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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 07:


PROPOSED INTERGALACTIC THEME PARK

IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE COURSE REQUIREMENT IN


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE

SUBMITTED BY:

DERAMAS, GERALDINE L.
EMAN, ANNABEL S.

SUBMITTED TO:
ARCH’T GELLI GARCIA

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Page
Table of Content
CHAPTER 1: THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 Statement of the Problem 2-6
1.2.1 Tourism Environment 2
1.2.2 Economy Environment 2
1.2.3 Socio-Cultural environment 2
1.2.4 Psychically Environment 3
1.2.5 Transportation 3
1.2.6 Infrastructure 4
1.2.7 Institutional Environment 4
1.2.8 Challenges 4-6
1.3 Scope and Delimitation 7

CHAPTER 2: REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES


2.1 Definition of Terms 8
2.2 Related Literature and Studies 8-11
2.2.1 Local 8-9
2.2.2 Foreign 10-11

CHAPTER 3: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY


3.1 Research Method 11
3.2 Data-Gathering Instrument 12
3.3 Data-Gathering Procedure 12
3.4 Data Analysis 12-13

CHAPTER 4: ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA


4.1 Site Criteria 14-15
4.2 Site Selection 16-24
4.3 Site Justification 24
4.4 Behavioral Analysis 24-26

CHAPTER 5: SYNTHESIS (ARCHITECTURAL)


5.1 Design Philosophy 27
5.2 Design Goals and Objectives 27
5.3 Design Concept 27
5.4 Design Consideration 27-28

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INTRODUCTION

Theme parks are star players in the tourism industry, and play a special and important
role in generating tourism demand. Theme parks are the main motivators for tourism trips to
many destinations and core elements of the tourism product. Competition in the theme park
market is growing also in terms of an increasing number of parks, but also relative to other uses
of leisure. But in different areas, the theme park market in seems to be reaching its saturation
point and the parks have to cater for visitors who are getting more and more experienced and
demanding. Given these trends of growing theme park supply, environmental constraints and
increasingly discriminating consumer demand, it can be concluded that theme parks, to survive
in this competitive market, must optimize is, given an ever increasing number of parks and
future trend of consumer behavior.

In general, theme parks can be defined as a subset of visitor attractions. Visitor


attractions are described as permanent resources which are designed, controlled and managed
for the enjoyment, amusement, entertainment, and education of the visiting public

Theme parks attempt to create an atmosphere of another place and time, and usually
emphasize one dominant theme around which architecture, landscape, rides, shows, food
services, costumed personnel, retailing are orchestrated. In this definition, the concept of
themes is crucial to the operation of the parks, with rides, entertainment, and food all used to
create several different environments.

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STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

The tourism general environment of the theme parks

The theme park and its total tourism environment need to be a place in which the entire
array of physical features and services are provided for an assumed capacity of visitors. The
tourism supply and demand market is the two sides that require close examination for theme
park planning. Insight in market developments is necessary for taking a longer term perspective
in theme park planning.

The economic environment of theme parks


The planning efforts of theme park are mostly directed towards improving the economy,
because the economic impact of theme parks is generally positive including: increased direct
and indirect employment, income and foreign exchange; improved transportation facilities and
other infrastructure for tourism that residents also can utilize; generation of government
revenues for improvement of community facilities and services; the multiplier effect within the
local and regional economy. Although improving the economy is an important goal, it will not be
achieved unless planning for the economy is accompanied by three other goals, enhanced
visitor satisfaction, protected resource assets, and integration with community social and
economic life.

The socio-cultural environment of theme parks

The impact of theme park operations can bring both benefits and problems to the local society
and its cultural patterns. A theme park in an area generates contact between residents and
visitors. This can be problematic in areas where the traditional cultural pattern of the residents
differs extremely from that of the visitors of a park. Also, when there is a substantial
socioeconomic difference between the visitors and the residents this may cause a problem. For
example, problems may include over crowding of facilities and transportation, over
commercialization, misunderstandings and conflicts between residents and visitors because of
differences in languages, customs, and value systems, and violation of local dress and behavior

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codes. Theme parks especially have peak attendance figures, and therefore the concentration
of visitors in space and time is a major problem. On the other hand, tourism in an area may
improve the living standards of people and help pay for improvements to community facilities
and services if the economic benefits of tourism are well distributed.

The psychically environment of theme parks

Theme parks’ environmental impact is mostly negative and a cause for concern. As theme
parks have been designed specifically to accommodate the modern visitor, the environmental
impact of theme parks can include visual pollution like unattractive buildings and structures, and
large unattractive car parks. The space occupation of parks is enormous and mostly involves
destruction of parts of the natural environment. Other environmental problems are air and water
pollution, noise, vehicular and pedestrian congestion, and land use incompatibility. Therefore,
an essential element of theme park planning is determining the carrying capacities or use
saturation levels of the area.

The transportation of the theme parks

Passenger transportation is a vital component of the theme park system. Theme parks have a
relationship with transport systems in a number of ways: The transport networks make theme
parks physically accessible to potential visitors and therefore are an important factor in
determining the number of visitors a theme park is likely to attract. The e existence of major
theme parks and attractions leads to the development of new public transport services to meet
the demand of visitors. The transport is also important within destinations to make travel
between theme parks and attractions and between attractions and services as easy as possible.
The modes of transport can often be an attraction in themselves with passengers being
encouraged to see using them as a type of special event. The novel methods of on-site
transport are used to move visitors around the theme park in ways that will add to the enjoyment
of their visit. The planning of inter modal transportation centers is needed for domestic local, as
well as outside, visitor markets.

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The infrastructure of theme parks

In addition to transportation facilities, other infrastructure elements include water supply, electric
power, waste disposal, and telecommunications. These components are usually planned by the
public sector. Even though private and independent decision making are valued highly by most
enterprises in all tourism sectors, each will gain by better understanding the trends and plans by
others. The public sector can plan for better highways, water supply, waste disposal, when
private sector plans for attractions and services are known. Conversely, the private sector can
plan and develop more effectively when public sector plans are known.

The institutional environment

The institutional elements need to be considered in planning the theme park environment. From
national to local governing levels, statutory requirements may stimulate or hinder tourism
development. For example, policies on infrastructure may favor one area over another. Also, the
administrative laws and regulations can influence the amount and quality of tourism
development in a particular area. Policies of the many departments and bureaus can greatly
influence how human, physical and cultural resources are applied.

Theme parks challenges

The first challenge for theme parks managers is to integrate the elements in the park
itself with all the elements defining the theme park environment in the theme park development
plan. For example, theme parks cannot function without transportation possibilities to bring the
visitor to the park, or food supply or accommodation to support the visitor’s stay.
Planning a theme park requires significant public private cooperation. More and more
public governments turn to the private sector for the provision of services and the production of
new products However, in order for such processes to run smoothly in theme parks, greater
understanding of the roles of both sectors is needed. All private sector players on the supply
side of the theme park environment such as, attractions, services, transportation, etc., depend
greatly on investment, planning and management policies of government.
Conversely, governments depend on the private sector for many tourism activities and
responsibilities. Therefore, cooperation between the public and private sector is essential.

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Another characteristic of theme parks is that their demand is highly seasonal. For theme
park planners seasonality effects mean that they need to plan the facilities in such a way that
whatever season or number of visitors in the park, the visitor experiences in the park are
optimal.
Also, when demand for rides, activities and facilities fluctuates during the day this can
cause problems for the park, such as congestion and time specific peaks at the rides, activities
and facilities.
For theme park managers, capacity planning and routing is therefore an important task
to deal with these problems. For example, to optimize the visitor streams in the park and to
minimize waiting times at the activities.
Another characteristic is the fact that theme parks face high fixed costs and low variable
costs. This means that the costs per visitor in the low season, when there are only few visitors in
the park, are much higher than in the high season, especially if the quality of the visitor
experience has to be maintained. Furthermore, each year parks require high investments to add
new exciting attractions to their product to attract the required level of visitors.
At the demand side, theme park planners may rely on marketers to actively try and
manipulate tourist demand, by price differentiation across seasons, special rates for early
bookings and bundling of services and visits over time or with other tourist facilities in the
region.
Similar to other tourist attractions, theme parks first and foremost provide enjoyment to
their customers. This implies that theme park managers face especially strong demands from
customers for new and exciting innovations in their services.
Special strategies need to be devised to deal with tourist variety seeking. Also typically a
diverse number of services within a park is required to promote repeat visits and to cater for
different members of visitors groups as seniors and children) and for different segments in the
tourist population at large.
This has important implications for theme park planning in terms of location and type of
activities that should be introduced and supported. Detailed consumer information often is
essential to meet these consumers’ requirements.
The costumers requirements place special demands on theme park planners in terms of:
meeting environmental standards imposed through (inter)national regulations and local
communities, by increasing demands in terms of landscaping and design, and financial
responsibilities in terms of managing large areas of land which need to be bought, leased or
rented depending on the organization’s financial management strategy.

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Another challenge facing theme park planner is that planning a park requires special
skills in terms of combining creative and commercial abilities. Theme park design is crucial in
determining the success of a park. In terms of design, several different levels can be
distinguished. First, rides, activities and exhibits have to be designed attractively and effectively
both in terms of initial appeal and usage. Second, landscaping and urban designs are required
to integrate the different single facilities into a whole based on the selected theme for the park.
And finally, activities and services need to be arranged that can support and increase consumer
experiences of the physical elements in the park.
There also are some more general features of the theme park product that are shared
with other services and that are a challenge to theme park planning.
Meeting consumer demand must be done however without compromising environmental
and socio-cultural objectives. Because the theme product is consumed and produced at the
same time, the service must be right the first time. Therefore, adequate theme park planning is
highly critical for optimizing the delivery of the theme park product to the consumer.
The final challenges facing theme park planners are created by the theme park market.
There is a growing competition in the theme park market, with an ever increasing number of
parks and many parks expanding their activities. Even more so, the tourist demand market is
facing demographic changes in the form of agreeing population, economic changes that lead to
tighter family time budgets because of an increasing number of double earner households, and
the introduction of new technologies such as multimedia entertainment that compete directly
with the traditional theme park market.
Knowledge of potential market origins, and interests, habits and other travel
characteristics of the population is a necessary but not sufficient condition to plan the several
components of the supply side.
It is important for the parks to know how consumers think, and what makes them visit or
not visit attractions, and when they want to visit a park. Also, for theme park planners, an
estimate of peak visitor volume is essential to the planning of every feature of the theme park,
parking, attractions, exhibits, toilet facilities, tour guidance, food services and souvenir sales.
It can be concluded that the challenges theme park planners face ask for planning
methods that can integrate the different components in the planning processes within and
across various levels of planning.

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SCOPE AND DELIMITATION

SCOPE

The study cover the Philippine tourism, issues, statistics and status from past to its
present. Also indicated activities that gives solutions to tourism’s development and contribution
for the growth rate of investment to their Economy. This is by means of observing, analyzing
and investigating the current Tourism of the Philippines in Tarlac City.

DELIMITATION

As for the Tarlac, which goal is to develop tourism, the study define the importance of
Tourism Sector, which plays a major role in the economy.
 The research delimits their study to the development on how to enhance the
Tourism
 The researches delimit the study on tourism
 Reseaches limit the focus on local and Foreign visitors
 The research would include further studies on the Phillipine Tourism especially
Tarlac
 The study is delimited to Tarlac which is the area of the researches

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REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE/ STUDIES

As of now, there is no existing intergalactic theme park in the local and abroad. But there is
indoor intergalactic theme that can be related to the project.

LOCAL

NATIONAL MUSEUM PLANETARIUM

National Museum Planetarium is a planetarium owned and operated by the National Museum of
the Philippines in Manila. It is a 16-metre (52 ft) dome located in Rizal Park between the
Japanese Garden and Chinese Garden on Padre Burgos Avenue in the central district
of Ermita. It opened on October 8, 1975, and has been in operation since then.
The line-up of shows includes A Planet for Goldilocks, Journey to a Billion Suns, and Hayabusa.
The National Planetarium is 16-metre (52 ft) high and has a seating capacity of 310. It is
equipped with a GM-15-S Goto starball projector acquired since 1975. It features four daily
regular shows and a permanent exhibit in the main building featuring paintings of Philippine
astronomical myths and beliefs and diorama representations of the Solar System,
major constellations and astronomists.

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THE MIND MUSEUM

The Mind Museum is a science museum in Taguig, Metro Manila, Philippines. It is located on a
1.2 hectares (3.0 acres) lot in the J. Y. Campos Park in Bonifacio Global City, a business district
of the city. The museum consists of 250 interactive exhibits that features the five galleries depict
stories of Universe, Life, Atom, Earth and Technology. The museum opened in March 16, 2012
and was designed by architect Ed Calma, from Lor Calma & Partners.
One of the attractions in the museum is the Universe Gallery. The gallery contains a unique
planetarium which simulates star-gazing from the point of view of literally laying down on a bed
beneath the stars. The centerpiece of the gallery is a mini-planetarium that is 8 meters in
diameter and can accommodate 35-50 visitors at a time. Instead of chairs, visitors will sit and
lounge on memory foam to simulate lying on the ground and staring at the night sky. It will
feature films that discuss the other planets and starts, as well as debates such as the existence
of extraterrestrial life.

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FOREIGN

UNIVERSAL STUDIO JAPAN, located in Osaka, is one of four Universal Studios theme parks,
owned and operated by USJ Co., Ltd., which is wholly owned by NBC Universal (as of 2017). It
was best known for attractions and lands based on famous classic and modern pop
culture properties (movies, television, literature, cartoons, comics, video games, music, etc.).
Space Fantasy The Ride is one of the top attractions at Universal Studios Japan in Osaka. It’s
an interior spinning roller coaster made up of 19 solar shuttles, each of which in turn is made up
of four two-passenger vehicles. The attraction makes use of a dizzying array of technology,
including 3D cameras, scanning lasers, giant video walls for projections, fiber optics and much
more.

YOO MOOV
Yoo Moov, the intergalactic theme park at La Villette, Paris, France is an indoor theme park has
opened at La Villette: Yoo Moov Stations. Yoo Moov, features intergalactic travel and games.
Designed by Laser Games Entreprise, a company creating laser game centers, the theme park
covers 2.500 sqm and has two offers: a 30-minute interstellar mission or a 1h15 intergalactic
missions.

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Upcoming
Intergalactic Theme Parks
Disney Parks is building a Star Wars theme park at both Disneyland in California and Walt
Disney World in Florida. The company released new illustrations that give the public an idea of
how the 14-acre parks will be laid out. According to The Verge, the image first went up on a
fence in Frontier and in Disneyland close to the area that will serve as the entrance for the
upcoming Star Wars theme park.

Disney says the two theme parks will be its biggest single-themed land expansions. The theme
parks will transport "guests to a never-before-seen planet, a remote trading port and one of the
last stops before wild space where Star Wars characters and their stories come to life."

METHODOLOGY

RESEARCH METHOD

The study used the descriptive method of research utilizing SWOT Analysis. It describes
the situation of the site and the relevance information regarding the land use and tourism of the
location. The data analysis based on available records was interpreted in qualitative terms. The
researchers also focused on the economic condition of Tourism to justify the proposal.

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DATA-GATHERING INSTRUMENT

The instrument used in the study to determine the best site selection was patterned from
researches on similar topics and ideas taken from the internet.

DATA-GATHERING PROCEDURE

To gain access to records in comprehensive land use plan (CLUP) and to give the study
its formal framework, a letter of request was sent to the official website and email of the selected
site.
Data obtained from different website in the internet were related to the study. The data gathered
were then tallied, tabulated and analyzed.

DATA ANALYSIS

The following data analyses were utilized by the researcher: Tabular presentation of
SWOT for site selection. To interpret the data gathered through analyzing the data and
compared the 3 (three) different site that used in the research. 12

PLACE VISION TOURISM PRIORITIES


To develop Tourism focusing Mount Banahaw, Dolores
Quezon Province on historical, cultural and Guisguis and Bignay 2,
natural attractions and at the Sariaya Polilio Island.
same time preserve the
environment.
To develop tourism as a
major generator of
employmentand income.
To promote tourism
consciousness among the
people in the province.

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To develop tourism in a
manner that will preserve the
social, cultural and moral
values of the people.
Tourism development Sacred Relics of the true
appropriately promoted for cross; Mount Damas;
Tarlac the Economic growth through Haduan Falls
increased investments and
productive undertakings.
Imploring the aid of the Mt. Pinatubo; Mt. Tapulao;
Anawangin Cove; Potipot
Zambales almighty, envision Iba as a
Island; Capones Island and
center for tourism, education Lighthouse
and sports development.

Number of Accredited Accommodation Facilities


PLACE HOTELS INNS RESORTS
Quezon Province 3 1 8
Tarlac 5 0 1
Zambales 29 4 20
TOTAL 37 5 29
Source: DOT 2014
Number of Accredited Travel Agencies
PLACE NUMBER
QUEZON PROVINCE 4
TARLAC 11
ZAMBALES 16
TOTAL 31
Source: DOT 2014

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ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

SITE CRITERIA

1. ENGINEERING CRITERIA

A. ZONING
The site should be in tourism recreational zone that is impart of the zoning
ordinance. If not, conversion is needed.

B. MINED-OUT
The site must not have the capability of obtaining mineral reserves and should
serve other purpose but not mining

C. LAND SUITABILITY
The site should be suitable enough to accommodate a tourism recreational
proposal.

D. FLOOD CONTROL
The site should have the capability of disposing water formations to the main
drainage system.

E. SOIL EROSION
The site must be stable enough to withstand the construction of the project and
the soils must be intact enough to prevent erosion.

2. ARCHITECTURAL CRITERIA

A. ACCESSIBILITY
The site must be accessible enough to both visitors and staffs. This is by means
of road networks and availability of transportation in approaching the site.

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B. VIEWS AND VISTAS
Since the project will provide tourism related structures the views and vistas
present in the site must satisfy the end-users. These views and vistas can be
good scenery or a perfect view of nature for relaxation.

C. PEACE AND ORDER


The site should not passes any threats coming from terrorist or other crimes that
will scares the visitors and staffs.

D, ENVIRONMENT
The site should be ready to adopt reforestation and conversion and it should
have the capability of planting trees and shrubs with regards to landscaping.

E. NEIGHBORHOOD
The site should be located near to the existing structures and facilities that will be
using for the park tours. This will give an easy access for both staffs and visitors.
3. UTILITIES

A. WATER
The site should have existing water line or must be located near to the existing
water facilities

B. POWER AND ELECTRICITY


The site should have existing electricity line or must be located near to the power
and electrical facilities.

C. TELECOMMUNICATION
The site should have existing telephone line or must be located near to the
existing telecommunication facilities.

D. WASTE DISPOSAL
The site should have existing sewage line or must be located near to the existing
sanitary and plumbing facilities.

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POSSIBLE SITES
QUEZON PROVINCE
Geographical and Physical Characteristics

LOCATION
Quezon Province is bounded on the north by the province of Aurora, on the west by the
provinces of Laguna and Rizal, on the southwest by the province of Batangas and on the
southeast by Camarines Norte and Camarines Sur.

TOPOGRAPHY
Quezon's topography is characterized by rugged terrain with few plains, valleys and
swamps. Only narrow strips of land along the coast and river valley are available for growing
crops. The undulating lowlands along the coast are well drained. The province is very narrow,
averaging about thirty (30) kilometers by its width.
Slope of the province ranges from 0-3% slopes and above. The topography of the area permits
prime agricultural activities within the province.

LAND AREA AND LENGTH OF COASTLINE


: 870, 660 has. (53.21% of CALABARZON's
Total land Area
land area)
Agricultural Land Area : 513,681has. (59% of Provincial Land Area)
Length of Coastline : 1,066.36 km.

DEMOGRAPHY

DEMOGRAPHIC DATA
Population (2010 Census of
: 1,987,030
Population)

Urban Population : 665,311


Rural Population : 1,321,719
Rural Population : 1,321,719

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Male : 841,864
Female : 802,211
Annual Growth Rate : 1.8%
Population Density : 228 persons per sq. km.
Number of Households : 384,455

MAJOR RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS


Roman Catholic including Catholic
1,619,899 93.2%
Charismatic
Iglesia ni Cristo 50,151 2.9%
Other Religious Affiliations 15,927 0.9%
Seventh Day Adventist 9,080 0.5%
Bible Baptist Church 4,914 0.3%
Jehovah's Witness 4,492 0.3%
United Church of Christ in the Philippines 2,986 0.2%
Jesus is Lord Church 2,779 0.2%
Other Protestants 2,168 0.1%
Baptist Conference in the Philippines 1,795 0.1%
(Source: NSO, Public Use File 2010; excluding Lucena City)

TARLAC
GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION
The city of Tarlac is situated in the heartland of Luzon’s rich central plain. It is bounded
on the north by the province of Pangasinan, Nueva Ecija on the east, on the south by
Pampanga and Zambales on the west. The city is almost fairly equidistant from Manila, 125kms.
And baguio, 127kms. This location has made it the favorite stop over of people travelling north
to Bagiuo or manila to South
The city is popularly known as the ‘Melting pot’ of central Luzon because its residents
speak several dialects.

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CLIMATE
The climate of tarlac resembles closely that of the surrounding provinces, Nueva ecija,
Pampanga and Pangasinan. It has two (2) distinct seasons: wetand dry. The months of
November to April are generally dry while the rest of the year is the rainy season.

CLIMATE MONTH AVERAGE RAINFALL


Rainy Seasons June 286.8mm
July 358.4mm
August 378.9mm
September 315.9mm
October 193.1mm
Cool Dry November 112.6mm
December 36.9mm
January 8.1mm
February 3.4mm

Hot Dry March 13.3mm


April 21.5mm
May 165.1mm

Tarlac receives its continuous rainfall during the southwest monsoon period from June to
November, which corresponds with the wet season. The northeast monsoon period from the
months of November to may with the dry season.

TOPOGRAPHY
The physical terrain of the City of Tarlac id generally flat with slightly rolling to
mountainous on the western part. The whole city is traversed by the Tarlac river system.

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ZAMBALES

LAND AREA/ CLASSIFICATION


The province is the second largest in Region III, covering a total area of 371,440
hectares including Olongapo City classified as follows:

Land type/Classification Area (Has)

a. Timber Land 243,604.9


a.1 Estb. Timberland 181,955.9
a.2 Forest Pasture 51,817
a.3 National Park 9
a.4 Military Reservation 8,600
a.5 Fishpond 1,223
b. Alienable &Disposable 127,835.1
Total 371,440

SOIL TYPE
The soil of the province is classified into three (3) distinct groups. These are the soil of
swamps and marshes, soil of the coastal plain and the soil of the mountain. Zambales soil type
is as follows:
Soil Type Area (has) % Source
1. Undifferentiated 241,284 64.96
Mountain Soil
2. Antipolo Clay 60,130 16.96
3. Bani Clay 33,292 8.96
4. Angeles Sand 16,983 4.57
5. Qurangua Silt Loam 11,308 3.05
6. Cabangan Sandy Loam 6,723 1.81
7. Hydrosol 1,720 0.46
Total 371,440 100.00

The average pH value of the surface soil of Zambales range from 5.8 to 6.9 as far as soil
reaction & organic mater contents of the soil is concern, rice & other similar acid tolerant plants

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can expect to grow normally or fairly well without lowering the pH of the soil. The province soils
contain organic mater with an average range of 1.5 to 2.5 % which is below normal level of
3.15% needed for high agricultural production.

CLIMATE
Zambales belongs to the first type in accordance with the classification based on rainfall.
The principal climate characteristics of the first type are: 1. There is distinct wet and dry season:
dry from November to April and wet during the rest of the year. 2. The percentage of rainfall
during the months from June to October is at least 89% of the total precipitation of the year,
while the rainfall from November to February does not covered 125 of the total. 3. The amount
of land coincides with average precipitation the clearest month are from January to April (The
cloudiest is from July to September). 4. The relative humidity was posted at eighty (80) percent.

TOPOGRAPHY
The topography is gradually irregular with the coastal plains and valleys stretching from
Lingayen Gulf down south towards Subic Bay along the Western Coast and northern towards
177 Km South of Masinloc. Hydrology There are 34 rivers with numerous numbers of creeks
following from the mountain ranges in Zambales draining outward along plains and valleys
toward the China Sea. The most table with significant part to the socio-economic and political
life of the people in Sto. Tomas River in San Marcelino, Bucao River in Botolan, Tanguay River
in Cabangan, Nayom and Bayto Rivers in Sta, Cruz, Panglit River in Paluig, Bancal River in
Botolan and Naculcol River in San Marcelino and San Felipe Area.

POPULATION
As of year 2000. Population is at 627,802 with Olongapo City as the highly populated
area followed by the towns of Subic and Sta. Cruz. It has a population density of 169 per sq.
km. and estimated to grow by 1.61% annually.

LABOR FORCE/EMPLOYMENT
As of April 2003, employment is counted at 226,000 with an employment rate of 80.5%.

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NATURAL RESOURCES
The province is endowed with a number of resources from mineral deposits, crops and
other agricultural and marine products. The City, however, have a limited agricultural area of 44
hectares which is basically subsistence in nature.

TOURISM ORIENTED ESTABLISHMENTS


Hotels (accredited by DOT) 6
Resorts 6
Other tourism related companies 8
Other resorts (not accredited) 78
RECREATIONAL FACILITIES
Movie Houses 1
Beach/Cottage Resorts 115

SITE SELECTION
CRITERIAS RATING SITE
% QUEZON TARLAC ZAMBALES
PROVINCE
A. ENGINEERING
CRITERIA
1. Zoning 15 15 15 15
2. Mined-out 5 3 4 4
3. Land Suitability 10 10 10 9
4. Flood Control 5 4 4 3
5. Soil erosion 10 10 10 8
B. ARCHITECTURAL
CRITERIA
1. Accessibility 10 6 8 9
2. Views and Vistas 8 8 8 10
3. Peace and Order 5 5 5 5
4. Environment 5 3 4 3
5. Neighborhood 7 5 6 7
C. UTILITIES

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1. Water 5 5 5 5
2. Power / Electrical 5 5 5 5
3. telecommunication 5 5 5 5
4. Waste Disposal 5 5 5 5
TOTAL 100% 89 94 93

SITE JUSTIFICATION
Since the Tarlac tops the site selection process from the criteria that have been
considered, the proposed project will be located at the said site.

BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS

ADMINISTRATION EXECUTIVES
1. GENERAL MANAGER

ARRIVE LOG-IN WORK LUNCH WORK

PARKING LOG-OUT WORK SNACK

LEAVE GET CAR

2. VP OPERATIONS

ARRIVE LOG-IN WORK LUNCH WORK

PARKING LOG-OUT WORK SNACK

LEAVE GET CAR

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3. SECRETARY

ARRIVE LOG-IN WORK LUNCH WORK

PARKING LOG-OUT WORK SNACK

LEAVE GET CAR

SECURITY
1. CHIEF SECURITY
LOCKER
ARRIVE LOG-IN CHANGE WORK BREAK
CLOTHES
LOCKER
LEAVE LOG-OUT CHANGE WORK
CLOTHES

2. GUARDS
LOCKER
ARRIVE LOG-IN CHANGE WORK BREAK
CLOTHES
LOCKER
ENTER NEXT LEAVE LOG-OUT CHANGE WORK
SHIFT CLOTHES
8

3. PATROLMAN
LOCKER
ARRIVE LOG-IN CHANGE WORK BREAK
CLOTHES
LOCKER
ENTER NEXT LEAVE LOG-OUT CHANGE WORK
SHIFT CLOTHES

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ACCOUNTING
1. CHIEF ACCOUNTANT

ARRIVE LOG-IN WORK LUNCH WORK

PARKING LOG-OUT WORK SNACK

LEAVE GET CAR

2. REGISTRAR

ARRIVE LOG-IN WORK LUNCH WORK

LEAVE LOG-OUT WORK SNACK

3. CASHIER

ARRIVE LOG-IN WORK LUNCH WORK

LEAVE LOG-OUT WORK SNACK

1. GUEST

ARRIVE CHECK-IN ROAM LUNCH ROAM

LEAVE ROAM SNACK

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CHAPTER 5: SYNTHESIS (Architectural)
DESIGN PHILOSOPHY
‘TODAY WE ARE SHAPERS OF THE WORLD OF TOMORROW’
-Walt Disney

DESIGN GOALS AND OBJECTIVES


GOALS
 To have an intergalactic theme park that boosts the tourism of the location
 To have a safe and secure theme park
 A theme park that gains interest to the public
 A theme park that will serve as tourism spot of the location

OBJECTIVES
 To provide an intergalactic theme park that not only brings amusement but also ensure
the safety of the guest and staffs
 Considering the location standards and guidelines
 Theme park that showcase the characterization of the concept

DESIGN CONCEPT
FUTURISTIC
 Having or involving very modern technology or design characteristic of futurism.

DESIGN CONSIDERATION

FUNCTION AND EFFICIENCY


The state or quality of being efficient, or able to accomplish something
with the least waste of time and effort; competency in performance.

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CIRCULATION PATTERN
The term 'circulation' refers to the movement of people through, around
and between buildings and other parts of the built environment. Within
buildings, circulation spaces are spaces that are predominately used
for circulation, such as entrances, foyers and lobbies, corridors, stairs,
landings and so on.

SAFETY AND SECURITY


Is the condition of a “steady state” of an organization or place doing
what it is supposed to do. “what it is supposed to do” is defined in terms of
public codes and standards, associated architectural and engineering
designs, corporate vision and mission statements, and operational plans and
personnel policies

BUILDING LAWS
Is a set of rules that specify the standards for constructed objects such
as buildings and non building structures.

VENTILATION
Is the process of supplying and removing air through an indoor space
by natural means

References :
1. Clave, Clark, Global theme park industry, Cab International, 2007;
2. Goelder, Ch., Tourism – principles, practices, philosophies 8th ed., Edit. John Wiley
3. & Sons, SUA, 2000;
4. Wright, Godwin, The Imagineering Field Guide to Magic Kingdom Park at Walt Disney World
5. Disney Press, 2005;
6. www.themeparkinsider.com
7. www.amusamentparks.com
8. www.ourawesomeplanet.com
9. www.themindmuseum.org
10. www.usj.co.jp
11. www.trendhunter.com
12. www.sortiraparis.com
13. www.terrifictraveller.com

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