You are on page 1of 4

Modern English part II—Sentence & Complex Structures

Exercises for Non-native Speakers


1-5 ABRIDGEMENTS IN CLAUSES OF SHORT AGREEMENT

pp. 11~13

Clauses may be shortened by substituting an auxiliary for an entire predicate.


Such abridgement is especially common in clauses of short agreement or
disagreement.

John likes the movies, and his wife does too.


John likes the movies, and so does his wife.
John doesn’t like the movies, and his wife doesn’t either.
John doesn’t like the movies, and neither does his wife.
John likes the movies, but his wife doesn’t.
John doesn’t like the moves, but his wife does.

Note the reversal of subject and auxiliary after so, neither.

A. Use the words in parentheses to make a short statement of agreement.


Give the forms of agreement with too or either.
EXAMPLE: a. The walls are painted white. (the ceiling)
The walls are painted white, and the ceiling is too.
b. The geometry books haven’t arrived. (the algebra books)
The geometry books haven’t arrived, and the algebra books
haven’t, either.

1. Your sister called today. (your brother)


Your sister called today, and your brother did too.
2. Mary finished her homework early. (Jane)
Mary finished her homework early, and Jane did too.
3. The rugs haven’t been cleaned yet. (the drapes)
The rugs haven’t been cleaned yet, and the drapes haven’t either.
4. My country wants peace. (all the other countries)
My country wants peace, and all the other countries do too.
5. A hawk can fly. (a dove)
A hawk can fly, and a dove can too.
6. Their car won’t start in this cold. (ours)
Their car won’t start in this cold, and ours won’t either.
7. The students enjoyed the play. (their teacher)

Page 1 of 5
Modern English part II—Sentence & Complex Structures
Exercises for Non-native Speakers
1-5 ABRIDGEMENTS IN CLAUSES OF SHORT AGREEMENT

The students enjoyed the play, and their teacher did too.
8. Jean dances very gracefully. (her sisters)
Jean dances very gracefully, and her sisters do too.
9. I’ve never read that book. (my friend)
I’ve never read that book, and my friend hasn’t either.
10. The younger students have already been fed. (the older students)
The younger students have already been fed, and the older students
have too.
11. That apple isn’t ripe. (this apple)
That apple isn’t ripe, and this apple isn’t either.
12. My friends failed the examination. (I)
My friends failed the examination, and I did too.
13. We don’t need any help. (she)
We don’t need any help, and she doesn’t either.
14. A woman was hurt in the accident. (Her two daughters)
A woman was hurt in the accident, and her two daughters were too.

B. Use the sentences in A to make the alternate forms of agreement with so


or neither. Keep in mind that the subject and the auxiliary must be reversed.
EXAMPLE: a. The walls are painted white. (the ceiling)
The walls are painted white, and so is the ceiling.
b. The geometry books haven’t arrived. (the algebra books)
The geometry books haven’t arrived, and neither have the
algebra books.

1. Your sister called today. (your brother)


Your sister called today, and so did your brother.
2. Mary finished her homework early. (Jane)
Mary finished her homework early, and so did Jane.
3. The rugs haven’t been cleaned yet. (the drapes)
The rugs haven’t been cleaned yet, and neither have the drapes.
4. My country wants peace. (all the other countries)
My country wants peace, and so do all the other countries.

Page 2 of 5
Modern English part II—Sentence & Complex Structures
Exercises for Non-native Speakers
1-5 ABRIDGEMENTS IN CLAUSES OF SHORT AGREEMENT

5. A hawk can fly. (a dove)


A hawk can fly, and so can a dove.
6. Their car won’t start in this cold. (ours)
Their car won’t start in this cold, and neither will ours.
7. The students enjoyed the play. (their teacher)
The students enjoyed the play, and so did their teacher.
8. Jean dances very gracefully. (her sisters)
Jean dances very gracefully, and so do her sisters.
9. I’ve never read that book. (my friend)
I’ve never read that book, and neither has my friend.
10. The younger students have already been fed. (the older students)
The younger students have already been fed, and so have
the older students.
11. That apple isn’t ripe. (this apple)
That apple isn’t ripe, and neither is this apple.
12. My friends failed the examination. (I)
My friends failed the examination, and so did I.
13. We don’t need any help. (she)
We don’t need any help, and neither does she.
14. A woman was hurt in the accident. (Her two daughters)
A woman was hurt in the accident, and so were her two daughters.

C. Supply the appropriate auxiliary, then restate the sentence by reversing


the positive-negative contrast.
EXAMPLE: a. He goes swimming every day, but his sister doesn’t.
He doesn’t go swimming every day, but his sister does.
b. The cat doesn’t like to be in the snow, but the dog does.
The cat likes to be in the snow, but the dog doesn ’t.

1. These books belong to me, but those …


These books belong to me, but those don’t.
These books don’t belong to me, but those do.
2. The first bus didn’t arrive on time, but the second one …

Page 3 of 5
Modern English part II—Sentence & Complex Structures
Exercises for Non-native Speakers
1-5 ABRIDGEMENTS IN CLAUSES OF SHORT AGREEMENT

The first bus didn’t arrive on time, but the second one did.
The first bus arrived on time, but the second one didn’t.
3. Marie will come to the party, but her husband …
Marie will come to the party, but her husband won’t.
Marie won’t come to the party, but her husband will.
4. The large picture looks good over the sofa, but the small one …
The large picture looks good over the sofa, but the small one doesn’t.
The large picture doesn’t look good over the sofa, but the small one does.
5. This room isn’t well lit, but that one …
This room isn’t well lit, but that one is.
This room is well lit, but that one isn’t.
6. The green dress can be washed by hand, but the blue one …
The green dress can be washed by hand, but the blue one can’t.
The green dress can’t be washed by hand, but the blue one can.
7. Her father liked her new boyfriend, but her mother …
Her father liked her new boyfriend, but her mother didn’t.
Her father didn’t like her new boyfriend, but her mother did.
8. I can ice stake, but my friend …
I can ice stake, but my friend can’t.
I can’t ice stake, but my friend can.
9. Her sister will bring the children, but her brother …
Her sister will bring the children, but her brother won’t.
Her sister won’t bring the children, but her brother will.
10. This pot leaks, but that one …
This pot leaks, but that one doesn’t.
This pot doesn’t leak, but that one does.
11. She has never been to Europe, but her children …
She has never been to Europe, but her children have.
She has ever been to Europe, but her children haven’t.
12. The salesgirls in this store are helpful, but those in the next store …
The salesgirls in this store are helpful, but those in the next store aren’t.
The salesgirls in this store aren’t helpful, but those in the next store are.

Page 4 of 5