 10,112,599 7,535,228 2,577,371 11.07 12.11 8.85

Male 5,187,264 3,860,958 1,326,306 11.05 12.10 8.83


Female 4,925,335 3,674,270 1,251,065 11.09 12.12 8.87
Child Sex Ratio 950 952 943
Absolute Literacy rate
Literates Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban

Persons 62,614,556 39,898,187 22,716,369 77.08 72.97 85.54

Male 34,508,159 22,298,022 12,210,137 82.67 79.51 89.15


Female 28,106,397 17,600,165 10,506,232 71.16 66.08 81.70
(Source-Census of India-2011)

Table: 1. 4

In addition to the human population the live stock population has also grown considerably
which depends on fodder. The majority is scrub cattle which feed either on forest or on wasteland as
there is meager amount of pasture / grazing land for them.
Life Stock Population

Item 1977 1982 1989 1994 1997 2003 2006 2007


Total Cattle(Cows & Bulls) 14435 15658 16510 17206 17832 17984 18665 19188
Total Buffaloes 1268 987 965 980 998 876 857 764
Total Sheep 1079 1365 1460 1415 1462 1411 1419 1577
Total Goats 7335 10916 11890 14167 15648 11757 11881 15069

Source: Statistical Abstract, 2008


Bureau of Applied Economic & Statistic, WB

4 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


CHAPTER - 2
LAND USE, CLIMATE AND SOIL

2.1 LAND USE


The overall land use pattern in the state of West Bengal depends mostly on the physiographic condition
of the area. Total geographical area of the state is divided into two major classes i.e. (a) arable land, that
includes net sown area and fallow land (b) non-arable land, which includes forest, area not available for
cultivation and other uncultivable land excluding current fallow. The percentage of arable land is about
63.48 % and about 34.36% land is under non-arable category (Economic Review, GoWB, 2009-10), which
includes notified forest area to the tune of 13.38% of total geographical area. Agricultural activities are mostly
restricted to the Gangetic plains having fertile cultivable land. The percentage of net sown area is higher (above
70%) in Uttar and Dakshin Dinajpur, Nadia, Murshidabad, Cooch Behar, North 24-Parganas, Hoogli,
Burdwan and Birbhum districts. High percentage of forest cover exists in the Districts having hills and
mountain ranges and also in the coastal areas. Protected forests also cover considerable areas in Purulia,
Bankura, Medinipur, Burdwan and Birbhum districts. The maximum area under forest (44.68 %) is found in
Darjeeling district.
CLIMATE
In general, the climate of West Bengal varies from subhumid to perhumid with uniformity of
temperature. The tropic of cancer runs across the middle of Nadia, Burdwan, northern parts of Bankura and
Purulia districts. In spite of its position in equatorial zone, the Himalayan Mountains in the north, Bay of
Bengal in the south and extensive network of rivers, canals, tanks etc. do not allow extreme climatic conditions
to prevail in the state.
Heavy rainfall occurs in the northern part of West Bengal and gradually decreases towards south
forming an area of moderate rainfall zone around central part of West Bengal. The annual rainfall is maximum
(>3000 mm) at the foothill region on the north (sub-Himalayan West Bengal). Whereas, the coastal region in
the south receives around 1500-2000 mm of rainfall, and it decreases to 900 mm in SouthWest. The average
annual rainfall in the state is about 1,900 mm of which 1,600 mm occurs during monsoon months.
In the Northern part of the state that includes the mountain region (Himalayas), temperature ranges
from freezing point to 10°C in winter. It hovers around 12°C to 18°C in the plains. January is the coldest month
and winter starts from the end of November and extends to February. Darjeeling has a normal mean
temperature ranging from 5.8°C to 17.0°C where snowfall also occurs occasionally. Rest of the area has mean
winter temperature ranging from 9°C to 14°C.
The summer season begins from the month of March and temperature starts rising upto June. May is
the hottest month. The summer temperature shows variation from 20°C in Darjeeling district to about 48°C in
Purulia district. Temperature in the rainy seasons is more or less uniform in the plains and it varies from 21°C at
Kolkata to 30°C at Canning. This uniformity indicates the influence of southwest monsoon in lowering
temperatures.
SOIL
In the Himalayan region the soils are predominantly shallow to moderately shallow but also deep at
places, well drained, coarse-loamy to gravelly loamy in texture. These soils occur on steep side slopes. They
are classified as Typic Haplumbrepts and Typic Udorthents.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 5


In the foothills of Himalayas and in piedmont plains the soils are deep to very deep, imperfectly drained
and coarse-loamy to fine loamy in texture and are placed in Aquic Ustifluvents and Fluventic Eutrochrepts.
Soils of the alluvial plain which includes Indo-gangetic alluvium (recent, active and old) are also very
deep, imperfectly to poorly drained, fine-loamy and also coarse-loamy in texture and with moderate flooding
problem in some cases. These soils are classified as Aeric Haplaquepts, Typic Fluvaquents, Typic Haplaquepts,
and Typic Ustochrepts. Undulating plain area is represented by very deep, fine-loamy and coarse-loamy soils
with moderate erosion and classified as Aeric Ochraqualfs, Typic Ustifluvents and Typic Haplustalfs.
The western part of the state i.e., predominantly Chhotanagpur plateau area have soils shallow to very
shallow, well-drained and gravelly loam and coarse-loamy in texture with moderate erosion whereas soils in
the remaining part are deep to very deep, well drained, fine loamy in texture. They are classified as Lithic
Haplustalfs and Typic Haplustalfs.
Coastal plain is represented by soils of both sandy as well as fine in texture, very deep with salinity
problems in some places. Soils are placed in Aquic Ustipsamments and Vertic Haplaquepts. Whereas soils of
delta plain are very deep, imperfectly to poorly drained, fine in texture and has the problem of inundation and
salinity and classified as Aeric Haplaquepts and Typic Haplaquepts.
The physiography of West Bengal can be divided into two major regions:
A. Himalayan Region
B. Gangetic Plains
A. Himalayan Region : This is sub-divided further into two parts:
i) Darjeeling Himalayas: This zone consists of Darjeeling district (except the Siliguri Sub-Division).
The hills are comparatively of recent origin, generally steep sided and prone to landslides. Soils are
brown, loamy in nature, rich in nutrients, organically rich and acidic in reaction. Most of the rivers
originate here.
ii) Sub-Himalayan : This zone comprises of the plains districts of Jalpaiguri and Cooch Behar and
Siliguri Sub-Division of Darjeeling district. Soils are mostly sandy, highly acidic, heavily leached and
poor in base and plant nutrients. Since most of the hilly river flow through this region, these areas are
flood prone.
B. Gangetic Plains: The Lower Ganga Plain in West Bengal forms a part of the Indo-Gangetic Plains.
14 districts of West Bengal are contained in this physiographic region. This region is further divided into
four micro physiographic zones. These are :
—
Barind tract comprising Cooch Behar, Malda, North and South Dinajpur districts.
—
Moribund Delta comprising of Murshidabad and Nadia districts.
—
Proper Delta consisting of the districts of Burdwan, Kolkata, Hooghly, Howrah, South & North
24-Parganas.
—
Rarh plain is spread over Purba and Paschim Medinipur districts, Bankura, Birbhum and Purulia.
Agro climatic zoning refers to the division of an area of land into land resource units, based on
numerical expressions of crop climate quantified in the form of agro-climatic indices, having an unique
combination of landforms, soils and climatic characteristics with a specific range of potentials and constraints
for land use.

6 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table 2.2

AVERAGEOFDAILYMAXIMUMANDMINIMUMTEMPERATUREINWESTBENGAL
YEAR:2010
Station January February March April May June July August September October November December
Bagdogra - - - - - - - - - - - -
Balurghat 16 23 28 31 30 29 29 29 30 29 27 16
Cooch Behar 17 19 24 26 27 28 29 29 28 26 24 18
Darjeeling 8 7 12 14 14 15 16 16 15 14 11 8
Jalpaiguri 15 19 25 27 27 27 28 28 28 26 24 19
Kalimpong - - - - - 24 26 26 25 24 22 14
Malda 16 22 28 31 30 30 30 30 29 28 26 20
Bankura 18 23 29 33 30 30 28 28 27 26 24 16

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Berhampur 16 21 28 31 30 29 29 29 28 27 25 19
Burdwan 17 22 29 33 31 31 30 30 29 28 25 20
Alipore 18 24 29 31 31 30 30 29 29 28 27 21
Dum Dum 17 23 29 32 31 31 30 30 29 26 26 15
Contai - - - - - - - - - - - -
Digha 18 23 27 30 30 30 29 29 29 27 26 20
Diamond Harbour 18 23 29 31 30 30 30 29 29 28 27 21
Krishnanagar 9 15 28 31 29 29 28 28 27 27 25 19
Mogra 15 22 28 32 31 30 27 29 27 26 25 18
Midnapore 17 23 29 32 30 31 29 29 29 27 26 20
Purulia - - - - - - - - - - - -
Suri (Santiniketan) 16 21 28 32 30 31 29 29 29 27 25 19
Uluberia 15 20 28 30 29 29 28 28 28 26 25 18

Source : Bureau of Applied Economics and Statistics, W.B.

7
Table 2.3

8
ANNUAL RAINFAIL IN WEST BENGAL BY DISTRICT (Inmillimeters)
YEAR:2010
DISTRICT January February March April May June July August September October November December
Darjeeling - - - 72 355 896 1142 876 456 188 33 -
Jalpaiguri - 2 74 159 396 900 1044 688 539 70 10 -
Cooch Behar - - 30 385 600 711 863 525 496 61 2 -
Uttar Dinajpur - - - 70 187 310 376 268 319 57 1 -
Dakshin Dinajpur - 71 171 419 237 367 268 144 6 -
Malda - 1 - 26 121 263 211 174 218 103 7 5
Murshidabad - 2 - 18 127 232 157 128 186 103 2 36
Nadia - 8 - 28 143 192 115 97 176 101 6 44
24 Prgs. (N) - 1 1 34 170 205 181 215 241 131 4 21
24 Prgs. (S) - 1 2 3 115 237 245 258 215 107 5 16
Howrah - 24 3 4 145 218 179 250 237 130 5 17
Hooghly - 9 1 18 145 190 155 211 212 137 3 20
Burdwan - 8 1 22 92 219 133 115 178 80 4 38
Birbhum 1 5 4 18 77 219 206 115 223 46 6 46
Bankura - 9 3 24 129 204 163 144 141 65 6 36
Purulia - 1 1 9 79 104 159 192 148 58 9 50
Pacchim Midnapore - 1 1 3 161 190 219 150 212 46 3 16
Purba Midnapore - 16 1 1 94 178 266 295 246 99 5 17
Source : Bureau of Applied Economics and Statistics, W.B.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


3
2.4 Agro Climatic Zones of West Bengal
Sl. No. Region Districts
1 Barind West Dinajpur, Malda
2 Alluvial Nadia, Burdwan, Hooghly, Howrah, Midnapore (except western part),
Murshidabad, Kolkata, North 24-Parganas and South-Western Part of
Darjeeling District.
3 Coastal South 24-Parganas.
4 Rarh & Eastern Parts of Purba and Paschim Midnapore, Birbhum, Bankura and Purulia.
Plateau
5 Terrai Cooch Behar, Jalpaiguri and south-western part of Darjeeling
6 Hills Darjeeling

However, the agro-climatic region approach failed due to i) non-consideration of minute differences in
soils and environmental conditions, ii) lacking uniform criteria and iii) using state as a unit of division.

Table 2.5
SOIL PROBLEMS IN WEST BENGAL
2.4.1 : Soils under Limiting Depth Classes
Class Distribution Area affected (,000 ha.)
Very shallow (0-25 cm.) Purulia 30.7
Shallow (25-50 cm.) Parts of Darjeeling, Purulia, Midnapore, 318.4
Bankura.
Moderately Shallow Parts of Darjeeling, Midnapur, Purulia, 125.2
(50-75 cm.) Bankura, Burdwan, Birbhum
T o t a l : 474.3

2 .4.2 : Soils Under Limiting Drainage Classes


Class Distribution Area (,000 ha.)
Very Poorly Drained Parts of Midnapore, Hooghly, 24-Parganas (S). 173.4
Poorly drained Parts of 24-Parganas, Nadia, Murshidabad, 2453.3
Jalpaiguri, CoochBehar, Malda, Midnapore,
Howrah, Hooghly
Imperfectly Drained Parts of Burdwan, Birbhum, Howrah, Malda, 1747.6
West Dinajpur, Midnapore & Purulia.
Excessively Drained Parts of Darjeeling, Jalpaiguri, Bankura and 64.7
Purulia.
T o t a l : 4439

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 9


2.4.3: Soils Under Limiting Erosion Classes
Class Distribution Area (,000 ha.)
Severe Parts of Darjeeling, Purulia, Birbhum, 57.4
Bankura and Midnapore
Moderate Whole of West Bengal excepting 24-Parganas 1303.1
(S & N) Nadia, Howrah & Hooghly.
T o t a l : 1360.5

2.4.4 : Soils Under Limiting Salinity Classes


Class Distribution Area (,000 ha.)
Very Strong Parts of South 24-Parganas & 241
Purba Midnapore.
Strong Parts of South 24-Parganas and 5.7
Purba Midnapore.
Moderate Parts of South 24-Parganas and 131
Purba Midnapore
T o t a l : 377.7

2. 4.5 : Soils Under Limiting Textural Classes


Class Distribution Area (,000 ha.)
Sandy Coastal part of Purba Midnapore. 13.7
Gravely loam Parts of Darjeeling, Paschim Midnapore, 488.4
Bankura, Purulia.
Clay 24-Parganas (S),Purba Midnapore, Nadia, 1550.7
Murshidabad, Burdwan
T o t a l : 2052.8

2.4.6 : Soils Under Limiting Water Logging Classes


Class Distribution Area affected (,000 ha.)
Moderate Cooch Behar, Jalpaiguri, West Dinajpur, 448.8
Midnapore, Burdwan, Birbhum, Murshidabad.
Slight Darjeeling, Jalpaiguri, Cooch Behar, 808.3
West Dinajpur, Malda, Murshidabad, Birbhum,
Midnapore, Hooghly, Burdwan, Nadia, Howrah.
T o t a l : 1257.1

10 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


2.4.7: Soils Under Limiting Flooding Classes.
Class Distribution Area (,000 ha.)
Moderate Parts of Jalpaiguri, Cooch Behar, Uttar Dinajpur, 1043.2
Malda, Murshidabad, Nadia, Burdwan,
24-Parganas, Midnapore.
Severe Parts of Hooghly, Midnapore, Murshidabad, 907.2
Nadia & 24-Parganas
T o t a l : 1950.4

Source : Soils of West Bengal for Optimising Land Use, 1992 (NBSS & LUP).

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 11


CHAPTER - 3
FOREST LAND, FOREST COVER, AND VEGETATION

The state of West Bengal extends from the Himalayas in the north to the Bay of Bengal in the south. It
lies between 20o 31' N and 27o 12' N latitude and 85o 50' E and 89o 52' E longitude covering a geographic area
of 88,752 sq.km. Five States (Sikkim, Assam, Bihar, Jharkhand and Orissa) and three countries (Bhutan,
Nepal and Bangladesh) surround West Bengal – Sikkim to the North, Bhutan to the North-East, Assam and
Bangladesh to the East, Nepal, Bihar and Jharkhand to the West and Jharkhand and Orissa to the South-West.
The exteme south end touches the Bay of Bengal.
Total recorded forest land in the state is 11,879 sq.km, of which 7,054 sq.km. is Reserved Forest, 3,772
sq.km. is Protected Forest and 1,053 sq.km. is Unclassed State Forest, thus constituting 13.38% of the
geographical area of the state.
The forest cover including the forests created outside the recorded forest area is 15.68% of the
geographical area as assessed by the GIS Cell of the W.B. Forest Department in the year 2006 on the basis of
Satellite Imagery procured from NRSA, Hyderabad in digital data format. While computing the forest cover of
the State, the protocol developed by RRSSC, Kharagpur under Dept. of Space, GOI, NRSA, Hyderabad in
earlier studies was followed. Estuarine water bodies like rivers & creeks in mangrove forest and river flowing
through the recorded forest land in Jalpaiguri and other districts have been included while computing the
forest cover. Similarly large portions of farm foresty plantations, raised out side forest land, having forest like
micro-ecosystem, have been enumerated as forest cover.
As perclassification of satellite imageries, the vegetation cover of the state is more than 27% of the
geographical area as in 2006. The vegetation cover include village orchards/groves, tea garden and
horticulture plantations.

Table – 3.1
LEGAL STATUS OF FORESTS IN WEST BENGAL SINCE 1901
Area in Sq. Km.
Year Reserved Protected Unclassed Private Tea Other Total
Forests Forests State Protected Garden Private Forests
Forests Forests Forests Forests Area
1901 2,401 4,856 115 - 398 5,271 13,491
1911 2,471 4,431 78 - 398 5,654 13,032
1921 2,530 4,408 78 - 325 5,950 13,291
1931 5,209 1,661 31 - 263 5,133 12,297
1941 5,199 1,645 31 - 258 4,995 12,128
1951 6,845 17 128 - 258 5,007 12,255
1961 6,979 3,451 483 598 257 204 11,972
1964 7,000 3,512 520 593 244 118 11,987
1971 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
1981 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
1991 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879

12 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


2001 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2002 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2003 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2004 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2006 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2007 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2008 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2009 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2010 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2011 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879
2012 7,054 3,772 1,053 - - - 11,879

(Source upto 1964 : West Bengal Forests, Centenary Commemoration Volume, 1964)

Table – 3.2
Districtwise Area under Forests by Legal Status in West Bengal
(Area in Sq.Km.)
Sl. District Reserved Protected Unclassed State Total Area
No. Forests Forests Forests & others
1 Darjeeling 1,115 - 89 1,204
2 Jalpaiguri 1,483 217 90 1,790
3 Cooch Behar - 42 15 57
4 Bankura 80 1,311 91 1,482
5 Purba Medinipur 8 1,166 535 1,709
8 1,166 535 1,709
6 Paschim Medinipur
7 Burdwan 3 192 82 277
8 Purulia 112 729 35 876
9 Birbhum 8 54 97 159
10 Hooghly 3 - - 3
11 Nadia 5 3 5 13
12 Murshidabad 1 7 - 8
13 Malda 8 5 7 20
14 Uttar Dinajpur 8 4 6 18
8 4 6 18
15 Dakshin Dinajpur
16 24-Parganas (N) 43 - - 43
17 24-Parganas (S) 4,177 42 1 4,220
18 Howrah - - - -
19 Kolkata - - - -
Total 7,054 3,772 1,053 11,879
(59.38%) (31.75%) (8.87%) (100%)
All India 423,311 217,245 127,881 768,437

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 13


Classification of Recorded Forest Land (Legal status)

Reserved Forest : An area notified under the provisions of Indian Forest Act,1927 having full degree
of protection. In Reserved Forests all activities are prohibited unless specifically
permitted (Sec.20 of IFA,1927).

Protected Forest : An area notified under the provisions of the Indian Forest Act having limited degree
of protection. In Protected Forest all activities are permitted unless prohibited
(Sec. 29 of IFA,1927).

Unclassed Forest : An area recorded as forest but not included in Reserved or Protected forest category.
Ownership status of such forests varies from state to state.

Table – 3.3
Districtwise Distribution of Geographical and Recorded Forest Land in West Bengal
District Geographical Area Recorded Forest Area % age of Recorded
(Sq. Km.) (Sq. Km.) Forest Area
Darjeeling 3,149 1,204 38.23%
Jalpaiguri 6,227 1,790 28.75%
Cooch Behar 3,387 57 1.68%
Bankura 6,882 1,482 21.53%
Midnapore 14,081 1,709 12.14%
Burdwan 7,024 277 3.94%
Purulia 6,259 876 14.00%
Birbhum 4,545 159 3.50%
Hooghly 3,149 3 0.10%
Nadia 3,927 12 0.30%
Murshidabad 5,324 8 0.15%
Malda 3,733 20 0.54%
Uttar Dinajpur 3,140 10 0.32%
Dakshin Dinajpur 2,219 8 0.36%
Kolkata 104 - 0.00%
Howrah 1,467 - 0.00%
24-Parganas (S) 10,159 4,221 41.54%
24-Parganas (N) 3,977 43 1.08%
Total : 88,752 11,879 13.38%

14 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table-3.4

Comparative statement of Forest cover as enumerated through GIS/RS

Survey Period % Recorded Forest land % Forest & Tree cover


1988 13.38 14.32
1991 13.38 14.97
1994 13.38 15.06
1997 13.38 15.16
2000 13.38 15.30
2004 13.38 15.52
2006 13.38 15.68
2007 13.38 16.67*
2008 13.38 16.67*
2009 13.38 16.67*

*Source: State Forest Report. 2009 – 2010, West Bengal and FSI 2011.
Protocol followed for forest cover includes waterbodies in mangrove forest

Table-3.5

Land Use Status of West Bengal Coniferous

Miscellaneous
Sal
Vegetation
1.99 2%
Mangrove
Mangrove 2.29 2% Open
Forest

Sal 3.30 3%
1.99 2% Miscellaneous
Vegetation
Riverine Succession
Cloud 0.09 0%
0.17 0% Open Forest
Young
Coniferous 0.00 0%
Coppice
0.60 1% Non Forest
Riverine
Vegetation Succession
Others 6.94 7%
22.18 Tea Garden 1.03 1% Young Coppice
22% Orchard 2.61 3%
Sand 4.20 4% Wasteland 6.96 7% Non Forest
Water 5.76 6%
Vegetation
Fallow
Marshy Area 2.12 2% 16.70 Agriculture 13.61 14% Tea Garden
Settlement 7.22 7% 17%

Orchard

Wasteland

Agriculture

Fallow

Settlement

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 15


Forest Area under Major Forest Types in West Bengal
Sl. Forest Type Area (in million hectares)
No.
West Bengal All India
1 Tropical Moist Deciduous Forests 0.459 23.245
2 Tropical Dry Deciduous Forests 0.43 29.149
3 Sub-tropical Broadleaved Hill Forests 0.005 0.287
4 Montane Wet Temperate Forests 0.005 1.613
5 Littoral and Swamp Forests 0.279 0.671
6 Alpine Forests 0.005 1.79
T o t a l : 1.183 56.755

Table – 3.6
Principal species under Major Forest Types in West Bengal
Sl. No. Forest Type Principal Species
1 Tropical Moist Deciduous forests Shorea robusta, Michelia champaca, Lagerstroemia
parviflora, Terminalia belerica, Chukrasia velutina.
2 Tropical Dry Deciduous forests Shorea robusta, Anogeissus latifolia, Boswellia serrata,
Terminalia belerica, T.tomentosa etc.
3 Sub-tropical Broadleaved hill Schima wallichi, Castanopsis indica, Phoebe attenuata,
forests Castanopsis tribuloides etc.
4 Montane Wet Temperate forests Quercus spp., Acer spp., Machilus spp., Michelia spp. etc.
5 Littoral and Swamp forests Ceriops spp., Avicennia spp., Rhizophora candelaria etc.
6 Alpine forests Tsuga brunoniana, Picea spp., Abies densa, Quercus spp.,
Juniperus spp., Rhododendron spp and Betula utilis.

Table – 3.7
A NOTE ON MAJOR FOREST TYPES OF WEST BENGAL
Group 1B : NORTHERN TROPICAL WET EVERGREEN FORESTS
Location : Plains of North Bengal upto 150 m. altitude.
Sites : Bagdogra range of Kurseong divison, Khutimari areas of Jalpaiguri division, Damanpur,
Cheko, Gadadhar, Rajabhatkhawa, Rydak of Buxa Tiger Reserve.
Area : 167 sq.km.
Species : Sal, Nageshwar, Jam, Kainjal, Lator, Malagiri, Lali & Canes.

Group 2B : NORTHERN SUB-TROPICAL SEMI-EVERGREEN FORESTS


Location : North Bengal
Sites : Sumbong, Peshok, Buxaduar
Area : 25 sq.km.
Species : Champ, Panisaj, Gokul, Angare.

16 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Group 3C : NORTH INDIA MOIST DECIDUOUS FORESTS
Location : North Bengal
Sites : Almost entire duars and terai area
Area : 1757 sq.km.
Species : The most important forests of the State are in this sub-montane belt consisting of Sal with
Champ, Chilauni, Chikrassi, Gamar, Lali, Lasune, Panisaj, Paccasaj interspresed with riverian
forests of Khair, Sissoo, Simul, Toon etc. representing succession from riverian to climax sal.
The changes of vegetation that occur with increasing altitude in the Himalayas are similar to
those that take place as one travels from tropics to the poles. The proportion of Sal
gradually dwindles, stopping short of Damuda rocks (2500 ft.) which are remains of
Gondwana sand stones and are unsuitable for Sal.

Group 4B : LITTORAL & SWAMP FORESTS – THE MANGROVES


Sites : The tidal mangrove forests of Ganga-Brahmaputra delta (Sunderbans):
Area : 4263 sq.km.
Species : Important species are :
Goran (Ceriops roxburghiana)
Gnewa (Excoecaria agallocha)
Sundari (Heritiera minor)
Baen (Avicennia officinalis)
Dhundal (Carpa obovata)

Group 4D : LITTORAL & SWAMP FORESTS-TROPICAL SEASONAL SWAMPS OF


Barringtonia.
Location : Malda & Dinajpur (N & S)
Area : 20 sq.km.
Species : Hijal (Barringtonia acuteangula)

Group 5B : NORTHERN TROPICAL DRY DECIDUOUS FORESTS


Location : Bankura, Purulia, Midnapur, Birbhum, Burdwan
Area : 4527 sq.km.
Species : Sal (Shorea robusta), Peasal (Pterocarpus marsupium), Kend (Diospyros melanoxylon),
Mahul (Madhuka latifolia), Kusum (Schleichera trijuga), Karam (Adina cordifolia), Asan
(Terminalia tomentosa), Bahera (T.belerica), Rahara (Soyamida febrifuga), Dhaw
(Anogeissus latifolia).

Group 8B : NORTHERN SUB-TROPICAL BROAD-LEAVED WET HILL FORESTS


Location : North Bengal hills 300m-1650m altitude.
Sites : Sim, Upper Sumbong, Upper Reyong, Forests blocks of Majua, Lower Babukhola,
Phuguri, Bunklong, Khairbani, Mana, Sittong Numbong, Setikhola, Shivakhola, Mirik,
Paglajhora, Kuhi and Latpanchar
Area : 800 sq.km.
Species : Chilouni, Panisaj, Gokul, Sour, Utis, Mauwa, Tarsing.
The species commonly found are Mowa, Chilauni, Katus, Panisaj, Lampate, Phaleado,
Saur, Tarsing, Angare, Melo Kapasi, Utis, Toon and Malagiri along with Kutmero, Jhingni,
Lek Chilauni, Malata, Thali, Kawla etc. Climbers and epiphytes are common here.
Choyabans and tree Ferns occur locally.

Group 11B : NORTHERN MONTANE WET TEMPERATE FORESTS


Location : North Bengal hills 1650m-3000m.altitude.
Sites : Selimbong, Kankibong, Little Rangit, Lopchu, Mahaldiram, Chattakpur, Dhobijhora,
Upper Babukhola, Phuguri, Paglajhora and Lower Babukhola forest blocks

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 17


Area : 150 sq.km.
Species : Kawla, Lkhar, Pipli, Oaks (buk & phalat), Rani champ, Abies densa, Tsuga brunoniana, Acer spp.
The principal species found here are Pipli(Bucklandia populnea), Utis, Saur, Katus, Kapasi,
Arkula, Mowa, Khankpa, Sinkoli, Buk, Phalant, Champ, Kawla, Malta, Magnolia, Latasaea
and Machilus spp. along with Jhigni, Chiwri, Araliaceous, spp. Ilex spp., Thali and Kharane,
The ground flora includes Kimbu, Kagate, Asare, Thotne, Chuletro, Maling, Lycopodium,
Basak and Chirata.

Group 12C : EAST HIMALAYAN MOIST TEMPERATE FORESTS


Location : North Bengal hills 1500m-1800m.
Sites : Rimbik
Area : 150 sq.km.
Species : The species commonly found are Mowa, Chilaune, Katus, Panisaj, Lampate, Phaleado,
Saur, Tarsing, Angare, Melo Kapasi, Utis, Toon, and Malagiri along with Kutmero Jhigni,
Lek Chilaune, Malata, Thali, Kawla etc. Climbers and epiphytes are common here.
Choyabans and tree Ferns occur locally. This type of forests are met within the forest blocks
of Majua, Lower Babukhola, Phuguri, Bunklong, Khairbani, Mana, Sittong Numbong,
Setikhola. Shivakhola, Mirik, Paglajhora, Kuhi and Latpanchar.

Group 14C : SUB-ALIPINE FORESTS


Location : North Bengal hills 3000m-3700m
Sites : Sandakpu, Sabarkum, Phalut
Area : 20sq.km.
Species : Important spp. are Putli, Lekh Kapasi, Lekh Pipli, Kapasi, Arupate, Sindure Katus
(Castanopsis sp.), Yew (Taxus bacata), Tsuga brunoniana, Abies densa, Junipers, Birch
(Betula utilis), Rhododendrons, Salix, Berberis, Maling bamboo.

Table 3.8
DEGRADED FOREST LAND IN WEST BENGAL
SL. NO. DISTRICT UNIT( in .Sq.K.m)
1 24 Parganas (North) 0.21
2 24 Parganas (South) 0.98
3 Bankura 203.64
4 Bardhaman 20.34
5 Birbhum 39.99
6 Cooch Behar 0.15
7 Darjeeling 21.82
8 Dinajpur (North) 0
9 Dinajpur (South) 0
10 Hoogly 0
11 Howrah 0
12 Jalpaiguri 23.32
13 Kolkata 0
14 Malda 0
15 Midnapur 110.70
16 Murshidabad 1.57
17 Nadia 0.25
18 Purulia 114.29
TOTAL 537.25
Source: Wastelands Atlas of India, 2011. Published by Ministry of Rural Development, Deptt. of Land Resources
Govt of India Govt of India and NRSA, Deptt. of Space., Govt of India.

18 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


CHAPTER - 4

DIVERSION OF FOREST LAND UNDER FOREST(CONSERVATION) ACT,1980.

Prior to the enactment of the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980, the recorded forest lands were
vulnerable to diversion for different non-forestry activities viz. : creation of human settlements, agriculture,
construction of dams, bridges, roads and other developmental activities. In order to check further depletion of
the forest cover and protect the forests, the Govt of India enacted the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 and
amended it from time to time with insertions of stringent stipulations. As per the act a majority of such
diversions requires prior approval of the Ministry of Environment and Forest, Govt. of India except for very
small areas to be diverted for basic public utilities in rural areas and also in Left wing Extremist Areas where the
powers vest with the State Govt. As a result the quantum of diversion of forest land for non forestry purposes
has reduced appreciably.

In West Bengal an area of 2343.7657 ha. of forest land, which does not include “In Principal” approval
and area meant for surface collection of boulders, has been actually diverted for different non forestry
purposes till march 2012 (Table 4.1).

As part of Compensatory Afforestation ( CAMPA) 2708.4296 ha. of plantation in Non Forest land and
573.8706 ha. of plantation on Degraded Forest land have been raised till March 2012 ( Table - 4.2).

Table - 4.1
Diversion of Forest Land for Non-Forest use in West Bengal since the enforcement of
Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980.

(Area in Hectares)
Year Area approved Diversion Not Temporary Net Diversion
for diversion executed Diversion
1981-82 29.7720 0.0000 0.0000 29.7720
1982-83 87.1900 0.0000 0.0000 87.1900
1983-84 15.3250 2.4400 0.0000 12.8850
1984-85 13.3091 0.0000 0.0000 13.3091
1985-86 306.0000 0.0000 0.0000 306.0000
1986-87 23.7657 0.0178 0.0000 23.7479
1987-88 16.7020 0.0000 0.0000 16.7020
1988-89 18.9250 0.0000 0.0000 18.9250
1989-90 94.4800 0.0300 0.0000 94.4500
1990-91 19.3572 0.6742 0.0000 18.6830
1991-92 47.5003 0.0823 0.0000 47.4180
1992-93 8.4400 0.0000 0.0000 8.4400

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 19


1993-94 232.0000 0.0000 0.0000 232.0000
1994-95 45.0000 0.0000 0.0000 45.0000
1995-96 93.9600 0.0000 0.0000 93.9600
1996-97 1.6459 0.0000 0.0000 1.6459
1997-98 6.7978 0.0000 0.0000 6.7978
1998-99 19.8700 0.0000 0.0000 19.8700
1999-2000 3.0200 0.0000 0.0000 3.0200
2000-01 0.9970 0.0000 0.0700 0.9270
2001-02 285.9000 0.0000 0.0000 285.9000
2002-03 10.0700 0.0000 0.0000 10.0700
2003-04 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
2004-05 310.6220 0.0000 119.0000 191.6220
2005-06 352.7500 0.0000 0.0000 352.7500
2006-07 115.3580 0.0000 0.0000 115.3580
2007-08 37.3535 0.0000 0.0000 37.3535
2008-09 0.0750 0.0000 0.0000 0.0750
2009-10 70.4841 0.0000 0.0000 70.4841
2010-11 180.0900 9.5530 0.0000 170.5370
2011-12 28.8734 0.0000 0.0000 28.8734
Total 2475.633 12.7973 119.07 2343.7657

—
The aforesaid data does not include the area meant for surface collection of boulder.

Table - 4.2
Statement showing the position of cases approved for diversion of Forest land under Forest
(Conservation) Act, 1980 and compensatory Afforesatation till March 2012.
1 Purpose of Diversion Nos.
(i) Irrigation Project 5
(ii) Hydel Project 8
(iii) Mining Project 4
(iv) Construction of Road 13
(v) Laying of Railway Line 2
(vi) Laying of Transmission Line/ Pipe Line 42
(vii) Others 27
Total (Nos) : 101

20 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


2 Forest Area Diverted (Ha) 2343.7657
3 Compensatory Afforestation Stipulated (Ha)
(i) On Degraded Forest Land 799.5608
(ii) On Non Forest Land 2835.7989
Total : 3635.3597
4 Compensatory Afforestation : done in Ha.
i) On Degraded Forest Land 573.8706
ii) On Non Forest Land 2708.4296
Total : 3,282.30
5 CAMPA Fund received form User Agencies during 2011-12 (Rs.) 5,06,98,241.00
6 CAMPA Fund spent during 2011-12 (Rs.) 1,52,42,323.00

Table : 4.3
Location details for Compensatory Afforestation under State CAMPA for the year 2011-12

Particular of works Area in (Ha) Location with GPS


Name of Range,Beat,Block coordinates
Division
Compensatory
afforestation for raising
plantation
Siliguri – Singthum
Darjeeling Kurseong, Garidhura, N26°50'176"
Transmission line of Power 8.00
(T) Rohini E86°17'512"
Grid
Darjeeling Panighta, Panighata, N26°49'047"
………do……… 12.38
(T) Putong-Dudhla E88°14'23.6"
N26°42'14.88"
Siliguri – Singthum
Bagdogra , Bagdogra, E86°16'17.61"
Kurseong Transmission line of Power 26.00
Lolfa N26°42'39.72"
Grid
E86°16'18.32"
N26°42'44.63"
Central , Bagdogra, E88°16'20.68"
Kurseong ………do……… 19.662
Lolfa N26°42'5.48"
E88°16'20.75"
H.T Line of Saraswatipur Belacoba ,Gourikone , N26°38'56"
Baikunthapur 0.015
T State Gourikone -3 E88°37'53"
Pipe line project of Oil Dabgram , Dabgram , N26°44'4.9"
Baikunthapur 4.80
India Ltd. Dabgram - 14 E88°28'9.1"
70.857

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 21


CHAPTER - 5

Forest Organisation in West Bengal

The present administrative set up of the Forest Directorate of the State stands
as follows: -
5.1 Organisational Structure of Forest Directorate
CIRCLE
IFSCadrePosts DIVISION
Non Cadre Posts

PCCF/WB
WBFSCadre
Addl. PCCF, CCF/ Personnel Mgmt. Cell DFO,Pers.Mgmt.
HRD.& Vig.
DFO, Publicity
CCF,Headquarters
Asstt. CCF
& LA
DFO,Utilisation
Addl. PCCF,
Hqrs & Waste CF, W. Plan DFO, Working Plan (N)
DFO, W. Plan (S-I)
Land Dev & GIS
DFO, W. Plan (S-II)
CCF, PGL& I DFO , Statistics

Addl. PCCF, DFO, Law Cell


CCF,Finance DFO , Planning
Finance
DFO, Jalpaiguri
CF,Northern DFO, Cooch Behar
DFO ,
Baikunthapur
CCF, North
DFO, Darjeeling
DFO, Non Timber
CF, Hill Forest Produce
DFO, Kurseong
DFO,Kharagpur
DFO, Medinipur
DFO,Rupnarayan.
CF,Western
DFO, Jhargram
DFO,Purba Medinipur
CCF, West DFO, Purulia
DFO, Kangsabati (S)
CF, South-West
DFO, Kangsabati (N) DFO,Purulia E.F

DFO, Bankura (N)


CF,Central DFO, Panchet
DFO, Bankura (S)
CCF, Central
DFO, Burdwan
CF, South-East DFO, Durgapur
DFO,Birbhum

DFO, Nadia-Murshidabad

22 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


From prepage
DFO, Malda DFO, Siliguri SF
CF,North-West
DFO,Raigunj
CCF, Consv &
DFO,Jalpaiguri SF
Extension DCF, U & R. Forestry
CF, P & G DFO,Pks&Gardens(N)

PCCF, Res, DFO,Howrah SF


Mon & Dev DFO,Kurseong Soil Consvn
CF, Soil C. (N) DFO, Soil
Consvn.(N)
CCF, DFO, Kalimpong Soil
Monitoring, Consvn.
Evaluation &
Soil DFO,Monitoring (North)
Conservation C.F. , Monitoring
DFO,Monitoring (South)

DFO,Silviculture (H)

CF/Research DFO ,Silviculture (N)

CCF, Research DFO,,Silviculture (S)


& Dev Dir. Forestry Training
DIR, W.B. Forest School Centre
CF,/Development

PCCF/ Wildlife

Addl. PCCF, CF, WL.(HQ) DFO, Wildlife (Hqrs.)


Wildlife
DFD, Buxa Tiger Reserve (E)
FD,BTR
DFD, Buxa Tiger Reserve (W )

CCF,Wildlife DFO,Wildlife-I
(N)
CF, Wildlife (N) DFO,Wildlife-II

DFO, Wildlife-III
Jt.Dir,
Sunderban DFO,24-Parganas (S)
Biosphere DFO,24-Parganas(N)
Reserve
Dir, SBR
FD,Sunderbans
DFD, Sunderban T.R.
Tiger Reserve

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 23


Table – 5.1
IFS CADRE STRENGTH IN WEST BENGAL
1 Senior posts under the State Government 78
Principal Chief Conservator of Forests & HOFF 1
Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife and Bio-diversity Conservation) 1
Principal Chief conservator of Forests (Research, Monitoring & Development) 1
Additional Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife) 1
Additional Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Human Resource & Development) 1
Additional Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Headquarters & Wasteland Developments) 1
Additional Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Finance) 1
Additional Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (North Bengal) 1
Additional Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (CAMPA & Nodal Officer FCA) 1
Additional Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Biosphere Reserve) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (West) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests, (Monitoring, Evaluation & Soil Conservation) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (Central) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests Wildlife (North) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (Research & Development) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (Conservation & Extension) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (Finance) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (Personnel Management Cell) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (Public Grievance, Law & Information) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (Gazetted Establishment) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests (Special Development Project) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests, (MIS & E. Governance) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests, Northern Circle 1
Chief Conservator of Forests, Hill Circle 1
Chief Conservator of Forests, Western Circle 1
Chief Conservator of Forests, Central Circle 1
Field Director (Buxa Tiger Reserve) 1
Field Director (Sunderbans Tiger Reserve) 1
Chief Conservator of Forests, South East Circle 1

24 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Chief Conservator of Forests, South West Circle 1

Conservator of Forests South – Circle 1

Conservator of Forests (Research) 1

Conservator of Forests (Development) 1

Conservator of Forests (Working Plan & GIS) 1

Conservator of Forests (Monitoring and Evaluation) 1

Conservator of Forests, Soil Conservation (North) 1

Conservator of Forests (Parks & Garden) 1

Conservator of Forests, Land Affairs & FCA. 1

Divisional Forest Officer (Territorial Division namely Baikunthapur, Bankura (North),


Bankura (South), Birbhum, Burdwan, Darjeeling, Jalpaiguri, Kurseong, Malda, Medinipur,
Jhargram, Nadia-Murshidabad, 24-Parganas (South), Purulia, andKangsabati North.) 15

Divisional Forest Officer, Soil Conservation (Kurseong & Kalimpong) 2

Divisional Forest Officer, Working Plan (North) 1

Divisional Forest Officer, Silviculture ((Hill) (North) and South) 3

Divisional Forest Officer, Monitoring (North) 1

Divisional Forest Officer, Monitoring (South) 1

Divisional Forest Officer, Planning 1

Divisional Forest Officer, Statistics 1

Asstt. Chief Conservator of Forest 1

Divisional Forest Officer, Wildlife ( I, II, III, Wl. Hq.) 4

Deputy Field Director (Buxa Tiger Reserve – East) 1

Deputy Field Director (Buxa Tiger Reserve – West) 1

Deputy Field Director (Sunderbans Tiger Reserve) 1

Director (West Bengal Forest School) 1

Divisional Forest-officer, (Urban & Recreational Forestry) 1

78

2 Central Deputation Reserve [ @ 20% of 1 above] 15

3 State Deputation Reserve [@ 25% of 1 above] 19

4 Training Reserve [@ 3.5% of 1 above] 2

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 25


5 Leave Reserve & Junior Posts Reserve [@ 16.5% of Item 1 above]. 12

6 Posts to be filled up by promotion [Under Rule 8 of IFS (Recruitment) Rules,1966 38


not exceeding 33 1/3 of items 1,2,3 & 4 above]

7 Post to be filled by Direct Recruitment (Items 1+2+3+4+6-5) 81 88

8 Total Authorised Strength 126

WBFS Cadre Strength in West Bengal

A Senior Duty Post ( D.F.O. / Dy. C.F. ) 23

B Junior Duty Post (A.D.F.O. ) 87

C Deputation Reserve Post 10% of Total ( A + B ) 11

D Leave Reserve & Training Reserve 5% of total ( A+ B ) 5

Total Post : 126

26 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table – 5.3

CATEGORY WISE NUMBER OF SANCTIONED POSTS AND ACTUAL NUMBER OF


PERSONNEL IN THE DIRECTORATE OF FORESTS
Sl. Sanctioned Personnel in
No. Category of Posts Strength Position Vacancy
(Nos.) (Nos.)
1 2 3 4 5
01. Indian Forest Service 115 104 11
02. West Bengal Forest Service 126 84 42
03. Administrative Officer 1 1
04. Accountant 2 2
05. Asstt. Statistician 1 1
06. Basic Grade Typist 7 5 2
07. Computing Supervisor 2 1 1
08. Computor 7 3 4
09. Grade-I Typist 6 6
10. Head Clerk-I & II 4 4
11. Head Clerk 4 4
12. Lower Division Clerk (Directorate Cadre) 26 17 9
13. Statistician 1 0 1
14. Supervisory Grade Typist 2 2
15. Upper Division Clerk (Directorate Cadre) 26 26
16. Accountant:CF Level: 8 3 5
UDC : D.F.O. Level 53 39 14
17. Agriculture Extension Officer 2 - 2
18. Asstt. Foreman (Mech.) 4 - 4
19. Asstt. Saw Doctor 5 2 3
20. Attendent 1 - 1
21. Asstt. Soil Chemist 1 1
22. Band Saw Operator 10 3 7
23. Basic Grade/Grade -I/SupervisoryTypist 30 14 16
24. Bearer 3 2 1
25. Boatman 102 63 39
26. Boiler Driver 3 2 1
27. Boiler Fireman 3 - 3
28. Bunglow Chowkidar 88 68 20
29. Bengali Translator 1 1
30. Cashaub 1 - 1
31. Chowkidar 2 1 1
32. Cleaner/Truck Cleaner 31 18 13
33. Cook 4 - 4

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 27


34. Cook-cum-Bearer 2 2
35. Crane Operator 3 2 1
36. Cross -cut-Operator 6 3 3
37. C.T.Mobile Medical Unit 1 - 1
38. Chairman 8 - 8
39. Compounder 1 1
40. Dakwalla 105 51 54
41. Darwan 36 26 10
42. Deputy Ranger/Forester 1277 873 404
43. Draftsman/Head Draftsman 35 16 19
44. Driver/Touring Vehicle/Truck Driver 144 76 68
45. Driver-cum-Mechanic 3 - 3
46. Duftary 13 5 8
47. Duplicating Operator 1 1
48. Electrician 1 1
49. Engine Driver 9 7 2
50. Electric Workman 6 1 5
51. ECG Technician 1 - 1
52. Fitter 2 1 1
53. Forest Guard 2444 1499 945
54. Forest Ranger 580 396 189
55. Forest Watcher 13 6 7
56. Forest Worker 17 6 11
57. G.D.A. (Medical Unit) 2 2
58. Gate Operator/Head Gate Operator 5 3 2
59. Grass Cutter 36 14 22
60. Game Watcher 2 2
61. Game Guard 4 - 4
62. Head Clerk (Regional Cadre) 56 32 24
63. Head Forest Guard 231 153 78
64. Installation Guard 12 - 12
65. Kiln Supervisor 1 - 1
66. Klin Operator 3 - 3
67. Laskar 17 13 4
68. Latheman 1 1
69. Lower Division Clerk/Clerk Typist/Jr.Asstt. (Regional Cadre) 326 95 231
70. Laboratory Assistant 3 2 1
71. Laboratory Attendant 1 1
72. Mahut 25 10 15
73. Majhi 44 25 19
74. Mali 151 118 33
75. Medical Officer 2 1 1

28 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


76. Mosalchi 1 - 1
77. Muharrir Grade-I, Grade -II 2 2
78. Museum Darwan 1 - 1
79. Night Guard 11 6 5
80. Night Watchman 5 3 2
81. Nurse 2 - 2
82. Oil Man -greaser 9 - 9
83. Orderly/Peon 572 515 57
84. Orchid Cultivator 1 - 1
85. Office Supdt. 1 1
86. Pharmacist 2 - 2
87. Power Saw Doctor 6 2 4
88. Pump Driver 1 - 1
89. Rd. Roller Driver 3 - 3
90. Record Supplier 2 2
91. Renepont Operator 2 1 1
92. Road Roller Cleaner 3 - 3
93. Road Roller Mate 3 1 2
94. Research Officer 1 - 1
95. Reopeway Motor Driver 7 5 2
96. Road Khalasi 3 - 3
97. Saw Doctor 1 1
98. Serang 7 7
99. Skilled Mazdoor 29 4 25
100. Station Helper 10 - 10
101. Stenographer 48 46 2
102. Sub-Station Operator 2 1 1
103. Sweeper 51 22 29
104. Sukhani 5 4 1
105. Tractor Driver 1 - 1
106. Tractor Mate 5 - 5
107. Taxidermist 1 - 1
108. Ticket Seller 1 1
109. Technical Asstt. 1 1
110. Tractor Mount Roller Driver 3 1 2
111. Unskilled Mazdoor 52 5 47
112. Upper Division Clerk/Sr. Assistant 273 258 15
113. Veterinary Officer 1 - 1
114. Veterinary Surgeon 1 1
115. Watcher 45 24 21
116. X-Ray Assistant 1 1
117. Zamadar 2 1 1

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 29


PARKS & GARDENS WING
118. Garden Supervisor 22 10 12
119. Head Uddyan Rakshi 30 23 7
120. Horticulture Officer 4 2 2
121. Senior Horticulture Officer 2 - 2
122. Senior Mali 70 39 31
123. Supdt. Horticulture Officer 1 - 1
124. Uddyan Rakshi 120 95 25
125. Uddyan Shramik 280 194 86
LLOYD BOTANIC GARDEN :
126. Black Smith 1 - 1
127. Carpenter 1 1
128. CT 1 1
129. Darwan 6 4 2
130. Head Mali 1 - 1
131. Herbarium Cleaner 4 - 4
132. Horticulture Officer 1 - 1
133. Junior Mali 1 1
134. Lebel Writer 1 - 1
135. Man Mazdoor 11 4 7
136. Night Guard 1 - 1
137. Orchid Supervisor 1 1
138. Orderly 1 1
139. Plant Collector 2 - 2
140. Peon 1 1
141. Sardar 1 1
142. Senior Mali 1 1
143. Store Keeper 1 1
144. Sweeper 2 - 2
145. UDC 1 1
146. Women Mazdoor 25 6 19

Supernumerary Posts
Bana Majdoor 738
Bana Shramik 2857
Table – 5.4
Administrative Units under Forest Directorate
Circle Division Range Beat
Territorial 7 22 243 509
Wildlife 5 9 86 142
Social Forestry 1 7 52 72
Soil Conservation 1 3 22 39
Functional 4 17 71 —
Total: 18 58 474 762

30 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table – 5.5

NO. OF RANGE AND NO. OF BEAT UNDER DIRECTORATE OF FORESTS

Sl. Name of Division Total Total


No. No. of No. of
Range Beat
1 Asstt. Chief Conservator of Forests, West Bengal. 2 —
2 Divisional Forest Officer, P.M.C., West Bengal. — —
3 Divisional Forest Officer, Law Cell, West Bengal. 3 —
4 Divisional Forest Officer, Planning — —
5 Divisional Forest Officer, Statistics — —
6 Divisional Forest Officer, Utilisation 4 —
7 Divisional Forest Officer, Jalpaiguri 13 27
8 Divisional Forest Officer, Cooch Behar 11 16
9 Dy. Conservator of Forests, Baikunthapur 15 20
10 Divisional Forest Officer, Jalpaiguri Social Forestry 7 13
11 Divisional Forest Officer, Darjeeling 11 25
12 Divisional Forest Officer, Kurseong 10 24
13 Divisional Forest Officer, N.T.F.P. 6 9
14 Divisional Forest Officer, Midnapore 15 29
15 Divisional Forest Officer, Jhargram 19 42
16 Divisional Forest Officer, Kharagpur 11 24
17 Divisional Forest Officer, Rupnarayan 10 19
18 Divisional Forest Officer, Panchet 10 21
19 Divisional Forest Officer, Bankura (S) 15 38
20 Divisional Forest Officer, Bankura (N) 14 34
21 Divisional Forest Officer, Malda 8 16
22 Divisional Forest Officer, Parks & Gardens (N) 5 —
23 Divisional Forest Officer, Siliguri Social Forestry 6 12
24 Divisional Forest Officer, Raigunj 9 17
25 Divisional Forest Officer, Publicity 2 —
26 Divisional Forest Officer, Howrah 6 11
27 Divisional Forest Officer, Birbhum 10 22
28 Dy. Conservator of Forests, U.R.F. 10 —
29 Divisional Forest Officer, Burdwan 8 21

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 31


30 Divisional Forest Officer, Kurseong Soil Cons. 7 12
31 Divisional Forest Officer, Kalimpong Soil Cons. 8 14
32 Divisional Forest Officer, Soil Cons. (North), Jalpaiguri 7 13
33 Divisional Forest Officer, Purulia 13 24
34 Divisional Forest Officer, Kangsabati (North) 9 18
35 Divisional Forest Officer, Purulia E.F. 7 19
36 Divisional Forest Officer, Kangsabati (South) 10 18
37 Divisional Forest Officer, Silviculture (N) 5 —
38 Divisional Forest Officer, Silviculture (S) 7 —
39 Divisional Forest Officer, Silviculture (H) 7 —
40 Divisional Forest Officer, Purba-Medinipur 7 16
41 Director, West Bengal Forest School 1 —
42 Director, Forestry Training Center 1 —
43 Divisional Forest Officer, Working Plan (N) 9 —
44 Divisional Forest Officer, Working Plan (S -I) 6 —
45 Divisional Forest Officer, Working Plan (S -II) 6 —
46 Divisional Forest Officer, Monitoring (N) 8 —
47 Divisional Forest Officer, Monitoring (S) 8 —
48 Dy. Field Director, Buxa Tiger Reserve (E) 11 22
49 Dy. Field Director, Buxa Tiger Reserve (W) 11 24
50 Divisional Forest Officer, Wildlife -I 11 22
51 Divisional Forest Officer, Wildlife -II 11 10
52 Divisional Forest Officer, Wildlife-III 14 27
53 Divisional Forest Officer, Wildlife (Hqrs.) 8 —
54 Divisional Forest Officer, 24 -Parganas (N) 7 12
55 Divisional Forest Officer, 24 -Parganas (S) 10 23
56 Divisional Forest Officer, Nadia Murshidabad 9 22
57 Dy. Field Director, Sunderbans Tiger Reserve 10 14
58 Divisional Forest Officer, Durgapur 6 12
TOTAL 474 762

32 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


CHAPTER - 6

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The Revenue of the Forest Directorate, Government of West Bengal is generated through Sale of Forest
products, Tariffs and Royalties, Rents, taxes, levies, fees and other charges. During the year 2011-12 total
revenue earned was `. 9146.71 Lakh. The maximum Revenue was generated by the Northern Circle
`.1911.05 Lakh.

The details of Revenue and Expenditure during the year 2011-12 are as follows:-

Table - 6.1

Revenue from major heads during 2011-2012.


Heads `. in Lakh
Timber & poles 6734.15
Fire wood 91.40
Grazing 0.06
Bamboo 4.91
MFP 104.85
Other 2211.34
Total: 9146.71

Table - 6.2

Expenditure under different heads during 2011-2012.

Major Head `. in Lakh


State Plan *7511.86
CSS & CS *1798.88
Non Plan 23,744.49
Non Plan (Development) 2.0
Total: 33,057.23

*(Including Annual MMM WP Agric Dev. Work & Housing Scheme_EMS


of Community [HO]).

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 33


Table - 6.3
Statement showing Unit wise Revenue for the year 2011-2012
(`. In Lakh.)
Accounting Units Timber Firewood Grazing Bamboo Minor FP. Others Total
1.General Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 31.93 31.93
2.Publicity Dn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.02
3.Utilisation 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 480.55 480.55
Total: (HQ:) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 512.50 512.50
4.Monitor (S) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
5.Monitor (N) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total (Mon.) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
6.WP&GIS Dir. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.25
7.W.Plan (S-I) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.09 0.09
8.W.Plan (S-II) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
9.W.Plan North 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.19 0.19
Total(WP&GIS): 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.53 0.53
10.Research Dir 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.12 0.12
11.Silvi(South) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 9.35 9.35
12.Silvi(North) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.59 0.59
13.Silvi (Hill) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.03 1.03
Total (Res. Cir.) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.09 11.09
14.Devlpmt Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
15.WBF School 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
16.F.T.C. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total (Dev.) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
17.S.W. Circle 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
18. Purulia Divn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 15.51 15.51
19.Kansabati(N) 7.31 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.21 17.52
20. Kansabati(S) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 21.92 21.92
21.Extn For Div 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 86.00 86.00
Total (S.W) 7.31 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 133.64 140.95
22.U.R.F. Divn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.92 2.92
23.P&G (N) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.14 1.14
24.Howrah SF 28.44 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 45.72 74.16
Total (P&G): 28.44 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 49.78 78.22
25.S.E. Circle 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
26.Burdwan 12.44 1.11 0.00 0.00 0.31 20.93 34.79
27.Birbhum 7.51 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 16.71 24.23
28.Durgapur 0.67 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.03 19.86 20.56
29.Nadia-Msd 77.51 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.26 12.09 90.86
Total (S.E): 98.13 1.12 0.00 0.00 1.60 69.59 170.44
30.Western Dir. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.14 0.14
31.Jhargram Dn. 24.38 14.65 0.00 0.00 3.17 61.40 103.60
32.Medinipur 196.13 1.79 0.06 0.00 5.72 149.82 353.52
33.Kharagpur 69.36 1.18 0.00 0.00 4.23 44.75 119.52
34.Rupnarayan 316.77 4.32 0.00 0.00 10.95 19.23 351.27
35.Purba Mid 13.79 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.61 16.61 33.01
Total (W.C.): 620.43 21.94 0.06 0.00 26.68 291.95 961.06

34 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Accounting Units Timber Firewood Grazing Bamboo Minor FP. Others Total
36.Central Crcl. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
37.Bankura (N) 636.50 16.58 0.00 2.50 0.00 25.15 680.73
38.Bankura (S) 59.58 2.09 0.00 0.00 10.23 428.10 500.00
39.Panchet Dn. 597.88 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.28 34.35 636.51
Total (C.C.): 1293.96 18.67 0.00 2.50 14.51 487.60 1,817.24
40.DFD/STR 1.44 6.01 0.00 0.00 4.94 84.49 96.88
Total (STR): 1.44 6.01 0.00 0.00 4.94 84.49 96.88
41.JtDir/SBR 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.03 0.03
42.24-Parg (S) 0.02 5.25 0.00 2.41 1.49 62.89 72.06
43.24-Parg (N) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.38 11.38
Total (SBR): 0.02 5.25 0.00 2.41 1.49 74.30 83.47
44.WL (Hqr) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 13.76 13.76
Total (WL HQ): 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 13.76 13.76
45.WL(N) Circle 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.01
46.ildlife-I 2.88 0.94 0.00 0.00 0.00 6.59 10.41
47.ildlife-II 4.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 27.32 31.57
48.Wildlife-III 834.05 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 57.60 891.66
Total:(WL North): 841.18 0.95 0.00 0.00 0.00 91.52 933.65
49.B.T.R. Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.02
50.B.T.R (West) 613.99 2.38 0.00 0.00 0.73 20.65 637.75
51.B.T.R (East) 639.90 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 38.06 677.96
Total (BTR): 1,253.89 2.38 0.00 0.00 0.73 58.73 1315.73
52.Hill Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.03 0.03
53.Darjeeling 0.19 7.90 0.00 0.00 0.00 133.59 141.68
54.Kurseong Div 659.59 2.37 0.00 0.00 0.00 9.16 671.12
55.NTFP Dn. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.25
Total (Hill): 659.78 10.27 0.00 0.00 0.00 143.03 813.08
56.Northrn Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
57.Baikunthapur 793.14 24.49 0.00 0.00 0.00 18.07 835.70
58.Jpg Division 693.60 0.32 0.00 0.00 54.90 0.00 748.82
59.Cochbehar 275.83 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 50.70 326.53
Total (N.C.): 1762.57 24.81 0.00 0.00 54.90 68.77 1911.05
60.N.W. Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.02
61.Siliguri SF 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.37 2.37
62.Raiganj Divn 167.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.60 177.60
63.Malda Divn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.85 1.85
64.Jpg SF Divn. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 103.68 103.68
Total: (N.W.) 167.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 118.52 285.52
65.S.C.(N) Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
66.Kurseong SC 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.07 0.07
67.Kalimpong 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.78 0.78
68.S.C.(N) Divn 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.69 0.69
Total Soil(North) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.54 1.54
GRAND TOTAL: 6734.15 91.40 0.06 4.91 104.85 2,211.34 9,146.71

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 35


Table - 6.4
Statement showing Unit wise Expenditure for the year 2011-2012
(`. In Lakh.)

Accounting Units State-Plan C.S.S. (Comm) CSS & C/Sec Non -Plan N.P. (Dev) Total

1. General Dirn 10.00 0.00 0.00 939.98 0.00 949.98


2. Publicity Dn 11.00 0.00 0.00 41.96 0.00 52.96
3. Utilisation 0.00 0.00 0.00 193.38 0.00 193.38

Total: 21.00 0.00 0.00 1175.32 0.00 1196.32

Monitoring:
~~~~~~~~
4. Monitor (S) 35.39 0.00 0.00 166.43 0.00 201.82
5. Monitor (N) 13.03 0.00 0.00 102.61 0.00 115.64

Total 48.42 0.00 0.00 269.04 0.00 317.46

WP&GIS Circl:
~~~~~~~~~
6. WP&GIS Circl 0.00 0.00 0.00 56.53 0.00 56.53
7. W.Plan (S-I) 53.39 0.00 0.00 110.19 0.00 163.58
8. W.Plan (S-II) 15.34 0.00 0.00 80.82 0.00 96.16
9. W.Plan North 6.01 0.00 0.00 104.97 0.00 110.98

Total: 74.74 0.00 0.00 352.51 0.00 427.25

Res. Circle:
~~~~~~~~
10. Research Circle 3.30 0.00 0.00 68.24 0.00 71.54
11. Silvi(South) 25.00 0.00 0.00 193.70 0.00 218.70
12. Silvi(North) 24.00 0.00 0.00 153.60 0.00 177.60
13. Silvi (Hill) 20.37 0.00 0.00 180.65 0.00 201.02

Total 72.67 0.00 0.00 596.19 0.00 668.86

Devlpmt Crcl:
~~~~~~~~
14. Devlpmt Crcl 9.99 0.00 0.00 84.92 0.00 94.91
15. WBF School 25.99 0.00 0.00 118.11 0.00 144.10
16. F.T.C. 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.45 0.00 11.45

Total: 35.98 0.00 0.00 214.48 0.00 250.46

Contd...

36 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


(`. In Lakh.)

Accounting Units State-Plan C.S.S. (Comm) CSS & C/Sec Non -Plan N.P. (Dev) Total

S.W. Circle:
~~~~~~~~
17. S.W. Circle 0.00 0.00 0.00 103.29 0.00 103.29
18. Purulia Divn 307.00 0.00 19.00 558.90 0.00 885.22
19. Kangsabati(N) 195.55 0.00 1.93 496.25 0.00 693.73
20. Kangsabati(S) 165.13 0.00 1.20 404.33 0.00 570.66
21. Extn For Div 38.99 0.00 0.00 194.32 0.00 233.31

Total 706.99 0.00 22.13 1757.09 0.00 2,486.21

P & G Circle:
~~~~~~~~
22. U.R.F. Divn 247.30 0.00 0.00 1056.43 0.00 1,303.73
23. P&G (N) Divn. 63.25 0.00 0.00 334.07 0.00 397.32
24. Howrah SF Dn 142.35 0.00 0.00 313.33 0.00 455.68

Total 452.90 0.00 0.00 1703.83 0.00 2,156.73

S.E. Circle:
~~~~~~~~~
25. S.E. Circle 5.00 0.00 0.00 120.72 0.00 125.72
26. Burdwan Divn. 226.26 0.00 1.46 491.64 0.00 719.36
27. Birbhum Divn. 136.83 0.00 4.28 612.92 0.00 754.03
28. Durgapur Divn. 111.10 0.00 1.19 265.90 0.00 378.19
29. Nadia-Mursbd 45.59 0.00 0.00 476.39 0.00 521.98

Total 524.78 0.00 6.93 1,967.57 0.00 2,499.28

Western Crcl:
~~~~~~~~
30. Western Crcl 0.00 0.00 0.00 104.79 0.00 104.79
31. Jhargram Divn. 229.31 0.00 14.58 860.12 0.00 1,104.01
32. Medinipur Dn. 293.22 0.00 5.69 782.50 0.00 1,081.41
33. Kharagpur Dn 183.67 0.00 0.67 512.57 0.00 696.91
34. Rupnarayan 356.26 0.00 12.94 560.82 0.00 930.02
35. East.Medinipur Dn 178.23 0.00 0.41 314.37 0.00 493.01

Total 1,240.69 0.00 34.29 3,135.17 0.00 4,410.15

Contd...

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 37


(`. In Lakh.)

Accounting Units State-Plan C.S.S. (Comm) CSS & C/Sec Non -Plan N.P. (Dev) Total

Central Crcl:
~~~~~~~~
36. Central Circl 0.00 0.00 0.00 71.14 0.00 71.14
37.Bankura (N) 402.03 0.00 15.43 890.01 0.00 1307.47
38.Bankura (S) 327.50 0.00 4.78 900.66 0.00 1232.94
39.Panchet Divn. 303.11 0.00 5.69 565.50 0.00 874.30

Total 1,032.64 0.00 25.90 2,427.31 0.00 3,485.85

FD/STR:
~~~~~~~~
40.DFD/STR 261.79 0.00 193.19 701.71 2.00 1,158.69

Total 261.79 0.00 193.19 701.71 2.00 1,158.69

Sunderban BR:
~~~~~~~~~
41. JtDir/SBR 5.40 0.00 17.07 120.43 0.00 142.90
42. 24-Parg (S) 276.86 0.00 266.73 584.79 0.00 1128.38
43. 24-Parg (N) 52.25 0.00 0.00 170.64 0.00 222.89

Total 334.51 0.00 283.80 875.86 0.00 1,494.17

WL (Hqr):
~~~~~~~~
44. WL (Hqr) 25.20 0.00 5.75 277.89 0.00 308.84

Total 25.20 0.00 5.75 277.89 0.00 308.84

Wildlife (N) Crcl:


~~~~~~~~~~
45.WL (N) Crcl 25.00 0.00 193.38 119.57 0.00 337.95
46.Wildlife-I 184.72 0.00 82.45 494.81 0.00 761.98
47.Wildlife-II 167.58 0.00 130.30 394.84 0.00 692.72
48. Wildlife-III 282.26 0.00 91.58 956.53 0.00 1330.37

Total 659.56 0.00 497.71 1,965.75 0.00 3,123.02

Contd...

38 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


(`. In Lakh.)

Accounting Units State-Plan C.S.S. (Comm) CSS & C/Sec Non -Plan N.P. (Dev) Total

Buxa T.R.:
~~~~~~~~
49.B.T.R. 0.00 0.00 0.00 77.71 0.00 77.71
50. B.T.R (West) 209.19 0.00 82.22 614.41 0.00 905.82
51. B.T.R (East) 208.93 0.00 88.14 615.79 0.00 912.86

Total 418.12 0.00 170.36 1,307.91 0.00 1,896.39

Hill Circle:
~~~~~~~~
51.HillCircle 0.00 0.00 0.00 72.92 0.00 72.92
52.Darjeeling 188.86 0.00 2.13 519.10 0.00 710.09
53.Kurseong Div 246.14 0.00 4.22 599.13 0.00 849.49
54.NTFP Dn. 27.60 0.00 0.00 178.02 0.00 205.62

Total 462.60 0.00 6.35 1,369.17 0.00 1,838.12

Northrn Crcl:
~~~~~~~~
56. Northrn Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 90.78 0.00 90.78
57. Jpg Division 220.88 0.00 14.38 844.76 0.00 1080.02
58. Baikunthapur 143.26 0.00 11.91 688.04 0.00 843.21
59. Coochbehar Dn. 156.29 0.00 0.00 364.48 0.00 520.77

Total 520.43 0.00 26.29 1,988.06 0.00 2,534.78

N.W. Circle:
~~~~~~~~
60. N.W. Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 62.80 0.00 62.80
61. Siliguri SF 46.39 0.00 0.00 150.13 0.00 196.52
62. Malda Divn 45.54 0.00 0.00 216.17 0.00 261.71
63. Jpg SF Divn. 48.97 0.00 0.00 136.82 0.00 185.79
64. Raiganj Divn 48.50 0.00 0.49 269.32 0.00 318.31

Total 189.40 0.00 0.49 835.24 0.00 1,025.13

SC(N) Circle:
~~~~~~~~
65. S.C.(N) Dirn 0.00 0.00 0.00 70.98 0.00 70.98
66. Kurseong SC 208.01 0.00 346.14 259.29 0.00 813.44
67. Kalimpong SC 104.51 0.00 179.55 237.94 0.00 522.00
68. S.C.(N) Divn 116.92 0.00 0.00 256.18 0.00 373.10
Total 429.44 0.00 525.69 824.39 0.00 1,779.52

GRAND TOTAL 7,511.86 0.00 1,798.88 23,744.49 2.00 33,057.23

*(Exp.Including Annual MMM WP Agric Dev. Work & Housing Scheme_EMS of Community [HO]).

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 39


Table - 6.5
Statement showing scheme wise Actual Expenditure during the year 2011-2012
6.5.1 : STATE PLAN SCHEMES
(`. In Lakh.)
Net Grant Actual Expenditure during 2011-2012
Schemes/Projects Component Normal TSP SCP Total
2401-Crop Husbandry:
1. Addl Central Assistance-RKVY [FR] 565.00 539.74 0.00 0.00 539.74
*2. Annual MMP WP on Agric Dev Work 0.00 14.51 9.68 33.89 58.08
Total: “2401” 565.00 554.25 9.68 33.89 597.82
2402-Soil & Water Conservation:
1. Protective Affn & Erosion Cont [FR] 54.10 20.10 4.00 30.00 54.10
2. Eco-Cons of Sensitive Zones [FR] 65.90 31.90 4.00 30.00 65.90
Total: “2402” 120.00 52.00 8.00 60.00 120.00
1. Forest Resources [FR] 10.00 6.90 0.00 0.00 6.90
2. Forest Consolidation [FR] 10.00 7.18 0.00 0.00 7.18
3. Development of Forest Comm [FR] 70.00 57.68 0.00 0.00 57.68
4. Buildings [FR] 538.00 278.08 0.00 0.00 278.08
5. Forest Protection [FR] 180.00 150.41 0.00 0.00 150.41
6. Working Plan [FR] 40.00 22.14 0.00 0.00 22.14
7. Management Information System [FR] 15.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
8. Integrated Forest Prot Schemes [FR] 32.73 25.45 0.00 0.00 25.45
9. Preserv of For W & D (13th Finance) 988.00 935.87 0.00 0.00 935.87
10. ACA for Rest & Regn of Forest Cover
11. Coastal Shelter Belt Plantation [FR] 61.80 61.80 0.00 0.00 61.80
12. Plantation of Quick Growing Spp[Fr] 430.15 281.67 39.88 36.60 358.15
13. Economic Plantation [FR] 400.36 0.00 54.60 342.28 396.88
14. Research & Seed Propagation[FR] 50.00 50.00 0.00 0.00 50.00
15. Mangrove Treatment [FR] 25.32 25.32 0.00 0.00 25.32
16. Forestry Treatment [FR] 314.96 111.37 27.24 126.57 265.18
17. Community Development [FR] 370.00 30.00 0.00 269.14 299.14
18. Monitoring and Evaluation [FR] 64.00 48.42 0.00 0.00 48.42
19. Timber Operation by Mech. Logging 137.50 95.59 9.90 0.00 105.49
20. Economic Rehab of Fringe Popln[FR] 50.00 0.00 48.87 0.00 48.87
21. Intensification of Management[FR] 230.00 100.96 0.00 0.00 100.96
22. Amenity to For Staff & Labours[FR] 15.00 10.00 0.00 0.00 10.00
23. Publicity-cum-Extension[Fr] 60.25 59.25 0.00 0.00 59.25
24. Protection & Improvement of WL[FR] 352.00 331.20 0.00 0.00 331.20
25. Tiger Reserve in Sundarbans[FR] 106.75 98.84 0.00 0.00 98.84
26. Tiger Reserve in Buxa[FR] 60.00 45.54 0.00 0.00 45.54

40 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


27. Jaldapara Wildlife Sanctuary [FR] 40.00 40.00 0.00 0.00 40.00
28. Control of Poaching [FR] 130.00 122.51 0.00 0.00 122.51
29. Singalila National Park[FR] 15.00 12.20 0.00 0.00 12.20
30. Neora Valley National Park[FR] 15.00 15.00 0.00 0.00 15.00
31. Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary[FR] 30.00 24.31 0.00 0.00 24.31
32. Senchal Wildlife Sanctuary[FR] 15.00 15.00 0.00 0.00 15.00
33. Gorumara Wildlife Sanctuary[FR] 30.00 30.00 0.00 0.00 30.00
34. Natural History Museum[FR]
35. Dev. of Medicinal & NTFP Plants [FR] 34.50 0.00 17.35 0.00 17.35
36. Wasteland Development [FR]
37. Conservation of Wetlands [FR] 35.00 0.00 32.00 0.00 32.00
38. Development of Eco-Tour & N & Edu . 50.00 0.00 35.45 0.00 35.45
39. Elephant Conservation [FR] 68.38 0.00 55.00 0.00 55.00
40. Creation & Improvement of P&G[FR] 70.00 70.00 0.00 0.00 70.00
41. Urban Forestry[FR] 160.00 160.00 0.00 0.00 160.00
42. Greening of Rural Areas[FR] 25.00 25.00 0.00 0.00 25.00
43. Lloyd Botanic Garden,Darjeeling[FR] 25.00 2.67 0.00 0.00 2.67
44. Decentralised People’s Nursery[FR] 47.25 13.10 0.00 31.98 45.08
45. Strip Plantation/Farm Forest [FR] 286.62 273.37 0.00 0.00 273.37
Total: “2406” 5,688.57 3,636.83 320.29 806.57 4763.69
1. Prot Afforstn & Erosion Control[FR] 40.00 29.49 0.00 0.00 29.49
2. Protn & Improvement of WL[FR] 5.00 3.50 0.00 0.00 3.50
4. Forestry Treatment[Fr] 15.00 12.99 0.00 0.00 12.99
Total: “2551” 60.00 45.98 0.00 0.00 45.98
1. Forestry Research [FR] 35.00 35.00 0.00 0.00 35.00
2. Training of Staff[FR] 20.00 18.99 0.00 0.00 18.99
Total: “2415” 55.00 53.99 0.00 0.00 53.99
*1. Housing Scheme-EWS of Community [HO] 0.00 39.23 166.30 142.05 347.58
Total: “4216” 0.00 39.23 166.30 142.05 347.58
1.Infrastructural facilities-RIDF[FR] 3000.00 803.12 205.29 574.35 1582.76
Total: “4406” 3000.00 803.12 205.29 574.35 1582.76
GRAND TOTAL: STATE PLAN: 9,488.57 5185.40 709.56 1616.86 7511.82

*(Expenditure Including Annual MMM & Housing Scheme_EMS of Cmmunity &


fund received from other Deptt. & utilised by Forest Deptt.)

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 41


6.5.2 : CENTRALLY SPONSORED AND CENTRAL SECTOR SCHEMES
(`. In Lakh.)

Net Grant Actual Expenditure during 2011-2012


Schemes/Projects Component Normal TSP SCP Total
2401-Crop Husbandry:
*1. Annual MMM WP on Agric Dev Work [AG] *0.00 155.72 30.63 339.34 525.69
Total: “2401” *0.00 155.72 30.63 339.34 525.69
2406-Forestry & Wildlife:
1. Cons & Dev of Wetlands in W.B. [FR] 78.75 78.75 0.00 0.00 78.75
2. Integrated Forest Prot Schemes [FR] 98.19 50.45 0.00 0.00 50.45
3. Med Plants Cons & Area Dev Prog [FR] 20.33 7.70 0.00 0.00 7.70
4. Cons & Mgmt. of Mangroves [FR] 238.40 144.93 0.00 0.00 144.93
5. Tiger Reserve in Sundarbans [FR] 207.40 253.32 0.00 0.00 253.32
6. Tiger Reserve in Buxa [FR] 88.32 145.79 0.00 0.00 145.79
7. Singhalila National Park [FR] 24.03 17.93 0.00 0.00 17.93
8. Jaldapara Wildlife Sanctuary [FR] 78.46 67.08 0.00 0.00 67.08
9. Neora Valley National Park [FR] 29.95 29.95 0.00 0.00 29.95
10. Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary [FR] 40.80 29.14 0.00 0.00 29.14
11. Senchal Wildlife Sanctuary [FR] 27.08 22.97 0.00 0.00 22.97
12. Elephant Project [FR] 224.50 377.96 0.00 0.00 377.96
13. Gorumara National Park [FR] 47.21 47.21 0.00 0.00 47.21
Total: “2406” 1203.42 1273.18 0.00 0.00 1273.18
Grand Total: C.S.S. Scheme: 1203.42 1428.90 30.63 339.34 1798.87

*(expenditure Including Annual MMM, fund received from other Deptt. & utilized by Forest Deptt.)

6.5.3 : NON-PLAN DEVELOPMENT


(`.in Lakhs)
Schemes/Projects Net Grant Actual Expenditure
2406-Forestry & Wildlife: (In `)
Sunderbans Biosphere Reserve [FR] 89.67 2.00
Total: “2406” 89.67 2.00
Grand Total: Non-Plan Dev. 89.67 2.00

42 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


6.5.4 : NON PLAN
(2011-2012)
(Figures in `)
Schemes/Projects Net Grant Actual Expenditure
1.Strengthening Soil Con Orgn [FR] 34,03,000 16,13,292
2.Protective Affn Erosion Control [FR] 3,37,52,000 3,84,05,642
3.Soil Cons in RVP-Kangsabati [FR] 2,07,44,000 1,44,08,137
4. Soil Cons in RVP-Teesta [FR] 1,22,35,000 1,30,52,281
5. Soil Cons in Himalayan Region [FR] 48,76,000 47,67,593
6.Flood Cont in FPR- Ganga Basin [FR] 84,000 84,000
7.Pilot Project for Afforestation [FR] 64,75,000 62,36,625
Total : “2402” 8,15,69,000 7,85,67,570
2406-Forestry & Wildlife:
1.Direction & Administration 1,64,63,59,000 1,55,85,93,384
2.Training of IFSS Probationers [FR] 0 87,381
3. Training of WBFS Probationers [FR 2,32,51,000 23,58,356
3.Surveys [FR] 4,30,000 3,38,992
4.Forest Resources [FR] 15,29,000 13,39,145
5.Forest Consolidation [FR] 7,77,000 7,48,581
6.Communication [FR] 94,60,000 93,25,361
7.Buildings [FR] 4,15,32,000 4,14,53,872
8.WL Wing (i) Conservancy & Regn [FR] 2,44,92,000 2,40,65,435
9.(ii). Working Plan [FR] 26,91,000 26,16,218
10.(iii) Forest Protection [FR] 1,63,46,000 1,62,36,307
11.Management Information System [FR] 5,39,000 4,86,222
12.Farm Forestry-cum-Fuelwood Pltn 2,00,000 1,82,944
13.West Bengal Forestry Projects [FR] 4,60,56,000 4,27,33,780
14.Social Forestry Project [FR] 17,96,42,000 180892677
15.Timber Operation by Govt Agency [FR] 4,51,95,000 4,50,61,626
16.Minor Forest Produce [FR] 23,94,000 23,73,962
17.MFP:Agro Silviculture [FR] 14,96,000 14,96,000
18.MFP:Silvo-Pisciculture [FR] 24,45,000 19,56,436
19.Timber Operation by Mech. Logging [FR] 52,05,000 52,25,185
20.Other Office Expenses 3,70,33,000 3,61,17,094
21.Economic Rehab of Fringe Popln [FR] 48,21,000 49,20,703
22.Intensification of management [FR] 4,31,000 3,54,194

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 43


23.Amenity to for Staff & Labours [FR] 8,50,000 5,62,400
24.WL Unit-Prot & Improve of WL [FR] 12,53,09,000 11,94,48,437
25.Nature Cons-Protn & Imp of WL [FR] 8,48,000 8,47,906
26.Sundarbans Tiger Reserve [FR] 1,69,64,000 1,42,46,230
27.Buxa Tiger Reserve [FR] 63,08,000 53,62,870
28.Jaldapara Wildlife Sanctuary [FR] 84,000 84,000
29.Control of Poaching [FR] 1,56,000 1,55,981
30.Singhalila National Park [FR] 77,000 77,000
31.Neora Valley National Park [FR] 70,000 70,000
32.Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary [FR] 87,000 87,000
33.Senchal Wildlife Sanctuary [FR] 77,000 77,000
34.Gorumara Wildlife Sanctuary [FR] 77,000 77,000
35.Parks & Garden Wing [FR] 13,55,11,000 13,16,11,709
36.Lloyd Botanic Garden, Darjeeeling [FR] 69,15,000 56,37,992
37.Creation & Improvement of P & G [FR] 13,00,000 13,00,000
38.Urban Forestry [FR] 6,03,000 6,03,000
39.Greening of Rural Areas [FR] 1,94,000 1,94,000
40.Wildlife Unit [FR] 24,11,000 24,07,482
41.Reward for Cont of Wild Animals [FR] 3,25,00,000 3,10,49,572
Total: “2406” 2,42,26,65,000 2,29,28,63,433
2551- Hill Areas:
1.Econ Rehab of Fringe Population [FR] 32,000 32,000
2.Prot Afforstn & Erosion Control [FR] 99,000 98,934
3.West Bengal Forestry Project [FR] 7,64,000 7,63,950
4.Prot & Improvement of wildlife [FR] 1,34,000 1,34,000
Total: “ 2551” 10,29,000 10,28,884
2415- Agricultural Research:
1.General Direction Trg of Staff [FR] 1,42,000 0
2.Forestry Research [FR] 20,12,000 19,87,342
Total: “2415” 21,54,000 19,87,342
GRAND TOTAL: NON-PLAN 2,50,74,17,000 2,37,44,47,228

44 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Actual Expenditure under Major Heads during 2005-2006 to 2011-2012

2005-06
(N.G.) ? 1,22,35,14,600 16,46,91,237 14,53,77,927 91,52,950 4,24,800 1,54,31,61,514
2402 3,42,94,495 19,51,072 32,96,790 ---- ---- ---- 3,95,42,357
2406 1,13,26,74,884 7,37,95,274 10,54,69,273 91,50,680 ---- ---- 1,32,10,90,111
2551 3,77,472 17,65,999 ---- ---- 4,24,686 ---- 2,568,157
2415 17,94,569 7,37,824 ---- ---- ---- ---- 25,32,393
4406 ---- 6,05,75,471 ---- ---- ---- ---- 6,05,75,471
TOTAL 1,16,91,41,420 13,88,25,640 10,87,66,063 91,50,680 4,24,686 ---- 1,42,63,08,489
2006-07
(N.G.) ? 1,28,41,26,000 20,07,85,675 12,64,93,316 79,11,400 3,90,000 1,61,97,06,391
2402 4,56,65,632 35,39,999 ---- ---- ---- ---- 4,92,05,631
2406 1,16,65,30,809 16,29,84,195 12,34,19,195 55,91,400 ---- ---- 1,45,85,26,164
2551 4,20,930 52,99,297 ---- ---- 3,14,940 ---- 60,35,167
2415 14,95,372 11,74,537 ---- ---- ---- ---- 26,69,909
4406 ---- 2,14,40,000 ---- ---- ---- ---- 2,14,40,000
TOTAL 1,21,41,12,743 19,44,38,028 12,34,19,760 55,91,400 3,14,940 ---- 1,53,78,76,871
2007-08
(N.G.) ? 1,35,60,62,000 35,63,54,900 14,05,77,231 87,19,600 3,90,000 ---- 1,86,17,13,731
2402 4,70,37,488 43,46,642 39,67,482 ---- ---- ---- 5,53,51,612
2406 1,27,67,07,907 16,57,24,063 12,60,14,658 86,19,600 ---- ---- 1,57,70,66,228
2551 8,61,919 9,99,954 ---- ---- 3,14,900 ---- 18,61,873
2415 16,71,200 16,00,000 ---- ---- ---- ---- 32,71,200
4406 ---- 12,62,68,644 ---- ---- ---- ---- 12,62,68,644
2401 ---- 2,23,08,248 ---- ---- ---- ---- 2,23,08,248
TOTAL 1,32,62,78,514 32,12,47,551 12,99,82,140 86,19,600 3,14,000 ---- 1,78,61,27,805
2008-09
(N.G.) ? 1,50,32,80,000 60,38,16,000 16,70,87,000 1,10,47,50 ---- ---- 2,28,52,30,500
2402 5,22,68,156 41,90,000 42,39,000 0 ---- ---- 6,06,97,156
2406 1,40,41,05,860 27,61,33,000 13,83,54,000 ---- ---- ---- 1,82,96,27,172
2551 8,36,312 10,00,000 ---- 1,10,34,31 ---- ---- 18,36,312
2415 16,62,299 18,00,000 ---- 2 ---- ---- 34,62,299
4406 ---- 23,74,75,000 ---- ---- ---- ---- 23,74,75,000
2401 ---- 5,82,00,000 ---- ---- ---- ---- 5,82,00,000
TOTAL 1,45,88,72,627 57,87,98,000 14,25,93,000 1,10,34,312 ---- ---- 2,19,12,97,939
2009-10
(N.G.) ? 2,03,58,21,000 73,11,83,000 16,73,78,000 1,16,19,00 ---- 0 2,94,60,01,000
2402 7,06,96,626 59,92,000 ---- 0 ---- ---- 7,66,88,626
2406 2,07,85,07,646 36,90,92,000 15,98,85,000 ---- ---- 23,000 2,61,85,42,646
2551 9,74,065 13,99,000 ---- 1,10,35,00 ---- ---- 23,73,065
2415 18,98,296 37,00,000 ---- 0 ---- ---- 55,98,296
4406 ---- 24,83,14,000 ---- ---- ---- ---- 24,83,14,000
2401 ---- 5,84,41,000 1,48,52,000 ---- ---- ---- 7,32,93,000
4216 ---- 2,79,59,000 ---- ---- ---- ---- 2,79,59,000

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 45


2010-11 Non Plan State Plan C.S.S. & C.S N P (Dev) SP (Comm) CSS (Comm) Total
(N.G.) ? 221,46,47,000 100,94,63,500 16,68,76,554 1,10,30,000 ---- ---- 3402017054
2402 7,48,07,956 1,19,98,899 ---- ---- ---- ---- 86806855
2406 2247511025 471868301 133321961 10997352 ---- ---- 2863698639
2551 1016803 5999299 ---- ---- ---- ---- 7016102
2415 1964984 5174442 ---- ---- ---- ---- 7139426
4406 ---- 371206570 ---- ---- ---- ---- 371206570
2401 ---- *105901554 *55691387 ---- ---- ---- 161592941
4216 ---- *82019265 ---- ---- ---- ---- 82019265
TOTAL 2325300768 1054168330 189013348 10997352 ---- ---- 3579479798
2011-12
(N.G.) ? 2507417000 948857000 120341200 89,67,354 ---- ---- 3585582554
2402 78567570 11999600 ---- 200000 ---- ---- 90767170
2406 2295063398 473912210 127316283 ---- ---- ---- 2896291891
2551 1028884 4598300 ---- ---- ---- ---- 5627184
2415 1987342 5398681 ---- ---- ---- ---- 7386023
4406 ---- 158533080 ---- ---- ---- ---- 158533080
2401 ---- *59781433 *52569772 ---- ---- ---- 112351205
4216 ---- *34758977 ---- ---- ---- ---- 34758977
TOTAL 2376647194 748982281 179886055 200000 ---- ---- 3305715530

*(Expenditure Including Annual MMM WP Agric Dev. Work & Housing Scheme_EMS of Community
[HO]) Fund utilized from other Deptt.

46 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


CHAPTER - 7
FOREST PROTECTION, FIRE AND ENCROACHMENT
West Bengal is one of the few states in the country where per capita forest area is the lowest (0.01 ha.)
and density of the population around fragmented forests is the highest. Evidently, there is tremendous
pressure on forests. Coupled with socio-economic problems of poverty, underemployment and
unemployment in the forest fringe areas, the major threat to forest comes from illicit collection of fuelwood,
fodder and small timber from the forests by the villagers to sustain their livelihood. This problem has, however,
been tackled by and large over a major part of forested tract in the State by formation of Forest Protection
Committees and through the process of consolidation of Joint Forest Management. But in areas where there is
a problem in the field of timber and poaching of wildlife, protection is provided through intensive patrolling of
the areas by protective personnel. Vigilance by departmental protective staff has been intensified in such areas
through organization of mobile squads being assisted by 200 men strong specially constituted battalion of
State Armed Police. Action has been taken to stop illegal activities by wood-based industries operating in
regions vulnerable to operation of gangsters. A post of Inspector General of Police, Forest Protection has been
created in the Department of Forests to have the required liaison with the Police Administration to extend their
support over district and state level to combat organized gangsters in illicit operation of timber.
An extensive net work of R.T. have been built up connecting Beats/Ranges to the Divisional
Headquarters in order to ensure required reinforcement at times of emergency to combat organized plunder of
timber and other produces, and poaching of Wildlife.
Table – 7.1
Number of Illicit felling cases detected, seizures done and persons arrested :
(Form 2007-2008 to 2011-2012)
Sl. Particulars 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
No.
01. Illicit Felling Cases detected (in Nos.) 9374 9069 8382 8756 14080
No. of POR 290 226 156 291 356
No. of COR 4428 4164 3298 3486 7743
No. of UDOR 4656 4679 4928 4979 5981
02. Volume of Timber seized ( m3) 5604.75 5074.722 5865.46 6435.54 9236.30
03. Value of Timber seized (` in lakh) 456.172 357.348 582.70 628.70 1160.21
04. No. of vehicles seized
a) Truck 89 79 89 89 109
b) LMV — 13 11 43 18
c) Van 54 107 888 1118 365
d) Boat 27 37 35 71 93
e) Others 38 478 65 192 1480
05. No of vehicles confiscated
a) Truck 10 11 19 51 25
b) LMV — 10 8 0 3
c) Van etc. 166 107 888 20 -
d) Boat 26 37 — 4 -
e) Others 14 468 65 42 5
06. No. of Persons arrested 1167 1104 604 720 467
07. No. of Persons convicted in court 127 74 33 22 61
08. No. of forest personnel assaulted 2 4 13 18 9

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 47


Fire
Forest fire is the most important cause after illicit deforestation which does incalculable harm to the
forest area. Apart from destruction of plantations, it damages biodiversity including killing of wild animals
thereby causing habitat destruction. Though, forest fire can be natural as well as man made, but carelessness of
man is the cause of about 95% of the forest fires. Based on the intensity, aggressiveness, and place of
occurrence fire can be of many types. The major types seen in the state are creeping fire, ground fire and
surface fire caused by local people unknowingly during the dry spell of the year.
In order to minimize the incidences of fire, action is being taken in the state under “Integrated Forest
Protection Scheme” sponsored by Government of India.
The works preformed under the scheme is to sensitize the Forest Protection Committees (FPC) about
the ill effects of fire and fighting of fire along with local staff of the area, creation of water sources such as
earthen dams, other soil moisture conservation structures, wells etc. which would on one hand benefit the FPC
and help to fight fire in the area on the other, creation of new firelines and maintenance of old ones etc. Besides
above, watch towers are constructed at strategic locations and fire watchers are also engaged during the fire
prone season for tracking of fire early.

Table – 7.2
Forest Fire report 2011-2012
Division No. of incidents Area Estimated Loss Reason of Fire Remarks
Affected (ha) (`. in lakh.)
Darjeeling 7 25 -
Kurseong 17 81.1 60.00
Kalimpong 13 37.5 -
Wildlife - II 31 477.86 -
Jalpaiguri - - -
Cooch Behar - - -
Wildlife-III - - -
B.T.R.(E) 6 23.5 -
B.T.R.(W) 87 235 -
Kharagpur 5 93 0.98
Bankura(N) - - - All
Accidental Ground
Bankura(S) 6 12 0.95
Fire
Birbhum 4 4 -
Purulia - - -
Panchet - - -
Kangsa.(N) - - -
Kangsa.(S) - - -
Burdwan 19 314 1.39
Durgapur 3 23 5.70
Wildlife-I 1 1.5 -
Baikunthapur 10 2.30 -
Jhargram 5 90 -
Malda 3 0.6 1,00
TOTAL 217 1420.36 70.02

48 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Encroachment.
The gradual increase in population went on building pressure on the forest land for agriculture and
other purposes. Consequently, the forest land faced a constant menace, due to encroachment during sixties
and seventies.
After the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 came into force the problem was, however, greatly checked.
For diversion of forest land for any developmental purpose, compulsory afforestation on the land made
available in lieu, has been made binding.
The Hon'ble Supreme Court of India also expressed great concern with the state of affairs relating to
illegal encroachment on forest lands in various States/Union Territories and in their order of 23.11.2001 in I.A.
No. 703 in W.P. (Civil) No. 202 of 1995 restrained the Central Govt. from regularisation of encroachments in
the country and in W.P.(Civil) No. 202 of 1995 in I.A.No. 502 of 2000 and I.A. No. 703 of 2001 in the case T.N.
Godavarman Thiru Mulkpad Vs. U.O.I. & others directed the Chief Secretaries of the different States on
18.02.2002 to file a reply in relation to “the steps required to be taken by them to prevent further
encroachment of forest land and in particular to the land in hilly terrains, national parks and sanctuaries etc.”
The apex court also directed to indicate as to what steps had been taken to clear the encroachments from the
forests, which had taken place at an earlier point of time.
In response to the observation and direction of the Hon'ble Apex Court, the Ministry of Environment
and Forests suggested a time bound action plan for eviction of illegal encroachments on forest lands. The Chief
Secretaries, Forest Secretaries and Principal Chief Conservators of all States/U.T.s were requested to prepare
the baseline information containing a comprehensive list of encroachments in the State/U.T.s with current
status of eviction and to send the same to the ministry preferably by June 30th, 2002. The Principal Chief
Conservator of Forests were directed to provide detailed progress report of the action taken, area evicted and
area reclaimed/planted etc. every quarter commencing from July, 2002 onwards.
The process of eviction is presently not being implemented without finalization of user right as per the
“Scheduled Tribes and other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006”

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 49


Table 7.3
STATUS OF ENCROACHMENT OF FOREST LANDS IN WEST BENGAL AS ON 31.03.2012
District Division Area under encroachment (ha)
Darjeeling 41.442
Kalimpong 0
Darjeeling Kurseong 1.52
Wildlife - I 63.95
Wildlife - II 34.9
Baikunthapur 25.96
Jalpaiguri 103.387
Jalpaiguri B.T.R.(E) 98.514
B.T.R.(W) 0
Wildlife - III 0
Cooch Behar Cooch Behar 947.09
Bankura(S) 1731.00
Bankura Bankura(N) 1405.071
Panchet 708.37
Medinipur 582.894
Paschim Midnapur Jhargram 1577.750
Rupnarayan 1079.01
Kharagpur 435.756
Purba Medinipur Purba Medinipur 2.10
Purulia 519.31
Purulia Kangsa.SC(N) 524.96
Kangsa.SC(S) 1458.747
Burdwan Burdwan 409.67
Durgapur 641.57
Murshidabad Nadia-Msd. 0
Nadia Nadia-Msd. 0
Birbhum Birbhum 91.09
Dakshin Dinajpur Raigunj 6.93
Hooghly Howrah SF 0.81
Howrah Howrah SF 0
Malda Malda 262
24-Pgs.(N) 24-Pgs.(N) 0
24-Pgs.(S) 24-Pgs.(S) 0
S.T.R. 0
TOTAL 12753.8

50 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


CHAPTER - 8
Status of Working Plan and GIS in West Bengal

Introduction:
All forests are managed under the prescriptions of a working plan/scheme prepared on the basis of
principles of sustainable forest management and recognized and innovative silvicultural practices. Working
plans have formed the basis of forest management practices over last 100 years. The National Forest Policy,
1988, states that no forest should be permitted to be worked without the government approved management
or working plan, which should be in prescribed format and in keeping with the National Forest Policy.
The forests of the State of West Bengal boast of rich biodiversity and are managed under approved
Working Plans/Management Plans in conformity with the National Working Plan Code 2004 as well as
National Forest Policy, 1988 commensurate with the people's basic needs.
History of GIS in Forest Management in West Bengal
Development and application of an interdisciplinary approach by integrating satellite Remote Sensing;
Geographic Information System (GIS) and GPS can solve specific problems of decision making in resource
management. Satellite Remote Sensing techniques can be used to generate spatial data on vegetation and
land use types while GPS locates the sample plots. The spatial and non-spatial data can be combined to
produce thematic maps that are useful in forest management.
These advanced technologies facilitate a regular feedback to policy makers and planners engaged in
the field of forestry on the state of forest resources and degradation of land. Processing of GIS data models can
help prepare working plans by identifying specific land characteristics and analyzing its potential. GIS is useful,
for example detecting changes in vegetation cover, predicting the susceptibility of land to erosion, for suitability
of timber harvest, identification of high-risk zones of forest fire incidents and preparing remedial measures.
The history of the application of remote sensing technology in forestry sector in the State can be traced
to 1989. Initially the Forest Directorate in West Bengal entrusted the work of classification of forest to Regional
Remote Sensing Service Centre (RRSSC), Kharagpur. RRSSC worked on the imageries procured from the
National Remote Sensing Agency (NRSA), Hyderabad, for the years 1988, 1991, 1994 & 1997 to generate
the forest cover map of the entire state.
The GIS cell was created in July 1999 in the office of the Conservator of Forests, Working Plan & GIS
Circle at Kolkata. Initially the cell had started functioning with one license of PC ARC Info and ERDAS
Software (DOS Version). At present the work in the GIS laboratory on interpretation of satellite imageries is
being carried out on desk top PCs by a trained Forest Range Officer and personnel hired on contract from the
Centre of Oceanographic Studies, Jadavpur University.
The Works undertaken and executed by the GIS Cell till June, 2010:
1. In-house digitization of all districts & PS maps of the State.
2. In-house digitization of mouza maps of 3 districts of South West Bengal
3. Procured satellite imageries in digital form (bands 1, 2, 3 & 4) from NRSC, Hyderabad for the
entire state, pertaining to the years 1997, 2000,2002 and 2005, 2006, 2008 and 2009.
4. Creating classified forest maps for all districts of the state as in 2005.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 51


5. For the first time Stock map of Jalpaiguri Forest division has been digitized and stock map
prepared from the digitized stock maps on a scale of 1:15,000. The Working plan has been
approved by Government of India in 2008.
6. Stock maps of 1st Working Plan of Malda forest division also prepared in GIS cell on an scale of
1:15,000 and has been submitted to Government of India for its approval.
7. Procured satellite imageries for the year of 2006-07, of Coochbehar Forest Division, BTR East
and West Forest division and Baikunthpur Forest Division (PAN+LISS-III; Scale 1:12,500).
Range, Beat, Blocks and Compartment maps of three forest divisions on a scale of 1:15,000
overlaid on the imageries and have been sent to Working Plan North Division, in order to prepare
stock maps of three forest divisions from satellite imageries.
8. Fire alerts are being issued on a daily basis since January, 2008, using our Forest maps and daily
fire alerts available on University of Maryland Website.
9. Forest maps up to Block compartment level in North Bengal and Sundarban Tiger Reserve are
available in digital Format. Forest Mouza maps in South Bengal have been digitized and
extracted. The work on digitization of forest areas inside mouza maps are under process and is
expected to be completed by the year 2010.
Recent GIS Activities in preparation of Working Plans and Use of GIS in Forest Administration
and management in West Bengal:
A. Preparation of GIS based Stock Maps and transition from stock maps based on
cadastral survey to GIS based Stock Maps-
The Working Plans in West Bengal that were prepared before 2007 had stock maps based on the
Cadastral Field Survey undertaken by the Working Plan Officers. After 2007 the Stock maps were prepared
using GIS. Since there is an exclusive GIS under Working Plan Circle, the cell was entrusted with the
responsibility to prepare the Stock maps. The first GIS based Stock map was prepared for Jalpaiguri Forest
division. Since the boundaries of all the Divisions of West Bengal are already digitized, the work became quite
simple. The following process was followed in the preparation of the GIS based Stock maps of Jalpaiguri Forest
Division.
a. The Cadastral maps that were prepared in the field were brought to the GIS lab.
b. The Field maps were registered using the already digitized maps as reference.
c. The Field maps were then digitized.
d. The different customized maps of Division, Range, Beat and Compartment level maps was
composed and printed on different scales.
e. The Compartment Maps were prepared as per the Standard National Working Plan Code on a
scale of 1: 15000.
The following is the pictorial representation of the preparation of the Stock Maps.
Since 2007 Stock Maps of the Following Divisions have been prepared using GIS in West Bengal:
1. Jalpaiguri Forest Division.
2. Malda Forest Division.
3. Burdwan Forest Division.
4. Durgapur Forest Division.

52 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


5. Howrah Social Forestry Division.
6. Buxa Tiger Reserve (East) Forest Division.
7. Buxa Tiger Reserve (West) Forest Division.
8. Wildlife-III Forest Division.
9. Baikunthpur Forest Division.
10. Raiganj Forest Division.
11. Nadia Murshidabad Division.
The Stock Maps of the Following Forest Divisions are under preparation by the GIS Cell in West Bengal.
1. Birbhum Forest Division.
2. Rupnarayan division.
3. Purba Midnapur division.
4. Jhargram division.
5. Midnapur division.
6. Kharagpur division.
B. Use of GIS and GPS for collection of field data for Forest Inventory and subsequently
as an input to Working Plans
After the successful completion of establishment of Web Based GIS Cell, the next task that was
implemented using GIS was preparation of Working Plans as per the Field Manual of Forest Inventory in West
Bengal, written by the Conservator Working Plan and GIS during 2008. Prior to that, the Volume-1 of the
Working Plans had very little details of the present stock position in the field. Nor any data on Site Quality,
Incident data like Grass, Weeds, Grazing Fire etc, Growing Stock, NTFP etc was incorporated. The Working
Plan Divisions started implementing the inventory manual with the preparation of the Working Plan of
Burdwan Forest Division.
The Field points are chosen using the maps available with the GIS cell. The Mouza maps are prepared
on a scale of 1:15000 on the map Grids that were constructed in such a way so that 50 plots per thousand
hectare were constructed. The Latitude and Longitude of the various points were provided to the Field Staff
who reached these points using GPS and collected the data. This exercise was finished by August 2009.
Growing Stock of BTR East, BTR West, Baikunthpur, Raiganj, Burdwan, Durgapur, Howrah SF,
Bankura North, Bankura South, Panchet Forest Divisions have been calculated species wise in cubic meter till
date. Mouzawise/Compartwise Growing Stock data of the above divisions are also available.
The Field Staff were provided training on the use of GPS in reaching a particular location using GPS
and the Field staff used the GPS to reach the positions in the field plots supplied to them by the GIS Cell.
C. Correction of Old Stock Maps using Remote Sensing and GIS.
Presently The Stock maps of Five Forest Divisions are under preparation or already been prepared in
the GIS Cell. These Five divisions are BTR East Forest Division, BTR West Forest Division, Wildlife-III Forest
Division and Baikunthpur Forest Division. The GIS Cell is preparing the stock maps of these divisions using
GIS and remote sensing. Before taking up the Work of revision of Working Plans in these divisions Satellite
maps of these Forest Divisions were procured. The satellite maps of the divisions were sent to the Field staff
prior to the preparation of the Stock maps in the Field. Since North Bengal has a long history of forest
management and all the compartments in North Bengal has been well demarcated using mostly the natural

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 53


boundaries like rivers, roads, fire lines, canals etc, therefore the Field Staff was instructed to provide the Stock
maps that are realistic. Training was organised in which the Working Plan Field Staff was sensitized about the
correction of old stock maps using the satellite imageries provided to them Range wise/beat wise and
Compartment wise. Since earlier we had no method of checking the accuracy of Stock maps therefore the
same stock maps were continuing over last one hundred of years or so. Sadly even after providing the Staff
with the latest satellite imageries, it was seen that the Stock maps that had been prepared by the field staff
contained the same boundaries as that of older stock maps. When the maps were brought to the GIS cell the
maps were overlaid on the satellite imageries and then it was seen that the rivers which formed the natural
boundaries of different ranges and compartments have shifted quite a bit and the maps sent from the field did
not match with the present position at all. It was then decided that the GIS Cell under supervision of
Conservator Working Plan & GIS will re fix the boundaries as per present position and would not continue the
boundaries that were demarcated on the basis of earlier stock maps. The following picture illustrates the
change over the years in the course of rivers in North Bengal.
Presently All the Stock Maps of the above mentioned divisions have been rectified as per the present
positions on the Satellite imageries and the legacy of older incorrect maps carried over last 100 years or so has
been corrected.
D. Use of GPS in the distribution of land under “The Scheduled Tribes and Other
Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006”
After the “The Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of
Forest Rights) Act, 2006” was enacted the parliament, it was felt necessary to expedite the distribution of
forest lands to the tribal's and the other under privileged sections of the society which was under their
possession in accordance with The ST and other traditional forest Dweller's Act, 2006. Initially the progress of
the distribution of land to the under privileged sections was very slow and the Backward Class welfare
Department was constantly blaming the Forest Department for the slow implementation of the act. The
Conservator of Forests, Working Plan & GIS trained the field staff of all the divisions in the usage of GPS for
the purpose of survey, Demarcation and preparation of Maps using GPS. The Field staff was acquainted with
the various functionalities of GPS like Various pages of GPS, saving data, saving tracks, calculating area,
tracking an area for the purpose of preparing maps, saving latitudes and longitudes using GPS , transferring
data from GPS to computer and from computer to GPS etc. Presently GPS is used by all the Forest Divisions
for the purpose of map preparation, printing and distribution of lands to the tribals and other less privileged
sections of the society under The ST and other traditional forest Dweller's Act, 2006, checking of plantations
and monitoring of other projects in the state.
E. Resource Survey Enumeration and Compilation of Growing Stock:-
For the Scientific management of Forests we need to know the forest resources at our disposal. In West
Bengal the Forest Resource Survey, which the Working Plan Circle and its divisions are carrying religiously,
during the preparation of Working Plans. The first such detailed data on Growing Stock, Site Quality,
prevalence of Herbs, Shrubs, bamboos etc, Soil profile, were for the first time initiated by the the Working Plan
Wing during the preparation of Working Plans of Burdwan District in 2009. Since then this has been
institutionalized and the standards were set as a benchmark during the preparation of Working Plans of
Burdwan District in 2009. Since then the Working Plan wing
Prepared the Working Plans of BTR, Baikunthpur, Wildlife-III, Raiganj etc by detailing all the statistics
as mentioned above.
The Growing Stock per Hectare of Wildlife as per latest estimates is 93.53 m3/ Ha. The Total Growing

54 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


3
Stock is 2135097.5 m . The detail species wise growing stock is given in annexure as well as contained in
Chapter-2 of Vol-I. The managers may use the data in augmenting the Growing Stock of the species they deem
fit for Wildlife Management and which is seen dwindling in the Growing Stock data. The details are given in the
tables.
F. Daily Forest Fire Alerts:-
West Bengal Forest Department started issuing Daily Forest Fire Alerts to the different divisions in the
state since the year 2007. The following procedure is carried out for daily fire alerts.
• Every day Point Data on Forest Fires downloaded from University of Maryland Website.
(http://maps.geog.umd.edu/firms/)
• The Forest Fire points are overlaid on existing Forest Boundary layers.
• The exact location of the forest fire like Forest Division, Range, Beat, Block, Compartment/Mouza
and Latitude and Longitude is identified and map of the location where fire has taken place is
prepared on an scale of 1:15000 scale.
• The Map is sent to the concerned Forest Divisions for verification by the Office of Conservator of
Forests, Working Plan & GIS Cell.
It is seen from our experience since last three years that about 99% of the fire alerts sent to different
forest Divisions were found to be correct and the feedback received confirmed the forest fire on the given
location. A Forest Fire map for the state has been prepared for the fires that took place during last three years.
The following photograph shows the exact process of processing the data on forest Fires.
The above was a brief description of Application of GIS and Remote Sensing in the preparation of
Working Plans and other fields for better Forest management in the State of West Bengal.

Sl. Forest Working Working Sanction Remarks


No. Division Plan in Plan Period Order No.
Progress
1 Darjeeling 12th 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Amended version submitted to RCCF.
2017-18 DAG, dt. 15.12.97 Approval has come vide no: 13-FCWP/
WB-DAG dated 24.07.2007
2 Kalimpong 9th 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Amended version submitted to RCCF.
2017-18 KLG, dt. 21.11.97 Approval has come vide no: 13-FCWP/
WB-KLG dated 24.07.2007
3 Kurseong 6th 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Amended version submitted to RCCF.
2017-18 KURSEONG, Approval has come vide no: 13-FCWP/
dt. 12.12.97 WB-KURSEONG dated 25.07.2007
4 Jalpaiguri 9th 2007-08 to 13-FCWP/WB- Amended version of working plan
2016-17 JP, dt.14.03.2008 submitted and approval has come vide
letter no 13-FCWP/WB-JP, dt.14.03.2008.
5 Baikunthpur 4th 2010- 9 (31)2/2000-
2019-20 FCE, dt. 23rd
February,2012
6 Buxa Tiger 8th 2000-01 to PWPR sent to Draft Working Plan Sent to RCCF
Reserve 2009-10 RCCF for approval Bhubaneshwar for approval.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 55


7 Wildlife-III 5th 2010- 9 (31)3/2000- FCE,
2019-20 dt. 28.02.2012
8 24- Parganas 2nd 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- 1st PWPR submitted by JD SBR, 2nd PWPR
2007-08 PRGN, DT 8.10.97 in progress
nd
9 West 2 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Mid term review report submitted to
Midnapur 2016-17 MDPR (W), RCCF and he has approved the mid-term
Dt. 7.08.98, appraisal vide no 13-FCWP/WB-
27.06.2000, MDPR(W) dated 28.07.2007
30.09.02,
28.07.2007
10 East 2nd 1995 to 2015 13-FCWP/WB- Mid term review report submitted to
Midnapur MDPR (W), RCCF and he has approved the mid-term
Dt. 7.08.98, appraisal vide no 13-FCWP/WB-
27.06.2000, DPR(W) dated 28.07.2007
30.09.02,
28.07.2007
11 Kharagpur SF 2nd 1995 to 2015 13-FCWP/WB- Mid term review report submitted to
MDPR (W), RCCF and he has approved the mid-term
Dt. 7.08.98, appraisal vide no 13-FCWP/WB-
27.06.2000, DPR(W) dated 28.07.2007
30.09.02,
28.07.2007
12 Rupnarayan 2nd 1995 to 2015 13-FCWP/WB- Mid term review report submitted to
(P&S) MDPR (W), RCCF and he has approved the mid-term
Dt. 7.08.98, appraisal vide no 13-FCWP/WB-
27.06.2000, DPR(W) dated 28.07.2007
30.09.02,
28.07.2007
13 Bankura (N) 2nd 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Draft Working Plan for the period 2012-21
2016-17 Purulia/Bankura, has been prepared and sent to RCCF for
Dt. 17.09.2008 his approval vide this office letter no 472/
1W-16 dated 16.06.2012
14 Bankura (S) 2nd 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Draft Working Plan for the period 2012-21
2016-17 Purulia/Bankura, has been prepared and sent to RCCF for
Dt. 17.09.2008 his approval vide this office letter no 472/
1W-16 dated 16.06.2012
15 Panchet Soil 2nd 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Draft Working Plan for the period 2012-21
Conservation 2016-17 Purulia/Bankura, has been prepared and sent to RCCF for
Dt. 17.09.2008 his approval vide this office letter no 472/
1W-16 dated 16.06.2012
16 Purulia 1st 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Mid term review report submitted to
2016-17 Purulia/Bankura, RCCF and he has approved the mid-term
Dt. 17.09.2008 appraisal vide no 13-FCWP/WB-urulia/
Bankura, Dt. 17.09.2008

56 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


17 Kangsabati 1st 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Mid term review report submitted to
SC-I 2016-17 Purulia/Bankura, RCCF and he has approved the mid-term
Dt. 17.09.2008 appraisal vide no 13-FCWP/WB-Purulia/
Bankura, Dt. 17.09.2008
18 Kangsabati 1st 1997-98 to 13-FCWP/WB- Mid term review report submitted to
SC-II 2016-17 Purulia/Bankura, RCCF and he has approved the mid-term
Dt. 17.09.2008 appraisal vide no 13-FCWP/WB-Purulia/
Bankura, Dt. 17.09.2008
st st
19 Birbhum 1 1990 to 2010 13-FCWP/WB- 1 PWPR Sent to RCCF Bhubaneshwar.
BVM, DT
5.09.1994
20 Burdwan 1st 2010-11 to 13/FCWP/WB-
2019-20 BDN Dt
10.06.2011
21 Durgapur SF 1st 2010-11 to 13/FCWP/WB-
2019-20 BDN Dt
10.06.2011
22 Howrah SF 1st 2010-11 to 13/FCWP/WB-
2019-20 BDN Dt
10.06.2011
23 Nadia 1st 2003- 04 to 9 (31)/99-FCE,
Murshidabad 2012-13 dt. 30.08.04
24 Malda 1st 2010-11 to 9(33)3/2003-FCE
2019-20 dt. 26.5.2011
25 Raiganj 1st 2012- New Draft Working Plan Sent to RCCF
2021-22 Bhubaneshwar for approval.
26 Coochbehar 1st New
SF

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 57


CHAPTER - 9
AFFORESTATION AND FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT SCHEMES
Out of a total geographical area of 88,752 sq. km., the state of West Bengal has 11,879 square
kilometers under recorded forests, which constitutes 13.38% of the total geographical area of the state.
However, satellite imageries of the state have indicated that the forest and tree cover of the state, which
includes forest cover as well as tree cover on farm land, institutional land, orchards, homestead land etc. is
reasonably high, though less than the ideal national target of 33%, as envisaged in the National Forest
Policy1988. The population density of the State is 904 per sq.km. against a national average of 324 per sq. km.
as per 2001 census. The productive per capita forest area is as iarrh as 0.015 ha. Against an average of 0.45 ha.
For the less industrial part of the world. Hence, a multifaceted programme of forestry development in the State
for a sustainable eco-system, with judicious use of forest resources for economic stability of fringe dwelling
community, with their active involvement in forest development, is the need of the hour.
With concerted efforts through scientific forest management it has been possible to enhance the total
forest cover to 15.68% (inclusive of the farm forests created outside the recorded forest area). Special
importance has been given on productivity gains through establishment of seed production areas; clonal
propagation of improved planting stock and use of better management practices. Quality clones are being
increasingly raised in the modern nurseries established in different parts of the state for use in plantation
programmes under different plan schemes. The use of bio-fertilizers and compost is being encouraged for their
environment friendly characters.
In view of the National Forest Policy 1988, conservation of Forests has been given priority with special
emphasis on fuelwood & fodder development on available wastelands through peoples' participation to avert
an ecological crisis and fuelwood and fodder famine. Major thrust areas of forestry development in the State
have been as follows.
i) Afforestation on available forest and private/ vested land including wasteland, and restoration and
rejuvenation of Sal forests of South-West Bengal involving local fringe population by forming Forest
Protection Committees and extending the same management system, gradually to productive forests
of other parts of the State.
ii) Soil and Water Conservation.
iii) Conservation of forest eco-systems, and the environment of ecologically fragile zones with special
emphasis on estuarine Sundarbans, Darjeeling Himalayas and the undulating lateritic tract of the
south-west.
iv) Wildlife conservation and habitat improvement with the requisite thrust on ecodevelopment activities
in and around Protected Area Network.
v) Socio-economic development of forest fringe population in for conservation of forest through PRA-
based microplans.
vi) Research on clonal propagation of tree-species including NTFP bearing trees, doses of optimal inputs
including application of biofertilizers.
vii) Raising awareness of people on conservation of wildlife and forests through creation of Nature
Interpretation Centre, Ecotourism facilities and publicity campaign during “Forestry Week” (Aranya
Saptah) and “Wildlife Week” (Vanya Pran Saptah).
Afforestation and Forestry Development Schemes
In consideration of the above, the following afforestation and forestry development schemes have
been taken up in the forestry sector of the State during 2006-2007.

58 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


1. Protective Afforestation : Very high rainfall and weak rock formation lead to frequent land slip, soil
erosion and gulley formation in mountains. Deforestation and faulty agricultural practices aggravate
the situation. In laterite zone, accelerated erosion takes place due to the absence of tree cover followed
by uncontrolled grazing, causing formation of deep gulleys and ravines during monsoon. Soil erosion
also results in deposition of silt and scree in riverbeds causing flash floods. In order to take care of the
problems enumerated above, afforestation and soil conservation works are taken up in the vulnerable
areas of North Bengal and South Bengal.
2. Eco-Conservation of Sensitive Zones : This is a scheme, which has been taken up to restore the
ecological balance in highly erosion prone areas of Darjeeling and Purulia districts. The nature of
treatment under this scheme includes afforestation, gully plugging, construction of earthen dam, check
dams, stream bank protection etc.
3. Economic Plantation : The degraded forest areas of the Duars and Terai have to be separated as per
provisions of approved Working Plan. Some areas in alluvial zone also have been identified for raising
plantations of mixed hard wood species. There is also need to take care of all younger plantations
th
created during the closing years of 10 five year plan.
4. Coastal Shelter Belt Plantation : Mainly plantations in coastal areas are taken up under this
programme with the object of mitigating fury of cyclones along the coast. This programme is taken up
mainly in Purba Medinipur district. Apart from creation of new plantations, maintenance of older
plantations is also taken up under this programme.
5. Plantation of Quick-growing species : Under this scheme, plantations of fast growing species are
created in the lateritic areas in South West Bengal. Maintenance of older plantations is also done under
the scheme.
6. Mangrove Treatment : The scheme aims at the rehabilitation of mangrove forest in Sunderbans by
taking up afforestation on blank patches of tidal mudflats.
7. Silvo-pasture : In order to keep down weed infestation, inter-planting by grass, legumes and other
fodder crops is taken up between plantation lines during the first three years. This helps in plant growth
apart from giving some production in terms of fodder. This is mainly done in high rainfall areas of North
Bengal, particularly in productive forests.
8. Creation & improvement of Parks & Gardens, Urban Forestry and Greening of Rural areas :
Due to rapid iarrheaationn and population growth, all the available open spaces are gradually being
covered up. Need for taking care of the aesthetic and recreational aspects of people is being increasingly
felt in rural, semi-urban and urban areas. There are more than 60 such parks and beautification spots in
West Bengal. Renovation and maintenance of older parks are also done under this scheme.
9. Decentralised Peoples' Nurseries : Seedlings are raised through Kishan Nurseries under this
programme to cover up the blank degraded areas outside the Forest areas at low cost and to financially
uplift the poor, small and marginal farmers at the same time.
10. Strip Plantation : The scheme is meant for the creation of plantations on roadsides, canal banks and
sides of the railway lines.
11. Forest Resource Survey : Under this programme survey of forest resources is done using Geographical
Information System. The forest resource position of the state is continuously updated for future planning.
12. Forest consolidation : The recorded forest area of the state is only 13.4 % of the total area of the
State. It is, therefore, important to maintain the boundaries of forest areas. Under this scheme
maintenance of forest boundaries is done through periodic survey and demarcation.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 59


13. Development of Forest communications : The scheme aims at improving communication in
forest areas to improve the status of forest protection, quick transportation of harvested forest produces
and better access to the remote forest fringe villages.
14. Buildings : Forest personnel have to live in forest areas for forest protection and execution of
developmental works. Construction of staff quarters, barracks, checkposts etc. is therefore necessary
for different categories of staff and officers. Such constructional works are taken up under this scheme.
15. Forest Protection : The objective of the scheme is to strengthen forest protection. It includes activities
like providing mobility to field staff, procurement of arms and ammunitions, expansion and
upgradation of R.T. Network etc.
16. Working Plan : For working of forest areas, working plans need to be prepared and got approved by
the Govt. of India. The Working Plan divisions are entrusted with the writing and revision of working
plans. All activities connected with the exercise are funded from the scheme.
17. Management Information System : For successful management of any resource, a comprehensive
and informative database is necessary. In terms of the adopted policy of the State Govt., all district
headquarters are proposed to be covered by a wide area net-work with the Headquarters of the
Directorate.
18. Research & Seed Propagation : The scheme focuses on seed and tree improvement, establishment
of seed stands and seed orchards, vegetative propagation trials, progeny trials, seed testing, grading
and certification, species provenance and introduction, improvement of nursery practices, agro-
forestry, silvi-pasture and ecological studies.
19. Wildlife & Bio-diversity : Species conservation depends first and foremost on the habitat
conservation. Bulks of the wildlife schemes are directed towards this end and have specific wildlife and
bio-diversity focus. Special efforts are made for protection of flagship, keystone, rare and endangered
species in the protected areas of the State.
20. Community Development : The foundation of Joint Forest Management (JFM) has been firmly laid
in south West Bengal through formation of Forest Protection Committees (FPC) and micro-planning
process. Under the scheme, efforts are made to extend JFM to other parts of the state through
community development works in order to address the problem of biotic interference, which is
responsible for forest degradation.
21. Allied Works Components : Apart from the afforestation schemes certain additional works have
been included in the State Plan, namely, survey and demarcation of external forest boundaries,
improvement of forest roads, construction of small earthen dams and other water-bodies for ground
water recharging, gully control and watershed iarrheaatio, social amenities, income generation and
employment for the sustenance of joint forest management.
22. Monitoring & Evaluation : The plantations raised under various state plan schemes and some
central sector schemes require regular monitoring. The fund provided under this scheme is iarrhea to
monitor and evaluate the success of the plantations using scientific sampling methods.
23. Training : This scheme is meant for training of forest staff in wildlife, soil conservation, general forestry
management, computer application, research, Seed technology, Social Forestry and other sectors
connected with fringe area development programmes.
24. Timber Operation : One of the thrust areas is judicious harvesting of forest resource compatible with
ecological, economic and environmental needs. As contractor system has been abolished in West
Bengal, this operation is done wholly departmentally all over the State. Presently the areas of both

60 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


North Bengal and South Bengal are covered under this scheme. Such harvesting of final and
intermediate yield as per provisions of approved Working Plan not only creates substantial
employment in rural areas but also generates revenue for the State Exchequer.
25. Economic rehabilitation of fringe population : It is being largely felt that forests cannot be
protected without enlisting the support of forest fringe dwellers. Participatory Management of forests
has taken deep root in some agro-ecological zones of the State. In addition, there is need to implant the
same in the right frame. Such efforts need to be nurtured through appropriate JFM-support activities
on adopted micro-plans continuously.
26. Intensification of Management : With rapid iarrheaati and rise in demand of forest produce,
protection of forests is becoming increasingly difficult. This task is becoming more complex due to
opening up of the roads in new directions. The scheme takes care of initiations in strengthening the
infrastructure through acquisition of tools for iarrheaatio of data collection, storing and retrieval system
in different spheres of activities.
27. Amenities to forest staff and labour : This is a scheme for providing amenities to forest staff and
forest villages. There are more than 10,000 forest staff spread all over West Bengal in more than 200
locations.
28. Publicity-cum-Extension : This scheme aims at generation of awareness about forests, wildlife and
biodiversity conservation throughout the state.
29. Nature Conservation- Protection and Improvement of Wildlife : This scheme is meant for
improvement of wildlife in the State. It includes improvement of wildlife habitat in different forest areas
of the State and improvement of Wildlife Sanctuaries and National Parks. About 34% of forest area of
the State is under protected area network.
30. Tiger Reserves in Sunderbans and Buxa : These are 50% Centrally Sponsored Scheme meant for
overall development of two Tiger Reserves. Eco-development works, iarrheaation development works
and other developmental programmes are taken up under this scheme. Allocation of funds from the
Govt. of India depends on availability of matching grant by the State.
31. Jaldapara Wildlife Sanctuary : This Scheme is meant for improvement and preservation of wildlife
habitat in Jaldapara sanctuary. This is a very important scheme for preservation of the prime rhino
habitat of the State.
32. Control of Poaching : Control of poaching of rare and endangered animals viz. tiger, rhino, elephant
etc. needs to be accorded highest priority. Similarly poaching of prey base species like deer etc. also has
to be kept at bay. The provision under the scheme is to take care of such activities.
33. Development of Singallila National Park : This is a scheme meant for management of biological
resources of Singalila National Park. This National Park is located at the highest altitudinal zone of the
State and has representation of a number of rare and endangered fauna.
34. Development of Neora Valley National Park : This is a scheme meant for management and
improvement of bio-ecological resources of Neora Valley National Park. This is unique that the National
Park has a rich diversity of flora and fauna spreading over iarrheaat zone of 2000 m to 3000 m.
35. Development of Mahananda, Senchal and Gorumara Wildlife Sanctuaries : These schemes
are aimed at management of Mahananda , Senchal and Gorumara wildlife sanctuaries which iarrh a
large number of rare and endangered species.
36. Lloyd Botanical Garden : The scheme is for the development of prestigious Lloyd Botanical Garden
situated in Darjeeling. This is the only Botanical garden located in the high altitude region of the

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 61


Himalayas. This garden has the potential of being developed as a model garden for the flora of
montane and temperate areas of the eastern Himalayas.
37. Forestry Research : Forestry research is an essential component of forest management. The scheme
aims at improving the quality of planting stock, selection of suitable species in different agro-climatic
zones.
38. Setting up a centre for Wildlife & Sustainable Forest Management : The scheme was started
with the objective of setting up of a Centre for Wildlife and Sustainable Forest Management and
running courses on wildlife management and other related subjects jointly with IIT, Kharagpur.
39. Rural Infratructure Development Fund(R.I.D.F.) : This is a NABARD assisted programme taken
up with a view to improving economic standard of fringe dwellers through afforestation and other
developmental works, like construction and maintenances of roads, construction of irrigation
channels, schoolbuildings, community centres, ring wells, dug wells etc.
Centrally Sponsored Schemes :
1. Bamboo Plantation Scheme : This is a 100% centrally sponsored scheme operative in various
districts of West Bengal. The objectives of the scheme envisage conservation, improvement and
increase production of bamboo while providing regular income to the tribal and rural poor living in and
around forests. The enormous diversity and design exhibited by the products made of bamboo reflects
its indispensability for tribal and rural communities. Besides, many bamboo species are excellent soil
binders and thus contribute in checking soil erosion.
Since 2002-03, the scheme has been included under the National Afforestation Programme being
implemented through Forest Development Agencies.
2. Integrated Forest Protection Scheme : This scheme was introduced in 2002-03 in place of
Forest Fire Control & Management Scheme. The main objectives of the scheme are prevention and
control of forest fire and improvement in the status of forest protection. Since 2003-04, the pattern of
the funding of the scheme has changed. The scheme, which was fully sponsored by central
government earlier, is now funded by the govt. of India to the extent of 75 %, the remaining 25 % share
being provided by the state government.
3. Coastal ShelterBelt Plantation : This is a 100% centrally sponsored scheme for the coastal
areas of Purba Midnapore district. Objectives of this scheme include raising plantations along the coast
to combat cyclones and thereby protect coastal areas.
4. River Valley Project – Teesta & Kangsabati : Works under these projects are being carried out
in catchments of Kangsabati and Teesta. These works are done on watershed basis for which
management plan is submitted to the Govt. of India. Work is in progress in priority watersheds. In other
watersheds, maintenance work is in progress. State Level and Watershed Level Committees have been
formed to monitor the work.
5. Tiger Reserves in Sunderban and Buxa : This project is taken up for protection and development
of Tiger Reserve and Eco-development activities in forest fringe villages.
6. Development of National Parks & Sanctuaries : This scheme is taken up for protection and
development of wild life and bio-diversity in National Parks and Sanctuaries of North Bengal.
7. Eco-Development around Protected Areas : This Scheme aims at Socio-economic development
of the forest fringe population to reduce pressure on Biodiversity in the protected areas.
8. Elephant Project : This scheme is taken up for development of elephant habitats, reduction of
man-elephant conflicts ,capacity building of elephant squads and also for economic uplift of the forest

62 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


fringe people of the Eastern Duars Elephant Reserve and Mayurjharna Elephant Reserve.
9. Conservation and Management of Mangrove : This schmes aims at afforestation of Sunderbans
estuary with mangrove plants.
10. Sunderban Biosphere Reserve : This scheme aims at Eco-development activities and JFM
support activities amongst the Forest Protection Committee members and development of eco-toursium.
th
11. Grants-in-Aid under 12 . Finance Commission : This Scheme aims at maintenance of older
plantations, purchase of patrolling vehicles, arms and ammunitions and also for afforestation.
12. Jaldapara Wildlife Sanctuary : This Scheme is meant for improvement and preservation of
wildlife habitat in Jaldapara wildlife sanctuary. This is an important scheme for preservation of the
prime Rhino habitat of the State.
13. Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary : This scheme is aimed at management of Mahananda Wildlife
Sanctuary, which harbours a large number of rare and endangered species of wildlife.
14. Chapramari Wildlife Santuary : This scheme is meant for improvement and preservation of
wildlife habitat in Chapramari Wildlife Sanctuary in Jalpaiguri district.
15. Singalila National Park : This is a scheme meant for management of biological resources of
Singalila National Park, which is located at highest Altitude Zone of the State, and it has representation
of a number of rare endangered fauna.
16. Gorumara National Park : This is a scheme meant for improvement and preservation of wildlife
habitat in Gorumara National Park, which is famous for one horned Rhino and Bison.
17. Neoravalley National Park : This is a scheme meant for management and improvement of
Bio-ecological resources of Neoravalley National Park which is unique for its rich diversity of flora and
fauna spreading over altitudinal zone of 2000 mts. To 3000 mts.
18. Conservation & Management of Wetlands in West Bengal : The scheme has been started
with the objective of ensuring conservation of the wetland faunal and floral association in the
Sundarbans, Rasik beel and Ahiron beel wetlands.
19. Medicinal plants Conservation & Area Development Programme : The objective of this
scheme is to promote in-situ & ex-situ conservation of medicinal plants, through survey and inventory
of medicinal species, development of better techniques for plantation and assisted natural regeneration of
medicinal plants, documentation of medicinal plants in the state and extension activities.
20. National Afforestation Programme : The National Afforestation Programme (NAP) was
th
formulated by merger of four 9 Plan centrally sponsored schemes of the Ministry of Environment &
Forests viz. Integrated Afforestation and Eco-development Project (IAEDP), Area Oriented Fuelwood
and Fodder Project (AOFFP), Conservation and development of Non-Timber Forest Produce Scheme
(NTFP) including medicinal plants scheme and Association of Scheduled Tribes and Rural Poor in
Regeneration of Degraded Forest (ASERP), with a view to reducing multiplicity of schemes with similar
objectives, and ensuring uniformity for funding pattern and implementation and institutionalization of
peoples' participation and project formulation and implementation. The scheme is being operated
through Forest Development Agencies with fund support from National Afforestation and Eco-
Development Board, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India as a 100% centrally
sponsored scheme. The objectives of the scheme are :
i) Regeneration and Eco-development of integrated forest and adjoining areas on a watershed basis ;
ii) Augmenting the availability of fuel wood, fodder and grass;

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 63


iii) Securing peoples' participation in plantation and regeneration efforts
iv) Promotion of agro-forestry and development of government property and resources;
v) Conservation and improvement of NTFP.
vi) Raising coastal shelter belt to mitigate the adverse impacts of cyclones
vii) Development of water resources thorough afforestation and water harvesting programme;
viii) Extension of improved technology as the clonal propagation and use of root training ;
ix) Employment generation for the disadvantaged section of the society, particularly women,
SCs/STs and landless rural labourers.

Table 9.1
Afforestation Activities 2011-2012
(Schemewise)
Sl. No. Plantations/Scheme Plantation Notional Area of
Raised (Ha.) Seedling
Distribution (Ha.)
1 Protective Afforestation 60.00 —
2 Eco-conservation 155.00 —
3 Economic Plantation 640.00 —
4 Coastal Shelterbelt Pltn. 25.00 —
5 Quick Growing spp. 1235.00 —
6 Forestry Treatment 123.00 —
Mangrove Treatment 265.00 —
7 Strip Plantation (Deptt.) 884.00 —
8 Protective Afforestation (Hill areas) 25.00 —
9 D.P.N. — 653.49
10 Other Wildlife Schemes 191.00 —
11 RIDF 2001.00 —
12 R.V.P. Teesta/ DVC 366.00 —
13 FDA (NAP) 1307.00 —
14 Elephant Project — —
15 Bamboo Pltn. 415.00 —
16 Medicinal Plantation — —
17 Conservation & mgmt. of Mangroves — —
18 Establishment of SBR — —
19 Compensatory Afforestation 131.40 —
20 Farm Forestry — 462.50
21 Public Garden —
21 Consolidation of J.F.M. and Enrichment of — —
Forest Productivity (W.B.F.D.C.)

64 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


22 SGRY/Greening of Rural Areas 147.00 —
23 RSVY — 62.50
24 NREGS 1283.50 2428.50
25 Others 997.33 —
26 RKVY 123.00 —
27 12 th Finance Commission — —
TOTAL 10374.23 3606.99

Table 9.2
Progress of Afforestation through successive plans

Sl. PLAN PERIOD AREA AFFORESTED


No. IN PLAN PERIOD (HA.)
01. FIRST (1951-56) 9,570
02. SECOND (1956-61) 14,625
03. THIRD (1961-66) 17,700
04. (1966-1969) 13,341
05. FOURTH (1969-74) 32,920
06. FIFTH (1974-79) 50,015
07. (1979-80) 14,000
08. SIXTH (1980-85) 165,026
09. SEVENTH (1985-90) 294,568
10. (1990-91) 63,352
11. (1991-92) 67,908
12. EIGHTH (1992-97) 299,630
13. NINTH (1997-2002) 100,839
14. TENTH (2002-2007)
(2002-2003) 13,481
(2003-2004) 10,104
(2004-2005) 14,592
(2005-2006) 13,352
(2006-2007) 15,382
15. ELEVENTH
(2007-2008) 13,387
(2008-2009) 18,707
(2009-2010) 15,043
(2010-2011) 14,101
(2011-2012) 10374.23

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 65


CHAPTER - 10
JOINT FOREST MANAGEMENT & SELF HELP GROUP
West Bengal is the pioneer state in India in initiating Joint Forest Management. This movement of JFM
had its genesis at Arabari in Midnapur District of West Bengal where 618 families of 11 villages were motivated
in early 70's to rejuvenate 1,186 ha. of degraded sal forest by roping in their participation through a set of
activities of employment generation and sharing of NTFP from such forests. This was followed by the adoption
of the Govt.'s decision in 1989 to share 25% of usufructs and net profit of the intermediate and final yield
respectively. This and subsequent resolutions of Government gave institutional support to the existing
participatory system of Forest management.
In1996, E.D.Cs were also constituted seeking co-operation of the fringe people in protection and
development of Wildlife Protected Areas (Sanctuaries and National Parks). All the Government Notifications
on the resolutions on JFM including the composition of FPCs and EDCs, the duties and functions of members
of FPCs and EDCs, usufructuary benefits etc. have been published in local vernacular and circulated amongst
the targeted communities of the JFM-movement.
Successful execution of the West Bengal Social Forestry Project in the 1980's opened up avenues for
Forest Department personnel for interaction with communities in fringes of forests and building up of rapport.
The JFM movement gained momentum with the implementation of World-Bank-aided West Bengal Forestry
Project during 90's. The main objective of which inter-alia was to promote people's participation in
management and development of forests. Subsequently, India Eco-Development Project implemented in
Buxa Tiger Reserve and UNDP in Sunderban Tiger Reserve came as a boon to carry on with the process of
consolidation of JFM.
As on March 2012, there are 4281 FPCs in the State . comprising of total number of 498808 members
protecting the total forest areas over 567599.016 ha. The total number of EDCs in the State are 117
comprising of 27575 members protecting 82008.09 ha. Of Protected Areas. In all FPCs and EDCs, the spouses
are joint members.
The process of formation and subsequent consolidation of JFM led to reckonable success in
rejuvenating the degraded forests and bringing about economic upliftment of fringe population constituting
the FPCs and EDCs through series of measures including implementation of people oriented development
programmes.
The factors which are considered important for success of JFM in the State are:
1) Realisation of the natural resource managers regarding the failure of custodian system of management
in continuing degradation of forests and their growing perception that only participation of stake-
holders can bring in a change in an otherwise bleak scenario.
2) Empowerment of the people at grass-root level through inclusion of Panchayet Raj Institution at
different levels of management.
3) Adoption of micro-planning through PRA as a tool for involvement of communities in developmental
activities, management of NWFPs, silvicultural and harvesting operations.
4) Community/Ecodevelopment activities by way of infrastructural development, vocational training and
input support for increased productivity of land-based systems, creation of assets for supplemental
income and generation of adequate employment in forestry and allied activities on a sustainable basis.

66 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


5) Sharing of usufructs with participating communities as envisaged in the resolution, resulted in
credibility to the Govt.'s intention to carry forward the mission of JFM. Marketing of timber and other
forest produce to ensure optimum iarrheaat of usufractory share reflected Department's concern for
the communities.
6) Persistent efforts by forest personnel, NGOs and natural leaders of FPCs to motivate and build
awareness through face to face communication, group meetings, workshops, awareness campaigns
etc.
Forest Department's resource being limited, integration of activities of other departments namely
Panchayet and Rural Development, Backward Class Welfare, Agriculture, Minor Irrigation, Animal Resources
Development, Cottage & Small Scale Industries etc. in JFM areas is essential. Again for maintenance of assets
and taking up village development activities in FPC areas, FPCs are persuaded to create community funds of
their own and many of the FPCs have already accumulated substantial fund. Self-Help Groups (SHGs) among
the members of FPC in some areas have been formed to take up various vocational and income generation
activities utilizing fund from their own savings as well as bank loans where necessary and available. Such
Self-Help Group activities are found to be very inspiring particularly for women folk as they are able to earn
or/and supplement the livelihood of their families.
There is no denying that performance of FPCs have tended to vary amongst regions endowed with
different bio-physical parameters but there is also appreciable difference in the level of performance of FPCs
iarrheaatio by similar resource parameters.
JFM-Support Activities
The people around forests are integral part of forest-eco-system and their livelihood needs is to be
reckoned as very important for ensuring long term conservation of resources. While direct benefit flow to
the members of FPC/EDCs from forest resources by way of sharing of usufructs and employment
generation is limited, there is scope of improvisation of traditional activities and allied land-based or skill-
based activities like :-
i) Agricultural development through creation of irrigation facility and supply of improved inputs.
ii) Animal husbandry through improvement of breeds and veterinary care.
iii) Promotion of small scale cottage industries.
iv) Vocational trainings for income generation activities namely mushroom cultivation, sal-leaves platter
making, pisciculture, tailoring, weaving, sericulture, bee-keeping, lac culture, muri making etc.
v) Agro-forestry and farm forestry practices including intercropping in plantations raised by Forest Deptt.
vi) Self-employment group oriented activities both for men and women (Self-Help Group activities) –
Dairy farming, Poultry farming, Piggery, Pisciculture etc.
vii) Development of marketing facilities.
viii) Value addition of NTFP resources.
Community oriented activities have been mostly relied upon as they have the following endowments:-
nMore effective, as they directly involve the FPCs & EDCs.
nBenefit maximum number of people.
nLeads to infrastructure development.
nHelps in creation of assets for sustained income generation.
nLeads to all round development of the village.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 67


Inspite of the fact that, individual beneficiary oriented schemes tend to have higher investment per FPC
family and are fraught with risk of transfer of assets in some cases such schemes have to be taken up for execution,
as a very large part of FPC beneficiaries belong to the group of landless and small / marginal farmers.
Monitoring
The impact of JFM activities in forest conservation and economic upliftment of fringe dwellers vary
widely and as such proper monitoring and assessment of such factors and activities which lead to the success of
JFM and the indicators which bring out the impact of JFM need to be determined and assessed for sustenance
of JFM. It is appreciable that factors like social and cultural aspects, economic status, organizational capacity,
characteristics of bio-physical system etc., influence the changes at different levels. It is therefore, a challenging
task to determine suitable indicators or parameters to monitor the impact of JFM. Such indicators of assessment
may be both qualitative and quantitative. But qualitative assessment could be subjective and may not help in
meaningful monitoring and long term evaluation.
So a proper monitoring methodology needs to be evolved taking suitable indicators and verifiers into
consideration and quantifying them. For monitoring of JFM, where information relating to FPCs are concerned,
their numbers, total members, area protected, status of protection, works implemented, employment
generation and sharing of usufructs should figure in monitoring format. Other aspects, relating to status of
forest regeneration and conservation of bio-diversity, duties and responsibilities of FPC members and the staff,
liaison of the forest department staff with the FPCs, involvement of women members in JFM, formation of Self-
Help Groups, maintenance of community fund, training etc., should also be reflected to assess the level of
performance of stake-holders namely FD and FPCs. The criteria/indicators for monitoring at different levels-
FPCs, Division, State and National, might differ according to requirements and purpose of monitoring and
formats are to be developed accordingly.
For better appreciation of members of FPCs as regards to overall achievement in forest conservation
and development, a system of participatory monitoring at FPC level is required to be developed using
measurable indicators like offence cases relating to pilferage of forest produce, grazing, incidents of forest fire
etc. These indicators relating to various areas could easily be compared to focus the level of performances of
varies protection committees at Beat or Range levels.
Apart from continuous monitoring, socio-economic survey and bio-diversity survey are also required
to be taken up at periodic intervals for knowing the impact of JFM activities and status of conservation and
development of the forest resources through JFM. As far as the state of West Bengal is concerned some
indicators have been developed for ascertaining the performance of FPCs with reference to the lateritic tract.
These need to be refined over the years to have a rational number of indicators which would be amenable for
participatory monitoring.
Some criteria have also been developed for institutional and socio-economic impact monitoring of
FPCs/EDCs in Buxa Tiger Reserve under IEDP. Such criteria/indicators have the desirable endowments as below:
i) Easily measurable.
ii) Reveal meaningful trend.
iii) Precise and unambiguous.
iv) Meaningful to local people and FD.
v) Drawn from existing knowledge and records.
vi) Easily comprehensible by FPCs and EDCs.
vii) Reasonably reflective of impact of project activities.

68 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Problems and Conflicting Issues :
1) Variability of site-productivity bringing in inequity in sharing of usufructs.
2) Political rivalries among people and inequities existing amongst groups of FPC members.
3) Population growth and unemployment.
4) Inadequate motivation of staff or absence of motivation.
5) Lack of will to be transparent.
6) A strong compartmentalized development approach.
7) Outreach of development activities falling short of targeted fringe-population.
8) Heterogeneity in population and occupational structure.
9) Organised timber theft, antisocial activities, insurgence and terrorism in certain areas and smuggling
and cross border activities along international border etc.
Key issues for consolidation of JFM and its sustenance
A Motivation & training of stake holders FD-staff and FPC members.
Initial period of euphoria on success of installation of JFM in some agro-ecological tracts is over. There
is stark iarrheaat that there is need for strengthening of activities in weak areas particularly in northern
part of the State as well as to sustain our efforts on the score in other tracts. FD-staff have to be tolerant,
patient, compassionate, transparent backed up by appropriate knowledge of natural resources and
harvesting practices to get into the role of an agent of social and environmental change.
B. Carrying on the process of reorientation of the mind-set of forestry professionals at
different levels.
It has been difficult to have the role of foresters reversed from that of custodial managers to that of
managers managing natural resources in participation with stake-holders being respectful of their
development needs and rational use of available resources. A consistent regular training programme of
all levels of forestry-staff need be institutionalized strongly raping in the services of competent
institutions including credible NGOs working at the grass-root level on this score.
C. JFM-Support activities ––
Pooling of resources is a key factor in scaling up support activities to improve the quality of life of the
stake-holders belonging to landless, small and marginal farmers. Depending on external-aid to sustain
such activities may only yield freak iarrhea result. To have the desired sustainable impact, pooling in of
internal resources supported by development of community fund has been identified as a key area of
activity. It has been possible to pool in resources through flow of funds in this sector from allocations of
the Deptt. Of Forests, Backward Communities Welfare Deptt., and other allied Govt. Departments
including formulation of an innovative project in forestry sector by WBFDC Ltd.
D Gender sensitization to ensure participation of women groups
Women of each household have been designated as joint member of FPC/EDC. But this did not pop
up their degree of involvement in FPC/EDC working. Some FPCs are exclusively controlled by
women-groups and their positive participation has changed the complexion of working of FPCs in
iarrhea areas. Many of self-help groups having representation of women tended to take on the mantle
of leaders in such areas. The spread of such groups with the help of CARE-INDIA and scheme funded
by NABARD has been planned to be implemented over the next few years. A boost on women
empowerment has also been given by adopting the participation of women to 33% of the total

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 69


members of the Executive Committee of FPCs through adoption in the govt. resolution.
E Sharing of Usufructs
Timely sharing of usufructs both from the intermediate and final-yield particularly in south-West
Bengal has established credibility of the State Govt. in pursuing with the desired zeal and mission of the
policy of JFM in managing natural resources – of the State. FPCs in the Hill areas of Darjeeling are yet
to perceive this – primarily due to delayed registration and partly due to dislocation in yield-harvesting
from forests because of absence of approved management plans. In the recent past management plans
of the forests of the Dooars and the Terai have been approved and extraction of intermediate and final
yield as per plans will help the State Govt. in meeting its commitment towards sharing of usufructs with
the targeted FPC-beneficiaries.
F Reorganisation of the Forest Directorate :
There was iarrheaat that an intense communication between FPC-members and the beat staff of grass-
root level is essential to install and support JFM-process. This coupled with the need for distribution of
work-load and pooling in of financial resources, the Forest Directorate has been re-organised with a
bottom-up approach. The Beat and Range-boundaries have been made co-jurisdictional with Gram
Panchayets and Panchayat Samities. Divisions and Circles have been made to administer compact
areas of a district or a region.
This has brought in accountability of different levels with regard to a well-defined geographical area
and removal of overlap of jurisdiction by some functional divisions in the sector of social forestry and
soil conservation.
G. A strong marketing initiative
Marketing of timber, pulpwood, mining props etc., has been organized on a very sound footing
through roping in coal-mining companies in public sector and pulpwood and paper mills in private
sector to ensure optimal realization from the product-mix of harvested areas. This marketing initiative
needs to be sustained over the years to keep the interest of FPC-communities alive. But marketing of
NTFP needs to be further strengthened. There is need for proper assessment of the NTFP resources –
particularly of important components with reference to different forest ecosystems and estimation of
sustainable harvests by FPCs. Dissemination of market information to collecting FPCs backed by
creation of storage and processing facilities is extremely desired to consolidate gains of JFM.
However, the present level of motivation, conviction and commitment between two major stake-
holders : the forest fringe dwellers as well as the Forest Department is well supported in many areas by
motivated tiers of Panchayet, who have been responsible for building up an atmosphere of mutual trust and
understanding and a strong intention of the State Govt. to pursue the process is destined to take the JFM in the
State a long way ensuring effective conservation of forests and a steady improvement in quality of life of fringe
population.

70 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table – 10.1
FOREST PROTECTION COMMITTEES IN WEST BENGAL
(As on 31.03.2012)
Total Area No. of Members
Zone Division No. of Protected
F.P.C (ha.) Male Female Total S.C. S.T. Others
Darjeeling 74 14412.88 3864 426 4290 139 107 4044
Kalimpong 64 26237.86 3582 195 3777 204 875 2698
Hilly
Kurseong 45 13091.08 4311 10058 14369 430 1219 12720
Wildlife I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jalpaiguri 63 20284.16 11431 638 12069 5255 3399 3415
Baikunthapur 64 12898.91 5978 129 6107 4475 628 1004
Duars- Cooch Behar 26 4102.90 2932 209 3141 1497 517 1127
Terai Wildlife III 25 6681.70 3738 171 3909 708 1958 1243
B.T.R.(E) 17 9331.09 3340 103 3443 1548 1334 561
B.T.R.(W) 33 25595.80 4064 489 4553 768 2563 1222
North Raigunj 21 1162.6 1727 74 1801 864 412 525
Bengal
Plains Malda 4 210 543 18 561 261 296 4
Midnapur 363 45956.45 48038 2801 50839 10131 9186 31522
Jhargram 474 52179.31 38254 2449 40703 9135 14906 16662
Kharagpur 254 27437.65 18421 12281 30702 6950 9504 14248
Rupnarayan 213 26397.78 26331 1343 27674 6419 7814 13441
Bankura(N) 540 43514.44 50560 2083 52643 19837 7912 24894
Bankura(S) 630 44460.37 53977 4857 58834 14189 18411 26234
Panchet 231 28466.18 27328 1562 28890 11033 4674 13183
South Purulia 213 30729.22 20741 867 21608 6012 6944 8652
Bengal Kangsabati (N) 244 17641.2 23578 881 24459 5677 8089 10693
Kangsabati (S) 305 25168.8 29561 569 30130 10899 4293 14938
Burdwan 74 20239.38 16914 2940 19854 7371 5771 6712
Durgapur 24 2436.439 1957 1964 3921 1112 1405 1404
Birbhum 194 10376.39 16608 347 16955 6028 5463 5464
Howrah 4 479.08 815 319 1134 537 238 359
Nadia-Msd. 12 916.24 957 44 1001 246 254 501
Purba Medinipur 19 1813.11 4760 1097 5857 1256 50 4551
S.T.R. 11 12844 3958 107 4065 3642 254 169
Estuarine
24-Pgs.(S) 40 42534 10801 10718 21519 11830 514 9175
TOTAL 4281 567599 439069 59739 498808 148453 118990 231365

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 71


Table – 10.2
Eco-Development Committees in West Bengal
(As on 31.03.2012)
Name of Name of No. of Area No. of Members
Zone Division P. A. EDC Protected Male Female Total S.C. S.T. Others
(Ha)
Mahananda 15 12405.55 2552 2088 4640 1284 992 2364
WLS
Wildlife-I
Senchal WLS 15 4114.72 1587 1196 2783 92 1442 1249
Hilly
Singalila N.P. 1 350 63 72 135 0 59 76
Wildlife-II Neora 6 5594.17 1526 1414 2940 283 758 1899
Valley N.P.
Gorumara N.P. 10 6315.17 1792 51 1843 458 569 816
Chapramari 1 960.31 47 1 48 4 8 36
WLS
Duars- Buxa Tiger 14 23534.97 1454 173 1627 223 612 792
Terai Reserve (E)
B.T.R.
Buxa Tiger All EDC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
transferred
Reserve (W) to FPC

Wildlife-III Jaldapara WLS 33 15986.53 6846 1604 8450 3452 2346 2652
NB Plains Raigunge Kulik WLS 3 130 193 21 214 172 30 12
Birbhum Ballavpur WLS 4 200 276 34 310 9 196 105
South
Bengal Nadia – Bethuadahari 1 66.67 96 6 102 55 - 47
Murshidabad WLS
Estuari- Sunderban S.T.R. 14 12350 3993 490 4483 4047 108 328
ne Tiger Reserve
TOTAL : 117 82008.09 20425 7150 27575 10079 7120 10376

72 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table – 10.3
Performance for consolidation of Joint Forest Management in South Bengal.

Year No. of FPCs No. of Amount FPC share per


involved Beneficiaries (‘ in lakh) capita ( in Re. )
1995-96 163 20311 123.37 607.40
1996-97 354 42361 243.45 574.70
1997-98 248 32156 251.24 781.32
1998-99 339 35530 287.00 807.76
1999-2000 445 50989 402.00 788.00
2000-2001 424 56479 455.50 806.00
2001-2002 520 45662 580.00 1,270.00
2002-2003 1454 45662 430.01 942.00
2003-2004 1454 51047 548.75 1,075.00
2004-2005 1510 60150 509.25 846.00
2005-2006 1944 56979 592.00 1,039.00
2006-2007 1967 57864 634.57 1,097.00
2007-2008 743 90103 1511.23 1,677.00
2008-2009 583 64344 1487.96 2312.00
2009-2010 233 24407 922.36 3779.00
2010-2011 327 33585 959.70 2857.53
2011-12 625 114398 1713.28 1497.65

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 73


10.4 NATIONAL AFFORESTATION PROGRAMME”: A PARTICIPATORY APPROACH TO
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF FORESTS ( CENTRALLY SPONSORED SCHEME )

OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR THE ELEVENTH FIVE-YEAR PLAN


The scheme entitled as “National Afforestation Programme (NAP)” has been formulated by merger of
th
four 9 Plan centrally sponsored afforestation schemes of the Ministry of Environment & Forests, namely,
Integrated Afforestation and Eco-Development Projects Scheme (IAEPS), Area Oriented Fuelwood and
Fodder Projects Scheme (AOFFPS), Conservation and Development of Non-Timber Forest Produce including
Medicinal Plants Scheme (NTFP) and Association of Scheduled Tribes and Rural Poor in Regeneration of
Degraded Forests (ASTRP), with a view to reducing multiplicity of schemes with similar objectives, ensuring
uniformity in funding pattern and implementation mechanism, avoiding delays in availability of funds to the
field level and iarrheaationng peoples participation in project formulation and its implementation. The
Scheme will be operated by the National Afforestation and Eco-Development Board, Ministry of Environment
and Forests as a 100% Central Sector/Centrally Sponsored Scheme (except for the AOFFP component).

1. Objectives of the Scheme.

1.1 Short term objectives :

- Regeneration and eco-development of degraded forests and adjoining areas on a watershed basis.

- Augmentation of the availability of fuelwood, fodder and grasses from the regenerated areas.

- Securing people's participation in planning and regeneration efforts to ensure sustainability and
equitable distribution of forest products from the regenerated lands, and to promote the
partnership concept in the management and administration of forests and common property
resources.

- Promotion of agroforestry and development of Common Property Resources.

- Promotion of fuel saving devices to encourage efficient use of fuelwood and to reduce the
drudgery of rural women involved in collection of wood as also to improve the environment.

- Conservation and improvement of non-timber forest produce such as bamboo, cane and
medicinal plants.

- Encouragement for production of non-timber products such as wax, honey, fruits and nuts from
the regenerated areas.

- Raising coastal shelterbelts to mitigate the adverse impacts of cyclonic winds.

- Development of water resources through plantation and water harvesting programme.

- Development and extension of improved technologies such as clonal propagation, use of root
trainers for raising seedlings, mycorrhizal inoculation etc.

- Rehabilitation of special problem lands like areas with saline/alkaline soils, ravines, desert areas,
coastal areas, mined areas. Himalayas, Aravallis and Western Ghats.

- Employment generation for the disadvantaged sections of society particularly women, scheduled
castes/scheduled tribes and landless rural labourers, inhabiting the forests and adjoining areas.

74 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


1.1.2 Long-term objectives:

- Protection, Conservation of natural resources through active involvement of the people.

- Checking land degradation, deforestation and loss of biodiversity.

- Ecological restoration and environmental conservation and eco-development.

- Evolving village level people's organization, to manage the natural resources in and around
villages in a sustainable manner.

- Fulfilment of the broader objectives of productivity, equity and sustainability for the general good
of the people.

- Improve quality of life and self-sustenance aspect of people living in and around forest areas.

- Capability endowment and skill enhancement for improving employability of the rural people.

2. Implementing Agencies : The scheme would be implemented by the following State agencies :

The two tier systemof FDAs is now being modified to three tier system with the introduction of State
Forest Development Agency (SFDA). SFDA will be a federation of FDAs at the State level to be
registered as a society. This change ia in concurrence with the Revised Operational Guideline, 2009 for
National Afforestation Programme. The SFDA shall guide the FDAs and receive and allocate funds to
FDAs. It will also coordinate the FDAs and their programmes.

2.1 The participatory mode of the scheme for implementation of the programmes, will prevail by involving
three-tier set up namely the SFDA, Forest Development Agencies (FDAs) and Joint Forest Management
Committees (JFMCs)/ Eco-development Committees (EDC). This iarrheaatio institutional structure
would allow greater participation of the community both in planning and implementation of the
appropriate afforestation programmes. This would ground the people-centered approach in
afforestation programmes and provide a firm and sustainable mechanism for devolution of funds to
JFMCs for afforestation and related activities. Organic unity in the structural framework will promote
efficiency, effectiveness, accountability through iarrheaationn and devolution of authority and
responsibilities, both physical and financial. Village will be reckoned as a unit of planning and
implementation and all the activities under the scheme will be iarrheaation at the village level. The
three-tier approach, would also empower the local people to participate in the decision making process
and improve their capabilities more effectively, with the policy support and close monitoring of SFDA.
FDA is constituted at the Forest Division (territorial/wildlife) level and has the composition as fixed by NAEB,
Government of India. FDAs are registered societies under the Societies' Registration Act. At the grass-root level, the
FPCs are implementing agencies.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 75


Table – 10.5

76
Status of FDA as on 31.03.2012
No. of FPC/EDC Members in FDA Fund Utilization during 2010-12
Name of FDA No. of FPC/ Male Female Total SC ST Others ( ` in lakh)
EDC in FDA NAP F.V. Dev. Bamboo
Mission
Darjeeling 74 3864 426 4290 139 1007 3144 16.42 52.92 ----
Kalimpong 64 3582 195 3777 204 875 2698 ---- ---- ----
Kurseong 46 2043 3065 5108 431 1195 3482 10.06 38.48 ----
Jalpaiguri 63 11431 638 12069 5255 3399 3415 19.59 1.07 ----
Baikunthapur 64 6032 129 6161 4529 628 1004 16.33 ---- 0.39
Cooch Behar 25 1288 77 1365 1045 243 77 15.59 ---- ----
Wildlife I 13 1485 1287 2772 193 915 1664 18.43 6.38 ----
Wildlife II 10 1604 90 1694 433 559 702 ---- ---- ----
Coochbehar – 60 10584 1775 12359 4160 4304 3895 ---- ---- ----
Jaldapara
(Wildlife III)
B.T.R.(E) 17 1556 181 1737 456 908 373 ---- 8.32 ----
B.T.R.(W) 18 2013 206 2219 147 1611 461 ---- 192.21 ----
Midnapur 193 20673 1562 22235 5069 3353 13813 28.29 ---- ----
Arabari 170 27365 1239 28604 5062 5833 17709 31.81 ---- ----
Jhargram 100 5532 1788 7320 1679 1708 3933 ---- 39.55 ----
Kharagpur 254 18421 12281 30702 6950 9504 14248 78.30 ---- ----
Rupnarayan 53 8059 641 8700 2018 2297 4385 67.81 ---- ----
Bankura(N) 9 842 820 1662 1393 269 0 5.90 ---- ----
Bankura(S) 89 8907 330 9237 2921 1845 4471 24.57 7.86 ----
Panchet ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Purulia 49 5890 174 6064 2170 1278 2616 19.40 ---- ----
Kangsabati (N) 57 5940 160 6100 784 2563 2753 38.90 ---- ----
Kangsabati (S) 46 9800 9807 19607 3203 7562 8842 63.24 ---- ----
Burdwan 57 13937 2312 16249 4329 6764 5156 38.77 ---- ----

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Birbhum 194 16884 381 17265 6035 5659 5571 26.50 ---- ----
TOTAL 1725 187792 39564 227296 58605 64279 104412 519.91 346.79 0.39
10.6 : Self Help Groups in Forest Fringe Villages.

The object of formation of 'Self Help Groups' in Forest Fringe Villages, taken up in different districts
involving the (eligible and willing) Forest Protection Committees and EDC members was to open alternative
sources of assured income on sustainable basis and simultaneously curtail the degree of dependency on forest
of the forest fringe dwellers who are mostly poor and tribal people in order to restore ecological balance and
environmental stability.
The target groups being mostly uneducated or sparsely educated people, dependent on neighboring
forests having practically no knowledge about SHG formation, management of funds, identification of
alternative income generating activities, credit requirement and marketing strategy of their products etc. To
overcome this problem and to change the mindset of the members of the FPCs and EDCs as well as that of
departmental staffs, arrangements were made for training and orientation of the target groups and
departmental staff of the identified areas. NABARD, DRDC and some NGOs alongwith the officers of some
line departments e.g. Rural Development, Health, ARDD, Sericulture, Agriculture, Fishery etc. and local bank
authorities were actively involved in the process.
The following areas were identified as sources of alternative income to the SHGs and accordingly
training-cum-orientation camps and workshops were held at predetermined venues:
1. Training on Sal leaf plate making and supply of plate making machine.Collection of medicinal and
herbal products and their processing. Training in tailoring including supply of sewing machines.
2. Apiary and mushroom cultivation.
3. Training on health care of domestic animals and table birds etc. in rural areas.
4. Training of 'bidi' making and supply of inputs.
5. Training on repairing of pump machine, cycle and motor cycle, electric wiring (where electricity is
available) etc.
6. Training on vermicomposting, biogas plants, homestead gardening, scientific Pisciculture, Lac culture,
Apiculture etc.
7. Training on establishment of piggeries, duckeries, poultry farm on small scale.
8. Tassar cultivation and supply of high yielding cocoons.
9. Rice husking and allied works.
10. Soft toy making, handicraft products of different forest produces e.g. bamboo, sabai grass, and jute etc.
Now many of the SHGs have been working successfully and their performances are encouraging.
However, for sustainability of SHGs it is felt that comprehensive training programmes including refresher
courses for both target groups and staff have to be undertaken at regular intervals to assess the actual state of
affairs including identification of the actual problems faced by the SHGs and to ensure the suitable market
linkages for their products.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 77


PERFORMANCE OF SELF-HELP GROUP UPTO 31.03.2012

78
District Division No. of SHG No. of members in SHG No. of No. of No. of Women Corpus fund
Formed as on on 31.03.12 FPC/EDC exclusively members in generated upto
31.03.11 Male Female Total in SHG Women SHG women SHG 31.03.2012
(` in lakhs )
Darjeeling 3 8 25 33 11 2 25 0.44
Darjeeling Kurseong 9 33 120 153 3 7 120 —
Wildlife I 13 57 90 147 13 9 90 1.79
Jalpaiguri 23 — 271 271 6 23 271 0.42
Wildlife II 10 — 141 141 14 10 141 3.96
Jalpaiguri Wildlife III 111 — 1149 1149 58 111 1149 —
Baikunthapur 63 79 604 683 14 49 604 7.21
B.T.R.(E) 252 - 2299 2299 125 252 2299 9.37
B.T.R.(W) 187 1445 245 1690 32 30 245 —
Midnapur 197 1741 291 2032 41 3 291 373.55
Paschim Midnapur Rupnarayan 207 387 1765 2152 87 102 1059 —
Jhargram 172 1637 204 1841 64 20 87 —
Kharagpur 160 70 1585 1655 37 51 1550 —
Purba Midnapur Purba Midnapur 34 — 340 340 9 34 340 —
Bankura Bankura(N) 63 550 202 752 45 9 202 2.25
Bankura(S) 40 — 320 320 20 40 320 0.83
Purulia 119 413 1085 1498 108 80 1085 —
Purulia Kangsa.SC(N) 137 — — — — — — —
Kangsa.SC(S) 223 0 5082 5082 223 223 5082 6.78
Birbhum Birbhum 91 574 510 1084 49 45 51 —
24-Pgs.(S) 24-Pgs.(S) 234 — 2808 2808 6 234 2808 4.73
S.T.R. 18 528 1198 1726 23 5 781 6.75
Nadia-Msd Nadia-Msd. 4 36 — 36 4 — — —

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


TOTAL 2370 7558 20334 27892 992 1339 19059 418.08
CHAPTER - 11
WILD LIFE MANAGEMENT & BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION IN WEST BENGAL
West Bengal is world famous for its Royal Bengal Tiger. The state is very rich in biodiversity. The main
Strategy for conserving its unique biodiversity has been through the creation of protected area network of
national parks, sanctuaries, biosphere reserves and identified wetlands and coastal areas. The state has 4,064
sq.km. of forests under protected areas network which is 34% of the State's total forest area and 4.54% of the
total geographical area. There are five National Parks, fifteen Sanctuaries, two Tiger Reserves and one Biosphere
Reserve. The PA network includes 1,102 sq.km. Sanctuaries, 1693 sq.km. National Parks and the balance are
being represented by buffer areas of the two Tiger Reserves, viz. Sundarbans Tiger Reserve and Buxa Tiger
Reserve. Recognising the special conservation value of the Sundarbans owing to its unique ecosystem having
substantial area under mangrove forests associated with tiger landscape, has been declared as Biosphere Reserve.
The management of Pas for biodiversity conservation in the State is done as per Management Plan
through the following means:-
a) Intensive and extensive protection through patrolling, setting up of communication network, watch
towers at strategic locations, supply of improved weapons to wildlife guards etc.
b) Habitat development of wildlife.
c) Research Activities including census through modern techniques like genetic fingerprinting etc.
d) Reduction of man-animal conflict through setting up of energized fence, use of tranquilizing equipments.
e) Extension of Nature Education through setting up of Nature Interpretation Centers and awareness
generation.
f) Involvement of local people in conservation through formation of Eco-development Committees.
Table –11.1
Status of Management / Tiger Conservation Plan(TCP) preparation . As on 31.03.2012
Name of Protected Area/Tiger Reserve Period Present Status
Sundarban Tiger Reserve 2011 onwards Tiger Conservation plan Submitted
(incl. Sundarban NP & Sajnekhali WLS)
Buxa Tiger Reserve (incl. Buxa NP & Buxa WLS) 2011 onwards Tiger Conservation plan Submitted
Gorumara National Park 2007-08 to 2017-18 Management Plan operational
Singhalila National Park 2010-11 to 2019-2020 Previous paln expired Draft Management
plan under prepration
Neora Valley National Park 2011-12 to 2019-20 Management Plan operational
Jaldapara Wildlife Sanctuary 2007-08 to 2016-17 Management Plan operational
Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary 2011-12 to 2021-22 Management Plan operational
Senchal Wildlife Sanctuary 2012-13 to 2021-22 Management Plan operational
Chapramari Wildlife Sanctuary 2011-12 to 2021-2022 Management Plan operational
Bethuadahari Wildlife Sanctuary 2010-11 to 2014-15 Previous paln expired Draft Management
plan under prepration
Bibhutibhusan Wildlife Sanctuary 2011-12 to 2020-21 Management Plan operational
Ballavpur Wildlife Sanctuary 2009-10 to 2019-20 Management Plan operational
Ramnabagan Wildlife Sanctuary 2012-13 to 2021-22 Previous paln expired Draft Management
plan under prepration
Raiganj Wildlife Sanctuary 2011-12 to 2020-21 Management Plan operational
Halliday Island Wildlife Sanctuary 2008-09 to 2017-18 Management Plan operational
Lothian Island Wildlife Sanctuary 2008-09 to 2017-18 Management Plan operational
Chintamoni Kar Wildlife Sanctuary 2010-11 to 2016-17 Management Plan operational

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 79


Table –11.2
Protected Areas of West Bengal
Sl. Protected Area Area in Sq. Km. Notification Bio-geographic District
No. No. & Date Zone
National Parks:
1 Singalila N.P. 78.60 Sq. km. 9057-For dt. 2.12.92 2C Darjeeling
2 Neora Valley N.P. 88.00 Sq. km. 9058-For dt. 2.12.92 2C Darjeeling
3 Buxa N.P. 117.10 Sq. km. 3403-For dt. 5.12.97 7B Jalpaiguri
4 Gorumara N.P. 79.45 Sq. km. 1-For dt. 1.1.98 7B Jalpaiguri
5 Sundarban N.P. 1330.10 Sq. km. 2867-For dt. 4.5.84 8B South-24 Parganas
6 Jaldapara N.P 216.51 975-For dt. 27.04.12 7B Jalpaiguri
Total 1909.76 Sq. km.
Sanctuaries:
1 Jorepokhri Salamander W.L.S. 0.04 Sq. km. 1107-For dt. 11.03.85 2C Darjeeling
2 Senchal W.L.S. 38.88 Sq. km. 2773-For dt. 19.8.98 2C Darjeeling
3 Chapramari W.L.S. 9.60 Sq. km. 2774-For dt. 19.8.98 7B Jalpaiguri
4 Mahananda W.L.S. 158.04 Sq. km. 2775-For dt. 19.8.98 7B Darjeeling
5 Raiganj W.L.S. 1.30 Sq. km. 1901-For dt. 11.4.85 7B North Dinajpur
6 Bethuadahari W.L.S. 0.6686 Sq. km. 2772-For dt. 19.8.98 7B Nadia
7 Ballavpur W.L.S. 2.021 Sq. km. 4655-For dt. 11.7.77 7B Birbhum
8 Ramnabagan W.L.S. 0.145 Sq. km. 4345-For dt. 30.9.81 7B Bardhaman
9 Bibhutibhusan W.L.S. 0.64 Sq. km. 2776-For dt. 19.8.98 8B North-24 Parganas
10 Chintamoni Kar Bird Sanctuary 0.07 Sq. km. 4300-For dt. 21.10.05 8B S. 24 Parganas
(old Narendrapur W.L.S.)
11 Sajnakhali W.L.S. 362.40 Sq. km. 5396-For dt. 24.6.76 8B South-24 Parganas
12 Halliday Island W.L.S. 5.95 Sq. km. 5388-For dt. 24.6.76 8B South-24 Parganas
13 Lothian Island W.L.S. 38.0 Sq. km. 2771-For dt. 19.8.98 8B South-24 Parganas
316-For dt. 24.1.86; 7B Jalpaiguri
14 Buxa W.L.S. **267.92 Sq. km. 7588-For dt. 6.10.90
and 12-For dt. 1.1.91
** Old Sanctuary area was 368.99 Sq.Km. Out of which 101.07 sq.km area is included in Buxa NP.
Total 885.6746 Sq. km.
Tiger Reserves:
A. Buxa Tiger Reserve Buffer Area: 370.2886 3050-For/11M-28/07 7B Jalpaiguri
Sq.km. dt. 06.08.09
B. Sundarban Tiger Reserve Buffer Area: 885.27 615-For/11M-28/07 8B South-24 Parganas &
Sq. km. dt. 17.02.09 Parts of North-24
Parganas
Total 1255.5586 Sq. km.
Grand Total: 4050.9932 Sq. km.

Biosphere Reserve:
Sundarban Biosphere (including 9630 Sq. km. Govt of India vide No --- South-24 Pgns.
STR areas) 16/6/84-CSC North-24 Pgns.
dt 19.03.1989.
Total 9630 Sq. km.
Elephant Reserve :
1 Eastern Duars Elephant Reserve 977.51 Sq. km. 3293-For/11B-19/2000 7B Jalpaiguri
Core Area: 484.00 Sq.km. dt. 28.8.2002
Buffer Area: 493.51 Sq.km.
2 Mayurjharna Elephant Reserve 414.00 Sq. km. 3040-For.11B-19/2000 6B West Midnapur,
dt. 24.10.2002 Bankura and Purulia
Total 1391.51 Sq. km.

80 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table –11.3
TIGER POPULATION IN WEST BENGAL
As per Census Report – 2004

Name of Division Male Female Cub Total


24 Parganas (South) 7 14 4 25
Sundarban Tiger Reserve 83 133 33 249
Buxa Tiger Reserve 9 15 3 27
Kalinpong 1 --- --- 1
Wildlife II(Neora valley N.P) 7 11 2 20
Wildlife I(Mahananda WLS) 5 10 1 16
CoochBehar(Jaldapara WLS) 4 2 --- 6
Total 116 185 43 344

Census Report of 2011 is under compilation through analysis of data using modern technique.

Table –11.4
POPULATION OF MAJOR FLAGSHIP SPECIES
Rhino
Year Jaldapara Garumara Total
2006 108 27 135
2008 -- 31 31
2009 125 -- 125
2011 149 35* 184
2012 149 43* 192

* (Garumara, Chapramari & adjoing area of


Gorumara N.P ......... Chapramari WLS.)

Leopard
Census Year Garumara Buxa Jaldapara Mahananda Other areas Total
1989 14 50 5 10 29 108
1992 -- 63 -- -- -- 63
1993 2 -- 9 2 94 107
2002 47 149 33 18 84 331
2004 43 Not done 28 26 67 164

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 81


Table –11.5
CENSUS DATA OF MAJOR WILD ANIMAL SPECIES
Name of Animal Nos.
Gaur(Census data 2009-10) Gorumara & Chpramari not less than 901
Sambar 1216
Chital 1979
Hog Deer 2261
Barking Deer 3960
Wild Boar 7354
Goral 486
Tahr 77
Screw 19
Himalayan Black Bear 65
Sloth Bear 200
Elephant 529 (North Bengal)**
118 (South Bengal) ***
Census data 2010 *** Census data 2011.

Table –11.6
DETAILS OF PERSONS KILLED/INJURED BY WILD ANIMALS
DURING THE YEAR 2011-12

Name of Animals Person Killed Injured


1. Wild Elephant 67 --
2. Tiger 3 --
3. Leopard -- 90
4. Rhino -- 5
5. Bison 1 25
6. Crocodile -- --
7. Bear -- --

82 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table –11.7
DEATH OF WILD ANIMALS DURING THE YEAR 2011-12
Sl. Name of animals Natural Accident Poaching Retaliatory Declared Death in Total
No. Death killing rouge & capativity
eliminated
1 Wild Elephants 21 8 --- --- --- --- 29
2 Death of Departmental/ --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Tame Elephant
3 Tiger 2 --- --- --- --- 1 3
4 Captive Tigers --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
5 Leopard 26 1 --- 2 --- 29
6 Rhino 7 --- --- --- --- 7
7 Barking Deer 14 3 --- --- --- 17
8 Sambar 11 --- 1 --- --- 12
9 Spotted Deer 36 20 2 --- --- 58
10 Hog Deer 3 1 --- --- --- 4
11 Wild Boar 3 2 --- --- --- 5
12 Goral 1 2 --- --- --- 3
13 Crocodile 3 --- --- --- --- 3
14 Swamp Deer 1 --- --- --- --- --- 1
15 Sloth Bear 2 --- --- --- --- 2
16 Black Buck 2 --- --- --- --- 2
17 Lepard Cat 7 --- --- --- --- 7
18 Monkey 7 4 --- --- --- 11
19 Serow 1 1 --- --- --- --- 2
20 Python 1 5 --- --- --- 6
21 Langur 2 3 --- --- --- 5
22 Dolphin 1 --- --- --- --- 1

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 83


Table –11.8
SEIZURE OF WILD ANIMALS AND ANIMAL BODY PARTS DURING YEAR 2011-12
South Bengal North Bengal
Sl. No. Seized items Qty. Sl. No. Seized items Qty.
1 Tiger skin 2 Nos. 1 Elephant tusk 1 No.
2 Leopard skin 1 No. 2 Beak of hornbill 1 No.
3 Turtle 1482 Nos. 3 Turtle shell 5 Kg
4 Indian Birds 1557 Nos. 4 Turtle 50Nos
5 Deer horn 2 Nos. 5 Deer horn 2 Nos.
6 Mongoose 4 Nos. 6 Tail of Barking Deer 1 No.
7 Turtle shell 42 Nos. 7 Sambar horn 1No
8 Snake 25 Nos 8 Sambar antler 2 No.
9 Jungle cat meat 1Kg 9 Serow horn 1 Nos.
10 Rhesus Monkey 2Nos 10 Indian Birds 1 Nos.
11 Tortoies 38 Nos 11 Tiger skin 1No
12 Mongoose hair brush. 1400 Nos 12 Samber meat 20 Kg
13 Spotted Deer 5Nos 13 Wild Boar meat 35 Kg
14 Gharial hatchling 8 Nos
15 Indian Wolf skin 1No

Table –11.9
Details of the animals rescued in West Bengal during the year 2011-12 are as follows:
Sl. No. Species Number Sl. No. Species Number
1 Bird 641 19 Barking Deer 17
2 Snake 803 20 Pangolin 2
3 Turtle 1485 21 Black buck 1
4 Tortoise 4 22 Leopard 9
5 Langur 160 23 Elephant 7
6 Monkey 112 24 Bison 6
7 Civet 262 25 Leopard Cat 2
8 Jungle Cat 24 26 Wild Boar 1
9 Fishing Cat 16 27 Porcupine 2
10 Monitor Lizard 11 28 Squirrel 3
11 Crocodile 1 29 Chameleon 1
12 Gharial 2 30 Red Panda 1
13 Mongoose 6 31 Sambar 2
14 Jackal 9 32 Hedge Hog 1
15 Fox 2 33 Serow 1
16 Dolphin 1 34 Gorel 2
17 Spotted Deer 11
18 Hog Deer 8
Total 3615

84 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table –11.10
Chemical Immobilization done during the year – 2011-12
Elephant
SL. Date Location Description Immobilising Remarks
No. Drug
26.06.11 Red bank TE near Female, sub Xylazine 5.0ml Injured by Train accident, died
Railway track adult Ketamine 2.0ml during treatment.
Jalpaiguri Div. Antagozil 4.0ml
26.06.11 Central Diana Block Femal ,Adult Xylazine 9.0ml Injured by Train accident, died
Jalpaiguri Div. Ketamine 4.0ml after treatment.
Antagozil 3.50ml
st
11.08.11 Chandabila, Male-adult 1 dose Treatment
Rupnarayan Div. Xylazine 8.0ml
Ketamine 2.0ml
2nd &3rd dose
same medicine
12.08.11 Malangi –IIIComptt. Male-adult Xylazine 4.50ml Treatment
Malangi Beat. Ketamine 1.2 ml
04.09.11 Sukna Range Adult Female Xylazine 7.0ml Treatment
Mahananda W.L.S
WL.-1Div
18.11.11 Bamanpokhri, Xylazine 7.0ml Treatment
Kurseong Div.
16.12.11 Satbindha, Adult Male Xylazine 4.0ml Treatment
Rupnarayan Div Ketamine 1.0ml
and rept. More
2 doses.
10.02.12 JP-III Comptt, Adult Male Xylazine 4.0ml Treatment
Jaldapara Beat. Ketamine 1.0ml
26.02.12 Rydak BTR. (East) Male , Adult Xylazine 4.0ml Normal activity of animal
Ketamine 1.0ml observed.
20.03.12 Totapara Beat Male , Adult Xylazine 11.0ml Treatment
Jpg Div. Ketamine 5.0ml

Tiger Tranquilisation done upto 2011-12


SL. Date Location Description Immobilising Remarks
No. Drug
1 11.02.02 Bali Village Adult Male Captured
2 05.09.02 Pirkhali, Satyanarayanpur Adult Male Tranquilised & released at Chamta.
3 11.11.02 Satyanaryanpur, Gosaba Adult Female Captured & released near Goasaba.
4 03.12.02 Panchmukhani,Lahiripur Adult Male Tranquilised & Captured but died
Village-STR on 13.12.02
5 30.03.03 Arbesi-2, Kumirmari, STR Adult Male - Transquilised & released at
Panchmukhani.
6 08.09.03 Jharkhali Adult Male - Captured & Translocated
7 12.11.05 Arbesi-2, Hemnagar Female - Traquilised & captured & released
at Chandkhali

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 85


8 03.03.07 Bhuruliapara, Basirhat Adult Female - Tranquilised & released in core
Range area of STR
9 09.06.08 Jhilla-1 (opposite Adult Male Ketamine-10 ml. Transquilised & released at Matla-4
Kumirmari island) (1st dart), 3 ml of NP(W) Range on 10.06.08.
nd
(2 dart)
10 13.03.09 Samsernagar under Adult Male Ketamine-17 ml Translocated to Alipore Zoo for
Hingalganj P.S. (3 darts) treatment of sinus wound, released
on 22.07.09 at Harinbhanga-3,
under BHT Range while declared fit
11 25.05.09 Jamespur under Sajnekhali Female Ketamine-11.8 ml. Released on 26.05.09 at
Beat, SWLS Range Panchamukhani-5
12 28.06.09 Kumirmari-Adibasipara, Female Ketamine-4 ml. Released back to Bagmara-7 under
Bagna Beat, BHT Range Xylazine-0.75 ml. NP(E) Range on 03.07.09
[tranquilized for ear tagging &
micro chipping]
13 04.07.09 Rajatjubili, Duttar Beat, Female Ketamine-3.75 ml. Released on 04.07.09 at Gosaba-3
SWLS Range Xylazine-1.25 ml. [tranquilized for ear tagging &
micro chipping]
14 09.07.09 Lahiripur-Chargheri, Male Ketamine-3.75 ml. Released on 10.07.09 at Chamta-6
Duttar Beat, SWLS Range Xylazine-0.75 ml. [tranquilized for ear tagging &
micro chipping]
15 03.01.10 Embankment plantation of Engineghat near Petkulchand under Kultali P.S.
16 22.02.10 Sonagaon village, Female a) Ketamine-15 ml Released back to Netidhopani-2 on
Sajnekhali Beat, (total) b)For 24.02.10 [Radio-collared]
SWLS Range Radio-collaring
Xylazine-425 mg,
Ketamine-344 mg,
addl. 150 mg
Ketamine
17 28.02.10 Prkhali-5, Dobanki Beat Female Ketamine-8 ml. Released back to Pirkhali-7 on
01.03.10 [Radio-collared]
18 18.03.10 Sudhangsupur village, Male Ketamine-10 ml. Released back to Matla-4 under
Sajnekhali Beat, SWLS Range NP(W) Range on 19.03.10
19 19.03.10 NP(E) Beat HQ, NP(E) Male Ketamine-12 ml. Released back to Pirkhali-7 on
Range 21.03.10 [Radio-collared]
20 26.04.10 Adibasipara FPC area Female On 27.04.10 the tiger was tranquilised
& captured. Released on 28.04.10 in
Katuajhuri-1
21 19.05.10 Hentalbari FPC area, Male a) Ketamine-15 ml Released back to Netidhopani
Kalidaspur village for iarrheaation in Compartment [Radio-collared]
locality b)For
Radio-collaring
Xylazine-210 mg,
Ketamine-450 mg
on 22.05.10
22 22.05.10 Netidhopani Camp at Male Ketamine-300 mg., Released back to Netidhopani on
Netidhopani-1 Xylazine-120 mg., 22.05.10 [Radio-collared]
addl. 80 mg.
Ketamine
23 28.06.10 Sajnekhali office complex Female Ketamine-8 ml. Released back to Narayantala Char
on 28.06.10
24 19.09.10 Kumirmari, Bagnapara Female Ketamine-8 ml. Released back to Gosaba-2 on
20.09.10
25 10.12.10 Kishorimohonpur village Male, 6-7 yrs. Released in Ajmalmari-8 RF area on
under Kultali Block 11.12.10

86 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


11.11 Rhino tranquilisation done during 2011-12
Date Location Description Immobilising Drug Remarks
20.09.11 JP-IIIComptt.Jaldapara Adult Male Immobilon-1.90 ml Treatment
BeatWild Life III Div. Revivon 1.90ml
30.11.11 Jaldhaka-2bCompt. Garumara Adult Male Immobilon-1.50 ml Release after
N.P. , WL Div -II Revivon 2.0ml Treatment
09.12.11 JP-IIIComptt.Jaldapara Beat Adult Male Immobilon-1.7 ml Treatmen
Wild Life III Div. Revivon 1.70ml
05.01.12 Dhupjhora-1b Comptt. Adult Male Immobilon-2.00 ml Release after
Garumara N.P WL Div II Revivon 2.50ml Treatment

Leopard Immobilisation.done during 2011-12


SL. Date Location Description Immobilising Remarks
No. Drug
1 20.04.11 Lopchu Tea Estate, Male, Xylazine-0.8 ml Animal fine later
Darjeeling 4/5 years Ketamine-4.0 ml released
Revivon 1.00ml
2 27.01.12 NeoraMajiali Revenue Male Xylazine-1.5 ml Released at
village Wild Life II Div. 6-7 Years Ketamine-2.5 ml Gorumara N.P.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 87


CHAPTER - 12
SOIL CONSERVATION
Introduction :
The three districts of North Bengal namely Darjeeling, Jalpaiguri and Cooch Behar are drained by
almost 20 rivers and other enumerable rivulets. The catchment area spreads over around 12,726 Km2 of which
2
only 3,068 Km is under forest cover. These rivers flow through three geographical zones, namely the Hilly
Region, the Piedmont Zone and the Active Plains. Except for river Tista, all the other main rivers originating
from the hilly region have steep to very steep fall and consequent high power of erosivity.
The area being part of new fold mountain is geologically unstable. The annual rainfall in the region is
one of the highest and varies from 3,500 mm to 5,000 mm annually. The geological instability, high rainfall
and high intensity of rainfall, porous sandy loam soil and steep slopes associated with different anthropogenic
activities, are factors that accelerate erosion and land degredation affecting the lives of people and property,
both public and private almost every year. Soil and moisture conservation by regular treatment through
different kind of intervention both structural and vegetative, therefore, is of utmost importance for restoration.
In West Bengal, soil conservation measures were taken up under several State Plans in First Five Year
Plan period. The efforts continued in subsequent plans. But the real thrust was given in the 3rd Five Year Plan
Period when the Government of India launched a Centrally Sponsored Scheme called the River Valley Project
(RVP) in the entire country to restore eco-systems in the catchments of rivers spreading over 17 States,
including West Bengal. The entire catchments of river Teesta comprises of 9,68,000 hectare in Sikkim from
where the river originates & 2,97,740 hectares in West Bengal from where it passes away to Bangladesh. The
Teesta Catchment in Darjeeling district is 1,87,071 ha., of which 67,465 ha i.e. 36% is categorized in very high
priority Sub watersheds. There are 129 Sub watersheds of which 15 are of very high priority and 21 are of high
priority.
The All India Soil & Land Use Survey (AISLUS) surveyed Teesta Catchments, way back in 1978-79. As
per their report (Ref.: Agri 509 of July 1980), the West Bengal part has been subdivided into 7 mini catchments
bearing codes of Tk, Tc, Tj, Th, Tg, Tf & Td. These 7 mini-catchments are further divided into 17 watersheds
and 129 sub-watersheds. The sub-watersheds are again grouped into Very High, High, Medium, Low and
Very Low priority based upon the Silt Yield Index of soil erosion. The total area and the details of catchment
area of River Tista, Priority Watershed delineated by AISLUS, is given below :

Table 1
Total Teesta – Catchment
( in lakh ha.)
W.B. 2.97
Sikkim 9.68
Total 12.65
A new feature of present watershed management and soil conservation works is the concept of
involvement of local community in project formulation and participation in execution and maintenance of
assets created.
Besides these Central Schemes, Soil Conservation measures form an important component in
different State schemes like Protective Afforestation, Eco-Conservation of sensitive zones, Hill Area

88 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Development Schemes and Economic Plantation etc. Compensatory afforestation which are raised on vested
land in exchange of forest land diverted for non-forestry purpose under Forest (Conservation) Act 1980,
include an inbuilt elaborate Soil Conservation measure for catchment area treatment.
Types of Interventions :
The three divisions of circle namely Kurseong, Kalimpong and Soil Conservation 9North) carry out
various soil and moisture conservation measures as shown below :
Plantations : The three Divisions take up plantations as a major activity in their jurisdictions. The plantations
after five years of maintenance are being handed over to respective Territorial Divisions.
Structural works : These include both vegetative and engineering measures mostly done on erosion prone
sites, smaller landslides and banks of streams, rivers and rivulets within the forest blocks.
Basic Objective, priority and approach :
Natural Resource Management (Land, Water & Vegetations) on Watershed pattern is basic approach
of Circle by keeping in view the socio economic needs of the dependent community on a sustainable manner.
This accounts for all factors and forces that come into play and interact with each other within the hydrological
unit of consideration and the same are thought to be covered by :
Objectives :
üMultidisciplinary integrated approach to prevent land degradation.
üImprovement of land capability and moisture regime.
üPromotion of land use to match land capability.
üPrevention of Soil loss to reduce siltation down below.
üPeoples’ involvement.
üUp gradation of skills in planning and execution.
Strategy :
ØProject approach.
ØIntegration of sectoral measures.
ØProper choice of work area and projectisation for consolidating treatment efforts.
ØEmphasis on sustainability.
ØVegetative thrust.
ØPeople’s involvement, planning and execution.
ØTo sustain the benefit of treatment through institutional and operational mechanism.
ØPromotion of skills of fringe dwellers and field functionaries through appropriate institutional linkage.
ØEffective administrative measures for direction, control and coordination.
Priority :
vBiodiversity as guiding principle.
vSoil and water conservation by creating small structures with vegetative support.
vAfforestation, growing grass and shrubs.
vPeople’s involvement secure best land use.
vClear administrative and institutional mechanism for execution, direction and control.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 89


Brief details of developmental activities (Physical and Financial)
The different activities as per fund support under different schemes in order of priorities as executed by
the three Soil conservation Divisions covering Districts of NB e.g. Darjeeling, Jalpaiguri and Cooch-Bihar
during the year 2011-12 under this circle are consolidated and listed as below:

Table - 2
Creation of 2011 Plantation done during 2011- 12 (In ha)
Scheme Kurseong Kalimpong SC(N) Total
SC Div. SC Div. Div.
2402-S&WC-102-SC-SP(AP 10th /11th Plan)-006- 100 -- -- 100
Eco. Cons. of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration
th th
2402-S&WC-102-SC-SP(AP 10 /11 Plan)-001 -- -- -- --
PAEC- on landslide,, slip, ,stream bank in Forest
Area-87 Regeneration
2402-S&WC-00-102-SC-SP (AP & 11th Plan)-003 -- 50 -- 50
Eco. Cons. of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration
th th
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10 /11 25 25 -- 50
Plan)-028-S & WC PAEC-50 -OC
th th
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10 /11 24 -- -- 24
Plan)-028-PAEC-50 OC
2406-F&WL-01-F-789-SCP-SP (AP-11th Plan)-001- 95 -- 165 260
Economic Plantation (FR)-87 Regeneration
RVP 320 46 -- 366
TOTAL : 564 121 165 850

Nurseries :
The nursery details of the circle for the year 2011-12 done by the different divisions are as listed below.
These seedlings were raised with purpose to create plantations under State Plan and under RVP, to infill older
plantations, to keep some of the seedlings for the next year and also to distribute during Aranya Saptah.

Table - 3
Divisions No.Sites No.Seedlings
(As on 31.03.2012)
Kurseong S.C.Division 6 2,50,000
S.C.(North)Division 13 10,24,000
Kalimpong S.C.Division 4 2,40,000
Total : 23 15,14,000
**Modern Nurseries created under S.C.(N) Divn.JPG. Over 6 nos.
In the Scheme – RIDF - XII

90 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table - 4
Advance Work of 2012 plantation done during 2011-12 (In ha)
Scheme Kurseong Kalimpong SC(N) Total
SC Div. SC Div. Div.
th th
2402-S&WC-102-SC-SP(AP 10 /11 Plan)-003- 55 95 -- 150
Eco. Cons. of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10th /11th 25 25 -- 50
Plan)-028-S & WC Protective Afforestation-50
Other Charges
th
2406-F&WL-01-F-789-SCP-SP (AP-11 Plan)-001- 50 -- 210 260
Economic Plantation (FR)-87 Regeneration
2401-Crop.Husb.-00-109-Extn. Of FT-032-ACAS 50 -- -- 50
under stream II of RKVY-031-GIA-02- Other
Grant-50 Other Charges
RVP -- 76 -- 76
Total : 180 196 210 586

Table 5
Plantation Maintenance Y1 (2010-2011)
(In ha)
Scheme Kurseong Kalimpong SC(N) Total
SC Div. SC Div. Div.
th
2406-F&WL-01-F-796-TASP-SP(AP& 11 Plan)- 107 65 172
004-S & FF- Economic Pltn.(FR) -87 Regn.
2406-F&WL-01-Forestry-789-SCP-for SC-SP -- -- 200 200
(AP&11th plan)-007-Forestry Treatment-50 OC.
[ RIDF-XII Plantation]
2402-S&WC-00-789-SCPFor SC-SP(AP&11th -- -- 60 60
Plan)-002-PAEC-on landslide slip stream bank in
forest area-87-Regn. [ RIDF-XII Plantation]
2406-F&WL-01-F-789-SCP-SP (AP-11th Plan)-001- 88 -- -- 88
Economic Plantation (FR)-87 Regeneration
2401-Crop.Husb.-00-109-Extn. Of FT-032-ACAS 10 -- -- 10
under stream II of RKVY-031-GIA-02- Other
Grant-50 Other Charges
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10th /11th 17 -- -- 17
Plan)-028-S & WC Protective Afforestation-50
Other Charges
2402-S&WC-102-SC-SP(AP 10th /11th Plan)-006- -- 100 -- 100
Eco.Cons.of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration
th
2402-S&WC-00-102-SC-SP (AP & 11 Plan)-003 50 -- 160 210
Eco.Cons.of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration
RVP 320 46 -- 366
TOTAL : 592 146 485 1223

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 91


Table - 6
Plantation Maintenance Y2 (2009-2010)
(In ha)
Scheme Kurseong Kalimpong SC(N) Total
SC Div. SC Div. Div.
th
2406-F&WL-01-F-789-SCP-SP (AP-11 Plan)-001- -- 170 -- 170
Economic Plantation (FR)-87 Regeneration
2406-F&WL-01-F-796-TASP-SP(AP& 11th Plan)- 70 -- -- 70
004-S & FF- Economic Pltn.(FR) -87 Regn
th
2402-S&WC-00-102-SC-SP (AP & 11 Plan)-001 30 -- 29 59
PAEC on landslide, slip, stream bank in Forest
areas-87 Regeneration.
2402-S&WC-102-SC-SP(AP 10th /11th Plan)-006- 100 -- -- 100
Eco. Cons. of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration
2402-S&WC-00-789-SCPFor SC-SP(AP&11th -- -- 60 60
Plan)-002-PAEC-on landslide slip stream bank in
forest area-87-Regn. [ RIDF-XII Plantation]
2402-S&WC-00-102-SC-SP (AP & 11th Plan)-003 -- -- 160 160
Eco.Cons.of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration
2401-Crop.Husb.-00-109-Extn. Of FT-032-ACAS 150 -- 20 170
under stream II of RKVY-031-GIA-02- Other
Grant-50 Other Charges
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10th /11th 30 — — 30
Plan)-028-S & WC Protective Afforestation-50
Other Charges
RVP -- -- --
TOTAL : 380 170 269 819

Table - 7
Plantation Maintenance Y3 (2008-2009) (In ha)
Scheme Kurseong Kalimpong SC(N) Total
SC Div. SC Div. Div.
th
2402-S&WC-00-102-SC-SP (AP & 11 Plan)-001 59 50 140.11 249.11
PAEC on landslide, slip, stream bank in Forest
areas-87 Regeneration.
2402-S&WC-102-SC-SP(AP 10th /11th Plan)-006- -- -- -- --
Eco. Cons. of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration
2402-S&WC-00-789-SCPFor SC-SP(AP&11th -- -- 220.73 220.73
Plan)-002-PAEC-on landslide slip stream bank in
forest area-87-Regn. [ RIDF-XII Plantation]
2402-S&WC-00-102-SC-SP (AP & 11th Plan)-003 40 40
Eco.Cons.of Sensitive Zone-87 Regeneration

92 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


2406-F&WL-01-F-796-TASP-SP(AP& 11th Plan)- -- 30 -- 30
004-S & FF- Economic Pltn.(FR) -87 Regn
2401-Crop.Husb.-00-109-Extn. Of FT-032-ACAS -- 50 -- 50
under stream II of RKVY-031-GIA-02- Other
Grant-50 Other Charges
2406-F&WL-01-F-789-SCP-SP (AP-11th Plan)-001- 70 -- -- 70
Economic Plantation (FR)-87 Regeneration
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10th /11th 73 06 -- 79
Plan)-028-S & WC Protective Afforestation-50
Other Charges
2406-F&WL-01-FORESTRY-101-FCD & Reg.- SP 56 30 -- 86
(AP & 11th Plan)-006 under 13th Fin
Commission- 27 MW.
RVP Maint. 20 75 -- 95
th th
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10 /11
Plan)-028-S & WC Protective Afforestation-50
Other Charges
TOTAL : 278 241 400.84 919.84

Table - 8
Plantation Maintenance Y4 (2007 -2008)
(In ha)
Scheme Kurseong Kalimpong SC(N) Total
SC Div. SC Div. Div.
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10th /11th 130 -- -- 130
Plan)-028-PAEC-50-OC
th
2406-F&WL-01-F-789-SCP-SP (AP-11 Plan)-001- -- -- 185 185
Eco. Pltn.- (FR)- 87 – Reg.
2402-S&WC-102-SC-SP(AP 10th /11th Plan)-006- -- 35 -- 35
Eco. Cons. of Sen. Zone-87-Reg.
th
2402-S&WC-00-102-SC-SP (AP & 11 Plan)-001 60 -- -- 60
PAEC on landslide, slip, stream bank in Forest
areas-87 Regeneration.
RVP Maint.
th th
2551-HA-60-OHA-101-DHA-SP(AP& 10 /11 20 87 -- 107
Plan)-028-PAEC-50-OC
TOTAL : 210 122 185 517

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 93


Table - 9
Summarised details of Plantations raised by different divisions of Circle
during 2011-12 :
st nd rd th
Division- Advance Creation Maint 1 Yr. Maint 2 Yr. Maint 3 Yr. Maint 4 Yr. Total Area
wise Work during of 2011 Plantation Plantation Plantation Plantation (Ha.)
2011-12 Plantations 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08
Kgn.S.C.div 180 564 592 380 278 210 2204
Kpg.S.C.div 196 121 146 170 241 122 996
S.C.(N) div 210 165 485 269 400.84 185 1714.84
Total : 586 850 1223 819 919.84 517 4914.84

BIODIVERSITY & ORCHIDERIUM PLOTS CUM GENE POOL RESERVES


The three Divisions i.e. Kurseong Soil Conservation Divn. Kalimpong Soil Conservation Divn. & Soil
Conservation (North) Divn.Jalpaiguri under control of this Circle are maintaining Biodiversity & Orchidarium
Plots cum Gene Pool Reserves for the indigenous and endangered species particularly in North Bengal. Over
the years, the plots have developed considerably with continous addition of species and regular maintainance.
Biodiversity Parks :
Besides above the three Divisions are also maintaining and upgrading the following areas and have
also published report on the same.

Table - 10
Division Location Area No of No of No of
Family Genera species
S.C.(North) Div. Khunia Arboretum- 1.25 Ha 62 133 167
Rasikbil Biodiver.Park -1 Ha 35 62 78
Kalimpong S.C.Div. Delo Arboretum - 2.14 Ha 79 100 140
Kurseong S.C.Div. Ghoom-3 & Shrubbery 1 Ha.,
Bhanjyang 5 Arboretum 1 Ha. 163 165 221
Medicinal
Garden 5 Ha
Total : 11.39 Ha 324 442 565

Kurseong Soil Conservation Division maintains a Biodiversity Park at Ghoom Bhanjyang which
is divided into three plots :

i) Shrubberies ii) Arboratum and iii) Orchiderium


The Arboratum and Shubbery were created in the year 1994 in Ghoom-3 and Bhanjyang-5 where
attempts were made to include rare and endangered species having altitudinal distribution from 1500 mt. to
4000 mt. The plot has been redesigned and renamed as Biodiversity Park having an area of 3 Heactares and
consisting of three plots a ) Shrubbery (2 ha) b) Arboretum (1/2 ha) and c) Orchidarium. Efforts have been
made to conserve some of the indigenous endangered, vulnerable and rare floral species of Darjeeling Hills. It
consists of shrubs and many types of flowering trees including rare wild orchids of Eastern Himalayas. It has
now become one of the tourist attractions for its unique topography and the clear view of snow clad

94 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Himalayan Ranges, tea garden valleys, breath taking picturesque landscape and amazingly unique floral
diversity.
BASIC AIMS & OBJECTIVES :
ü
Ex-situ Genepool Conservation and Research for endangered, vulnerable, rare & indigenous
floral diversity of Darjeeling. Eastern Himalayan wild rare medicinal plants of Darjeeling.
ü
Propagation of planting material.
ü
Soil and moisture conservation demonstration for public awareness.
ü
Eco-tourism for environmentally conscious tourists of Darjeeling.
ü
Taxonomic awareness for school kids and college students.
ORCHIDERIUM :
An orchiderium has been started in the year 2005, in Biodiversity Park at Ghoom Bhanjang. Mainly
wild orchids are collected as per altitudinal distribution from 1500 mt.(Foothills) of Darjeeling to 4000 mt.
(Sandhakphu) forest areas. Some of the species are also collected from the Tea Gardens and Khasmahal
forest areas and planted in natural micro climatic condition as well as in an Orchidarium.
OBJECTIVES :
Ø
Collection, conservation and propagation of wild orchids of Eastern Himalayas.
Ø
Public Awareness and Research.
Ø
Study on Exsitu conservation of Ephiphytic Lithophytic and Terrestrial Orchids.
Ø
Re-translocation and reintroduction in natural habitat.

Bio-Diversity Park at Kalimpong Soil Conservation Division :

In an attempt to preserve the bio-diversity in the area, Kalimpong S.C.Division has created a
Biodiversity Park at Delo Ridge, under Relli Catchment Range, about 3 Km away from Kalimpong Town and at
an altitude of 5250 ft. rare plant species have been planted in the garden.
Since the garden is located in one of the tourist spots of Kalimpong, many tourists, students and local
people visit it. It therefore, serves as an important place for making people of all walks of life aware of the plant
diversity and the need for conservation in the region. The Park has a footpath on which people can walk
leisurely to have a closer look at the individual species. The whole area is divided into blocks for broad leaved
species, bamboos, conifers, experimental plot and a shrubbery. There are 140 species at present. There has
been an attempt to show an evolution series by creating different chambers with plant species viz. Algae-
Bryophytes-Pteridophytes-Gymnosperms-Angiosperms.

Rhododendron and Michelia species Demonstration Plot, Rimbik.

A demonstration plot of indigeneous species of Rhododendrons and Michelias was created in the year
2003-04 near Forest Rest House Complex at Rimbik. This was created over a fenced area of 0.40 ha. for the
study, culture, demonstration and research of the above species. There are presently 18 species of Rhododendron
and 6 Species of Michelia to serve as a germ plasm.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 95


Various species of birds in the periphery of Bio-diversity Conservation Park:
Around 22 species of birds are identified roaming in an around the Bio Diversity Conservation Park.
However available foods required for them are quiet insufficient for which necessary steps are to be taken to
raise food bearing species of plants in this reason. Special funds for this purpose are to be allocated to develop
Bio Diversity Conservation Park so that different species of Flora and Fauna can be preserved.

Table – 11
Details Family (No) Genera (No) Species ( No )
Rhododendron 1 1 18
Michelia 1 2 6

CHECKLIST OF BIRD SPECIES OBSERVED OR HEARD IN BIO_DIVERSITY


CONSERVATION PARK AND GHOOM BHANJANG
Table – 12
Sl. Zoological Name Common Name Time Remarks
No.
1 Phylloscopus trochiloides Greenish Warbler 6:25 AM
2 Yuhina flavicollis Whiskered Yuhina 6:27 AM Abundant
3 Aethopyga nepalensis Greentailed Sunbird 6:27 AM
4 Garrulax erythrocephalus Chestnut Crowned Laughing Thrush 6:29 AM
5 Tragopan satyra Satyr Tragopan 6:31 AM Heard
6 Tesia castaneocoronata Chestnut headed Tesia 6:35 AM
7 Niltava grandis Large Niltava 6:41 AM
8 Leiothrix lutea Redbilled leiothrix 6:43 AM
9 Minla ignotincta Redtailed Minla 6:43 AM
10 Phylloscopus fuscatus Dusky Leaf warbler 6:49 AM
11 Streptopelia orientalis Rufous Turtle Dove 6:49 AM
12 Phylloscopus affinis Tickell’s Leaf Warbler 6:51 AM
13 Glaucidium cuculoides Asian Barred Owlet 6:27 AM
14 Phylloscopus maculipennis Ashy Throated Warbler 6:59 AM
15 Lophura leucomelanos Kaleej Pheasant 7:05 AM Pair
16 Niltava sundara Rufous Bellied Niltava 7:10 AM
17 Pomatorhinus ruficollis Streak Breasted Scimitar Babbler 7:13 AM
18 Saxicola ferrea Grey bushchat 7:15 AM
19 Garrulax affinis Black faced Laughing Thrush 7:18 AM
20 Seicercus castaniceps Chestnut Crowned Warbler 7:26 AM
21 Minla strigula Chestnut Tailed Minla 7:41 AM Abundant
22 Culicicapa ceylonensis Grey Headed Canary 8:01 AM
Note :: Apart from the above species a pair of Yellow Throated Marten (Martes flavigula) were also sighted in
the area. A solitary satyr tragopan was heard calling in distance. Further evidence is required to prove
its presence in the area.

96 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


In addition to the above list prepared as primary data collected, a separate list of secondary data
collected by means of interview with Navin Rai (Forest Staff) regarding commonly observed
birds in the area throughout the year is given below :-

Table – 13
Sl. Zoological Name Common Name Time Remarks
No.
1 Chaimmarronis leucocephalus White Capped Redstart -
2 Enicurus maculates Spotted Forktail -
3 Eumyis thalassina Verditer Flycatcher -
4 Parus monticolus Greenbacked tit -
5 Ficedula westermanni Little pied flycatcher -
6 Pomatorhinus ferruginosus Coral Billed Scimitar -
7 Hypsipetes leucocephalus Black Bulbul -
8 Sitta himalayensis White Tailed Nuthatch -

Bio Diversity Conservation Park under W.B.C.Range

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 97


Physical Performance :
Summarised details of Structural works raised by different Divisions of Circle
during 2011-12 under State Plan.

Table 14
Nature- Work / Division Kurseong Kalimpong S.C.(North)
Vol (in M3 / RMT) S.C.Divn. S.C.Divn. Divn.
Boulder Sausage(m3) 800 m3 752 m3 950 m3
Bamboo Pallisade (RMT) 575.5 rmt 500 rmt
3
H.P. Wall(m3) 1200 m 1890 m3 1300 m3
C.W. Drain (km/Mtr.) 3 km 3.36 km
No_DLT_under CSS-RVP-TISTA (in Nos.) 563 nos 173 nos
Gully Plugging(m3)/Rock check dam (m3)
Water harvesting structure (No.)
Earthen Dam(m3)
Vegetative fencing (rmt)
C.R.M.
Terrace planting-Kgn.
Drop wall (cum)
Const. Barrack- cum stores/watcher
hut cum stores./ stores cum lab.
Jhora Training & slip stabilization.
Plum wall(m3)
Const.Gr’D’ Qtrs. 1 (Incomplete)
Const. of Ban Bhawan. 1 (II- Phase)
Bamboo palisade wall (m3)
Sausage wall (m3)
Bank protection
Pallisade work (Rmt)
Earthen embankment (Rmt) (MGNREGS) 1500 rmt
Irrigation chanel (Km)
Pond 2 nos
Retaining wall (cum) (Guide Wall)
Boulder pitching (sq.m)
Approach road (Km)
Earthen road (Km) (MGNREGS) 10 km

98 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Financial Involvement : 2011-12
Expenditure during the year 2011 -12 (Detailed Head of Service - wise)
Case A-Accounts submitted to Accounts General, West Bengal (excluding Civil Deposits. )

Table 15
Head of Service Sanction Expenditure Revenue
Non Plan. Grant (in)
0406-01-800-Rev.& Rt. - -
2551 99,000.00 99,000.00
2406 5,18,74,000.00 5,18,71,010.00
2402 2,45,21,000.00 2,45,19,800.00
Total Non Plan : 7,64,94,000.00 7,64,89,800.00
Head of Service State Plan.
2406 1,00,67,000.00 1,00,66,300.00
2402 82,15,000.00 82,14,600.00
2551 28,00,000.00 27,99,300.00
2406-12th Finance Commission. 14,85,000.00 14,85,000.00
2401-RKVY 1,04,76,300.00 1,04,76,300.00
4406-RIDF –XII - -
Total State Plan : 3,30,43,300.00 3,30,41,500.00
2401-CSS (NS)
RVP – Teesta (CS) 5,25,39,740.00 5,25,39,740.00
RVP – Teesta (SS) 58,37,748.00 58,37,748.00
Total CSS & SS : 5,83,77,488.00 5,83,77,488.00
8843-Civil deposit-00-109- 99,02,376.00 95,46,250.00
For. Deposit. (NREGS)
Grand Total : 17,78,17,164.00 17,74,55,038.00
* Balance Rs.231126.00 against NREGS

Methodology of Watershed Treatment under Teesta River Valley Project :


Watershed Project Reports (WPRs) for the purpose of treatment of these areas are prepared sub-
watershed wise by Forest and Agriculture Department combined, including all categories of land, forest or non-
forest for Treatment period spreads over 5 years. Once treatment is completed these watersheds are termed as
Saturated.
The main objectives behind treatment prescriptions are: to prevent premature siltation of
multipurpose reservoirs, treatment of the degraded lands in the catchment's areas to increase their all round
productivity, improve soil water regime through rain water harvesting and enhance filtration into the soil,
reduce peak flow and run-off volume hence minimize flood hazards. The basic unit of implementing these
schemes is watersheds having treatable areas ranging in between 2000 to 4000 hectares. These watersheds
are treated with an integrated approach depending upon the extent and the need of the degraded lands.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 99


Various treatment measures viz Afforestation, bench & contour terracing and bunding, pasture developments,
engineering structures of Earthen Dams, Rock Check Dams, Boulder Sausages, palisading, wattling, horticultural
development etc. are implemented.

Table - 16
Forest Division - wise distribution of sub-watersheds is as below:
Priority Kurseong Kalimpong Soil Cons (N) Total Area
Soil Soil Jalpaiguri
VH 5 10 0 15 28854
H 9 12 0 21 38611
M 10 9 0 19 37988
L 16 1 6 23 54026
VL 1 4 46 51 138261
Total 41 36 52 129 297740
Details Of Saturated Sub-Watersheds, presently belonging to Very High & High Priority
(Forest Division Wise)
Saturated Watersheds (1992 to 2012)
Table - 17
Priority KSG Soil Area KPG Soil Area SC (N) Jalp. Area Total No. Total Area
VH 5 9628 4 9692 0 0 9 19320
H 9 14030 8 13592 0 0 17 27622
M 6 14017 2 5362 0 0 8 19379
Total 20 37675 14 28646 0 0 34 66321

ABSTRACT
Table – 18
TOTAL VH H M L VL TOTAL
SATURATED
Number 9 17 8 0 0 34
Area (hect.) 19320 27622 19379 0 0 66321
ONGOING
Number 0 0 0 0 0 0
Area (hect.) 0 0 0 0 0 0
BALANCE
(to be treated)
Number 6 4 11 23 51 95
Area (hect.) 9534 10989 18609 54026 138261 231419
Total
Number 15 21 19 23 51 129
Area (hect.) 28854 38611 37988 54026 138261 297740

100 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Store cum Lab at Divisional Forest Office Compound under RVP/Teesta

Proforma for submission of quarterly / six monthly / annual progress report during the year
2011-2012 of River Valley Project & Flood Prone River (RVP & FPR)

Table - 19

Sl. No. Activity


1 Name of the State West Bengal
2 Name of the Catchments RVP-TEESTA
3 Action taken report on decisions of earlier review Attach a separate sheet
meeting
4 Allocation under MMA During last year (10-11)
5 (a) Date and amount released by GOI
(b) Date and amount released by state to project implementing Agency (PIA) 8.11.2011
Rs. 5,83,77,488.00
6 Item-wise expenditure during reporting year Amt. Amt. Utilized Balance
(2011-2012) Sanctioned
A Works 44366883 44366883 0
B Pay & Allowances 8756637 8756637 0
C Contingencies 1751322 1751322 0
D Hydrologic & Sediment Monitoring 1167549 1167549 0
E Construction of Stores,labs camp Huts 583775 583775 0
F Maintenance of Previous works 0 0 0
G Transfer of Technology (TOT) 1751322 1751322 0
GRAND TOTAL 58377488 58377488 0
7 Catchments-wise Target, outlay & achievements 58377488 58377488 0

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 101


Treated Structure Work Estb. Total
Area Constructed
1 RVP Teesta 3515 Ha. 728 Nos. Rs. 443.67 Rs. 140.10 Rs. 583.77
8 Number of sediment Monitoring stations (SMS) functioning & proposed. Attach SMS Data
along with analysis.
i. Monggong Khola No.of sediment monitoring station (SMS) – 2No.
ii. Peshok Khola No. of sediment monitoring functioning – 2 No.
iii. No. of sediment monitoring proposed during 2011-12 – Nil.
iv. SMS data attached – No, Already submitted
9 Workshop and demonstrations Number Participant attd.
(a) State Level Nil NA
(b) Catchment level Nil NA
(c) Watershed level Nil NA
(d) Demonstrations Nil NA
Total
10 Mobilization of community (a) No.of Watershed Committes
implementation & maintenance
i) Ongoing 10 Nos.
ii) Constituted during reporting 0
(b) Creation of Corpus of fund
i) Central Share Rs. 583775.00
ii) State Share Rs. 291887.00
iii) Beneficiaries Share Rs. 291887.00
Total : Rs. 1167549.00
11 Maintenance under taken during the Phy. Remark
year 2011-2012
12 Impact/evaluation studies conducted Impact/evaluation studies in respect of 6 Sub-Water-
(pl.indicate increase in crop area, crop sheds pertaining to Kurseong Soil Conservation
yield, pasture land, ground water level, Division have been already conducted by Society
runoff & sediment reduction etc. for Socio-Economic Studies & Services
Bhawani Complex, Block ‘M’, Krishnapur Road,
Kolkota-700102 and the reports have been already
submitted to Authorities concerned.
13 Success Stories prepared (Hard Copy Post Pjoject Reports in respect to 6 Sub-Watersheds
& CD) pertaining to Kurseong Soil Conservation Division
have been already submitted to Authorities concerned.
14 Constraints / Problems faced The rate for Treatment of Treatable area
(i.e. Rs. 15,000.00 per Ha.) is ineduquate for
Treatment in Hill Areas as well as the labour rate is
not at par with the rate of Deptt. of Labour, Govt.
of West Bengal.

102 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Details of Entry Point activities under RVP/Teesta 2011-2012
Ø
Distribution of Poly Water Tank 1000lt x 31 numbers for drinking water under sub watershed
Th1h, Tj2c, Th1k & Th1m.
Ø
Distribution of Poly Pipe 1268.29 kg for drinking water for the welfare of village people under sub
watershed Th1h, Tj2c, Th1k & Th1m.
Ø
Distribution of untensil set to the villagers for society development under Th1h, Tj2c, Th1k &
Th1m.
Ø
Distribution of 112 nos. of PVC Chair for the welfare of the villagers under Th1h, Tj2c, Th1k &
Th1m.
Details of Livelihood Support during 2011-2012 under RVP/Teesta 2011-2012
Ø
Providing 4250 numbers of chick lets, 2 numbers of Pigs and 18 numbers of Goats etc. Poly Pipe
40 numbers & GCI Sheet 189 numbers to the poor familes covered under sub watershed Th1h,
Tj2c, Th1k & Th1m.
Details of Support to Firm Production System during 2011-2012 under RVP/Teesta 2011-2012
Ø
Distribution of agricultural seeds :-
Zinger 2240 kg. Maize 225 kg. Potato 600 kg. Mixed vegetables seed, 2 nos. of Agricutural
Sprayers & 250 kg of Pipe to the poor familes covered under Sub watershed Th1h, Tj2c, Th1k &
Th1m.
Training & Workshop ( Transfer of Technology ) :
Ø
Workshop held on 28.04.2011 & 14.02.2012 under Tj2c regarding Watershed Management and
was attended by 12 and 12 members.
Ø
Workshop held on 28.04.2011 & 11.02.2012 under Th1k regarding Watershed Management
and was attended by 9 and 10 members.
Ø
Workshop held on 28.04.2011 & 11.02.2012 under Th1k regarding Watershed Management
and was attended by 11 and 10 members.
Ø
Workshop held on 15.04.2011 & 22.02.2012 under Th1h regarding Watershed Management
and was attended by 13 and 11 members.

Revenue Details of Nature Interpretation Centre during 2011-2012


Sl. No. Month Ticket @Rs.2/- Ticket @Rs.5/- Total
1 April/11 to 3508.00 11325.00 14833.00
March-2012

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 103


RVP/FPR Programme during 2011-2012

104
Table - 20
WPR New/ Proposal for Proposal for Programme of Programme of Spl.
Circle Division Code Old revalidation revalidation 11-12 12-13 Grant for Grand Total
10-11 09-10 SMS
Phy Fin Phy Fin Phy Fin Phy Fin Phy Fin
Ha No Rs Ha No Rs Ha No Rs Ha No Rs Ha No Rs
Tc2b Old 224 42 2709676 224 42 2709676
Tc2c Old 1050 322 16031395 1050 322 16031395
Kurseong Tc2h Old 510 66 6783868 510 66 6783868
S.C. Tc2k Old 520 60 7169353 520 60 7169353
Tc2p Old 40 13 888709 40 13 888709
Tk1g Old 380 60 4877443 380 60 4877443
Total : Project
SC(N)
Kurseong 2724 563 38460444 Closed 2724 563 38460444
S.C.
Th1h Old 26 19 1234354 26 19 1234354
Kalimpong Th1k Old 190 33 4238983 190 33 4238983
S.C. Th1m Old 195 8 4197200 195 8 4197200
Tj2c Old 380 105 10246507 380 105 10246507
Total :
Kalimpong 791 165 19917044 791 165 19917044
S.C.
Grand Total 3515 728 58377488 3515 728 58377488

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Sediment Monitoring Station (SMS) at Monggong Khola & Peshoke Khola :
A SMS at Mongwong Khola has been established w.e.f. 2003 under RVP Scheme in cooperation with
Govt.of India, Ministry of Agriculture and IGBP to monitor the Hydrological data of the sub-watershed
TK3f,Area (in ha) -1866,Treatable area-900 ha. This is fully modern SMS with automatic to manual data
st
recorders and is 1 of it's kind in India at present. This SMS will fulfill a long felt need of this region for being a
reliable system of collection of various hydrological data needed for planning effective models of treatments in
delineated watersheds of Darjeeling Hills.
The equipments of this SMS are highly modernized and supplied by the Indo-German Bilateral Project
' Watershed Management’. The equipments consist of three-tier system, manual, semi-automatic and digital.
The equipments installed are as follows :
o Digital Water Level Sensor (Float type) with memory module with GPRS system
o Automatic Weather Station with Memory module consisting of Data Logger with softwear.
o Ordinary rain Gauge.
o Self Recording or Tipping bucket Rain Gauge. (upgraded during 2010-11)
o Manual Type Rain Gauge
o Self recording Water level Recorder (upgraded during 2010-11)
o Self Recording Thermometer (upgraded during 2010-11)
o Self Recording Hygrometer (upgraded during 2010-11)
o Punjab bottle with holder (Punjab Type bottle sampler)
o Cup type current meter with pulse counter. Fish weight & accessories.
o Anemometer for wind velocity & direction (Self recording Type)
upgraded during 2010-11
The data are first recorded in the data recorder from where they are then transferred to memory
modules which are small portable boxes of sizes 15 cm x 10cm x 0.25 cm. The data are finally transferred to a
central computer. The details of computerized data of rainfall (mm),run off(mm) and sediment yeield
production Rate, ha.m/100 sq km.from of the SMS are sent to to Govt. of India, Ministry of Agriculture for
study and record.
During the financial year another similar SMS has been established at Peshoke Khola near Teesta Bazar
which will be commissioned during the year 2011-12.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 105


Computerised Silt Monitoring Station at Monggong Khola

106 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


CHAPTER - 13
FORESTRY RESEARCH
Forestry research in West Bengal aims at enhancing forest productivity and conserving biodiversity. It
focuses on standardization of nursery practices, production of quality planting material, improvement of
plantation techniques, introduction of new varieties, and conservation of rare and endangered species.
RESEARCH ORGANISATION
Forestry research in the state is looked after by Research Circle. The Circle has three divisions, namely,
Silviculture (North) Division, Silviculture (Hills) Division, and Silviculture (South) Division. Silviculture (North)
Division, with headquarters in Siliguri, covers the Dooars and Terai region. Silviculture (Hills) Division has its
headquarters in Darjeeling and covers the hill areas of Darjeeling, Kurseong and Kalimpong sub-divisions.
The activities of Silviculture (South) Division, which has its headquarters in Midnapore, extend over the
southern part of West Bengal.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES DURING 2011-12
1. Production and supply of Quality Planting Material (QPM):

QPM Quantity/Number supplied Remarks


Seeds 3,647 kg Supplied to 22 divisions
Seedlings 67,670 Supplied to 5 divisions
Ramets 1,59,128 Supplied to 2 divisions

2. Tree Improvement programmes and pilot plantations

Type of plantation Objective Area Location


(ha.)
Clonal Testing Area To assess and compare growth and survival 3.0 Sursuti, Mal
(CTA) percentage of ramets from different Plus Trees
Seedling Seed Established by seedlings from seeds of selected 15.0 Sursuti, Rajabhatkhawa,
Orchard (SSO) trees to create high quality seed production Sonada, Mal
areas for improving productivity of forest tree
species
Species To assess and compare growth and survival 6.5 Anara, Beliatore,
Introduction Trial percentage of different introduced species Ranibandh, Arabari,
Adalpur, Rajabhatkhawa
Coastal Mudflat To reclaim coastal mudflats by planting 2.0 Dkshin Kadua
Plantation mangrove species
Medicinal trees To preserve rare and endemic trees having 12.8 Mal, Sursuti,
medicinal value Rajabhatkhawa
Total 39.3

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 107


3. Selection of Seed Trees:
Species Number of Trees Location
Nyasa javanica 10 Bagora
Melia composite 5 Lopchu
Bischofia javanica 2 Berrick
Cedrela toona 2 Berrick
Acrocarpus fraxinifolius 2 Berrick
Polyalthia simiarum 4 Berrick
Total 25

4. Creation of new Seed Stands


Species Area (ha.) Location
Quercus lamellosa 2.0 Rishop
Quercus pachyphylla 3.0 Chattakpur
Eleocarpus ganitrus 0.5 South Khairbari
Emblica officinalis 0.5 South Khairbari
Lagerstroemia flosregine 1.0 Lataguri
Total 7.0

5. In-situ Conservation of medicinal plants


Seven Medicinal Plants Conservation Areas (MPCA), which were demarcated under the UNDP CCF-II
Project, are being maintained by the Silviculture divisions. The details are as follows:
Name of MPCA District Area Number of Flagship species
(ha) species
Bonnie Camp 24 Parganas South 300 30 Nipa Fruticans
Garhpanchakot Purulia 250 206 Pterocarpus marsupiam
North Jalpaiguri 400 249 Gynocardia odorata, Aristolochia indica,
Rajabhatkhawa Dioscorea prazeri, Cinnamomum
cecidodaphne
Sursuti Jalpaiguri 100 216 Toona ciliate, Cinnamomum bejolghota,
Asparagus racemosa
Dhotrey Darjeeling 180 154 Taxus walichiana, Panax pseudoginseng,
Swertia chirayita
North Sevoke Darjeeling 100 209 Abelmoschus moschatum, Alpinia calcarata,
Celastrus paniculatus, Steriospermum colais,
Rauwolfia serpentina
Tonglu Darjeeling 230 254 Aconitum bisma, Aconitum ferox, Aconitum
spicatum, Berberis aristata, Panax pseudo-
ginseng, Picorhiza kurroa, Podophyllum
hexandrum, Swertia chirayita, Thalictrum
foliolosum
Total 1560

108 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


5. Ex-situ conservation of medicinal plants (Herbal gardens):
Districts Location No. of Species
Darjeeling Lloyd Botanical Garden 135
Sonada 82
Sukna 129
Lava 50
Gorubathan 76
Jalpaiguri Lataguri 44
Salugarah 28
Rajabhatkhawa 60
Mal Park 76
th
Adabari, 5 Mile 60
Bankura Beliatore 82
Jhargram Sukumar Smriti Udyan 212
Chandrakona Road (Parimal Kanan) 84
Amlachati 673
Purba Medinipur Digha 150

5. Maintenance of sample plots


Sample plots over an area of 6.69 ha. and linear sample plots over an area of 15.26 ha. were
maintained by the Silviculture divisions during the year.
6. Lloyd Botanical Garden (LBG)
Established in 1878, the Garden is located at an elevation of 6,000 ft and covers an area of about 40
acres. It displays 133 trees species, including two living fossil species (Gingko biloba and Metasequola
glyptostrobiodes), 40 species of climbers and 92 species of orchids.
The garden has a herbarium with about 14,000 sheets representing 175 families, 1,145 genera and
3,584 species. Digitization of the herbarium sheets has been undertaken to make this unique resource
available to a wider audience.
7. Soil analysis
There are two soil testing laboratories under the Research Circle, one in Salugara and another in
Midnapore. The laboratories carry out soil analysis to determine pH value, organic carbon, available N2, total
N2, available P2O5, available K2O and C/N ratio. During 2011-12, the laboratory in Salugarah submitted
analysis reports of 179 samples sent from 9 Divisions of North Bengal while the laboratory in Midnapore tested
130 samples from 8 Divisions of South Bengal.
10. Publications
The following reports were published by Research Circle during 2011-12:
i. Medicinal Plant Resources of Kolkata- A Photo Guide
ii. Annual Research Report of Silviculture (Hills) Division for the year 2010-11
ii. Annual Research Report of Silviculture (North) Division for the year 2010-11
iii. Annual Research Report of Silviculture (South) Division for the year 2010-11

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 109


CHAPTER - 14
FORESTRY TRAINING
The main function of the Development Circle is to conduct various training programme for the various
categories of Forest Staff Training for capacity building of Forest Staff is essential for better management of
Forests and Wildlife Protected Areas. Now a days Forestry Sector is faced with a number of problems and new
challenges due to population pressure and emerging needs of the Society. Training of Forest Staff help in better
management of Forests, Afforestation, Soil Conservation, Wildlife Management, Control of Man-animal
conflict, Social Forestry, Protection of Forests through Joint Forest Management and application of Modern
Technology in Forestry.
Development Circle organizes six month regular (Induction) Course for the Deputy Ranger/Forester
and Forest Guards apart from short courses and Workshops for the Range Officers, DR/Fr., FG, Banamazdoors
& Banashramiks as well as for Office Staff.
Presently there are two training Centers :-
1) West Bengal Forest School at Dow Hill, Kurseong which was established in 1907.
2) Forestry Training Centre at Rajabhatkhawa which was established in 1983 and was closed during
2004. However, it was again started during 2010.
The capacity of these two Training Centers is 60 numbers each.
The Forestry Training Centre at Jhargram which was established in 1984 was the main centre of
learning in South West Bengal. However, this Training Centre was handed over to the Paschim Midnapore
District Police Authorities on 23/04/2010 to accommodate Para-Military Force of Central Government.
There are some field accommodation for the use of trainees during their educational tours at Sukna,
Bamanpokhri, Md. Bazar, Hizli & Bishnupur. These structures are very old and in need of repair.
At present the Students Barracks and other accompanying structures at Hizli, Kharagpur are under
renovation.
Statement showing the Details of Training held during 2011-12
Sl. Name of Training Category of Venue Duration No. of
No. Trainee Participants
1 100th Batch Regular DR/Fr. DR/Fr. WBFS 6 months 39
Training Course Dowhill
2 Orientation Course BM/BS FTC 5 days 40
st
(1 Batch) Rajabhatkhawa
3 Orientation Course BM/BS FTC 5 days 40
(2nd Batch) Rajabhatkhawa
4 Short Term Refreshers’ Course DR/Fr. WBFS 5 days 40
Dowhill
5 101st Batch Regular DR/Fr. DR/Fr. WBFS 6 months 32
Training Course Dowhill

110 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Progress regarding implementation of JICA Project on
“Capacity Development for Forest Management and Training of Personnel”
i) The State Government has given consent letter for implementation of JICA Project on 01-12-2009.
ii) The Quadripartite agreement has been signed between CPMU, State Government, SPMU and SFDA
on 29-01-2010.
iii) State Level Project Management Unit constituted on 17th March, 2010 and held its first meeting on 02-
02-2011.
iv) Administrative approval and Expenditure Sanction for Rehabilitation of State Forest Training Institutes
(SFTI), Dowhill, West Bengal under Externally Aided Project “Capacity Development for Forest
Management & Training of Personnel” funded by JICA, has been received for ` 4,99,92,537 (Rupees
four crore ninety nine lakh ninety two thousand five hundred thirty seven) only.
v) Administrative approval and Expenditure Sanction for Rehabilitation of State Forest Training Institutes
(SFTI), Hizli, West Bengal, under Externally Aided Project “Capacity Development for Forest
Management & Training of Personnel” funded by JICA, has been received for ` 9,27,47,738.95
(Rupees nine crore twenty seven lakh forty seven thousand seven hundred thirty eight and paise ninety
five) only.
vi) Tender for selection of Architect for construction of buildings of FTI, Hizli, West Bengal, and
rehabilitation of FTI, Dowhill, Kurseong, West Bengal is completed.
vii) In the case of FTI, Dowhill, Kurseong, out of the total work in 18 (eighteen) Tenders amounting to
` 4,64,62,238.24 (Rupees four crore sixty four lakh sixty two thousand two hundred thirty eight and
paise twenty four) only, 5 (five) nos. of Tenders for ` 65,62,742 (Rupees sixty five lakh sixty two
thousand seven hundred forty two) only, have been floated.
viii) Payment for ` 4,32,628 (Rupees four lakh thirty two thousand six hundred twenty eight) only, have
been done for Architectural & Engineering design and site survey works for construction of FTI, Hizli.
ix) Payment for ` 6,37,544 (Rupees six lakh thirty seven thousand five hundred forty four) only, have
been done for Architectural & Engineering design and site survey works for construction of FTI,
Dowhill.
x) Stage - I clearance has been accorded under FCA for diversion of 1.00 hec. of Forest Land at Hizli,
under Kharagpur Forest Division for construction of FTI at Hizli. Presently Stage – II FCA clearance is
under process.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 111


CHAPTER - 15
West Bengal Forest Development Corporation Limited
West Bengal Forest Development Corporation Limited
-: A short profile and resume of activities :-

History
West Bengal Forest Development Corporation Limited came into existence in 1974. Having been
registered as a Company and incorporated under the Companies Act, 1956, the Corporation started
functioning on 19th November, 1974.
Broad Objectives
Broad objectives of the Corporation are as follows :-
a) To help conserve fragile eco-system of the Himalayas, in areas it operates.
b) To promote Joint Forest Management (JFM) with people's participation in South West Bengal and
North Bengal
c) To offer timber, non-timber forest produce and value-added products at reasonable price.
d) To help develop and promote wood-based industries.
e) To generate rural employment through forestry and related activities.
f) To promote and market, filtered honey of the Sundarbans
g) To promote eco-tourism for social awareness and nature education
h) To promote cultivation and marketing of medicinal plants and their products.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES DURING 2011-12
WBFDCL made a net profit of Rs. 387.01 lakh after tax. The profit of WBFDCL has gone up as
compared to the last financial year Rs. 205.37 lakh.
1. Territorial Functions:
Total management of Kalimpong Division has been given on lease to the WBFDCL since 2.11.1974.
Kalimpong Division is the largest territorial division (438 sq km) in North Bengal. WBFDCL is responsible for
all the territorial functions in this Division including protection of forests and wildlife and administration of
forest villages and Forest Protection Committees.
Due to political problems in the Darjeeling hills, it has become highly uneconomic to manage
Kalimpong Division. This Division used to be the highest revenue-earning division of WBFDCL in the past.
The working of Kalimpong Division (including timber harvesting) improved somewhat during the year. During
the last financial year, this Division has generated revenue of Rs. 370.60 lakh as compared to Rs 164.85 lakh
during the previous year. WBFDCL has to spend about Rs. 7.5 Crore every year on the salary of its staff in
Kalimpong out of its earnings from other areas. However, overall deficit of this Division has come down from
Rs. 897.95 lakh during 2010-11 to Rs. 791.66 lakh during this year, thereby adding to the overall profit of your
Corporation.
A number of office buildings, staff quarters, eco-tourism centers and other infrastructure in Kalimpong
Division suffered heavy damages on 8.2.2011 during the political turmoil in Darjeeling. Some more buildings
worth Rs. 50 lakh were damaged in an earthquake on 18.9.2011 in this Division. The total extent of damage
has been estimated to be Rs. 10.27 Crore. A report has been submitted to the State Government with a request

112 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


to provide financial support for re-construction of the damaged buildings and infrastructure. Action has also
been taken to write off the depreciated value of the damaged buildings with the approval of the Board of
Directors.
2. Harvesting and Marketing of Timber
2.1 North Bengal Project
The Project for Infrastructure Development & Joint Forest Management Support (commonly referred
to as the North Bengal Project) was initiated by the WBFDCL in collaboration with the Directorate of Forests
during 2003-04 for a period of 10 years. The WBFDCL arranges for harvesting of timber and firewood in
North Bengal forests and its disposal through auction and tenders. The revenue is deposited with the Forest
Directorate. The WBFDCL gets 17% of the net sale proceeds as service charge. The State Government has
appointed Divisional Forest Officers (DFOs) of Baikunthpur, Kurseong, Jalpaiguri, Wildlife-I, Wildlife-II and
Wildlife-III Divisions as ex-officio Divisional Managers (DMs) of this Corporation in North Bengal vide Forest
Department's Notification No. 691-For/FR/O/11M-43/12 dated 28.3.2012 to facilitate transactions relating to
expenditure and revenue under this project.
For want of approval of Working Plans from Government of India, about 168.55 ha of mature
plantations could not be felled in Buxa Tiger Reserve during the year. Felling in Baikunthpur Division (55.69
ha) was also withheld by the Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (PCCF), West Bengal, in view of the heavy
illicit felling in that Division. The total revenue earned by WBFDCL from the North Bengal Project during
2011-12 stood at Rs. 973.51 lakh as compared to Rs. 630.58 lakh during the previous year.
2.2 Agency for Timber Operation in South Bengal
The Project for Consolidation of Joint Forest Management (JFM) and Enhancement of Forest
Productivity in SW Bengal (commonly referred to as the South Bengal Project) was launched by the WBFDCL
in collaboration with the Forest Directorate during 1998-99 for a period of 12 years. The primary objective of
the Project was to arrange resources for the large-scale harvesting and marketing of forests in South West
Bengal to help meet State Government's commitment for usufruct-sharing with a large number of FPCs
operating in this region. The Project was also inspired by the funds crunch in the State Budget faced by the
Forest Department at that point of time which necessitated institutional financing in the form of a loan from the
West Bengal Infrastructure Development Corporation Limited (WBIDCL).
After the expiry of the project on 31.3.2010, the WBFDCL has been undertaking harvesting and
marketing of timber on agency basis for the Forest Directorate. The WBFDCL also supplies pulpwood to the
paper mills and mining timber to the coal companies in accordance with directions of the PCCF and at rates
fixed by the Price Fixation Committee of the Forest Department, though no pulpwood was supplied to the
paper mills during the year on instructions from the Forest Department. The revenue is deposited with the
Forest Directorate. The WBFDCL gets 20% of the net sale proceeds as service charge. The State Government
has appointed DFOs of Medinipur, Rupnarayan, Jhargram, Kharagpur, Panchet, Bankura (North), Bankura
(South), Purulia, Kangsabati (North) and Kangsabati (South) Divisions as ex-officio DMs of this Corporation
vide Forest Department's Notification No. 691-For/FR/O/11M-43/12 dated 28.3.2012 to facilitate financial
transactions relating to timber operation in South Bengal.
Due to the extremist problems in South Bengal as also for lack of funds for reforestation with the Forest
Directorate, only 5378 ha of forest coupes could be operated during 2011-12 as against the target of 7526 ha.
The total revenue earned by WBFDCL from timber operation (agency basis) in South Bengal during
2011-12 stood at Rs. 956.98 lakh.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 113


3. Saw Mills & Sale of Sawn Timber
The WBFDCL runs 4 Saw Mills at Siliguri (Govt. Saw Mill Division), Salugara (Kurseong Logging
Division), Bhuttabari (Kalimpong Division) and Madarihat (Saw Milling Division). Timber for sawing is
allotted by the Forest Directorate every year but it is always far below the actual requirement. The PCCF did
not allot any timber to the WBFDCL for running its saw mills during 2011-12 despite the recommendation for
allotment of 6200 cum made by the CCF (North). The PCCF had allotted only 2000 cum of timber to the
WBFDCL during 2010-11 against the requisition of 3740 cum. The PCCF has, however, allotted some timber
from South Bengal during 2011-12 in accordance with the rates approved by the Price Fixation Committee. In
view of the uncertainty over allotment of timber from the Forest Directorate, Saw Mills have also been
permitted to accept private jobs to reduce the idle period.
The WBFDCL sells sawn timber to public through 6 (six) sale centres situated at Siliguri, Raiganj,
Saltlake, Durgapur, Midnapur and Purulia. Four retail sale centres at Darjeeling, Kalimpong, Kurseong and
Bhuttabari in Darjeeling district, hitherto lying defunct due to political problems, were reopened during the
year. The WBFDCL also sells sawn timber through authorized dealers (51 as of 31.3.2012) located in different
parts of the state. The total revenue earned by WBFDCL during 2011-12 through sale of sawn timber was Rs.
599.41 lakh as compared to Rs. 571.29 lakh during the previous year.
4. Joinery and Carpentry Units
The WBFDCL is running 5 (five) Joinery and Carpentry Units at Madarihat, Siliguri, Raiganj (started
during 2010-11), Saltlake and Durgapur. During 2011-12, WBFDCL supplied furniture and joinery items to
many prestigious organizations including the High Court (Kolkata), Mother Dairy (Kolkata), Yuva Bharati
Krirangan (Saltlake), Calcutta International School (Kolkata), Narsinha Dutta College (Howrah), etc.. The
total revenue from the Joinery & Carpentry units earned by WBFDCL during 2011-12 was Rs. 210.69 lakh as
compared to Rs. 218.76 lakh during the previous year.
5. Honey
The WBFDCL procures honey from the Sundarbans through the members of the Forest Protection
Committees and sells it after refinement under the brand name MOUBAN. The WBFDCL collected 26.735 MT
of honey during 2011-12. The total revenue for the year 2011-12 earned by WBFDCL from the sale of honey
stood at Rs. 27.78 lakh in comparison to the last year's figure of Rs. 34.62 lakh.
6. Cashew-nut Plantations
The WBFDCL has raised cashew nut plantations over 1566 ha of barren forest land in Midnapur
received from the Forest Directorate during 1984-85. The plantations are over-matured and their productivity
is going down. Auction of cashew-nut is also a problem due to ring-formation. In March 2010, the Board of
Directors recommended gradual replacement of cashew-nut plantations with quick-growing pulpwood
species. The area under cashew-nut plantations stood at 1174.60 ha as of 31.3.2012. Total revenue earned by
WBFDCL from the sale of cashew-nuts during 2011-12 was Rs. 18.67 lakh as compared to Rs. 19.96 lakh
during the previous year.
7. Project for Quick-Growing Pulpwood Species
The Board of Directors has approved a 10-year Project (2010-11 to 2019-20) costing Rs.6.57 Crore (at
current prices) for raising high quality Eucalyptus and other pulpwood species over 1365 ha by replacing the
existing cashew-nut plantations. The Corporation has raised clonal plantation over 115 ha of land during the
year in South-West Bengal. Total area under clonal plantations stood at 471.052 ha (including 300.50 ha
raised during the project period) as of 31.3.2012. The PCCF (HoFF) has been requested to provide financial

114 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


support from the CAMPA fund to bring more areas under plantation.
8. Non-Timber Forest Products, Medicinal Plants & Lac
The functional control of the Non-Timber Forest Produce (NTFP) Division of the Forest Directorate was
taken over by WBFDCL during 2009-10. The State Government has appointed DFO, NTFP Division as the
ex-officio DM of this Corporation. The Board of Directors (161st Meeting; 30th June 2010) has approved a 6-
year Project (2009-10 to 2014-15) costing Rs. 3.56 Crore for promoting Citronella, Turmeric and various
medicinal plants in North Bengal. Citronella grass and turmeric are grown as intercrops in the forestry
plantations with the help of forest villagers and FPC members.
The NTFP Division runs a manufacturing unit at Taipu (near Bagdogra) for producing herbal drugs and
cosmetics. It also runs distillation plants for producing Citronella oil at Nilpara, Khuntimari, Targhera and
Sukna. The WBFDCL and the NTFP Division sell Citronella oil, turmeric powder and other herbal products
through various sale-centres in the state under the brand name BANAJA. The trademark 'Banaja' for the
products of the NTFP Division has been registered (Registrar of Trademark's Cert. No.1024752 dated
9.11.11). The NTFP Division opened a new retail sale center for the NTFP products at Mathabhanga in
Coochbehar district during the year. A Quality Control Laboratory for testing the herbal products
manufactured by the NTFP Division was also set up at Taipu during the year.
The NTFP Division raised 130 ha of Citronella grass and 10 ha of Turmeric during the year.
Experimental plantation of Citronella grass over 6.5 ha was taken up by WBFDCL in South Bengal. The NTFP
Division signed a MoU with Chamurchi Tea Estate (North Bengal) for cultivation of Citronella grass and
production of Citronella oil in the blank land within the tea estate. The NTFP Division also procured Kalmegh
cultivated by the FPC members in Rupnarayan Division in Paschim Medinipur district during the year.
Four new herbal products, viz. Trikatu Churna, Neem Oil, Arjun Tea and Ayurvedic Shampoo were
launched in the market during the year. Two new derivatives of Citronella oil, viz. phenyl and hand-wash, have
been introduced in the market on trial basis. The NTFP Division and the Marketing Division of WBFDCL
participated in the International Herbal Fair at Bhopal in December 2011.
The WBFDCL also announced support price for 2011-12 in respect of 10 medicinal plants of wild
origin, viz. Kalmegh, Gurmar, Aswagandha, Tulsi, Amlaki, Haritaki, Bahera, Maha Bhringraj, Neem and Bel
collected by the FPC members in Paschim Medinipur and Bankura districts.
WBFDCL made its maiden entry in the field of lac cultivation in Purulia district during 2011-12 by
initiating work on 6 (six) Brood-Lac Farms with a financial support of Rs. 19 lakh provided by the Paschim
Anchal Unnayan Parishad.
The revenue collected by WBFDCL from the sale of NTFP products during the year stood at Rs. 41.92
lakh as compared to Rs. 36.80 lakh during the previous year.
9. Eco-tourism
WBFDCL maintained 20 resorts; 17 in North Bengal and 3 in South Bengal. District-wise distribution
of these resorts is as follows:
Darjeeling District: Lepchajagat, Kalimpong, Lava, Lolegaon, Rangpo, Mongpong, Gorubathan,
Samsing, Suntlekhola, Jaldhaka, Paren; Jalpaiguri District: Murti, Barodabri (Malungi), Rajabhatkhawa,
Rangamati ; Coochbehar District : Rasikbil, Gosanimari; Purulia District : Garhpanchkot, Duarsini;
Bankura District : Mukatmonipur
Eco-resorts at Lolegaon, Gorubathan, Samsing, Jaldhaka and Paren under Kalimpong Division (33

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 115


buildings: 75 beds) suffered heavy damages on 8.2.2011 during the political turmoil in Darjeeling. Eco-resort
at Duarsini (3 cottages: 6 beds) is defunct due to law and order problem in the region. Eco-resort at Gosanimari
(2 cottages: 4 beds) has been damaged in a cyclone while that at Rangpo (4 beds) was damaged on 18.9.2011
in an earthquake.
One room and one dormitory (Total 7 beds) were added during the year to the Buxa Jungle Lodge at
Rajabhatkhawa. Temporary tourism facilities in the form of 4 luxury tents (8 beds) at Rangamati and 4 luxury
tents (8 beds) at Jhallong were added during the year. These were in addition to the 5 swiss tents (10 beds) at
Jhallong and 4 swiss tents (8 beds) at Suntlekhola set up during the previous year. As of 31.3.2012, 14 Eco-
resorts of WBFDCL (N.B.:12, S.B.:2) with 343 beds (N.B.:271 beds, S.B.:72 beds) were available for tourists.
During the year, WBFDC initiated a project for promoting eco-tourism in and around Buxa Tiger
Reserve (BTR) with a financial support of Rs. 244 lakh from the Department of Tourism, Government of West
Bengal. The project, which envisages development of trekking route, display of signages, construction of watch
towers and setting up camping facilities, is being implemented in collaboration with the BTR authorities. The
WBFDCL also experimented with conducted tours in the Sundarbans during 2011-12 with encouraging results.
WBFDCL has also entered into agreements with the following four private tour-operators
in North Bengal resulting in additional 78 beds for tourists:
1. M/S Journey Mart [Rishyap (Darjeeling): 18 beds]
2. M/s Aranya [Lataguri (Jalpaiguri): 20 beds]
3. M/S Kakurban [South Dhupjhora (Jalpaiguri): 24 beds]
4. M/S Elephant Forest [South Dhupjhora (Jalpaiguri): 16 beds]
During the year under report, the earnings of WBFDCL from eco-tourism activities increased to
Rs. 292.29 lakh from Rs. 265.91 lakh during the previous year.
10. Darjeeling-Rangit Valley Ropeway
Darjeeling-Rangit Valley Ropeway, which was lying closed after an accident on 19.10.2003, was
reopened for public on 2.2.2012 with due permission from the PWD, Government of West Bengal. The
ropeway is being run in collaboration with a private partner, viz. M/S Conveyor & Ropeways Services Private
Limited.

116 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


FINANCIAL RESULTS
The summery of the working result of WBFDCL for the year 2011-12 as compared to the earlier year is
as follows:
A. Income (Rs. in lakh)
Current Year Previous Year
2011-12 2010-11
REVENUE FROM OPERATION
Sale of Goods 1371.85 5846.48
Other Operating Income 2546.00 1217.59
TOTAL REVENUE FROM OPERATION 3917.85 7064.07
OTHER INCOME 1052.33 627.09
TOTAL REVENUE (I + II) 4970.18 7691.16
TOTAL EXPENSES 4306.12 7383.65
PROFIT BEFORE EXTRAORDINARY ITEMS AND TAX (III – IV) 664.06 307.51
EXTRA ORDINARY ITEM 57.68 0.00
PROFIT BEFORE TAX (V – VI) 606.38 307.51
TAX 219.36 102.14
PROFIT FOR THE YEAR 387.02 205.37
ADD BALANCE CARRIED FORWARD FROM LAST YEAR 4241.72 4043.61
PROFIT AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION 4628.74 4248.98
LESS: (A) PROPOSED DIVIDEND 6.23 6.23
(B) DIVIDEND TAX 1.01 1.03
BALANCE CARRIED TO BALANCE SHEET 4621.49 4241.72

EMPLOYMENT
Total number of employees of WBFDCL as on 31.3.2012 stood at 997 including 69 Government
employees on deputation. Moreover, WBFDCL has generated adequate employment opportunities among
the backward and weaker section of communities through various activities in different Divisions.
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
The Board of Directors of the Corporation has been reconstituted by the Department of Forest,
Government of West Bengal vide their Notification No. 2039-For/10A-1/99 dated 10.8.2011 as amended vide
Notification No. 2578/FR/O/CP/10A-1/99 dated 25.10.2011, with the following members:
1. Shri Khageswar Roy, MLA
2. Shri Anil Adhikary, MLA
3. Shri Dulal Murmu, MLA
4. Shri Srikanta Mahato, MLA
5. Shri Joachim Baxla, Ex-MP
6. Dr. Subesh Das, IAS, ACS (Forest), Govt. of West Bengal,
7. Shri J.K.Tewari, IFS, Regional CCF (Central), Bhubaneswar
8. Shri C.C.Bhattacharya, WBCS (EXE), Special Secretary (Finance), Govt. of West Bengal
9. Shri Dipankar Dasgupta
10. Shri S.S.Bist, IFS, PCCF & Managing Director
Shri Khageswar Roy, MLA has been appointed as the Chairman of the Board of Directors.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 117


CHAPTER - 16
MONITORING PLANTATIONS IN WEST BENGAL
Monitoring & Evaluation of forest plantations created by Forest Directorate, Govt. of West Bengal are
conducted by the Monitoring Circle since last three decades. It is the regular observation and recording of
st rd th
status of survival, height and B.H.G (only for fifth year plantation) in 1 year, 3 year and 5 year of plantation.
Deviations from the working Plan prescription if any are also monitored. Monitoring also involves giving
feedback regarding the progress of the plantations to the fund providers, implementers and beneficiaries so
that the gathered information can be used in decision making for improving the plantation performances in
future.
MONITORING TEAM
Survey Monitoring & Evaluation of forest plantations in West Bengal is done by Monitoring Circle with
two divisions, namely Monitoring (N) and Monitoring (S) under its jurisdiction. Monitoring (N) division with
headquarter at Siliguri covers the hilly areas of Darjeeling, Kalimpong, Kurseong and plains areas of Dooars
and Terai region while Monitoring (S) division with headquarter at Kolkata covers the whole area of South
Bengal.
Administrative Hierarchy
C.F. Monitoring Circle (Hq. Kolkata) works under the guidance of CCF, Monitoring Evaluation and
PCCF Research, Monitoring and Development as well as PCCF and Head of Forest Force West Bengal, D.F.O.
Monitoring (N) and Monitoring (S) work under his control.
Methodologies of Monitoring
Three types of parameters are taken into consideration.
st
1. 1 year (2011) Plantation -- Survival% & Height of seedling.
2. 3rd year (2009) Plantation -- Survival% & Height of seedling.
3. 5th year (2007) Plantation -- Survival%, Height & Girth of seedlings.
For the purpose of execution of survey & monitoring works the Statistical random sampling technique
is adopted.
Pre-survey Works:
1) Copies of regeneration maps along with plantation journals are collected from the respective
Divisions.
2) A grid line is laid over the map with quadrates of 50m x 50m each serially numbered.
3) Sample plots are chosen randomly using the statistical random sample table.
4) Selection of sample plots is done in such a way so as to have proper representation of the area.
Field works:
1) The selected sample plots are identified in the field.
2) Boundary corners are clearly marked with raised earthen mound with painted pegging.
3) Total enumeration is carried out species wise and in respect of height class intervals.

118 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Calculation of Survival percentage:
As per approved spacing in the regeneration plan, total number of seedlings that should be present in
those plots is calculated. Survival percentage is found out as the ratio of actual number to the prescribed
number.
st
For 1 year survey & monitoring, in a 10 ha plot at 7.5% sampling intensity three samples plots of
50mx50m are taken. Average of survival percentage values obtained in the three sample plots gives the
survival percentage for the 10ha plantation. To obtain the Divisional performance, weighted average survival
rd th
percentage were calculated. In case of 3 year & 5 year survey & monitoring, in a 10 ha plot at 5% sampling
intensity two sample plots of 50mX50m are taken.
Standard Survival % of plantations:
Standard to be maintained as envisaged by the P.C.C.F. Research, Monitoring & Development as
follows.
st
1. 1 year Plantation -- above 90% (S.P.)
2. 3rd year Plantation -- above 75% (S.P.)
3. 5th year Plantation. -- above 50% (S.P.)
Further in accordance to the S.P. the plantations are categorically classified as follows :

Year of Category A Category B Category C Category D


plantation
1st year WSP : 90% & above WSP : 89 – 75% WSP : 74 – 50 % WSP : < 50%
3rd year WSP : 75% & above WSP :74 – 60% WSP : 59 – 40 % WSP : < 40%
th
5 year WSP : 50% & above WSP :49 – 40% WSP : 39 – 30 % WSP : < 30%

Publication of Report
Zonal reports are being published separately for South and North Bengal along with State monitoring
report every year regularly. Copies of reports are circulated among the Forest Division of Directorate and are
available with the concerned Monitoring wing of the Directorate.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 119


Area Statement: Scheme-wise, Year-wise, Total plantations created & monitored
during 2011-2012
1 yr old plantations 3 yr old plantations 5 yr old plantations Total pltn area (ha)
(2011) (2009) (2007)

Scheme Total Actual Total Actual Total Actual Total Actual


pltn area pltn area pltn area pltn area
area monitored area monitored area monitored area monitored
(ha) (ha) (ha) (ha) (ha) (ha) (ha) (ha)
Bamboo Pltn. 130 130 0 0 0 0 130 130
CMM 345 345 80 80 735 505 1160 930
CSB 150 150 150 150 50 50 350 350
CSS / MED/ EP 113 113 100 45 160 5 373 163
Eco. Pltn. (Sal) 187 187 40 30 0 0 227 217
Eco. Conservation 150 150 100 100 0 0 250 250
Eco. Pltn. (Misc) 972.25 972.25 893.92 893.92 200 200 2066.17 2066.17
ESBR 0 0 0 0 200 200 200 200
F.T./HAD 0 0 0 0 50 50 50 50
FT- Sal 760 760 321.5 321.5 330 330 1411.5 1411.5
Medicinal Plant 40 40 0 0 0 0 40 40
Prot. Afftn. 60 60 100 100 160 160 320 320
Prot. Afftn /HAD 50 50 30 30 75 75 155 155
QGS 5308.9 5308.9 4255 4246 799 799 10362.9 10353.9
RIDF 30 30 875 855 0 0 905 855
RKVY 0 0 292 292 0 0 292 292
RKVY (QGS) 0 0 555 555 0 0 555 555
RKVY (Sal) 0 0 410 410 0 0 410 410
RVP 366 366 0 0 0 0 366 366
Strip Plant. 710 710 702 697 718 663 2130 2070
WBFDC (NB) Proj. 0 0 0 0 904.93 861.71 904.93 861.71
TOTAL 9372.15 9372.15 8904.42 8805.42 4381.93 3898.71 22658.5 22076.28

120 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Divisions at a glance: Weighted Survival Percentage (WSP)-wise 1st year (2011) - all the schemes together monitored during 2011-2012

Strip Pro.Aff./ Medicinal Eco. Eco.


QGS FT-Sal CMM Pro.Aff. CSB Bamboo RVP Eco. Sal CSS Conserva RIDF Total
Division/ Plant. HAD Pltn. Misc. tion
WSP
Scheme
Ha.

Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha

WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP

WL-I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 99 0 0 25 99 0 0 0 0 75 99
KPG SC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 97 0 0 0 0 46 98 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 99 0 0 121 99
BNK (S) 850 98 60 98 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 910 98
DRJ 0 0 0 0 10 99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 95 98 5 95 0 0 0 0 0 0 110 98
BIR 211 98 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 211 98
KGN SC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 98 0 0 0 0 320 98 0 0 95 98 0 0 0 0 100 97 0 0 540 98
COB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 60 98 0 0 18 99 0 0 0 0 98 98
PNCT 550 96 80 99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 670 97
DGP 144 96 25 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 169 97
BDN 306 98 15 98 25 96 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 346 97
MID 510 98 110 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 670 97
N-M 57.9 96 10 97 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 67.9 96

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


RPN 510 94 100 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 610 95
SLG SF 0 0 0 0 70 94 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 98 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 90 95
KGN 0 0 0 0 10 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 110 96 80 92 0 0 0 0 0 0 200 95
JHR 220 93 40 98 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 260 94
BNK(N) 590 93 170 95 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 760 93
BKP 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 100 27 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 47 93
SC (N) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 145 91 20 96 0 0 0 0 0 0 165 92
RGJ 0 0 0 0 60 91 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 91 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 70 91
PRL 350 91 40 93 0 0 0 0 20 79 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 410 91
MLD 0 0 0 0 35 90 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 90
KGP 260 91 50 85 30 96 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 86 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 390 90
WL-III 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 90 20 86 30 93 0 0 0 0 100 90
JPG SF 0 0 0 0 80 89 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 30 94 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 110 90
PMID 0 0 0 0 60 83 80 94 0 0 0 0 150 87 10 82 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 300 88
KNG(N) 410 87 40 90 0 0 0 0 20 84 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 470 87
24 PGS 0 0 0 0 90 83 265 89 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 355 87
(S)
JPG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 153 86 0 0 5 62 0 0 0 0 158 85
EFD, PRL 0 0 0 0 20 85 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 85
KNG(S) 340 83 20 92 0 0 0 0 20 97 0 0 0 0 20 63 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 400 83
HWH 0 0 0 0 200 81 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 200 81
BTR (E) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 76 35 67 25 73 0 0 30 67 125 73
WL-II 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 69 0 0 10 56 0 0 0 0 30 65
BTR (W) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 79.25 44 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 79.25 44

121
Total : 5309 760 690 345 60 50 150 130 366 40 972.25 187 83 150 30 9372.15 93
3rd year (2009) - all the schemes together monitored during 2011-2012

122
R.K.V.Y. R.K.V.Y. Strip Pro.Afftn./ Economic Economic Eco.
QGS FT-Sal CSB CMM Pro.Aff. CSS RKVY RIDF Conserva Total
Division/ (QGS) (Sal) Plant. HAD Mise. Sal tion
WSP
Scheme
Ha.

Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha

WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP

WL-I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 55 95 0 0 0 0 55 95
KPG SC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 170 94 0 0 0 0 170 94
DRJ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 68 0 0 125 96 0 0 0 0 135 94
PNCT 530 94 0 0 55 94 35 97 20 95 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 640 94
KGN SC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 30 81 30 97 0 0 10 89 0 0 70 90 0 0 100 93 240 91
BNK(S) 500 89 50 94 45 92 20 94 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 615 90
RPN 245 90 50 64 40 98 40 99 15 90 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 390 88
KGN 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 83 0 0 91 87 0 0 0 0 136 86
BDN 42 84 0 0 0 0 20 89 20 77 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 82 84
KPG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 82 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 82
BNK(N) 770 82 50 88 100 79 20 71 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 940 82
N-M 45 83 0 0 0 0 1.5 76 15 70 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 61.5 80
COB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 77 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 70 79 10 78 0 0 0 0 100 79
BIR 388 77 45 85 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 433 78
SLG SF 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 70 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 94 0 0 0 0 70 77
BKP 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 75 50 72 30 82 0 0 0 0 120 76
MID 255 69 50 61 75 92 45 99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 425 75
PMID 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 30 95 150 70 60 73 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 240 74
MLD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 79 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 30 69 10 71 0 0 0 0 60 73
WL-II 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 72 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 72
SC (N) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 70 0 0 0 0 20 81 400 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 449 70
KNG(N) 350 71 50 68 10 34 20 78 0 0 0 0 0 0 41 54 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 471 69
JHR 310 65 100 71 15 60 45 87 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 470 68
KNG(S) 291 63 50 78 10 69 20 65 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 371 65
DGP 100 59 30 65 10 71 20 82 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 160 64
JPG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 74 80 52 60 61 30 65 0 0 220 63
WL-III 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 73 50 63 110 58 95 62 0 0 0 0 290 62
JPG SF 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 137 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 69 0 0 0 0 150 61
KGP 200 63 30 64 30 80 15 42 40 45 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 315 61
HWH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 150 56 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 150 56
RGJ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 47 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 115 54 15 90 0 0 0 0 170 56
24PGS(S) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 54 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 54
24PGS(N) 20 54 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 52 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 53
BTR (W) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 22 62 0 0 99.92 50 0 0 0 0 122 52
EFD, PRL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 52 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 52
BTR (E) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 70 0 0 30 37 0 0 0 0 55 52

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


PRL 200 47 50 48 20 43 20 72 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 290 49
Total 4246 555 410 321.5 697 150 80 100 30 45 292 855 893.9 30 100 8805. 42 75
5th year (2007) - all the schemes together monitored during 2011-2012

Strip CSS,Eleph. Economic WBFDC Pro.Afftn./


QGS FT-Sal ESBR Pro.Aff. CMM CSB F.T. F.T./HAD Total
Division/ Plant. Proj. Mise. (NB) HAD
WSP
Scheme
Ha.

Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha

WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP
WSP

N-M 25 85 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 85
BNK(S) 70 86 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 75 84
WL-I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 55 83 0 0 55 83
PNCT 60 78 40 88 20 82 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 120 82
KGN SC 0 0 0 0 130 81 0 0 60 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 69 230 81
SLG SF 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 80
KPG SC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 78 35 78
DRJ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 56 50 84 0 0 50 87 0 0 150 76
KGN 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 63 0 0 50 78 41 69 0 0 141 70
KPG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 59 69 0 0 59 69
MID 100 61 40 84 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 140 68
COB 0 0 0 0 30 79 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 30 65 0 0 0 0 40 62 0 0 100 68

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


JPG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 61 0 0 0 0 55 64 0 0 75 63
BNK(N) 70 61 20 72 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 90 63
JPG SF 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 63 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 63
BKP 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 74.71 62 0 0 74.71 62
BDN 0 0 30 66 100 59 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 130 61
RPN 100 60 60 66 6 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 166 61
DGP 50 62 20 51 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 70 59
SC (N) 0 0 0 0 21 65 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 145 58 0 0 166 59
MLD 0 0 0 0 52 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 52 58
WL-III 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 57 0 0 100 57
JHR 60 53 10 84 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 70 57
PMID 0 0 0 0 14 45 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 64 49
BTR (W) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 194 46 0 0 194 46
KGP 40 55 10 20 10 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 60 41
24 PGS (S) 0 0 0 0 0 0 200 22 0 0 505 84 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 705 41
PRL 100 45 20 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 120 39
RGJ 0 0 0 0 100 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 39
KNG(S) 50 31 10 71 0 0 0 0 50 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 110 38
HWH 0 0 0 0 100 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 36
BIR 0 0 10 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 35
BTR (E) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 33 0 0 48 33
24PGS(N) 25 22 0 0 80 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 105 23
KNG(N) 49 28 10 35 0 0 0 0 50 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 109 23

123
Total 799 280 663 200 160 505 50 5 200 50 50 861.71 75 3898.71 55
CHAPTER - 17
MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATIONS
Table – 17.1
OUTTURN OF TIMBER & FIREWOOD FROM 1976-77 TO 2011-2012
( Forest Directorate & WBFDC Ltd.)
Year Outturn of total Timber (M3) Outturn of total Firewood (M3) Total Outturn (M3)
1976-77 301,319 526,173 827,492
1977-78 350,646 582,797 933,443
1978-79 329,405 591,000 920,405
1979-80 295,374 417,613 712,987
1980-81 273,118 396,005 669,123
1981-82 303,222 793,145 1,096,367
1982-83 294,450 642,584 937,034
1983-84 242,890 778,812 1,021,702
1984-85 233,720 491,782 725,502
1985-86 210,748 454,096 664,844
1986-87 140,101 305,456 445,557
1987-88 143,707 258,462 402,169
1988-89 152,808 277,312 430,120
1989-90 72,590 285,862 358,452
1990-91 88,252 210,692 298,944
1991-92 94,754 180,645 275,399
1992-93 117,164 184,052 301,216
1993-94 84,489 191,572 276,061
1994-95 84,903 125,807 210,710
1995-96 88,554 208,589 297,143
1996-97 86,363 196,595 282,958
1997-98 88,728 87,589 176,317
1998-99 86,769 152,800 239,569
1999-2000 145,031 299,563 444,594
2000-01 88,160 250,399 338,559
2001-02 147,031 275,514 422,545
2002-03 102,357 218,469 320,826
2003-04 130,551 306,729 437,280
2004-05 113,871 366,583 480,454
2005-06 85,993 324,092 410,085
2006-07 114,589 387,094 501,683
2007-08 231,578 262,023 493,601
2008-09 151,123 314,740 465,863
2009-10 183,401 207,625 391,026
2010-11 58,086 155,854 213,940
2011-12 95612 103250 198862

124 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table – 17.2
OUTTURN OF NON TIMBER FOREST PRODUCE (NTFP) IN FOREST AREAS IN WEST BENGAL
FROM 1998-99 to 20011-12
Minor Forest Unit 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 2008- 2009- 2010- 2011-
Produce 99 2000 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12
Honey Quintals 495 552 494 323 363 383.3 311.2 305.52 382.07 251.28 245.65 257.5 5924 277.6
Wax Quintals 22.15 23 7.24 21.23 34.55 17.58 13.17 15.59 14.02 13.96 8.89 0.4 334.2653 14.68
Sal Seeds MT -- 264.68 1848.37 -- -- -- 1070.7 117.67 120.58 1408.13 75.53 418.1 2046.01 2360.68
Kendu Leaf MT 159 581 362 379 367 642 347.22 1104.76 1163.96 849.06 803.16 907.24 11254.295 21151
(Biripata)
Lac Tons 2070 985 -- -- -- -- 22.38 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
Citronella grass Quintals 5200 1311 2137 6738 9530 6890 2316 8613 7101.21 3227.14 2094 3548 3273 --

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


125
Table – 17.3

126
List & Location details of Forest Rest Houses under Forests Directorate, Govt. of West Bengal
Sl. Name of District Name of Rest House Location with address Categories Nearest Rly. Distance Mode of To whom to Tel No.
No. Station from Rly. Transport contact for
Stn. permission
1 Darjeeling Rimbick Rimbick C Darjeeling 90 km Bus DFO/Darjeeling 0354-2252159
2 Darjeeling Palmauja Palmauja B Darjeeling 60 km Train/Bus DFO/Darjeeling 0354-2252160
3 Darjeeling Batasi Batasi, Manebhanjang C Darjeeling 50 km Train/Bus DFO/Darjeeling 0354-2252161
4 Darjeeling Badamtam Badamtam C Darjeeling 27 km Train/Jeep DFO/Darjeeling 0354-2252162
5 Darjeeling Kakjhora Barakakjhora A Darjeeling 1 km Train/Bus DFO/Darjeeling 0354-2252163
6 Darjeeling Takdah Takdah B Darjeeling 35 km Train/Bus DFO/Darjeeling 0354-2252164
7 Darjeeling Reang Reang, Rambi Bazar B NJP 52 km Train/Bus DFO/Darjeeling 0354-2252165
9 Darjeeling kalijhora kalijhora, Sevoke B NJP 34 km Train/Bus DFO/Kurseong 0354-2332200
10 Darjeeling Bagora Bagora B Kurseong 20 km Train/Jeep DFO/Kurseong 0354-2332201
11 Darjeeling Bengdubi Bagdogra B NJP 25 km Train/Bus DFO/Kurseong 0354-2332202
12 Darjeeling Tukriajhar Naxalbari B NJP 40 km Train/Bus DFO/Kurseong 0354-2332203
13 Darjeeling Khairbani Panighatta B NJP 60 km Train/Bus/Jeep DFO/Kurseong 0354-2332204
14 Darjeeling Mirik Mirik A NJP 60 km Train/Bus DFO/Kurseong 0354-2332205
15 Darjeeling Bamanpokhri Bamanpokhri B NJP 27 km Train/Bus DFO/Kurseong 0354-2332206
16 Darjeeling Dow-Hill Dow-Hill, Kurseong B Kurseong 6 km Train/Jeep Director/WBFS 0354-2332198
17 Darjeeling Sukna Sukna A&B NJP 18 km Train/Bus DFO/Wildlife-I 0354-2257314
18.4 Darjeeling Latpanchar Latpanchar A NJP 69 km Train/Jeep DFO/Wildlife-I 0354-2257315
19.4 Darjeeling Rambhi Rambhi B Ghoom 10 km Train/Jeep DFO/Wildlife-I 0354-2257316
20.5 Darjeeling Sandakphu Sandakphu B Ghoom 60 km Train/Jeep DFO/Wildlife-I 0354-2257317
21.6 Darjeeling Chunabhati Bagrakote A NJP 45 km Train/Bus DFO/Kalimpong 03552-255496
22.7 Darjeeling Ghoomti Mahanadi, Kurseong B Kurseong 5 km Train/Bus DFO/Kalimpong 03552-255497
23.8 Darjeeling Upper Teesta Teesta A NJP 58 km Train/Bus/Jeep DFO/Kalimpong 03552-255498
24.9 Jalpaiguri Buxaduar & Dormitory Santrabari C Alipurduar Jn. 32 km Bus/Private Car DFO/BTR(E) 03564-256005
26 Jalpaiguri Jayanti Dormitory Jayanti A Alipurduar Jn. 24 km Bus DFO/BTR(E) 03564-256006
27.1 Jalpaiguri Rydak Samuktala B New Alipurduar 30 km Bus/Private Car DFO/BTR(E) 03564-256007
28.2 Jalpaiguri Silbunglow Baribhisa C New Alipurduar 49 km Bus/Private Car DFO/BTR(E) 03564-256008
29.3 Jalpaiguri Kumargram Kumargram C New Alipurduar 60 km Bus DFO/BTR(E) 03564-256009
30.4 Jalpaiguri Rajabhatkhawa Rajabhatkhawa A Alipurduar Jn. 15 km Bus DFO/BTR(W) 03564-255129
31.5 Jalpaiguri Nimati Nimati B Alipurduar Jn. 20 km Bus DFO/BTR(W) 03564-255130
32.6 Jalpaiguri Raimatang Kalchini B Alipurduar Jn. 35 km Bus/Private Car DFO/BTR(E) 03564-256009

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


33.6 Jalpaiguri Kathambari Kathambari B Odlabari 12 km Bus DFO/Baikunthapur 0353-2436536
34.7 Jalpaiguri Oodlabari Oodlabari B Odlabari 1 km Jeep DFO/Baikunthapur 0353-2436537
35.8 Jalpaiguri Bodaganj Gourikone C Belacoba 12 km Bus DFO/Baikunthapur 0353-2436538
36.9 Jalpaiguri Ambari Moulanigar B Ambari-Falakata 5 km Bus DFO/Baikunthapur 0353-2436539
38 Jalpaiguri Khuntimari Khuntimari A Dhupguri 22 km Bus DFO/Jalpaiguri 03561-232016
39.1 Jalpaiguri Sulkapara Sulkapara B Maynaguri 50 km Bus DFO/Jalpaiguri 03561-232017
40.2 Jalpaiguri Gorumara Gorumara A Jalpaiguri Road 51 km Bus/Jeep DFO/Wildlife-II 03561-220017
41.3 Jalpaiguri Chapramari Chapramari A Jalpaiguri Road 70 km Bus/Jeep DFO/Wildlife-II 03561-220018
42.4 Jalpaiguri Hollong Hollong A+ Falakata 28 km Train/Bus DFO/Wildlife-III 03582-227185
43.5 Jalpaiguri South -Khairbari Eco-Park Madarihat --- Khairbari 35 km Bus/Jeep DFO/Wildlife-III 03582-227186
44.6 Jalpaiguri Kunjanagar Eco-Park Jaldapara South --- Jaldapara 70 km Bus/Jeep DFO/Wildlife-III 03582-227187
45.7 Jalpaiguri Nilpara Hasimara B Falakata 35 km Train/Bus DFO/Wildlife-III 03582-227188
46.8 Jalpaiguri Mendabari Mendabari C Alipurduar 46 km Train/Bus DFO/Wildlife-III 03582-227189
47.9 Jalpaiguri Chilapata Chilapata B Alipurduar 30 km Train/Bus DFO/Wildlife-III 03582-227190
48.9 Jalpaiguri Kodalbasti Kodalbasti C Alipurduar 50 km Train/Bus DFO/Wildlife-III 03582-227191
50 Jalpaiguri Jaldapara Holiday Home Jaldapara (East) --- Falakata 70 km Bus/Jeep DFO/Wildlife-III 03582-227192
51.1 Jalpaiguri Mal Pagoda Malpark B NJP 70 km Train/Bus DFO/P&G(N) 0353-3433143
52.2 Cooch Behar Atiamochar Takuamari C Kamakhyaguri 25 km Train/Bus DFO/Coochbehar 03582-227727
53.3 Cooch Behar Debibari Cooch Behar SF --- New Coochbehar 25 km Bus/Jeep DFO/Coochbehar 03582-227728

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


54.4 Cooch Behar Mathabhanga Mathabhanga C New Coochbehar 60 km Train/Bus DFO/Coochbehar 03582-227729
55.5 Uttar Dinajpur Chopra Chopra C NJP 25 km Bus DFO/Siliguri SF 0353-2436217
56.6 Uttar Dinajpur Kulik Soharai, Raiganj B Dalkhola 40 km Train/Bus DFO/Raiganj 03523-252647
57.7 Dakshin Dinajpur Balurghat Beltala Park, Balurghat C Malda 110 km Train/Bus DFO/Raiganj 03523-252648
58.8 Malda Rajadighi Rajadighi C Malda 35 km Bus/Jeep DFO/Malda 03512-252346
59.9 Malda Karjadanga Karjadanga C Malda 40 km Bus DFO/Malda 03512-252347
61 Malda Bhaluka Koriali C Bhaluka Road 1 km Rickshaw DFO/Malda 03512-252348
62.1 Malda Mokdumpur Mokdumpur C Malda 3 km Rickshaw DFO/Malda 03512-252349
63.1 Malda Adina Gazole B Malda 10 km Rickshaw DFO/Malda 03512-252350
64.2 Purulia Ajodhya Ajodhya A Barabhum 35 km Bus/Hired Vehicle DFO/Purulia 03252-222329
65.3 Purulia Matha Matha B Barabhum 13 km Bus DFO/Purulia 03252-222330
66.4 Purulia Balarampur Balarampur B Barabhum 1 km Rickshaw DFO/Purulia 03252-222331
67.5 Purulia Jhalda Jhalda C Jhalda 1.5 km Rickshaw DFO/Purulia 03252-222332
68.6 Purulia Divisional Office Divisional Office B Purulia 1.5 km Rickshaw DFO/Purulia 03252-222333
69.7 Purulia Banabani Raghabpur B Purulia 4 km Rickshaw DFO/Extn.Forestry 03252-222696
70.8 Purulia Surulia Surulia A Purulia 5 km Bus DFO/Purulia 03252-222333
71.9 Purulia Kashipur Rangiladih, Kashipur B Adra 10 km Bus DFO/Kangsabati(N) 03252-222231
73 Purulia Damodarpur Damodarpur C Purulia 38 km Bus DFO/Kangsabati(N) 03252-222232
74.1 Purulia Bandwan Bandwan C Barabhum 42 km Bus DFO/Kangsabati(N) 03252-222233
75.2 Purulia Kuilapal Kuilapal B Barabhum 61 km Bus/Hired Vehicle DFO/Kangsabati(S) 03252-222604

127
76.3 Purulia Barabazar Barabazar C Barabhum 20 km Bus DFO/Kangsabati(S) 03252-222605
77.4 Purulia Kenda Kenda C Purulia 25 km Bus DFO/Kangsabati(S) 03252-222606
78.4 Purulia Keshargarh Hura C Purulia 40 km Bus DFO/Kangsabati(N) 03252-222232

128
79.5 Purulia Kumari & Jamuna Bundwan-1 C Purulia 60 km Bus DFO/Kangsabati(S) 03252-222606
80.6 Bankura Sonamukhi Sonamukhi C Purulia 45 km Bus DFO/Bankura(N) 03242-250758
81.7 Bankura Murlu Saltore B Bankura 45 km Train/Bus DFO/Bankura(N) 03242-250759
82.8 Bankura Beliatore Beliatore C Durgapur 22 km Train/Bus DFO/Bankura(N) 03242-250760
83.9 Bankura Amarkanan Gangajalghati B Bankura 20 km Train/Bus DFO/Bankura(N) 03242-250761
85 Bankura Hirbandh Hirbandh B Bankura 45 km Bus DFO/Bankura(S) 03242-250307
86.1 Bankura Motgoda Motgoda C Bankura 65 km Bus DFO/Bankura(S) 03242-250308
87.2 Bankura Ranibandh Ranibandh C Bankura 60 km Bus DFO/Bankura(S) 03242-250309
88.3 Bankura Simlapal Simlapal B Bankura 32 km Bus DFO/Bankura(S) 03242-250310
89.4 Bankura Sarenga Sarenga C Chandra 35 km Bus DFO/Bankura(S) 03242-250311
90.5 Bankura Bishnupur Bishnupur A&B Bishnupur 1 km Train DFO/Panchet 03244-252189
91.6 Bankura Joypur Joypur B Bishnupur 22 km Train/Bus DFO/Panchet 03244-252190
92.7 Bankura Asna Asna,Taldanga C Bishnupur 30 km Train/Bus DFO/Panchet 03244-252191
93.7 Bankura Bankadaha Bankadaha C Bishnupur 18 km Train/Bus DFO/Panchet 03244-252192
94.8 Birbhum Md. Bazar Md. Bazar B Birbhum 25 km Bus DFO/Birbhum 03462-255262
95.9 Birbhum Gonpur Gonpur C Saithia 15 km Train/Bus DFO/Birbhum 03462-255263
97 Birbhum Ballavpur Bolpur C Bolpur 4 km Train/Rickshaw DFO/Birbhum 03462-255264
98.1 Birbhum Chandrapur R H Chandrapur R H C Dubrajpur 15 km Train/Bus DFO/Birbhum 03462-255265
99.2 Birbhum Tumboni Tumboni, Rampurhat C Rampurhat 11 km Train/Bus DFO/Birbhum 03462-255266
100 Birbhum Suri Rest House at Chhora Bolpur C Suri 12 km Bus DFO/Birbhum 03462-255267
101 Paschim Midnapur Mandalpuskarini Garhbeta B Garhbeta 6 km Bus/Hired Vehicle DFO/Rupnarayan 03222-275494
102 Paschim Midnapur Amlagora Garhbeta B Garhbeta 2 km Bus/Hired Vehicle DFO/Rupnarayan 03222-275495
104 Paschim Midnapur Mahalisai Mahalisai B Chandrakona 24 km Bus/Hired Vehicle DFO/Rupnarayan 03222-275496
105 Paschim Midnapur Ruparghagra Ruparghagra C Chandrakona 50 km Bus/Hired Vehicle DFO/Rupnarayan 03222-275497
106 Paschim Midnapur Rangamati Rangamati C Midnapur 1 km Private car/Rickshaw DFO/Rupnarayan 03222-275498
107 Paschim Midnapur Chichra Chichra C Jhargram 22 km Train/Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
108 Paschim Midnapur Nayagram Nayagram C Jhargram 77 km Train/Bus DFO/Kharagpur 03222-277269
109 Paschim Midnapur Hijli Hijli A Kharagpur 5 km Train/Bus DFO/Kharagpur 03222-277270
110 Paschim Midnapur Hatibari Hatibari B Jhargram 70 km Train/Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
111 Paschim Midnapur Kankrajhore Kankrajhore B Jhargram 82 km Train/Bus/Jeep DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
112 Paschim Midnapur Balivasa Balivasa B Kharagpur 20 km Train/Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
113 Paschim Midnapur Kendugari Kendugari C Jhargram 34 km Train/Bus/Jeep DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
115 Paschim Midnapur Kanaisole Kanaisole C Jhargram 11 km Train/Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
116 Paschim Midnapur Banspahari Banspahari B Jhargram 83 km Train/Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


117 Paschim Midnapur Banaphool Jhargram C Jhargram 3 km Train/Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
118 Paschim Midnapur Belpahari Belpahari B Jhargram 40 km Train/Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
119 Paschim Midnapur Gopiballavpur Gapiballavpur B Jhargram 48 km Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
120 Paschim Midnapur Arabari Arabari A Salboni/C.K.Road 6 km Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
121 Paschim Midnapur Chandra Chandra C Midnapur 20 km Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
122 Paschim Midnapur Lalgarh Lalgarh C Midnapur 45 km Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
123 Paschim Midnapur Nayabasat Nayabasat C Chandrakona 6 km Bus DFO/Jhargram 03221-255010
124 Purba Medinipur Digha Digha A Tamluk/Kharagpur 70 km Train/Bus DFO/Kharagpur 03222-277269
125 Purba Medinipur Contai Contai C Tamluk/Kharagpur 60 km Train/Bus DFO/Kharagpur 03222-277269
127 Burdwan Panagarh Panagarh B Panagarh 1 km Train/Bus DFO/Burdwan 0342-2657172
128 Burdwan Aduria Panagarh B Panagarh 25 km Train/Bus DFO/Burdwan 0342-2657173
129 Burdwan Ausgram Gushkara C Gushkara 10 km Train/Bus DFO/Burdwan 0342-2657174
130 Burdwan Arrah Durgapur A Durgapur 5 km Train/Bus DFO/Burdwan 0342-2657175
131 Burdwan Ramnabagan A.F.R. B Burdwan 5 km Bus DFO/Burdwan 0342-2657176
132 Burdwan Maithon Maithon B Sitarampur 17 km Bus DFO/Durgapur 0343-2537229
133 Burdwan Tilaboni Ukhra C Durgapur 28 km Bus/Jeep DFO/Durgapur 0343-2537230
134 Nadia-Murshidabad Bethuadahari & Cottage Bethuadahari A&C Bethuadahari 3 km Bus DFO/Nadia-Msd 03472-252362
135 Nadia-Murshidabad Ranaghat Ranaghat C Ranaghat 2 km Rickshaw DFO/Nadia-Msd 03472-252363
136 Nadia-Murshidabad Berhampore Berhampore C Berhampore 2 km Rickshaw DFO/Nadia-Msd 03472-252364

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


137 Nadia-Murshidabad Bagdabra Farakka C Kotalpukur 1 km Rickshaw DFO/Nadia-Msd 03472-252365
139 24-Parganas (South) Bakkhali Bakkhali C Kakdwip 38 km Bus DFO/24-Pgs(S) 033-24799032
140 24-Parganas(North) Parmadan Bongaon S.F. C Ranaghat 30 km Bus DFO/24-Pgs(N) 033-25520968
141 Howrah S.F. Division Arambagh Arambagh/Chandur C Arambagh 10 km Bus DFO/Howrah 033-26411772

Kindly note that most of the Rest Houses are primarily used by Forest Officer & Other District Officers during inspection of works in the field.
Rate-Official Rs 25/- for all the rest houses for Forest Officers on Duty.
Dormitory-Rs 75/- for all categories of Dormitories,Rates should not be less than Rs 25/-per bed.
Categories:-
A= Rs. 500/- per room per day
B= Rs. 300/- per room per day
C= Rs. 200/- per room per day

129
Table – 17.4.i
District and Division wise information of Saw Mills and other
Wood Based Industries of West Bengal
District Forest Division No. of Licensed unit Annual installed capacity
of licensed units ( cum.)
1 2 3 4
Bankura Bankura (South) 29 6811
Bankura (North) 20 13800
Panchet SC Divn. 16 10000
Total 65 30611
Birbhum Birbhum 65 52650
Total 65 52650
Burdwan Burdwan 29 9457
Durgapur SF 84 35650
Total 113 45107
Cooch Behar Cooch Behar SF 101 37764
Total 101 37764
Darjeeling Darjeeling 3 5160
Kurseong 4 129
Kalimpong. Gen & Spl 1 1150
Total 8 6439
Hooghly Howrah SF 39 1195018
Total 39 1195018
Howrah Howrah SF 22 45255
Total 22 45255
Jalpaiguri Jalpaiguri 66 72557
Baikunthapur 77 97860
BTR(E) 6 6053
BTR(W) 11 16750
Wildlife III 8 15300
Total 168 208520
Malda Malda 90 49919
Total 90 49919
Murshidabad Nadia -Murshidabad 30 14988
Total 30 14988
Nadia Nadia -Murshidabad 48 38250
Total 48 38250
Paschim Medinipur & Medinipur 48 26243
Purba Medinipur Jhargram 17 9283
Rupnarayan 11 5176
Kharagpur 253 148500
Total 329 189202

130 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Purulia Purulia 11 3768
Kangsabati (N) 12 2013
Kangsabati(S) 9 891
Total 32 6672
Uttar Dinajpur & Raigunj 77 36422
Dakshin Dinajpur
Total 77 36423
24-Pgs.(North) 24-Pgs.(North) 42 59027
Total 42 59027
24-Pgs.(South) 24-Pgs.(South) 72 204000
STR --- ---
Total 72 204000
Kolkata Forest Utilisation Divn. 230 188186
Total 230 188186
GRAND TOTAL 1531 2408031

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 131


Table – 17.4.ii
Length of Forest Road as on 31.03.2012
(length in Km.)
District Name of Water Black top Cement Earthen Non- Total
Divisions bound Motorable Concrete Motorable
Macadam foot tracks
Darjeeling Darjeeling 6 13.3 -- 92 328 439.3
Kalimpong 35 201 -- 145 -- 381
Kurseong -- 6.84 -- -- 15.50 22.34
Wildlife-I -- 29.772 -- 35 250.525 365.297
Jalpaiguri Jalpaiguri 180 -- -- 59.09 180 419.09
Jalpaiguri SF 0.6 -- -- -- -- 0.6
Baikunthapur -- 8 -- 117 120 245
Wildlife-III 8 -- -- 91.5 226.5 326
Wildlife-II -- -- -- 161 139 300
B.T.R.(E) -- 55 -- 178 320 553
B.T.R.(W) -- 9 -- 150 300 459
Cooch Behar Cooch Behar 36 1 -- 37.5 25 99.5
Paschim Midnapur 39 -- -- -- -- 39
Medinipur Jhargram -- 270 -- 425 80 775
Kharagpur -- -- -- -- 30.5 30.5
Rupnarayan -- -- -- 136 40.5 176.5
Purba Purba Medinipur -- -- -- -- -- --
Medinipur
Bankura Bankura(N) -- 465 -- 175 197 837
Bankura(S) -- -- -- 10 -- 10
Panchet 520 200 -- 210 70 1000
Purulia Purulia -- -- 0.5 33 -- 33.5
Kangsa.North -- -- 50.5 211.45 -- 270.95
Kangsa.South -- -- -- 104 -- 104
Burdwan Burdwan -- -- -- 159.5 100 259.5
Durgapur -- -- -- -- 2.5 2.5
Birbhum Birbhum 20.5 -- -- 73 26 114.5
24-Pgs.(N) 24-Pgs.(N) -- -- 0.3 -- 3.5 3.8
24-Pgs.(S) 24-Pgs.(S) -- -- 1 3 2.31 6.31
S.T.R. -- -- -- -- -- --
Malda Malda -- -- -- -- -- --
U& D Dinajpur Raigunj -- -- -- 2 0.5 2.5
Howrah & Howrah SF -- -- -- -- -- --
Hoogly
Nadia & Nadia-Msd. -- -- -- 7.61 -- 7.61
Murshidabad
Total 841.1 1258.912 51.3 2615.65 2457.335 7224.297

132 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


Table – 17.5
Parks maintained by the DFO, Parks & Gardens ( North )
District Name of Park/Garden Location Area
(Acres)
Coochbehar 1. Narendra Narayan Park Coochbehar 13.62
2. Nilkuthi D.M.’s Bunglow 3.78
3. Keshab Ashram Udyan 2.17
4. Lansdown Hall Garden 1.33
5. Hirendra Narayan Park 0.32
6. Shib Temple Garden 0.03
7. Statue Garden 0.12
8. Sagardighi Sq. Garden. 0.01
9. Dist. Judges Bunglow 0.40
10. Circuit House Compound 0.50
11. Dak Bunglow Garden 0.28
12. Station Garden 0.79
13. Haldibari Park Haldibari 2.50

Jalpaiguri 1. Alipurduar Park Alipurduar 2.10


2. Teesta Udyan Jalpaiguri 4.45
3. Karala B. Beautification Jalpaiguri 2.00
4. Birpara Park Birpara 3.50
5. Falakata Park Falakata 1.23
6. Dhupguri Park Dhupguri 2.53
7. Banarhat Park Banarhat 3.00
8. Nagrakata Park Nagrakata 3.75
9. Maynaguri Park Maynaguri 2.00
10. Lataguri Park Lataguri 1.00
11. Kranti Park Kranti 2.00
12. Oodlabari Park Oodlabari 2.00
13. Mal Park Malbazar 6.10

Darjeeling 1. Siliguri Park Debgram 1.19


2. Padmaja Park N.B.University campus 20.00

Uttar Dinajpur 1. Islampur Park Islampur 2.03

Dakshin Dinajpur 1. Balurghat Children’s Park Balurghat 10.41

N.B. – One Park has been created at Cooch Behar Palace complex and is also being maintained by Cooch
Behar Division under direction of a Committee formed by the District Magistrate, Cooch Behar.

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 133


Table – 17.5.i
Parks & Beautification areas under the control of U R F Division
District Name of Park/Garden Location Area in
acre
Calcutta 1. Southern Avenue Southern Avenue 4.00
2. S.N. Park Barabazar 9.00
3. Eden Gardens Eden Garden 14.00
4. Jodhpur Park Calcutta 6.00
5. Niranjan Sishu Uddyan Naktala 0.50
6. Rabindra Sadan Calcutta 0.46
7. Writers’ Buildings Calcutta --

24-Parganas (N) 1. Lake Town Nursery/Garden Lake Town 1.00


2. Salt Lake Nursery Salt Lake 1.50
3. Banabitan Salt Lake 50.00
4. Jawaharkunj Garden Latbagan 19.00
5. Nabapalli Park Barasat 0.19
6. E.M.Byepass Nursery Near Ruby General Hospital --
7. Barasat Garden Barasat 2.55

Hooghly 1. Rabindra Bhawan Chinsura 0.75


2. Joy Krishna Library Uttarpara 0.12

Bankura 1. Sukumar Uddyan Bankura Town 3.54


2. Sonamukhi Park Sonamukhi 3.00
3. Chatna Park Chatna 1.95
4. Nehru Park Bankura Town 0.85
5. Indpur Park Indpur 1.75
6. Bishnupur Park Bishnupur 3.50

Purulia 1. Subhas Park 10.00


Purulia Town
2. Gandhi Park 0.50
3. Anandabazar R. Uddyan 11.00
4. Ambarish Smriti Uddyan 1.00
Napara (Hura)
5. Napara tree Park 1.00
6. Sahid Gobinda Chunaram S.Udyan Manbazar 0.17
7. Kuilapal Children Park Kuilapal 5.00

Midnapur 1. Parimal Kanan 4.00


Chandrakona Road
2. Arboratum 4.50
3. Sukumar Smriti Uddyan, Midnapur 9.00

Birbhum 1. Gandhi Park Rampurhat 13.98


2. Captive Garden Suri --

Burdwan 1. Children Park Katwa 1.05


2. Kalpataru Sishu Uddyan Burdwan Town 2.00

Nadia 1. Shantipur Rastriya Uddyan Santipur 6.00


2. Krishnagar Garden Krishnagar 1.00
3. Kalyani Picnic Garden 12.00
Kalyani
4. Kalyani Central Garden 2.00

134 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012


17.6
Supreme Court's Journey on Forest Conservation.
vJudicial intervention in forest conservation mainly started by mid 1990s.

vThe T.N Godavarman vs VOI case in SC is an example of the judiciary overstepping its constitutional
mandate. SC in its order of 12-12-1996 clarifies that the 'forest' word must be understood according to
the dictionary meaning and also include any area recorded as forest in the govt. record irrespective of
the ownership.

vThe orders in Centre for environmental law, WWF vs VOI are passed in 2000 prohibiting the
dereservation of any forest land, NP, Sanctuary without approval of SC.

vGoa Foundation Case-an interim order was passed directing that all projects which are located within
10km from boundaries of NP and Sanctuaries must be placed before the standing committee of
NBWL.

vIn A.Chowgule vs Goa Foundation Case Court stated that Reforestation is the restocking of existing
forests and woodlands which have been depleted with native tree stock, where as afforestation is the
process of restoring and recreating areas of woodlands of forest that once existed but were deforested
or otherwise removed or destroyed at some point in the post.

vNational Green Tribunal Act, was enacted in the year 2010. It has exlicit powers to hear matters
concerning the Forest Conservation Act, 1980.

vSupreme Court in its order dated 15-01-1998 directed that state should ensure sufficient budgetary
provisions for preservation of biodiversity and protection of wildlife. The Court prohibited the felling of
all sal trees (infected by sal borer) at Kanha National Park's buffer Zone. A similar issue also related to
Rajaji National Park situated in the state of Uttaranchal. An application was filled in the state of
Uttaranchal seeking permission for felling of 203 sal trees (infected by sal borer). The Court allowed the
extraction on the condition that it will be done under supervision of the scientists of Entomology
Division of FRI, Dehradun. On a similar issue, the Court clarified on 18-02-2002, that the order of the
Court prohibiting cutting of trees does not apply to bamboos including cane since they belong to grass
family.

vForest Advisory Committee plays a crucial role in forest related decision making in the country.
Recommendation of FAC is required for diversion of forest land for non-forestry purpose.

On 23-11-2001,Court directed MOEF to formulate a scheme whereby the responsibilities for CA


should be of user agency. A fund should be created called CA fund.

vOn 29-10-2002 the Court directed that CA fund shall be created in which all monies received from the
user agency will be put together. The fund will be administered through a body called CAMPA.

On 12-05-2001 Court issued detailed guidelines for the felling of tree in forest area as well as non-forest
area. All state shall follow the prescriptions and felling of trees shall be only in accordance with working
plans and schemes and/or felling schemes approved by MOEF.

vCEC (Central Empowered Committee) was set up in May, 2002 with a mandate to decide on
conservation issues including WPA. The diversion of forest land in Askot Wildlife Sanctuary in

STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012 135


Uttrakhand for construction of road by defense ministry was dealt by Court. The Court allowed the
diversion of forest land on the condition that 155 acres of forest land at Rajwala Cant. Will be handed
over to Forest Deptt which will act as an elephant corridore.

An Aravalli mining cases, Oct-2009, the Court was presented satellite images of Gurgaon and Mewat
which had been entirely devastated by mining. The state of Haryana contended before the Court that
complete suspension of mining of minor minerals would lead to scarcity of the building materials and
developmental activities will be hampered. It was suggested that an area of 600 ha. In the Faridabad district
should be identified of mining of minerals on conditions that state shall established on Aravalli Rehabilitation
Fund and monitoring Committee.

136 STATE FOREST REPORT - 2011-2012