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Chapter 8 :

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


Shear Friction
(Ref.2 ch.16)

Subjects:

8.1 – Shear Friction Chapter 8 - Shear Friction

8.2 – Composite Concrete Beams

Considering the shear strength of interfaces between


members or parts of members that can slip relative to one
another.
Among other cases, this includes the interface between a
beam and a slab cast later than the beam, but expected to
act in a composite manner. 2

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8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 The shear-carrying mechanism is known variously as
a. aggregate interlock,
b. interface shear transfer, or
c. shear friction. (this chapter)

 The interface on which the shears act is referred to as the shear


plane or slip plane.

 Three methods of computing shear transfer strengths have been


proposed in the literature:

1. Shear friction models,


2. Cohesion plus friction models, and
3. Horizontal shear models as occur in composite beams. 3

8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Shear friction models: ACI318-11 - Sect 11.6 ACI318.14 22.9
v: the ratio of the area of the transverse reinforcement across the
shear plane to the area of the shear Plane.

in terms of stresses

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: appropriate value of the coefficient of friction given in ACI Code Section
11.6.4.3 ACI318.14 22.9.4.2

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8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Shear friction models: ACI318-11 - Sect 11.6 ACI318.14 22.9
- Permanent Compression Force, perpendicular to the slip plane,
causes a normal stress on the slip plane in the concrete. If is
compressive, the normal stress adds to the compressive stress on the
concrete due to the reinforcement.

- If Tensile forces Nu, act on the shear plane, they must be


equilibrated by tensile reinforcement provided in addition to the
shear-friction reinforcement.

8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Shear friction models: Inclined Shear-Friction Reinforcement

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8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Other Factors Affecting Shear Transfer:
1. Lightweight concrete: the resistance to slip along the shear
plane is smaller for lightweight-concrete specimens than for
normal-weight concrete specimens. This effect has been
accounted for by multiplying the coefficient of friction, , by
the correction factor for lightweight concrete, given in
3ACI318.14 22.9.4.2

2. Coefficients of
Friction:

8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Design Rules in The ACI Code:

Upper Limit on Shear Friction, Min of:

Where Ac is the area of the concrete section 
resisting shear transfer
(normal concrete) 8

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8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Cohesion-plus-Friction Model:

8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


Example 16-1 - Ref[2]

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8.1 Shear Friction
8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction Chapter 8 - Shear Friction

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8.1 Shear Friction

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


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8.2 Composite Concrete Beam

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Computation of Horizontal Shear Stress:

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8.2 Composite Concrete Beam

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Computation of Horizontal Shear Stress:

Frequently, assuming that the slab and beam act as a monolithic unit

Precast or dropped beams combination is referred to as a composite

beam.

Case with composite beams where:

1. the beam is precast concrete or

2. other concrete cast at an earlier time than the slab.

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8.2 Composite Concrete Beam

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Shored or Unshored Construction:
ACI 17.2 ACI318.14 22.3.3.2 & 22.5.4.2 allow shored or unshored:

1. Unshored  precast beam support the selfweight and the be


considered as shoring for additional loads
2. Shored  precast beam is shored and supported by shoring
formwork system to carry out the total loads.

Tests have shown that the ultimate strength of a composite


beam is the same whether the member was shored or unshored
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during construction

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8.2 Composite Concrete Beam

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Horizontal Shear:
ACI 17.5 ACI318.14 16.4.4

Computation of Horizontal Shear Stress:

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8.2 Composite Concrete Beam

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Horizontal Shear:
ACI 17.5 ACI318.14 16.4.4
Computation of Horizontal Shear Stress:

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8.2 Composite Concrete Beam

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


 Horizontal Shear:
Tie for Horizontal Shear: ACI 17.5 ACI318.14 16.4.4(Minimum required)

The tie spacing shall not exceed four times the least dimension of the
supported element, which is usually the thickness of the slab, but not
more than 24 in. The ties must be fully anchored both in the beam
stem and in the slab.

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Important Chapter

Chapter 8 - Shear Friction


Chapter 9 – [Ref 2 - ch17]
Discontinuity Regions &
Strut-and-Tie
Models

Chapter 10 – [Ref 2 - ch18]


Walls &
Shear Walls

Chapter 11 – [Ref 2 - ch19]


Design 20

for Earthquake Resistance

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