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Unit: What is a harvest festival?

Term: Autumn 2
Year: 1
Contents Page
Page Page Page
Number Number Number

Subject Summaries 1 English Lesson 8/20 28 Music Lesson Plans 42-44


Links 2 English Lesson 9/20 29 Music Lead Lesson 1/4 42-43
Resources 3 English Lesson 10/20 29 Music Lesson 2/4 44
Programme of Study 4-8 English Lesson 11/20 30 Music Lesson 3&4/4 44
Unit Overview 9 English Lesson 12/20 30 Art and Design Lesson Plans 45-47
Week 1 Medium Term Planning 10-11 English Lesson 13/20 31 Art and Design Lead Lesson 1/4 45
Week 1 English Medium Term Planning 12 English Lesson 14/20 31 Art and Design Lesson 2/4 46
Week 2 Medium Term Planning 13 English Lesson 15/20 32 Art and Design Lesson 3&4/4 47
Week 2 English Medium Term Planning 14 English Lesson 16/20 33 Design and Technology Lesson Plans 48-50
Week 3 Medium Term Planning 15 English Lesson 17/20 34 Design and Technology Lesson 1/4 48
Week 3 English Medium Term Planning 16 English Lesson 18/20 34 Design and Technology Lesson 2/4 49
Week 4 Medium Term Planning 17-18 English Lesson 19/20 35 Design and Technology Lesson 3&4/4 50
Week 4 English Medium Term Planning 19 English Lesson 20/20 35 Computing Lesson Plans 51-52
Other Ideas 20 Mathematics Lesson Plans 36-37 Computing Lead Lesson 1/4 51
Unit Launch Lesson 21-22 Using and Applying linked Maths Lesson 1/4 36 Computing Lesson 2/4 51
English Lesson Plans 23-35 Using and Applying linked Maths Lesson 2/4 36 Computing Lesson 3/4 52

English Lead Lesson 1/20 23-24 Using and Applying linked Maths Lesson 3/4 37 Computing Lesson 4/4 52

English Lesson 2/20 24 Using and Applying linked Maths Lesson 4/4 37 Unit Conclusion 53

English Lesson 3/20 25 History Lesson Plans 38-41 Parent Support Activities 53

English Lesson 4/20 25 History Lead Lesson 1/4 38 Standalone Mathematics Overview 54-57
English Lesson 5/20 26 History Lesson 2/4 39

English Lesson 6/20 27 History Lesson 3/4 40

English Lesson 7/20 27 History Lesson 4/4 41

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Summaries
What is a
harvest
English
Art and Design • Pupils get their hands dirty as they handle root vegetables festival?
• Pupils practise sketching and drawing listening to the story of the Gigantic Turnip and take part in
leaves in preparation for leaf print several role play sketches and sequence and predict
designs. events in the story.
• Use leaf print design ideas to create • Learn about capital letters at the start of names and days
print blocks on polystyrene tiles. of the week when they write invitations to the farmer’s
• Create a sheet of leaf print wrapping feast. Music
paper and compare similarities and • Write shopping lists for a Harvest or autumn themed party, • Pupils chant and sing a familiar rhyme,
differences with other designs. ingredients lists for a recipe and look at instructions. followed by singing a new song to a
• Invent party game rules and instructions. tune they already know.
• Write thank you notes in role as the mouse from the • Experiment with singing the same lyrics
Gigantic Turnip story of a harvest or autumn song along to
two different tunes.
• Rehearse and perform a mini-concert of
autumn poems, rhymes and songs.

History Computing
• Pupils find out about where we buy our
food from and where it grows. They • Pupils create their own version of
explore how this has changed over time. a harvest story using a
• Pupils find out about Richard Hawker who computerised paint programme
first introduced the idea of a harvest and a desktop publisher.
festival.
• Pupils find out about food production in Design and Technology
wartime and the role children played in
this.
Applied Maths • Pupils touch, sniff and taste a range of fruit
and vegetables, discussing what makes
• Estimate small amounts them healthy.
• Write numerals to 20 and beyond • Produce several design ideas for appealing,
• Represent numbers with concrete healthy snacks.
resources • Make a healthy snack, selecting fruit and
• Sing number songs vegetables that will appeal to a young child.
• Make repeating patterns with shapes

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Links

What is a harvest festival?


Harvest is the theme with plenty of hands-on Outdoor Learning
exploration, singing and study. They use fruit veg
and leaves as a source of inspiration for their own
wrapping paper.
 • Any links with farming, allotments can be brought into this Unit for seeing how
vegetables look. Visits to gardens with vegetable collections such as Heligan in
Cornwall would work.
This ‘harvest’ Unit comes alive with songs and
party related activities such as invitations, games,
thank you notes and, of course, food!
Pupils observe and handle harvest produce,
considering where it comes from, how healthy it is
and how it reaches our tables. They consider
National and International links
healthy and appealing snacks for younger
children, investigate tastes and combinations and
set out to design and create their own original
 • Any links with schools in other countries where they have different harvests would
be interesting.
snack.
The ‘Gigantic Turnip’ is the key text in English
and pupils engage in insightful discussion and
role play around characters’ feelings and to
predict future events. Sequencing, ordering,
writing instructions and writing a thank you note Links to the world of work
feature in English lessons and pupils also develop
and try out their own original party games.
In History, children learn how Britain fed its
 • Farmers, greengrocers, farm veg distributers, gardeners, caterers, fresh food
production, canning/bottling, preserve makers, school dinner providers, party
planners, event organisers.
people during World War II, Dig for Victory and
rationing, the role of women and children on
wartime farms. Links are made between wartime
and modern foods and pupils produce their own
‘historical’ and ‘modern’ snacks.
Harvest and Autumn songs, poems and rhymes

Links to learning and life skills
appear throughout the Unit and pupils can
perform these during a mini concert to a chosen • Let’s communicate
audience in the Unit conclusion. • Let’s try to agree

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Resources What is a harvest festival?
Music
• Alternative version
Art and Design
• Selection of interestingly shaped fruit and
of ‘The Grand Old Launch Lesson
Duke of York’
vegetables • Basket of produce or photographs of produce
(included in lesson
• Sketch books (available on the internet)
plan)
• Pencils • Photographs and video clips showing crops being
harvested (available on the internet)
• Small rectangular sheet of card
• Small rectangular sections of a polystyrene tile • Lyrics and tune for the harvest song ‘Cauliflowers
fluffy’ (available on the internet)
• Blunt pencils
• Farm machinery toys such as tractor and combine
Applied Maths
• Water colour paints: red, blue, yellow, black and • Basket of fruit and vegetables
harvester (if available)
white • Paper leaves or fruit and
• Ink rollers & trays vegetable shapes
• Printing ink – red, blue, yellow, black and white
• Big sheets of plain white paper

Design and Technology


• A selection of fruits and vegetables Computing
• Tasty fruity snacks
• Electronic painting or
• Pictures of tasty fruit and vegetable snacks
drawing programme
• Sketchbooks
English • Pencils, paints, brushes
• Desk top publishing
programme
• An age appropriate version of ‘The Giant Turnip’ e.g. ‘The Gigantic Turnip’ by • Camera • Voice recording apparatus
Aleksei Tolstoy, illustrated by Niamh Sharkey, Barefoot Books 1998/2005 ISBN • Equipment/ingredients for making a healthy snack – such as’ talking tins’
1-905236-58-1 plastic safety knives, chopping boards, aprons etc.
• Some real raw turnips, peas, carrots, potatoes and beans for pupils to handle
and explore, ideally still with their tops or in their pods and with some
evidence of mother earth adhering to the root vegetables!
• A suitable PowerPoint or YouTube animation of the Gigantic Turnip – follow
this Google link for a good example
History
• Laminated cards showing different scenes from the story of The Gigantic • Photographs of children helping out on the farm in wartime
Turnip. Some of the images captured in the previous lesson’s activity could be (available on the internet)
incorporated here. • Grains of rice or cereal
• Range of invitation cards • Biography and photographs of
• Set of simple instructions for preparing a tasty dessert for harvest or Autumn- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Stephen_Hawker
themed party, i.e. baked apple stuffed with juicy sultanas • ‘What’s for Tea?’ story – see resources zip
• Simple recipe • Magazine photographs of different food and drink items.
• 200g of boiled sweets

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Programme of Study

Unit: What is a harvest festival? Please note that all appendices and guidelines referred to in the
Year: 1 programme of study are available to download at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-curriculum
Term: Autumn 2
The POS codes replace the DfE bullets for ease of reference.

Spoken Language

SL1 listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers


SL2 ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
SL3 use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
SL4 articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
SL5 give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings
SL6 maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
English

SL7 use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
SL8 speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
SL9 participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates
SL10 gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
SL11 consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
SL12 select and use appropriate registers for effective communication

These statements apply to all Years. The content should be taught as a level appropriate to the age of the pupils (taken from notes and guidance [non-
statutory]). Speaking and listening activities throughout the Unit have been designed with these POS statements in mind. Specific speaking and listening
objectives are provided for some English lessons where appropriate.

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Reading - word reading


WR1 apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words
respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative
WR2
sounds for graphemes

WR3 read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught

WR4 read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word

WR6 read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs
read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work
WR8
out words
WR9 re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading
English

Reading - comprehension

RC1 develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, and understanding by:

RC1.1 listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently

RC1.2 being encouraged to link what they read or hear read to their own experiences

RC1.3 becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling them and considering their particular characteristics
RC1.4 recognising and joining in with predictable phrases
RC1.6 discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known
RC2 understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by:

RC2.1 drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher

RC2.2 checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading
RC3 participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to what others say
RC4 explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them

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Writing - composition
WC1 write sentences by:
WC1.1 saying out loud what they are going to write about
WC1.2 composing a sentence orally before writing it
WC1.4 re-reading what they have written to check that it makes sense
WC2 discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils
English

WC3 read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher
Writing - vocabulary, grammar and punctuation
(covered when following Inspire SPG http://theinspirecurriculum.co.uk/product/spag-for-the-inspire-curriculum)
WVGP1 develop their understanding of the concepts set out in English Appendix 2 by:
WVGP1.1 leaving spaces between words
WVGP1.2 joining words and joining clauses using and
WVGP1.3 beginning to punctuate sentences using a capital letter and a full stop, question mark or exclamation mark
WVGP1.4 using a capital letter for names of people, places, the days of the week and the personal pronoun ‘I’

Multiplication and division


1 solve simple one-step problems involving multiplication and division, calculating the answer using concrete objects, pictorial representations and
arrays with the support of the teacher
Fractions
1 recognise, find and name a half as one of two equal parts of an object, shape or quantity
Maths

2 recognise, find and name a quarter as one of four equal parts of an object, shape or quantity
Geometry: properties of shapes
1 recognise and name common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including:
1.1 2-D shapes (e.g. rectangles (including squares), circles and triangles)
1.2 3-D shapes (e.g. cuboids (including cubes), pyramids and spheres).
Geometry: position, direction, motion
1 describe position, direction and movement, including whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns

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1 changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life
events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally (e.g. the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight or events
2
commemorated through festivals or anniversaries)
History

the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare
3 aspects of life in different periods (e.g. Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-
Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell)

4 significant historical events, people and places in their own locality

1 use their voices expressively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes
Music

2 play tuned and untuned instruments musically


Art & Design

2 to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination

to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space
3

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Design
1 design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and
2
Design & Technology

communication technology
Make
3 select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing)
select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their
4
characteristics
Evaluate
5 explore and evaluate a range of existing products
6 evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria
Cooking & Nutrition
9 use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes
10 understand where food comes from
Computing

4 use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns
6
about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Unit Overview

Harvest and its wonderful bounty of colourful fruit and vegetables is the theme that runs throughout this Unit, with pupils having the opportunity for plenty of hands-on
exploration, singing and study. They can profit from the abundance of leaves at this time of the year and use them as a source of inspiration for their own wrapping
paper covered in leaf print designs.

This ‘harvest’ Unit comes alive with songs and party related activities such as invitations, games, thank you notes and, of course, food!
Pupils observe and handle an array of harvest produce, considering where it comes from, how healthy it is and how it reaches our tables. They consider the
attributes of a healthy and appealing snack for younger children and, having investigated tastes and combinations for themselves, they set out to design and create
their own original snack, which they ultimately prepare and share before considering how they could make it even better next time!

The story of the ‘Gigantic Turnip’ is the key text in English and after listening to it pupils are encouraged to engage in insightful discussion and role play around
characters’ feelings and to predict future events. Sequencing, ordering, writing instructions and writing a thank you note feature in English lessons linked to the
Gigantic Turnip and harvest and pupils also develop and try out their own original party games.

In History pupils find out about where we buy the food we eat and how this has changed over time. They learn about the Rev. Richard Hawker and how he introduced
the concept of Harvest festivals in the Christian church. The explore how children played a role in food production in the past.
Harvest and Autumn songs, poems and rhymes appear throughout the Unit and pupils can perform these during a mini concert to a chosen audience in the Unit
conclusion.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Medium Term Planning Week 1 Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Week 1hr = approx time

 Pupils are introduced to the theme of harvest during the Launch lesson where they learn to sing a popular harvest song and they get their hands on a range of harvest produce. They think about how the
produce is gathered at source and the journey it takes before reaching them. Pupils have an opportunity to get their hands dirty once again as they handle root vegetables in English before listening to the
story of the Gigantic Turnip. They take part in several role play sketches and sequence and predict events in the story, considering how characters may be feeling. They also learn about capital letters at
the start of names and days of the week when they write invitations to the farmer’s feast.
 In History pupils learn about the Dig for Victory campaign in an introduction to their work in this Unit on how Britain fed itself during World War Two. They are encouraged to arouse all of their senses in
Design and Technology when they touch, sniff and taste a range of fruit and vegetables, discussing what makes them healthy. This is the springboard for a design and make task which will culminate in an
appealing and healthy snack for younger children later in the Unit.
 Music finds pupils chanting and then singing a familiar rhyme, followed by singing a new song to a tune they already know, whilst Art and Design gives them a chance to practise sketching and drawing
leaves in preparation for leaf print designs next week.

Please see over for all other subjects and English Medium Term Planning Week 1

Launch Lesson
2 hrs

Objectives:
I am learning to:
− sing a simple song in tune and with good vocal expression
− describe where food comes from and what happens at harvest time

Outcomes:
Pupils will:
− sing a simple song comprised of three verses and a chorus
− use vocal expression and physical actions to enhance performance
− know that food is grown on farms and that harvest is when ripened crops are gathered in

Success Criteria:
Remember to:
− sing the words to the song clearly and in tune
− use my voice to make the words of the song sound interesting
− add hand and body actions to make my song even more interesting
− discuss where food comes from and what happens on a farm at harvest time

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Medium Term Planning Week 1 continued Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class
Week 1hr = approx time Please see over for English Medium Term Planning Week 1
 Pupils are introduced to the theme of harvest during the Launch lesson where they learn to sing a popular harvest song and they get their hands on a range of harvest produce. They think about how the
produce is gathered at source and the journey it takes before reaching them. Pupils have an opportunity to get their hands dirty once again as they handle root vegetables in English before listening to the
story of the Gigantic Turnip. They take part in several role play sketches and sequence and predict events in the story, considering how characters may be feeling. They also learn about capital letters at
the start of names and days of the week when they write invitations to the farmer’s feast.
 In History pupils learn about where we get our food from and how this has changed over the years. They are encouraged to arouse all of their senses in Design and Technology when they touch, sniff and
taste a range of fruit and vegetables, discussing what makes them healthy. This is the springboard for a design and make task which will culminate in an appealing and healthy snack for younger children
later in the Unit.
 Music finds pupils chanting and then singing a familiar rhyme, followed by singing a new song to a tune they already know, whilst Art and Design gives them a chance to practise sketching and drawing
leaves in preparation for leaf print designs next week. In computing pupils use a computerised paint programme to draw small sketches for their own version of a harvest story .

History Applied Mathematics Art and Design Music Computing Design and Technology
2hrs 1hr 1hr 1hr 1hr 1hr

Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives:


I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to:
− recognise where different food − make estimates of the − sketch a variety of − chant a simple − organise, store, − understand where food comes from
items come from number of objects in the different leaf shapes rhyme manipulate and − recognise why healthy food is important to our bodies
− think about the importance of a basket − create a print design idea − sing together the retrieve data in a − sample fruits and vegetables and combine tastes
successful harvest in food − count objects in different based on my sketches words of a simple range of digital together
production ways song clearly and in formats − consider what makes a healthy and appealing snack,
− write numbers on labels tune evaluating a range of existing snacks

Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes:


Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will:
− know that nearly all food comes − reliably count and make − discuss the shapes of − sing a song based − plan, save and − taste a selection of fruits and vegetables
from something that has been labels for objects in a harvest fruit and on a well-known record text which − experiment with combinations of fruits and vegetables
grown basket vegetables nursery rhyme tells the story of a − look at and discuss the appeal of existing snacks for
− count the objects in − draw some sketches of the harvest younger pupils
different ways, such as in different shapes in their − choose a snack type to design next time
twos and fives sketchbooks − recognise the importance of fruit and vegetables in our
− create a design idea for diet
their printing block

Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria:
Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to:
− look carefully at photos of food − estimate the number of − observe the shape and − sing clearly and in − develop and save − use all senses when handling different fruit and
to identify if they have been objects in basket and give colour of different fruit and tune a series of pictures vegetables
grown or made reasons vegetables − sing together as a for an event − experiment with different flavours
think about what the food I eat − accurately count objects − make some pencil group − decide what makes a snack appealing
every day is made of − write numbers correctly sketches of them in my − adapt examples to make them more appealing to
sketchbook young children
− use ideas from my
sketchbook for my design

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English Medium Term Planning Week 1 Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Day 1 1hr Day 2 1hr Day 3 1hr Day 4 1hr Day 5 1hr

Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives:


I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to:
− listen to and talk about stories I can’t − recall the main events of a story in − predict what might happen on the − use a capital letter for the names of − use a capital letter for days of the
yet read for myself order basis of what has been read so far people week
− build new stores of words − retell a story in an audible voice − take part in drama activities − say out loud what I am going to write − say out loud what I am going to write
− predict what might be going to about before I write it about before I write it
happen next in a story − write lists − re-read what I have written to make
− take part in drama activities sure it makes sense
− spell the days of the week

Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes:


Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will:
− make predictions based on what − work with a partner to sequence − work with a partner to improvise new − write a guest list for a harvest − write a party invitation
they have seen or heard so far events scenes for the story supper feast − orally rehearse their ideas before
− work in role with a partner − work with a partner to retell the story writing
− talk about characters’ feelings − read their writing back cumulatively to
check for sense

Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria:
Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to:
− think about how characters might be − speak clearly and loudly so that my − use what I know about the − start each name with a capital letter − use capital letters for names and
feeling partner can hear me characters to help me imagine what days of the week
− use my new feelings words to talk − use the pictures to help me happens next − say what I want to write before I write
about the characters remember what happens in our story − listen to my partners ideas and it
share my own − read my writing back from the
beginning to check it makes sense

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Medium Term Planning Week 2 Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Week 2hr = approx time Please see over for English Medium Term Planning Week 2
• Pupils begin English lessons by writing a shopping list for a harvest or Autumn themed party. This leads in to writing ingredients lists for a recipe and then looking at instructions, which they unjumble and
order correctly.
• In History this week they find out about the Rev. Richard Hawker who first introduced the idea of a harvest festival to the UK.
• In Art and Design pupils use their leaf print design ideas to create print blocks on polystyrene tiles and in Design and Technology they produce several design ideas for appealing, healthy snacks and after
some shared discussion they produce their final design idea ready for making next lesson.
• Music gives pupils the chance to experiment with singing the same lyrics of a harvest or Autumn song along to two different tunes.
• Pupils continue to develop pictures to tell their chosen harvest story in computing.

History 2hrs Applied Mathematics 1hr Art and Design 1hr Music 1hr Computing 1hr Design and Technology 1hr

Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives:


I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to:
− explain why we celebrate harvest − sing songs and rhymes which − make a printing block − sing the same − organise, store, − design an appealing product for a young
festivals involve counting on − transfer my design idea onto a lyrics to two manipulate and child
− know who first began celebrating − order numbers from 1-20 and printing block different tunes retrieve data in a − create some design ideas
harvest in the Christian church beyond range of digital − discuss strengths and weaknesses of a
− identify written numbers and formats design idea
show their value

Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes:


Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will:
− know who Robert Stephen − know the names and be able − draw their design onto their − learn to sing a − plan, save and − design healthy fruit and vegetable
Hawker was and what he did to order numbers 1-20 printing block song lyric to its record text which snacks in sketchbooks
− create a thank you card for their − recognise the numbers in the − choose a colour for their design traditional tune tells the story of a − draw and then talk about their designs
favourite food count and identify patterns idea and to an harvest − choose a design idea as a team
− work out how to create the colour alternative tune
by mixing primary colours or
adding black or white to darken or
lighten shade

Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria:
Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to:
− look carefully at the photographs − identify numbers that are − copy my design idea carefully onto − listen carefully to − develop and save a − sketch several ideas to choose from
especially at the peoples clothes important to me the printing block the tunes series of pictures for − create a design that will appeal to a
− think about your favourite food − join in the rhymes and count − mark the reverse of my printing − remember which an event young child
and why you are grateful for it accurately block with a ‘T’ along the top edge tune I am − talk about what is good and not so good
− put numbers in the right order to remind myself which way round singing about the designs
− say the names of numbers to place it when printing − say which tune I − listen and act on feedback
like best − produce a final design idea that can be
made next time

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English Medium Term Planning Week 2 Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Day 6 1hr Day 7 1hr Day 8 1hr Day 9 1hr Day 10 1hr

Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives:


I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to:
− write lists − participate in discussion about what − begin to punctuate sentences using − begin to punctuate sentences using − begin to punctuate sentences using
− say out loud what I am going to write is read to me a capital letter and a full stop, a capital letter and a full stop, a capital letter and a full stop
before I write it − take turns speaking and listening to question mark or exclamation mark question mark or exclamation mark − follow simple instructions
− re-read what I have written to make what others have to say
sure it makes sense − identify key features of a text

Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes:


Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will:
− contribute ideas for a shared list − use their knowledge of instructions − write an ingredients list − write an ingredients list − contribute suggestions for
− write their own list to help them identify which texts are − write or unscramble two or more − write or unscramble two or more unscrambling muddled instructions
sets of instructions (and which are instructions instructions − unscramble a muddled set of
not) instructions independently
− explain how they made their yes/no
decision about each text
− contribute ideas for a toolkit of
features

Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria:
Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to:
− offer suggestions for our shared − use what I know about how − check my teacher’s modelled writing − check my teacher’s modelled writing − explain why I think the muddled
write instructions look on the page to help against our toolkit against our toolkit instructions should go in the order I
− use my teacher’s list to help me me decide which texts are − use our toolkit and my teacher’s − use our toolkit and my teacher’s suggest
write my own instructions and which are not modelled writing to support my own modelled writing to support my own − use what I already know about
− say my ideas for our toolkit loudly writing writing instructions to help me with the task
enough for others to hear

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Medium Term Planning Week 3 Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Week 3hr = approx time Please see over for English Medium Term Planning Week 3
• A harvest or Autumn themed party needs some party games, so this week in English pupils invent their own party game rules and instructions for this event. They begin by trying out their ideas for new games
with spoken instructions. These are developed into written instructions which are trialled as party games and evaluated for success at the end of the week.
• In this week’s History lesson the pupils think about the role that children have played in gathering the harvest in the past .
• Food is also at the centre of Design and Technology which culminates in a two hour ‘make’ and ‘evaluate’ healthy snacks session. (Design and Technology could take place this week, or instead in Week 4 and
will need to take place during the opposite week to the longer Art and Design lesson i.e. Do DT one week and Art the other, as both final lessons are 2 hours long).
• Pupils choose or mix their ink colours in Art and Design and then use their leaf print tiles to produce a sheet of leaf print wrapping paper. Once dry, they evaluate their own designs and skills, and compare
similarities and differences with other people’s designs. Music time is spent practising Autumn/harvest poems, rhymes and songs in preparation for a mini concert.
• In computing pupils use a word processing program to decide upon the text or message for each part of their harvest story.

History Applied Mathematics Art and Design Music Computing Design and Technology
2hrs 1hr (2hrs this or next week) 1hr 1hr (2hrs this or next week)

Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives:


I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to:
− describe differences in the lives of − sing songs and rhymes which − use a printing block to − perform − organise, store, − make a healthy snack, selecting fruit and vegetables that
children past and present involve counting on and back make a repeating singing manipulate and will appeal to a young child
− explain why many children were − identify written numbers 1-20 design retrieve data in a − select and use tools and equipment safely
allowed to take time off school in and place them on a number − evaluate my design range of digital − evaluate my own and others’ products
wartime line formats

Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes:


Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will:
− know that children played a part in − count on and back (up to 10) − mix colours to achieve − rehearse, − plan, save and − choose fruit and vegetables to match their design
helping to make sure there was − know the names and be able oranges and browns ready to record text which − select suitable tools and use them safely and skilfully
enough food to eat in wartime to order numbers 1-20 − use their printing block perform a tells the story of − explain their choice of tools
− be able to say why children were to create a clear and variety of a harvest − make their snacks
allowed to take time off school carefully positioned autumn songs − sample the end products, deciding on their success
− describe the kind of work children did printed image to a small
on the farm in wartime − use their printing block audience
know that in some part of the world to create a design that
children still help out on farms and in repeats itself
food production

Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Success Criteria: Success Criteria:
Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Criteria: Remember to: Remember to:
− look carefully at photos to find clues − join in the rhymes and count − press firmly down on Remember to: − decide the text − make a snack that will appeal to a young child, especially
about life in the past on and back accurately the printing block − sing clearly or message for in colour and taste
− use correct historical vocabulary − read numbers and place them − lift the printing block − sing tunefully each part of the − select tools carefully, using them as shown and with safety
(gleaning, harvest, wartime) in the right order off the paper carefully − sing together story which is in mind
− give reasons why I think children − avoid overlap when − smile and represented by − ask others for their opinions
enjoyed (or did not enjoy) working on placing the block on stand up the pictures − clear up
the farm the paper again straight − consider what needs to change if making the snack again

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English Medium Term Planning Week 3 Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Day 11 1hr Day 12 1hr Day 13 1hr Day 14 1hr Day 15 1hr

Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives:


I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to:
− say out loud what I want to write − think through and give clear − compose a sentence orally before − compose a sentence orally before − read my writing aloud clearly
− understand that instructions come in instructions writing it writing it enough to be heard by everyone
various forms − re-read what I have written to check − re-read what I have written to check − re-read what I have written to check − follow simple instructions
− contribute to a set of instructions for it makes sense it makes sense it makes sense − evaluate my own writing
a game I know well

Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes:


Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will:
− participate in a game and suggest − work with a partner or in a three to − offer suggestions for a shared set of − offer suggestions for a shared set of − read their instructions to the class
instructions for new players in an invent a simple game instructions instructions and help others to follow them
audible voice − generate oral instructions for their − write their own simple sequence of − write their own sequence of − participate when others are reading
− explain how rules for a game are game instructions instructions their instructions
instructions too, like recipes are − teach their invented game to − decide what needs to be changed or
another pair or three improved based on watching others
− learn another game from a different try to follow their instructions
pair or three

Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria:
Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to:
− use what I know about how the − check that my instructions make − say what I want to write before I − say what I want to write before I − listen carefully and follow
game is played to help me think of sense and see whether they work write it write it instructions
the rules for someone new to the game − keep reading my writing back from − keep re-reading my writing from the − read my writing in a loud, clear voice
− listen carefully and follow the beginning to check it makes beginning to check it makes sense so everyone can hear me
instructions from others sense − check that my partner’s instructions − watch how others follow my
− check that my partner’s instructions make sense instructions and decide how I can be
make sense clearer

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Medium Term Planning Week 4 Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Week 4hr = approx time Please see over for Unit conclusion and English Medium Term Planning Week 4
• Following a party, thank you notes are sent. In English pupils listen to such a note and discuss its content and key features before creating a toolkit and writing their own thank you note in role as the mouse
from the Gigantic Turnip story.
• In History pupils explore the concept of rationing and the sharing of limited food supplies.
• For Art and Design and Design and Technology, see Week 3. One of these will have taken place last week and the other should take place this week.
• Pupils record their text for their harvest story in computing.

History Applied Art and Design Music Computing Design and Technology
2hrs Mathematics 1hr (2hrs this or last week) 1hr 1hr (2hrs this or last week)

Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives:


I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to:
− describe differences in the lives of − explore repeating − use a printing block to − perform singing − organise, store, − make a healthy snack, selecting fruit and
children past and present patterns with different make a repeating design manipulate and retrieve vegetables that will appeal to a young
− explain why children had to go without shapes − evaluate my design data in a range of digital child
some fruits and treats in wartime − explain if patterns are formats − select and use tools and equipment
repeating or not safely
− evaluate my own and others’ products

Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes:


Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will:
− listen to and discuss a story − make repeating − mix colours to achieve − rehearse and perform a − plan, save and record − choose fruit and vegetables to match
− work with a partner to compare their patterns with different oranges and browns variety of autumn songs text which tells the story their design
own lives with those of children in shapes and colours − use their printing block to a small audience of a harvest − select suitable tools and use them safely
wartime − identify whether a to create a clear and − perform and skilfully
− record their ideas about the differences pattern is repeating carefully positioned − explain their choice of tools
between their own lives and those of printed image − make their snacks
children in wartime − use their printing block − sample the end products, deciding on
to create a design that their success
repeats itself

Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria:
Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to:
− use everything I know about what − make patterns with − press firmly down on the − sing clearly − decide the text or − make a snack that will appeal to a young
children’s lives were like in wartime squares, circles and printing block − sing tunefully message for each part of child, especially in colour and taste
triangles − lift the printing block off − sing together the story which is − select tools carefully, using them as
− explain how I made a the paper carefully − smile and stand up represented by the shown and with safety in mind
repeating pattern − avoid overlap when straight pictures − ask others for their opinions
− explore different placing the block on the − clear up
patterns using shapes paper again − consider what needs to change if making
and colours the snack again

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Medium Term Planning Week 4 continued Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Week 4hr = approx time

• The Unit conclusion can take the form of a class assembly and is an opportunity for pupils to perform the songs, poems and rhymes that they have practised in Music lessons as well as an opportunity to
teach their party games to others and to show and explain to others some of their learning during this Unit.

Please see over for English Medium Term Planning Week 4

Unit Conclusion 1hr

Objectives:
I am learning to:
− perform to an audience
− review and explain my learning
− read aloud clearly

Outcomes:
Pupils will:
− perform songs and rhymes from this Unit
− teach their party games to new people using instructions
− read thank you notes
− show fruit and vegetable print design wrapping paper and explain the process

Success Criteria:
Remember to:
− stand up straight
− speak and sing clearly
− smile
− read aloud clearly
− show designs, sketches and pictures from activities carried out this Unit

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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English Medium Term Planning Week 4 Unit Narrative


NB: Please adapt and differentiate all objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class

Day 16 1hr Day 17 1hr Day 18 1hr Day 19 1hr Day 20 1hr

Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives: Objectives:


I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to: I am learning to:
− take part in a discussion about what − take part in a discussion about what − plan what I want to write before I − plan what I want to write before I − make decisions about what part of
is read to me is read to me write it write it my new learning to show and share
− take turns speaking and listen to − take turns speaking and listen to − say each sentence before I write ire- − say each sentence before I write ire-
what others say what others say read what I have written to check it read what I have written to check it
− identify key features of a text makes sense makes sense
− evaluate my teacher’s writing
against our toolkit

Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes: Outcomes:


Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will: Pupils will:
− take turns speaking and listening to − make suggestions for a shared − evaluate teacher’s modelled writing − write their own notes using the − use and show what they have
others toolkit for a thank you note against a toolkit toolkit and their own plans learned in the Unit
− make suggestions for improvement
− plan their own thank you note

Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria: Success Criteria:
Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to: Remember to:
− listen to other people’s ideas and − listen to other people’s ideas and − use our toolkit to assess my − use our toolkit to help me write my − use what I have learned and decide
suggest my own suggest my own teacher’s writing note how to share it
− offer my suggestions in a loud, clear − offer my suggestions for − use my plan to help me remember
voice so everyone can hear me improvement in a loud, clear voice what I want to write
− use our toolkit to help me plan my
own writing

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Other Ideas

• Hold a traditional harvest festival celebration in school and encourage pupils to bring in non-perishable goods to give to a local charity.
• Ask a local farmer/green grocer/market garden to donate any excess/unsaleable produce to be used by the pupils to observe, handle, cut up and use in their
healthy snacks.
• Create a harvest display of fruit and vegetables in the classroom or school hall. Perhaps pupils could bring in spare items if they know anyone who has a
vegetable plot with excess produce.
• Talk to pupils about composting and different ways of using old/rotting fruit and vegetables.
• Visit a farm that produces crops or a local allotment (with permission) to see vegetables growing in the ground.
• Potato print wrapping paper. (Pupils cut designs into potato halves and dip them into paint to create a repeating pattern on large paper for a different style of
wrapping paper.)
• Read:
‘Pancakes, Pancakes’ by Eric Carle
‘I Will Never Not Eat a Tomato’ by Layren Child featuring Charlie and Lola
‘Bread and Jam for Frances’ by Russell Hoban
‘The Vegetables we Eat’ by Gail Gibbons
‘Tops and Bottoms’ by Janet Stevens
‘Eat Healthy, Feel Great’ by William Sears

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120 mins
Unit Launch Lesson
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− sing a simple song in tune and − sing a simple song comprised of three verses and a chorus − sing the words to the song clearly and in tune
with good vocal expression − use vocal expression and physical actions to enhance − use my voice to make the words of the song sound
− describe where food comes from performance interesting
and what happens at harvest time − know that food is grown on farms and that harvest is when − add hand and body actions to make my song even more
ripened crops are gathered in interesting
− discuss where food comes from and what happens on a farm
at harvest time

Resources required:
• Basket of produce or photographs of produce (available on the internet)
• Photographs and video clips showing crops being harvested (available on the internet)
• Lyrics and tune for the harvest song ‘Cauliflowers fluffy’ (available on the internet)
• Farm machinery toys such as tractor and combine harvester (if available)

Whole class teaching/ group/ pairs and individual activities:


N.B. Prior to this lesson as a sensible precaution make a careful note of any food allergies pupils may have. These can apply to touching and sniffing foodstuffs as
well as consuming them.

Bring in a basket of colourful harvest produce (or look at photographs showing this) and discuss the different fruit, vegetables and other foodstuffs pupils can see.
Which ones can they name? Which ones have they tasted before? Which ones are their favourites to eat? Which can be eaten raw and which need to be cooked?
Which grow on trees or bushes and which grow in or on the ground? Pass examples around so that they can feel the weight and texture of the produce.

Next, have pupils listen to the popular harvest time song ‘Cauliflowers fluffy and cabbages green’ (lyrics and tune available on the internet). On this first occasion, it is
best to play the song in its entirety. Afterwards, ask pupils to name fruit and vegetables mentioned in the song and to point to any examples that they can see in the
classroom around them. Tell them that they are going to learn to sing this song (with actions) during the course of the lesson.

Re-play the first verse and chorus of the song and then encourage pupils to repeat it with good vocal expression. It may help some pupils to remember the words if
the teacher or a teaching assistant displays pictures of relevant fruit and veg as they come up in the song. When pupils have practised the opening to the song three
or four times as necessary, take a short break for some discussion about harvest time (see below).

Harvesting is the gathering of ripened food crops including fruit and vegetables. Encourage pupils to talk about any experiences they may have of gathering food,
such as taking part in blackberry or strawberry picking or helping to dig up potatoes or carrots in the garden or allotment. Where pupils have not experienced
gathering food in these ways give them opportunities to talk about ways in which they get their food, such as going to shops and markets or by home delivery etc.

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Allow some time for discussion about how the food we buy in shops gets there in the first place? Who grows and harvests it?

Return to ‘Cauliflowers fluffy’ and have pupils sing the first verse and chorus through again to make sure that they have learnt it. Emphasise the need for improved
vocal expression as pupils master memorising the lyrics and tune. At an appropriate point, re-play the second verse and chorus and have pupils practise singing it in
the same way that they learnt the first verse and chorus. Once they have practised the second verse and chorus several times, get them to sing the song right
through from the first line of the first verse to the end of the second chorus. Again, use pictures to help pupils remember the lyrics where necessary. Take another
short break for discussion.

Show pupils some images of farmers harvesting different food crops such as apples, peas and wheat. Give them an opportunity to discuss the different techniques
that they can see being used for harvesting different crops. Which crops are being picked or harvested by hand? Which are being harvested by machines (such as
combine harvesters)? If any of the pupils in class live on or have recently visited a farm give them a chance to talk about their experiences. Pass around toy models
of farm machinery if these are available and talk about the roles they perform.

Return once more to’ Cauliflowers fluffy’ and have pupils sing through the first and second verses and chorus to re-inforce prior learning. Re-play the third and final
verse and chorus. Have pupils learn it in the same way that they learnt the earlier parts of the song. When they have practised the final part of the song several times
give them an opportunity to sing the song through from start to finish.

Finally, now that pupils have mastered the lyrics and tune to the song, have them bring in some hand and body actions to represent the different fruit and vegetables
listed in the song. This could include making cloud shapes with their hands for cauliflowers; using their extended arms and finger tips to make a pointy carrot and so
forth. You could involve them in discussions about what would make the best actions for each item.

Now get them to put it all together in a performance that includes tune, expression and actions. This could be performed again later as a class or whole school
assembly.

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English Lesson Plans


60 mins
English Lesson 1/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− listen to and talk about stories I can’t yet read for myself − make predictions based on what they − think about how characters might be feeling
− build new stores of words have seen or heard so far − use my new feelings words to talk about the characters
− predict what might be going to happen next in a story − work in role with a partner
− take part in drama activities − talk about characters’ feelings

Resources required:
• An age appropriate version of ‘The Giant Turnip’ e.g. ‘The Gigantic Turnip’ by Aleksei Tolstoy, illustrated by Niamh Sharkey, Barefoot Books 1998/2005 ISBN 1-
905236-58-1
• Some real raw turnips, peas, carrots, potatoes and beans for pupils to handle and explore, ideally still with their tops or in their pods and with some evidence of
mother earth adhering to the root vegetables!
• An age appropriate text version of The Gigantic Turnip
• A suitable PowerPoint or YouTube animation of the Gigantic Turnip – follow this Google link for a good example

Whole class teaching/group/pairs and individual activities


Introduce the story of the Gigantic Turnip by showing the front cover of a suitable text version or an image from a PowerPoint presentation (available online) or a
DVD freeze frame. Have pupils predict what they think the story is going to be about. Then give each group or table some of the raw vegetables to see whether they
can identify any of them. Make sure pupils understand that these are not suitable for eating at this stage (except the peas inside the pods and the carrots if carefully
washed) but can be safely handled, squeezed, sniffed and explored. Hands that get dirty can easily be washed so help pupils make the link between undesirable ‘dirt’
clinging to raw root vegetables and the vital soil in which our food is grown! Pupils may know some dishes which use these vegetables though they may not know
that snacks like crisps originate with hard, lumpy, dirty potatoes. Make sure they realise that all these vegetables can be grown in the UK and will have been grown
for people to eat as part of the ‘Dig for Victory’ campaign. Turnips were and are often grown as food for animals, too, especially for cattle.

Now read the story aloud, using a visualiser or similar to show the illustrations. Stop at the point at which the old man looks at the turnip and realises just how
enormous it has grown. In pairs, pupils can discuss how they think the farmer feels. Suggested words for discussion could include the following: happy, surprised,
sad, amazed, proud, disappointed, delighted, dismayed, annoyed, overjoyed etc.

Continue reading the story until reaching the point at which the old man is unable to pull the gigantic turnip out of the ground. Have pupils in pairs act out being the
farmer and the old woman unsuccessfully struggling to pull up the turnip. Then have them talk in pairs about how the two characters feel and what they think they
should do next.

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Continue reading the story, showing how more and more characters gradually join in to help the old man and his wife pull up the turnip. Pupils can join in with
reciting the story as the list of participants is repeated over and over again. As each additional participant fails, ask the pupils to guess who the old man and his wife
will ask for help next. Turn back to the earlier pages where all the creatures on the farm are listed to help pupils predict!

Read on until the point is reached at which the mouse steps in and offers to help! The old man and his wife express doubt that someone as tiny as the mouse could
make much of a difference. In pairs pupils could role-play a conversation which occurs after the tiny mouse offers to help: one child could be the mouse offering or
being coaxed to help, the other could play the part of the old man or his wife.

Finally, with necessary safety precautions in place, pupils could act out the hilarious scene in which groups of about four or five finally succeed in pulling the turnip
out of the ground, forming a physical chain of characters each of whom tugs the waist of the person in front of them. A pupil from each group could capture digital
images of the activity for later use as discussion prompts If they are available, pupils could wear simple masks to show which characters they are in the story.

60 mins
English Lesson 2/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− recall the main events of a story in order − work with a partner to sequence events − speak clearly and loudly so that my partner can hear me
− retell a story in an audible voice − work with a partner to retell the story − use the pictures to help me remember what happens in
our story

Resources required:
• Laminated cards showing different scenes from the story of The Gigantic Turnip. Some of the images captured in the previous lesson’s activity could be
incorporated here.

Pupils sequence the images (on laminated card or on screen) for the Gigantic Turnip story used in the last lesson. They work in pairs to discuss and agree the order
of events. They also complete an oral re-telling of the story in pairs using the sequenced images with the challenge of incorporating some of the new feelings
vocabulary. Pupils could share the narrative by passing the storytelling role back and forth as each new character is introduced.

Key questions:
Why do you think the woman thinks that a tiny mouse can make a difference?
How do you think the old man feels when the mouse helps to pull up the turnip?
How could the old couple further reward the mouse?

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
English Lesson 3/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− predict what might happen on the basis of what − work with a partner to improvise new scenes for − use what I know about the characters to help me imagine
has been read so far the story what happens next
− take part in drama activities − listen to my partners ideas and share my own

Use role-play to explore and consider what happened next? Extend the story by inventing another episode with a different helpful creature or to show how the farmer
and the other characters recognised the mouse’s efforts and how he responded.

Lead whole class discussion to generate ideas about working together and appreciating each other’s contributions, however small they might seem to be.

Pupils then work in threes to improvise a ‘showing appreciation’ scene between the farmers and the mouse.

60 mins
English Lesson 4/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− use a capital letter for the names of people − write a guest list for a harvest supper feast − start each name with a capital letter
− say out loud what I am going to write about before
I write it
− write lists

Remind pupils about the wonderful feast which the old man organises to celebrate the pulling up of the giant turnip. Talk about all of the different characters he and
his wife would need to invite. Discuss who the guest of honour might be. The teacher then models writing a guest list for the farmer’s feast, using capital letters for
characters’ names. Pupils then decide on names to write on their own guest lists for a harvest party or similar which they are helping to organise, ensuring that they
too use capital letters for names.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
English Lesson 5/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− use a capital letter for days of the week − write a party invitation − use capital letters for names and days of the week
− say out loud what I am going to write about before I write it − orally rehearse their ideas before writing − say what I want to write before I write it
− re-read what I have written to make sure it makes sense − read their writing back cumulatively to − read my writing back from the beginning to check
− spell the days of the week check for sense it makes sense

Show pupils a range of invitation cards to see what other information they give, i.e. date, time, venue, dress-code. Shared read an example on screen and have
pupils identify the different bits of information included.

Teacher models writing an invitation for the tiny mouse, including details of games and food to make the party sound really enticing. Make sure to compare you
modelled invitation with the example and have pupils assess your model against it.

Pupils then write their own invitation for a family member or classmate, using a suitable writing frame. This might be a pre-printed party invitation form such as can be
purchased in tear-off pad form. You might enlarge this for some pupils. Your more able writers may not need a frame at all at this stage and could prefer to work
without one.

Pupils then rotate around the classroom to look at each other’s invitations. Give them opportunities to read back some examples, checking for sense as they go.

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60 mins
English Lesson 6/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− write lists − contribute ideas for a shared list − offer suggestions for our shared write
− say out loud what I am going to write before I write it − write their own list − use my teacher’s list to help me write my own
− re-read what I have written to make sure it makes sense

Begin by modelling the writing of a weekly shopping list, deliberately staying clear of party items. Point out how we start at the top and then list each following item
immediately beneath its predecessor. Make a point of modelling the use of lower case in your simple list. Word processing programmes may automatically capitalise
lists which is unnecessary. Make sure pupils understand that a list needs no punctuation, either.

Next, discuss with pupils what we are going to need to buy for our harvest or Autumn party (pumpkins, apples, sticky toffee, lemonade etc). Now have them write
their own shopping list, remembering to set it out like the one you modelled earlier. Items they cannot yet spell confidently can be represented phonetically using
pupils’ existing knowledge, with perhaps a simple illustration beside really tricky words to communicate meaning and remind the writer. It is important for pupils to use
what they already know and ‘have a go’ rather than hesitating and seeking adult input with spellings. Make sure all the adults in the classroom take the same
approach or you may find them spoon-feeding spellings to pupils.

60 mins
English Lesson 7/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− participate in discussion about what is read to me − use their knowledge of instructions to help them identify − use what I know about how instructions look on
− take turns speaking and listening to what others which texts are sets of instructions (and which are not) the page to help me decide which texts are
have to say − explain how they made their yes/no decision about each instructions and which are not
− identify key features of a text text − say my ideas for our toolkit loudly enough for
− contribute ideas for a toolkit of features others to hear

Share a set of simple instructions with the pupils for preparing a tasty dessert for their harvest or Autumn-themed party, i.e. baked apple stuffed with juicy sultanas.
Teacher reads the text and works with pupils to analyse its features and organisational layout. Out of the resulting discussion, teacher and pupils begin to compile a
‘toolkit’ of success criteria which will inform pupils’ own writing. Pupils look at further examples of simple recipe texts to independently identify the layout features etc.
Include some texts which are not recipes and encourage pupils to explain why these do not fit the criteria.

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60 mins
English Lesson 8/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− begin to punctuate sentences using a capital − write an ingredients list − check my teacher’s modelled writing against our toolkit
letter and a full stop, question mark or − write or unscramble two or more instructions − use our toolkit and my teacher’s modelled writing to
exclamation mark support my own writing

Teacher models writing a set of instructions for a simple dessert recipe such as an ice cream sundae.

Pupils can then have a go at writing their own ingredients list for a simple dessert recipe for their party. They can make up the ingredients and include nonsense
flavours! Examples could include Marshmallow surprise, Banana delight, Sticky toffee crunch and so forth.

Alternatively, pupils could unscramble the words to some existing instructions to make them make sense:

teaspoons three add juice lemon to of mixture the

If sentences are written on card strips and cut into words pupils can move them around until they are happy with the sequence. Words like juice and mixture may
need to be read to some pupils by an adult. You may already have wooden racks or plastic pocket strips for assembling words into sentences or pupils can simply
use their table top to assemble the sentences.

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60 mins
English Lesson 9/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− begin to punctuate sentences using a capital − write an ingredients list − check my teacher’s modelled writing against our toolkit
letter and a full stop, question mark or − write or unscramble two or more instructions − use our toolkit and my teacher’s modelled writing to
exclamation mark support my own writing

In this lesson the focus is on the ‘How to’ section of the recipe that follows the ingredients list. How is this written? What type of language is used? The teacher
models the ‘how to…’ or method steps, using numbers or bullets for sequencing. Make sure to begin each instruction with a verb like wash, peel, chop, mix, stir etc.

Pupils could unjumble four or five bullet-pointed method steps from an alternative recipe, placing them in the correct sequence. Some pupils may benefit from having
pictorial representations of each instruction to help them with their sequencing. If you and your pupils have done any cooking before, you may have images of them
at work and the steps in the process that would be useful to support their sequencing.

60 mins
English Lesson 10/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− begin to punctuate sentences using a capital − contribute suggestions for unscrambling muddled − explain why I think the muddled instructions should go in
letter and a full stop instructions the order I suggest
− follow simple instructions − unscramble a muddled set of instructions − use what I already know about instructions to help me
independently with the task

Choose a simple recipe known to the pupils and write it in four or five bulleted steps for cutting up. Display it jumbled on the screen or use sticky putty to position
large card strips on your whiteboard or flip chart. Read the sentences together, establish that it is in fact a set of instructions and challenge pupils to help you sort it
into the right order. Give them a sentence prompt to use, such as ‘I think this one goes first/next/last because…’ so they get into the habit of justifying their opinions
and uttering longer, explanatory sentences.

Remember to read through the text from the beginning as you establish each bullet in order. When finished, the steps could be numbered.
Now challenge pupils to work with a partner or in a three on another set. You could use the same text for all in mixed ability pairs/threes or differentiate by text –
number of bullets, complexity of vocabulary, sentence length – for pairs or threes of different ability.
When they have completed the task, have the pupils rotate to look at others’ solutions.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
English Lesson 11/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− say out loud what I want to write − participate in a game and suggest instructions for − use what I know about how the game is played
− understand that instructions come in various forms new players in an audible voice to help me think of the rules
− contribute to a set of instructions for a game I know well − explain how rules for a game are instructions too,
like recipes are

It’s party time! The harvest is in and the farmers are celebrating. What party games do you pupils know that might be enjoyed at a harvest party?
Have pupils Think, pair, share some of their favourites and choose one they all know to model with. The chosen game should be one that large numbers can play
together, not a sit-down one-to-one or electronic game dependent on a device!
Now have pupils play the game together, asking them to focus on how the game works and what rules they are following.
Finally, shared-write the rules, acting as the scribe for their ideas. Encourage them to contribute complete sentences and model reading back for sense and
cumulative re-reading as the text grows. Make sure pupils realise that the rules for a game are just another set of instructions like a recipe.

60 mins
English Lesson 12/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− think through and give clear instructions − work with a partner or in a three to invent a simple game − check that my instructions make sense and see whether
− re-read what I have written to check it − generate oral instructions for their game they work for someone new to the game
makes sense − teach their invented game to another pair or three − listen carefully and follow instructions from others
− learn another game from a different pair or three

In this lesson, pupils are challenged to invent a party game suitable for a harvest party. Their game should be for multiple players and should not depend on any
devices. It would be good if the game had a clear ending, though it does not need to have winners and losers. The aim is to have fun.
As they try out their game, pupils should be reminded to agree and speak the rules as they go. When they have decided their rules, join the groups into twos and
have each group teach the other their newly invented game.

Finally, ask pupils to share feedback on what they liked about the new games and help choose one of them for you to model writing the rules for the next lesson..

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
English Lesson 13/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− compose a sentence orally before writing it − offer suggestions for a shared set of instructions − say what I want to write before I write it
− re-read what I have written to check it makes − write their own simple sequence of instructions − keep reading my writing back from the beginning to
sense check it makes sense
− check that my partner’s instructions make sense

Shared-write the rules for the chosen game, acting as the scribe for pupils’ contributions. Encourage them to contribute complete sentences and model oral rehearsal
before writing, reading back for sense and cumulative re-reading as the text grows. Pupils who actually played the game as inventors or guinea pigs may have
refinements and alterations to suggest to improve the game, so encourage and allow for this in your shared-write.
Draw pupils’ attention to the setting out of the rules – just like instructions – and explain they are going to be writing instructions for their own game.

Have them begin to plan this with their partner(s) when the shared/modelled write is finished.
Whichever pair or three had their game modelled will be writing instructions for the invented game they were taught – an extra challenge. Make sure you choose your
stronger writers for this!

60 mins
English Lesson 14/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− compose a sentence orally before writing it − offer suggestions for a shared set of − say what I want to write before I write it
− re-read what I have written to check it makes sense instructions − keep re-reading my writing from the beginning to check it
− write their own sequence of instructions makes sense
− check that my partner’s instructions make sense

In this lesson pupils will complete writing instructions for their invented game working independently but alongside their partner(s) so they can check finer points with
each other.
When they have finished, have them share with their partner, looking at each set of instructions together in turn, not simply swapping work. The writing needs to be
‘under four eyes’ so they can have the discussion about whether the instructions would work or not. The writer is the one who decides whether to make changes and
what changes to make. Make sure pupils know there is no need for each set of instructions to be identical even though they are for the same game.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
English Lesson 15/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− read my writing aloud clearly enough to be − read their instructions to the class and help others to − listen carefully and follow instructions
heard by everyone follow them − read my writing in a loud, clear voice so everyone
− follow simple instructions − participate when others are reading their instructions can hear me
− evaluate my own writing − decide what needs to be changed or improved based − watch how others follow my instructions and decide
on watching others try to follow their instructions how I can be clearer

Today the finished instructions are tried out to see whether they work. Each pair or three in turn gives instructions to the rest of the class who play the game by the
rules. Rotate until all the games have been played, allowing feedback time for players to suggest improvements to the game or the instructions.

Finally, give pupils time to make any of the changes they have wish to make in light of the feedback.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
English Lesson 16/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− take part in a discussion about what is read to me − take turns speaking and listening to others − listen to other people’s ideas and suggest my own
− take turns speaking and listen to what others say

Shared read the following thank you note with the pupils:

Dear Little Mouse,

Thank you for coming to our harvest party. We are so glad you could come and hope you had a good time. We would never have been able to get that gigantic
turnip out of the ground without your help so it was good to be able to say thank you with a big party!

We hope you enjoyed all the games, even though the other players were so much bigger than you are. The turnip soup turned out well and you seemed to be
enjoying it. Did you like the mouse-shaped cheesy snacks we made for you? We do hope the black cat didn’t eat all of them, but we did see her helping herself
to one or two!

Yours,

Mr and Mrs Farmer

This is the note that the farmers in our book wrote to the little mouse after she came to their harvest party. I expect the old woman wrote it in tiny writing on a scrap of
paper and posted it in the mouse hole!

Have the pupils Think, pair, share to decide whether they think that Little Mouse had a good time at the party or not. Was there anything she may not have enjoyed or
that might have frightened her? What do you think she liked most and least about the party and why do you think so?

Finish by telling them they will be planning and writing Little Mouse’s thank you note over the next couple of days.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
English Lesson 17/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− take part in a discussion about what is read to me − make suggestions for a shared toolkit for a − listen to other people’s ideas and suggest my own
− take turns speaking and listen to what others say thank you note − offer my suggestions in a loud, clear voice so everyone
− identify key features of a text can hear me

Look carefully with the pupils at what the farmers said and how the note starts and finishes and how it looks on the page.
Start to make a toolkit of features suggested by the pupils, making sure they know they will be writing their own thank you note.
Look at the content of the note and see how the farmers mention the games and the food as well as some of the other characters who were there. They can use their
imagination to think of some details about the party for their own note which will be a thank you note in reply from Little Mouse.

60 mins
English Lesson 18/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− plan what I want to write before I write it − evaluate teacher’s modelled writing against a − use our toolkit to assess my teacher’s writing
− say each sentence before I write ire-read what toolkit − offer my suggestions for improvement in a loud, clear
I have written to check it makes sense − make suggestions for improvement voice
− evaluate my teacher’s writing against our − plan their own thank you note − use our toolkit to help me plan my own writing
toolkit

Use the success criteria to model writing a thank you not from Black Cat and have pupils assess it against the toolkit. You can model making changes to improve
your note, too! Make sure to model using your imagination for the sort of detail the cat mentions in her note.

Now pupils can begin to plan their own thank you note from Little Mouse, working with a partner to share ideas.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
English Lesson 19/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− plan what I want to write before I write it − write their own notes using the toolkit and their − use our toolkit to help me write my note
− say each sentence before I write ire-read what own plans − use my plan to help me remember what I want to write
I have written to check it makes sense

Now pupils independently write their own thank you notes in role as Little Mouse, mentioning what they particularly enjoyed about the party.

60 mins
English Lesson 20/20
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− make decisions about what part of my new − use and show what they have learned in the Unit − use what I have learned and decide how to share it
learning to show and share

As part of the end of Unit celebration, pupils decide which bit of new learning they are most proud of or excited about and how they will show/ share this with the
class and an invited audience.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Mathematics Lesson Plans


60 mins
Using and Applying linked Maths Lesson 1/4
N.B Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− make estimates of the number of objects in the − reliably count and make labels for objects in a basket − estimate the number of objects in basket and give
basket − count the objects in different ways, such as in twos reasons
− count objects in different ways and fives − accurately count objects
− write numbers on labels − write numbers correctly

Show pupils a basket of fruit or vegetables. Estimate how many items are in the basket at the start. Give suggestions such as ‘Are there 6 or 10 special things in the
basket? Why do you think that?’ Once agreed, count to make sure. Explore writing numbers to make labels for the basket. You could also count them in different
ways, such as in two or fives.

60 mins
Using and Applying linked Maths Lesson 2/4
N.B Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− sing songs and rhymes which involve counting − know the names and be able to order numbers 1-20 − identify numbers that are important to me
on − recognise the numbers in the count and identify − join in the rhymes and count accurately
− order numbers from 1-20 and beyond patterns − put numbers in the right order
− identify written numbers and show their value − say the names of numbers

Which numbers are special for you? (E.g. your age, your house number, the number of letters in your name, your brother or sister’s age etc.). Pupils sing songs and
rhymes which support using number names in order e.g. ‘1, 2, 3, 4, 5 once I caught a fish alive’ or count to a regular rhythm or pace alongside a song or rhyme.

Use the numbered labels from the previous activity or create a set of labels (these could be harvest shapes e.g. fruit and vegetables or Autumn leaves) to explore
ordering some of the numbers from 1 to 20 and beyond. Look at the numbers and say their names. Show the value of these numbers using concrete resources. How
do you know 14 is a bigger number than 6? Which envelopes have numbers less than 8 on them? Which have numbers more than 14 on them?

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
Using and Applying linked Maths Lesson 3/4
N.B Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− sing songs and rhymes which involve counting − count on and back (up to 10) − join in the rhymes and count on and back accurately
on and back − know the names and be able to order numbers 1-20 − read numbers and place them in the right order
− identify written numbers 1-20 and place them
on a number line

Pupils sing songs and rhymes which involve counting on and back e.g. 10 fat sausages, 10 green bottles.

Use around 10 of the numbered labels(e.g. 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 13, 16, 19, 20) to explore reading and writing numbers.
Explain you are going to order the labels which are in the bag. They have numbers between 1 and 20.
Take one envelope out of a bag. What number is this? Decide where to place it in the line. Repeat with the other labels in the bag so they are all placed in order.

60 mins
Using and Applying linked Maths Lesson 4/4
N.B Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− explore repeating patterns with different shapes − make repeating patterns with different shapes and − make patterns with squares, circles and triangles
− explain if patterns are repeating or not colours − explain how I made a repeating pattern
− identify whether a pattern is repeating − explore different patterns using shapes and colours

You want to make a repeating pattern for your special basket. How could you make a pattern which has 1 square and 1 triangle and 1 circle? How many different
patterns can you make using a square, a circle and a triangle? What about if you have 2 squares and 2 circles? Do you think you make more or less different
patterns now? Why? How do you know your pattern is a repeating one? Can you explain to someone else how to make it? Explore different patterns using shapes
and colours. This could be linked to the wrapping paper activity in the pupils Art lessons.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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History Lesson Plans


120 mins
History Lead Lesson 1/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− recognise where different food items come from − know that nearly all food comes from something − look carefully at photos of food to identify if they
− think about the importance of a successful harvest that has been grown have been grown or made
in food production − think about what the food I eat every day is made of

Where does our food come from?

Show pupils a picture of a loaf of bread, a bag of flour and a field of wheat and ask them if anybody knows what they are and what they have in common.
Ask the children to think about what would happen if the wheat in the fields didn’t grow, how would the baker make the bread?
Explain to pupils that in many different religions and countries people give thanks to their God for a successful harvest and for the food they have to eat.

Show pupils a range of different food stuffs(or photographs of them) including fresh produce and tinned or dried food, including bread, rice and pasta. Ask them to
think about where they have come from. Many children will say ‘from the shop’ and so should be encouraged to think about where the food came from originally.
Ask them to look at the different items and say whether they are ‘grown’ or ‘made’. For the made items such as pasta ask if anyone knows what the items are made
from. Encourage pupils to think about how much of our food depends on something somewhere that has been grown. Explain to pupils that in the past there were no
big supermarkets and many people grew a lot of their own food in their gardens.

In pairs or small groups ask pupils to cut out pictures from magazines of food items and to sort them in to two groups of ‘made’ or ‘grown’. When they have done this
look together at the collection of ‘made’ food items and talk about what they are made from and where this might have come from.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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120 mins
History Lesson 2/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− explain why we celebrate harvest festivals − know who Robert Stephen Hawker was and − look carefully at the photographs especially at the peoples
− know who first began celebrating harvest in what he did clothes
the Christian church − create a thank you card for their favourite food − think about your favourite food and why you are grateful for it

Why do we celebrate harvest?

Show pupils a picture of Robert Stephen Hawker and ask them if they think he is alive now or lived a long time ago. Ask them to explain their answers and see if
anyone can guess what his job was.

Explain to pupils that Robert Hawker was a Victorian vicar from Cornwall who first introduced the idea of a harvest festival in the Christian church (a biography of him
can be found at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Stephen_Hawker
The harvest festival took place in the church and was an opportunity for everyone to say thank you to god for the food that they have to eat. People would bring food
to the church to be given to the poor.

Ask children to think about the food that they are most thankful for and to create a thank you card about it. Pupils may want to create a non-religious card in which
case they can send their thank you cards to farmers or shop keepers or even their parents.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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120 mins
History Lesson 3/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− describe differences in the lives of − know that children played a part in helping to make sure there − look carefully at photos to find clues about life in the
children past and present was enough food to eat in wartime past
− explain why many children were − be able to say why children were allowed to take time off school − use correct historical vocabulary (gleaning, harvest,
allowed to take time off school in − describe the kind of work children did on the farm in wartime wartime)
wartime − know that in some part of the world children still help out on − give reasons why I think children enjoyed (or did
farms and in food production not enjoy) working on the farm

Resources required:
• Photographs of children helping out on the farm in wartime (available on the internet)
• Grains of rice or cereal

Explain to pupils that 70 years ago during WW2 lots of the men who worked on farms had to go away to fight so the jobs on the farm had to be done by the women
and children left behind.. At very busy times such as harvest many people were needed to help out on the farm. Children were actually given permission to take time
off school to participate in farm work! They were paid a small wage and did safer jobs such as gleaning which meant picking up any stray grains that were left behind
on the ground after a field was cut at harvest time. The gleaned grain would then be fed to the chickens on the farm. In some areas special camps were set up for the
child workers and they lived and slept in the tents during the harvest period.

Show some photographs of children helping out on the farm in wartime. What jobs are they doing? Do they look as if they are enjoying themselves?

Sprinkle some grains of rice or cereal around the classroom or playground (if the weather permits) and ask pupils to see how many grains they can glean in five
minutes. Is the job fun or boring?
Explain to pupils that in some countries in the world children still have to help on farms and sometimes if the weather is bad the crops don’t grow and they won’t have
enough to eat. Discuss why it is important to be able to share the food we have with others.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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120 mins
History Lesson 4/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− describe differences in the lives of children past and − listen to and discuss a story − use everything I know about what children’s lives
present − work with a partner to compare their own lives were like in wartime
− explain why children had to go without some fruits with those of children in wartime
and treats in wartime − record their ideas about the differences between
their own lives and those of children in wartime

Share the story ‘What’s for Tea?’ (see resources) with the pupils and explore what was different and special about this meal. Yes, they had to make the most of what
they had in the house and there wasn’t much. Explore with pupils why food was short in the house (it was Sunday evening and the most of the shops were shut; Dad
was tired and didn’t want to go out in the car again; Dad’s wallet was empty, the children were hungry and wanted something quickly).

Explain that in wartime, food was always short for everybody. Even if people had plenty of time and money, they couldn’t buy food which just wasn’t in the shops!
Lots of foods usually came from the countries where they were grown by ship, and ships don’t set out in wartime because it isn’t safe. Show pupils a paper bag of
traditional sweets containing about 200g weight: this had to last a week! Show an orange and a banana and tell pupils that many children their age only saw and
tasted these fruits for the first time after the war finished. You could also show a tin of peaches, a packet of raisins or even a mango. Explain that some fruits, like
bananas and oranges, and some plants, like sugar cane, can only grow in hotter countries, so British people could not grow their own. Everyone had to have some of
the food that was available so it was carefully shared out to make it fair. This was called rationing.

Everybody had to make the most of what they did have not only by growing their own food but by making sure every little bit was used up and nothing was wasted.
Even vegetable peelings and the outside leaves and stalks of cabbages and cauliflowers were saved and given to chickens and pigs to eat. That way, people could
have more bacon and eggs to eat! Ask pupils what fruits we can grow in Britain, even in our own gardens: yes, we can grow apples, strawberries, raspberries and
gooseberries. And children could pick blackberries growing wild for a taste of something sweet or to take home and put in an apple pie or crumble!

Now have pupils talk with a partner and record their answer to the question: How was life in wartime for children different from your life now? Remind them about
what they learnt last week about children helping on farms. They could make notes, record their voices, draw diagrams or write some sentences. It might help to have
them divide a page down the middle, putting wartime children on one side and their own lives on the other. Remind them to draw on everything they have learned in
this Unit, not just today’s lesson.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Music Lesson Plans


60 mins
Music Lead Lesson 1/4
N.B Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− chant a simple rhyme − sing a song based on a well-known nursery rhyme − sing clearly and in tune
− sing together the words of a simple song clearly − sing together as a group
and in tune

Resources required:
• Alternative version of ‘The Grand Old Duke of York’ (included below)

Autumn is a wonderful time of year to celebrate in music! In this lesson pupils learn to sing some autumnal songs to the tunes of familiar nursery rhymes such as ‘The
Grand Old Duke of York’, ‘Jack and Jill’ and ‘Twinkle, twinkle little star’.
To get pupils voices warmed up for singing begin the lesson by having them chant the following autumn rhyme. It is based on the traditional nursery rhyme of Humpty
Dumpty. When they know it well have them experiment with their voices by repeating the rhyme loudly, softly, quickly, slowly etc.
Autumn leaves have started to fall;
Some are big and some are small.
Orange and yellow; gold and brown:
Crunchy beneath our feet on the ground

Autumn leaves have started to fall;


From trees and bushes short and tall
Oak and ash; chestnut and lime
Trees so very proud and fine

Now that their voices are warmed up it is time for pupils to sing! Remind them how well they sang the song ‘Cauliflowers fluffy’ in the opening lesson of the Unit. You
may wish to give them an opportunity to sing this again to celebrate their previous success and to build confidence ahead of the singing that they will do in the music
lessons for this Unit.

Teach pupils to sing the following harvest song to the tune of the Grand Old Duke of York. It will be best if the teacher or teaching assistant sings the whole song
through before setting out to teach pupils to sing it a verse at a time. You may wish to display images that illustrate things mentioned in the song as they occur, i.e. a
barn, a tractor, furrows etc.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


43

Farmer Joe of York


Busy working on his farm
Now the crops are gathered in
He stores them in the barn
And on his tractor he rides
With its huge black wheels
Ploughing furrows all day long
Up and down the fields

Farmer Jess of York


She has ten thousand hens
They go clucking around the farm
And lay their eggs again
Some of the eggs are pink
And some of the eggs are brown
She sells them in the villages
She sells them in the town

Farmer Jack of York


Has apples red and green
In the orchard by his house
The best you’ve ever seen
And up his ladder he climbs
To pick them pound by pound
Before the mighty west wind blows
And they fall to the ground

Once they know the song well, get pupils to experiment with it by taking it in turns to sing alternate verses. For example, the boys could sing the first verse (Farmer
Joe) and the girls could sing the second verse (Farmer Jess). They could then all join in with the singing of the third and final verse (Farmer Jack). Alternatively, boys
could sing the first and girls the last lines of each verse.
Have one group of pupils chant a verse and then have another group sing the same verse. What differences can they hear? Do they prefer the sound of the chanting
or the singing? This could lead to discussions about tune and melody.
Spend some time discussing how we can make our singing even better. Remind pupils about the work that they did on vocal expression in the Unit’s launch lesson.
If time allows you may wish to give pupils an opportunity to enhance the performance of their song by putting some suitable actions to it.

Support:
It may be necessary to reduce the amount of words pupils are required to memorise. Learn one verse rather than two or three.

Challenge:
Some pupils may be confident enough to perform a verse individually or as a duet.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
Music Lesson 2/4
N.B Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− sing the same lyrics to two different tunes − learn to sing a song lyric to its traditional tune and − listen carefully to the tunes
to an alternative tune − remember which tune I am singing
− say which tune I like best

In this lesson pupils will further develop their singing skills by learning to sing the same lyrics to two very different tunes. For example, having learnt to sing the well-
known harvest hymn ‘We plough the fields and scatter’ to its traditional tune, pupils could go on to try and sing its lyrics to the tune of another hymn or song such as
‘Oh Jesus I have promised’. If possible, record pupils singing both versions and get them to listen carefully to the differences in tune and tempo. Have them discuss
which version of the song they liked performing best and why.

120 mins
Music Lessons 3 & 4/4
N.B Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− perform singing − rehearse, ready to perform a variety of autumn − sing clearly
songs to a small audience − sing tunefully
− perform (Wk. 4) − sing together
− smile and stand up straight

In this final music lesson pupils will rehearse and perform a mini-concert of the autumn poems, rhymes and songs that they have learnt in this Unit plus any others
they may know. This could form part of a whole school harvest-themed assembly or serve as a contribution to a harvest festival event in the local community. They
should attempt to enhance their final performance with excellent vocal expression and actions where appropriate, bringing as much variety and interest to their
performance as possible. For example, songs could be sung quietly through the verses but with a louder chorus or vice-versa. They could also sing the same set of
lyrics to two different tunes as practised in lesson 2.
For evaluation purposes it might be useful to film part of the mini-concert so that pupils can see themselves performing individually and as a group. They should be
encouraged to identify strengths of their performance as well as areas for improvement.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Art and Design Lesson Plans


60 mins
Art and Design Lead Lesson 1/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− sketch a variety of different leaf shapes − discuss the shapes of harvest fruit and − observe the shape and colour of different fruit and
− create a print design idea based on my vegetables vegetables
sketches − draw some sketches of the different shapes in − make some pencil sketches of them in my sketchbook
their sketchbooks − use ideas from my sketchbook for my design
− create a design idea for their printing block

Resources required:
• Selection of autumn leaves
• Sketch books
• Pencils
• Small rectangular sheet of card

Making an autumn leaves print


Over the course of the next four lessons pupils will work towards designing and printing their own harvest produce wrapping paper. Show them some examples of
wrapping paper or fabric designs that are based on repeating patterns and images.
Show children a selection of different fruit and vegetables and discuss their different shapes. These could be native fruits and vegetables such as courgette, potatoes
or apples or more exotic produce such as star fruit which would give more unusual shapes. Discuss with pupils what will happen to the shape of the fruit or vegetable
when it is cut asking them to predict what shape it will make. You could experiment with cutting the produce in different ways to create different shapes.
Place a selection of fruit and vegetables at each table and ask pupils to study them very carefully. Then have them draw some simple l sketches in their
sketchbooks. Compare some of the different sketches from around the class and discuss which would make attractive print designs for our harvest wrapping paper.
Next, provide pupils with a sheet of card that is the same size as the polystyrene tile printing block that they will use to make their prints. On this card they should
draw their final design idea for next lesson’s printing block. Have pupils move around the classroom at an appropriate point to look at some of the designs that other
pupils are coming up with. Give them an opportunity to say what they like about each other’s design ideas and why.

Support:
Encourage pupils to start sketching some of the simpler shapes first before moving on to try more complex ones.

Challenge:
Encourage pupils to sketch more complicated shapes such as star fruit.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
Art and Design Lesson 2/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− make a printing block − draw their design onto their printing block − copy my design idea carefully onto the printing block
− transfer my design idea onto a printing block − choose a colour for their design idea − mark the reverse of my printing block with a ‘T’ along the top
− work out how to create the colour by mixing edge to remind myself which way round to place it when
primary colours or adding black or white to printing
darken or lighten shade

Resources required:
• Small rectangular sections of a polystyrene tile
• Blunt pencils
• Water colour paints: red, blue, yellow, black and white

Hand out the print designs that pupils created last lesson on card and provide them with a rectangular piece of polystyrene tile of the same size. Have pupils very
carefully copy their design onto the polystyrene tile with a blunt pencil or similar. When it is complete they should mark the reverse of the polystyrene tile block with a
‘T’ along its top edge. This is so that they will know which way round to place the tile when repeating the pattern.

Inform pupils that red, yellow, blue, black and white printing ink will be available next lesson and to start thinking about the colour or colours they will use. They will
need to discuss how they go about creating colours such as orange and brown. They will also need to discuss how to go about creating darker or lighter shades of
colours. It might be a good idea to give them opportunities to experiment with water colour paints prior to mixing their inks next lesson.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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120 mins
Art and Design Lessons 3 &4/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− use a printing block to make a repeating design − mix colours to achieve oranges and browns − press firmly down on the printing block
− evaluate my design − use their printing block to create a clear and − lift the printing block off the paper carefully
carefully positioned printed image − avoid overlap when placing the block on the paper again
− use their printing block to create a design that
repeats itself

Resources required:
• Ink rollers
• Ink trays
• Printing ink – red, blue, yellow, black and white
• Big sheets of plain white paper

Hand out the polystyrene printing blocks that pupils made last lesson. Provide them with an ink tray, an ink roller and some printing ink of their chosen colour. Allow
time for mixing if pupils have chosen to create a colour by mixing two or more colours together.
Model rolling the ink roller up and down in the ink tray until pupils can hear a sticky squelchy sound. This means that the ink is ready to be rolled onto the printing
block.

Hand out a big sheet of plain paper that will be used for the wrapping paper. Once pupils have used the roller to cover their printing block in ink have them position
the block precisely in the top left corner of the big sheet of paper and press down hard. Remove the block carefully to avoid smudges and smears and have pupils
observe the printed image that they have created.

Repeat the process above, placing the block on the paper next to the first printed image, being careful to avoid any overlap. Continue doing this until the whole of the
sheet of paper is covered in your print design.

Allow time for clearing up and cleaning up and then admire the prints that the class have created.
In what ways are they similar? In what ways are they different?
Linked to the harvest theme for this Unit, the activity above could also be carried out around fruit and vegetable design ideas. Pumpkins, squashes, apples and pears
provide interest stimuli for design ideas, including when they are sliced to show the internal structure of the fruit or vegetable and its seeds.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Design and Technology Lesson Plans


60 mins
Design and Technology Lead Lesson 1/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− understand where food comes from − taste a selection of fruits and vegetables − use all senses when handling different fruit
− recognise why healthy food is important to our bodies − experiment with combinations of fruits and vegetables and vegetables
− sample fruits and vegetables and combine tastes − look at and discuss the appeal of existing snacks for − experiment with different flavours
together younger pupils − decide what makes a snack appealing
− consider what makes a healthy and appealing snack, − choose a snack type to design next time − adapt examples to make them more
evaluating a range of existing snacks − recognise the importance of fruit and vegetables in our appealing to young children
diet

Eat more fruit and veg!


N.B. Please be fully aware of any food allergies that pupils may have.

Resources required:
• A selection of fruits and vegetables
• Tasty fruity snacks
• Pictures of tasty fruit and vegetable snacks

Have children pass around some examples of fruit and vegetables that you have in the classroom. Encourage them to use all of their senses when handling the food.
What does it smell like? What does it feel like? Is it shiny or dull, rough or smooth to the touch? Encourage them to talk about which ones they would most like to eat.
Pass around some tasty fruity snacks to get their taste buds working!
Remind pupils that fruit and vegetables need to be an important part of our daily diet. We should eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day to stay
healthy. Fruit and vegetables provide us with fibre and vitamins. Without these our bodies do not work as well as they should.
Inform pupils that we need them to design and make some delicious, attractive fruit and vegetable snacks that will appeal to the children in Reception class or
nursery and encourage them to eat healthily.
In this first lesson pupils can work together in groups to sample some examples of fruit and vegetables that might be included in their snacks. Encourage them to be
bold and to experiment with combinations of fruit and vegetables as well as fruit or vegetables only. They might try combining apple and celery or cucumber and
strawberry.
Have pupils look at some pictures of existing examples of tasty fruit and vegetable snacks such as juicy fruit salad or fruit and vegetable kebabs. Get them to discuss
which of these would be most and least likely to appeal to their target group and why. How might some of the examples be adapted to make them more appealing to
young children (replace lemon slices with orange or pineapple slices etc)?
Finally, have pupils decide what kind of snack they are going to work together to design and make.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
Design and Technology Lesson 2/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− design an appealing product for a young child − design healthy fruit and vegetable snacks in − sketch several ideas to choose from
− create some design ideas sketchbooks − create a design that will appeal to a young child
− discuss strengths and weaknesses of a design − draw and then talk about their designs − talk about what is good and not so good about the designs
idea − choose a design idea as a team − listen and act on feedback
− produce a final design idea that can be made next time

Resources required:
• Sketchbooks
• Pencils, paints, brushes
• Camera

In this lesson pupils work together to create some design ideas for their snacks. They can sketch some of their ideas in their sketchbooks. After they have
generated some preliminary design ideas they should be encouraged to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each design idea i.e. ’It looks nice but wouldn’t
taste very good. It looks messy even though it’s healthy.’
If time permits pupils could talk to pupils in other groups to get their feedback on their design ideas.
Now work together as a team to draw, paint or photograph the design idea that you will take forward to the making stage. You may want pupils to make a simple
proto-type of their product at this stage.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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120 mins
Design and Technology Lessons 3 & 4/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− make a healthy snack, selecting fruit and − choose fruit and vegetables to match their design − make a snack that will appeal to a young child,
vegetables that will appeal to a young child − select suitable tools and use them safely and especially in colour and taste
− select and use tools and equipment safely skilfully − select tools carefully, using them as shown and with
− evaluate my own and others’ products − explain their choice of tools safety in mind
− make their snacks − ask others for their opinions
− sample the end products, deciding on their − clear up
success − consider what needs to change if making the snack
again

Resources required:
• Equipment for making a healthy snack – plastic safety knives, chopping boards, aprons etc.
• A selection of fruits and vegetables
• Camera

In this final 2 hour lesson pupils work together in groups to make their tasty fruit or vegetable snack, fruit kebab , fruit salad or similar.
Spend time talking with pupils about the need for health and hygiene when handling foodstuffs. Hands should be nice and clean!
Lay out some tools that pupils are permitted to use when putting their snack together. Use plastic safety knives in line with school’s health and safety policy.
Encourage them to choose tools carefully and be prepared to say why they have chosen them and how they will make use of them in the making process.
Pupils now make their healthy snacks based on their design ideas from last lesson. They should keep in mind the target audience for their snacks as they work.
Take some photos of them working together and making skilful use of tools. Show these at the end of the lesson to remind pupils how well they worked together.
When the snacks are ready pupils could revolve around the class sampling each other’s efforts and saying what they like about them in terms of colour, texture and
taste. Some members of the target group might be invited into class to give their opinions.
Once clearing up is completed, pupils should be encouraged to reflect on what they would keep and change about their snacks if they were to repeat the activity.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Computing Lesson Plans


60 mins
Computing Lead Lesson 1/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− organise, store, manipulate and retrieve data in − plan, save and record text which tells the story − develop and save a series of pictures for an event
a range of digital formats of a harvest

Resources required:
• Suitable computer based drawing program for pupils that enables images to be saved and retrieved

Remind the pupils of the Giant Turnip story they are reading in their English lessons. Ensure pupils are clear of the story and can tell you it. Alternatively pupils could
choose a different story with harvest or food theme such as The Little Red Hen.
Different groups could work on different stories, so long as they are clear of the key information.

Pupils draw small sketches to plan the 6 - 8 pictures they will need to produce to tell their story clearly. Once the planning is complete, they can start creating their
images for their story. Ensure they save their images as they complete each one.

60 mins
Computing Lesson 2/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− organise, store, manipulate and retrieve data in − plan, save and record text which tells the story − develop and save a series of pictures for an event
a range of digital formats of a harvest

Pupils continue to develop pictures to tell their chosen harvest story. They manipulate the pictures by cropping as necessary. Pupils could add extra clip art, shapes
and lines using formatting tools. They order the pictures to tell the story of the chosen celebration.

These may be saved electronically and use in an interactive whiteboard software, PowerPoint or other digital format. Alternatively, they could be printed for use in a
talking photos album or display.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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60 mins
Computing Lesson 3/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− organise, store, manipulate and retrieve data in − plan, save and record text which tells the story − decide the text or message for each part of the story which
a range of digital formats of a harvest is represented by the pictures

Pupils use a word processing program to decide upon the text or message for each part of the story that is represented by the pictures. They ensure each part has
enough detail. The text is typed into a table or document and saved to use next lesson. Some pupils will need support with this. Pupils decide who will say each part
of the story at this point.

60 mins
Computing Lesson 4/4
NB: Remember to adapt and differentiate objectives, outcomes and success criteria for your own class!

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− organise, store, manipulate and retrieve data in − plan, save and record text which tells the story − decide the text or message for each part of the story which
a range of digital formats of a harvest is represented by the pictures

Pupils record their text for the story using a chosen format. This may be using a talking photo album, talking tin lids or talking postcards that enable you to record
sounds. The message for each part of the story can then be listened to while looking at the associated picture created earlier.

Alternatively, the final product could be completely computer based. Pupils can record the message to play along with the picture on screen. Suitable programs for
this include interactive whiteboard software or PowerPoint.

Some pupils could add the written text to their images to present the final story using pictures and written text, rather than recording their sound for the story parts.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Unit Conclusion 60 mins

Objectives: Outcomes: Success Criteria:


I am learning to: Pupils will: Remember to:
− perform to an audience − perform songs and rhymes from this Unit − stand up straight
− review and explain my learning − teach their party games to new people using instructions − speak and sing clearly
− read aloud clearly − read thank you notes − smile
− show fruit and vegetable print design wrapping paper and − read aloud clearly
explain the process − show designs, sketches and pictures from activities
− explain who Rev Robert Hawker was and what he did carried out this Unit

The Unit conclusion can take the form of a class assembly but should embrace the idea of a traditional harvest festival with the theme of giving thanks for the food we
have to eat. It is an opportunity for pupils to perform the songs, poems and rhymes that they have practised in Music lessons. Pupils can spend time during their
Music and English lessons this week to prepare what they would like to show/share with others and to think about what they would like to give thanks for. This might
be:
• A song, rhyme or poem learnt or practised in Music
• Their wrapping paper leaf design - from conception to end product
• How children were involved in food production during World War 2
• Their Little Mouse thank you letter
• The story of Rev. Robert Hawker.
• A description of their appealing and healthy snack and why they made what they did – photos/videos taken at the time may be shown to the audience

Parent Support Activities


• At meal times talk about where different food comes from. Is it grown on a tree, or a bush, or does it come out of the ground? When you buy it, does it look like it
did when it was growing?
• Thinking about the food you eat, do you eat it raw, or does it need to be cooked? Can it be eaten either way? Which foods are healthy?
• Can you think of and share any songs, rhymes or stories at home about harvest, or fruit or vegetables?
• Read together and talk about stories that feature harvest, food, farming and gardening (fruits and vegetables)
• Ask your child to predict what’s inside and then cut open fruit and vegetables. Talk about what you can see (seeds, pips, stones).
• Find someone who has a vegetable plot or allotment and ask if you can visit when they are picking/harvesting some of the fruit or vegetables they have grown
so that your child can see where they come from and how important soil is.
• Walk, cycle or drive in the countryside and try to identify crops growing in the fields. What foods do they become?

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Standalone Mathematics
Within this Unit the following programme of study (PoS) statements are addressed:

Multiplication and division

Pupils should be taught to:


• solve simple one-step problems involving multiplication and division, calculating the answer using concrete objects, pictorial representations and arrays with
the support of the teacher

Fractions

Pupils should be taught to:


• recognise, find and name a half as one of two equal parts of an object, shape or quantity
• recognise, find and name a quarter as one of four equal parts of an object, shape or quantity

Geometry: properties of shapes

Pupils should be taught to:


• recognise and name common 2D and 3D shapes, including:
o 2D shapes (e.g. rectangles (including squares), circles and triangles)
o 3D shapes (e.g. cuboids (including cubes), pyramids and spheres).

Geometry: position, direction, motion

Pupils should be taught to:


• order and arrange combinations of objects and shapes in patterns
• describe position, directions and movements, including half, quarter and three-quarter turns

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Multiplication and division


Pupils look at and make estimates of a small number of objects based on their experience of the size and value of numbers, using visual patterns or grouped
arrangements of objects (e.g. dice patterns for 5). They answer questions such as ‘Do you think there are 6 or 16 marbles in this jar? Why?’
They arrange the objects in arrays and use these to justify their estimates, gradually linking this to counting in 2s, 5s or 10s.

Link to Inspire Unit ‘What is a harvest festival? 1/4

Show pupils a basket of fruit or vegetables. Estimate how many items are in the basket at the start. Give suggestions such as ‘Are there 6 or 10 special things in the
basket? Why do you think that?’ Once agreed, count to make sure. Explore writing numbers to make labels for the basket. You could also count them in different
ways, such as in two or fives.

In practical contexts throughout this Unit, pupils describe and extend number sequences by counting on or back in repeated steps of the same size, including 2, 5 and
10. They begin to link this with multiplication. Pupils count on in tens from zero and then back to zero. They use practical equipment such as 10p coins or straws bundled
into tens, or a number line or 100-square, to consolidate the count. These help them to form mental images, to recognise the numbers in the count, and to identify
patterns. They learn to recognise the difference between ‘ty’ and ‘teen’ numbers.

Link to Inspire Unit ‘What is a harvest festival? 2/4

Which numbers are special for you? (E.g. your age, your house number, the number of letters in your name, your brother or sister’s age etc.). Pupils sing songs and
rhymes which support using number names in order e.g. ‘1, 2, 3, 4, 5 once I caught a fish alive’ or count to a regular rhythm or pace alongside a song or rhyme.

Use the numbered labels from the previous activity or create a set of labels (these could be harvest shapes e.g. fruit and vegetables or Autumn leaves) to explore
ordering some of the numbers from 1 to 20 and beyond. Look at the numbers and say their names. Show the value of these numbers using concrete resources. How
do you know 14 is a bigger number than 6? Which envelopes have numbers less than 8 on them? Which have numbers more than 14 on them?

Pupils continue to count on and back in ones. They use a range practical resources and number lines to support with this. They can count on in ones from zero or
any small number and can count back ones from a range of small numbers to zero. This familiarity with the counting sequence, and practical equipment and images
for it, underpins all future work with Number.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Link to Inspire Unit ‘What is a harvest festival? 3/4

Pupils sing songs and rhymes which involve counting on and back e.g. 10 fat sausages, 10 green bottles.

Use around 10 of the numbered labels(e.g. 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 13, 16, 19, 20) to explore reading and writing numbers.
Explain you are going to order the labels which are in the bag. They have numbers between 1 and 20.
Take one envelope out of a bag. What number is this? Decide where to place it in the line. Repeat with the other labels in the bag so they are all placed in order.

Pupils count on from zero in twos, and then back to zero, using objects such as pairs of socks to answer questions such as: I have three pairs of socks in the bag.
How many socks is this? They check the answer by counting the socks in ones and then in twos. They count 2p coins, for example by tapping the coin twice on the
table to remember that it is worth 2p. They listen as 2p coins are dropped into a tin one by one, keeping a count and saying how much money is in the tin. They mark
repeated hops of 2 on a number track to at least 20, saying the numbers they land on. They develop counting on and back to zero in steps of 5 to 30, using objects,
hand patterns, dice patterns, coins or other familiar arrangements. They mark repeated hops of 5 on a number track to 50, saying the numbers they land on. They
develop counting in steps of 10 to 50 or beyond, again using objects, concrete resources, coins, number squares or number lines to 100 to support, marking the
numbers they land on. They notice the patterns within the numbers they say when counting in 2s, 5s and 10s.
They use patterns in the numbers to identify missing numbers in the sequence, for example identifying the missing number when they hear a clap: 28, 27, 26, [one clap],
24, 23, or 5, 10, 15, [one clap], 25, [one clap].

Pupils develop their understanding of doubling. They make two identical sets of objects and find the total. For example, they place an equal number of bug counters onto
two leaves. They record this in the number sentence 3 + 3 = 6. They understand that they are finding the sum of two threes, or ‘doubling three’, and that double 3 is 6
because 3 + 3 = 6.

Fractions
Throughout the Unit, pupils use halves and quarters in context. For example, they cut objects such as apples or balls of Plasticine in half to make two identical pieces.
They find half the length of pieces of string or ribbon. They find half a piece of paper by folding one half on top of the other. They count half the number of eggs in a box
of six eggs, and put half of the eight cubes on their table into a box. They find a quarter of objects such as string or ribbon paper shapes by folding into four equal pieces.
This may be achieved by folding in half and then half again. They start to find a quarter of a small number (8, 12 or 16) of objects by sharing them into 4 equal groups.
Practical experiences such as folding and cutting shapes and pictures in half or quarters help to consolidate their understanding.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


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Geometry – properties of shapes


Pupils use 2D shapes and 3D solids to build models, pictures and patterns. They learn to name shapes and describe their features. In describing the features they refine
their everyday language to include appropriate mathematical terms. The pupils use flat ‘2-D shapes’ (rectangles, squares, circles and triangles) made from card or thin
plastic to support the early development of visualisation and mental imagery of shapes. They also explore, handle and describe the features of a range of 3D shapes
(cuboids, cubes, pyramids and spheres). Pupils listen carefully to instructions, descriptions and explanations and pick out the key points. For example, they listen
carefully to a description of a shape so that they can select the shape that matches the description from a collection. They take part in activities such as:
I spy something that will roll … has a curved face … has flat faces … has a point……..
Look at this collection of objects or shapes. Shut your eyes while I pick one up and hide it. Open your eyes. Tell me which object or shape I have hidden. Put your
hands into this big box. An object with corners? Something round? An object with straight edges? An object with no corners?

Pupils explore repeating patterns of shape, developing the language of shape. They refer to, and recognize, shapes in different orientations. They continue patterns
which they can see the beginning of and explain how they knew the pattern continued in the way they decided. They can look at a pattern and identify if the pattern is
incorrect and explain why. They order and arrange shapes, coloured counters or other objects to make their own repeating patterns. They describe the way they have
solved a problem and respond to questions about what they have done, which helps them to clarify their mathematical thinking and understanding.

Link to Inspire Unit ‘What is a harvest festival? 4/4

You want to make a repeating pattern for your special basket. How could you make a pattern which has 1 square and 1 triangle and 1 circle? How many different
patterns can you make using a square, a circle and a triangle? What about if you have 2 squares and 2 circles? Do you think you make more or less different
patterns now? Why? How do you know your pattern is a repeating one? Can you explain to someone else how to make it? Explore different patterns using shapes
and colours. This could be linked to the wrapping paper activity in the pupils Art lessons.

Geometry – position and direction


Pupils use everyday language to describe position, direction or movement. For example, they place objects above, below, to the right of and to the left of other objects on
a magnetic board or interactive whiteboard. They follow instructions to put play-people in a scene. In PE, they follow instructions to roll or slide, or to make whole and half
turns on the spot. They explore moving forward and backwards. They also explore turning left and turning right in order to be able to turn a quarter turn to the left or a
quarter turn to the right. They also explore half turns and move onto making three quarter turns to the left and three quarter turns to the right.

©Cornwall Learning Publications 2015


Cornwall Learning
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