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AN EVALUATION OF THE STRATEGIES PROVIDED BY THE VEGETABLE

VENDORS

IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF VICTORIA

________________________________

A Research Paper Presented to

Mr. Dan Carlo P. Balmores

Research Paper

_________________________________

In Partial fulfilment

of the Requirements in

Practical Research II

_______________________________

BY:

LORENZO, Glenn T.

PASCUA, Shiela Marie M.

TADEM, Michelle B.

ABM-B

First semester

S.Y, 2017-2018
ii

Republic of the Philippines


Victoria National High School
Senior High School
ACCOUNTANCY AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
San Gavino Victoria Tarlac

APPROVAL SHEET

This Research of GLENN T. LORENZO, SHIELA MARIE M. PASCUA and

MICHELLE B.TADEM entitled AN EVALUATION OF THE STRATEGIES

PROVIDED BY THE VEGETABLE VENDORS IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF

VICTORIA, which is prepared and submitted in partial fulfillment of the

requirements for PRACTICAL RESEARCH II, is hereby accepted.

RESEARCH COMMITTEE

MR. DAN CARLO P. BALMORES

Chairman

Gerald Gamido Jhay – R Oriente

(Member) (Member)

Cayla Sumat

(Member)
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ABSTRACT

Title: AN EVALUATION OF THE STRATEGIES PROVIDED BY THE

VEGETABLE VENDOR IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF VICTORIA.

Researchers: Glenn T. Lorenzo

Shiela Marie M. Pascua

Michelle B. Tadem

Institution: Victoria National High School

Track: Academic Track

Strand: Accountancy and Business Management

This study was focused to the evaluation of the strategies provided by

the Vegetable Vendors in the Municipality of Victoria. The vegetable vendors

describe their different strategies to improve their sales. Also the common problems

were known and probable action plan is proposed.

The study made use a Proposed Comparative research design in the

evaluation of the strategies provided of Vegetable Vendors in the Municipality of

Victoria. The Researchers use tables, Frequency and Percentage to analyze the most

common strategies that Vegetable vendors provided in the Municipality of Victoria.

The study showed that there were problems encountered in the

business. Among with the vegetable vendor the following problems showed:

unsalable, high price of Vegetable dealer, competitor, decay of product and lastly no

permanent stall.

An action plan was recommended to address the problems encountered.


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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

It would not have been possible to write this research paper without the help

and support of the kind people around us, to only some of whom it is possible to give

particular mention here.

Above all, I would like to thank our Parents Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo, Mr. and

Mrs. Mariano Pascua Jr. and Mr. and Mrs. Vidal Tadem who helped personal

support and great patience at all times, my brother and sisters have given us their

unequivocal support throughout our journey. Financially, spiritually, mentally, and

physically. Our parents and God is our inspiration.as always, for which my mere

expression of thanks likewise does not suffice.

This Research Paper would have been possible without the help, support and

patience of our Practical Research subject teacher, Sir Dan Carlo Panzo Balmores,

not to mention his advice and unsurpassed knowledge of Research, in which we are

extremely grateful.

To the Vegetable Vendors in the Municipality of Victoria, who kindly

cooperate with us. And for their support and guidance in conducting research.

To our panelists, Mr. Gerald Gamido, Mr. Jhay-R Oriente and MS. Cayla

Sumat, for the recommendation made and for the direction they had given.

To our classmates and friends, for cheering us up every time were stressed,

and for believing that we can do it.


Above all, the praises and love to our almighty God for letting us survive and

surpassed all the challenges we encountered, for every breath we take, love and

strength. We are nothing without Him so thanks God.

Glenn, Shiela Marie and Michell


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DEDICATION

This research paper is dedicated to our Almighty God who gave us strength,

Power and Guidance in all challenges.

To our very supportive parents who extended their moral and financial

support and readily sacrifice everything to give us what we need.

To Ms. Ana Rose Y. Adan as our supporters who always cheering us up and

always there to support us in all tasks we have suffered.

To our Practical Research teacher Mr. Dan Carlo P. Balmores for his

unequivocal support and advices, despite of many ungrammatical words.

To Victoria National High School, for being our second home for almost six

years where we acquired knowledge that we need for us to survive.

To our Teachers, for enhancing our knowledge, for their advices and

unending support.

To our Classmates and friends, for the moral support and guidance

The Researchers
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Table of Contents
Title Page

Title Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i

Approval Sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

Abstract. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iii

Acknowledgement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

Dedication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v

Table of Contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi

List of tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

List of diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .viii

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Statement of the Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Significance of the Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Scope and Delimitation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Definition of Terms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

Related Literature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Foreign Literature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Foreign Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Locale Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Conceptual Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Paradigm of the Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

METHODS OF THE STUDY AND SOURCES OF DATA

Research Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Research Locale and Respondents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Sampling Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Data Gathering Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Statistical Treatment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

Gender of Vegetable vendors . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Age of vegetable vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Years in Business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Strategies of Vegetable Vendors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Problems met by the Vegetables Vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Implication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSION AND RECCOMENDATION

Summary of findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Recommendation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

APPENDICES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
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List of Tables

Table 1. Gender of Vegetable vendors . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Table 1.2 Age of vegetable vendors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Table 1.3 Years in Business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Table 2 Strategies of Vegetable Vendors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Table 3 Problems met by the Vegetables Vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21


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List of Diagram

Diagram1. Paradigm of the Study…………………………………………………15


CHAPTER 1

Problem and its Background

Introduction

Selling is first and foremost a transaction between the seller and the prospective

buyer or buyers (the target market) where money (or something considered to have

monetary value) is exchanged for goods or services. So the best way to define selling is

to focus on the sales skills that are necessary to make that transaction happen. Defining

selling as the art of closing the deal encapsulates selling's essence.

The seller or the provider of the goods or services completes a sale in response to

an acquisition, appropriation, requisition or a direct interaction with the buyer at the point

of sale. There is a passing of title (property or ownership) of the item, and the settlement

of a price, in which agreement is reached on a price for which transfer of ownership of

the item will occur. The seller, not the purchaser generally executes the sale and it may be

completed prior to the obligation of payment. In the case of indirect interaction, a person

who sells goods or service on behalf of the owner is known as a salesman or saleswoman

or salesperson, but this often refers to someone selling goods in a store/shop, in which

case other terms are also common, including salesclerk, shop assistant, and retail clerk.

Selling skills are critical in organizations that rely on ongoing buying from

customers or clients. The ability to build relationships with customers, persuade them to

make purchases and generate repeat business is at the heart of selling. A sale is a

component of a company's marketing and promotions.

Buyer motivations are quite complex and vary according to gender, age, cultural,

ethnic, regional etc. The previous chapter showed that consumer attitudes do not follow a
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uniform pattern. The Stifle (Centre technique interprofesionnel des fruits et legumes,

Laborde, et al., 1993) identifies three different types of group behavior patterns. The first

group comprises consumers with a basic attitude. They are traditional - i.e. consumers of

generic and undifferentiated fruits and vegetables. The second group seeks quality

differentiation - i.e. organic or quality certified products, commercial brands, labels of

certification of origin or regional produce that is differentiated etc. Convenience

consumers belong to the third group. They are looking for fast and simple ways to

prepare meals - i.e. prepackaged items, fresh-cut, frozen, canned and ready to eat produce.

There are other factors which also influence buying decisions. The main objective

of buying is to obtain satisfaction. For fruits and vegetables, this means being able to

meet nutritional requirements as well as being able to enjoy different tastes, textures,

colors and aromas. There are two key considerations. The tangible quality attributes such

as uniformity, freshness, quality, color, ripeness, packaging, etc. which affect appearance

and make produce more appealing or attractive compared to similar products. Buying

decisions are also influenced by some intangible quality attributes such as quality,

environmentally friendly production techniques, brand reputation, image of the supplier,

etc.

After the government suspended the import of vegetable for neighboring country,

the price of vegetable has shot up. The vegetable business in the country is awkward and

hard to understand. The profit for vegetable is huge comparing to our farmers. The

hardships of our farmers are being sold to the vendors who are imposing huge price on

the vegetables. Local and pure organic product is strong phrase use by these vendors to

Sell. A consumer has no space to negotiate. Lack of proper storage facilities is


3

Compelling farmers to sell early and consumers have to buy at the highest.

(Nimdorj,2016)

Vendors is part of the supply chain, a supply chain is the summation of all

Individuals, organization, resources, activities and technologies used in the

manufacturing and selling of a good or service. The supply chain starts with the

production and delivery of raw source material, and it ends with the sale and delivery of

the end product.

Vegetables can be eaten either raw or cooked and play an important role in human

nutrition, being mostly low in fat and carbohydrates, but high in vitamins, minerals and

dietary fiber. Many nutritionists encourage people to consume plenty of fruit and

vegetables, five or more portions a day often being recommended.

Vegetable is very important in our lives it gives us energy to do our different task,

people who eat vegetable helps to reduced risk of some chronic diseases. vegetables’’

deliver ample amounts of vitamins, including foliate, vitamin A, vitamin K and vitamin

B6, as well as carotenoids like beta carotene from carrots, lycopene from tomatoes,

zeaxanthin from greens, and lutein from spinach and collard green it is also help in

keeping your weight under control, we know that Dark green vegetables have lots of

phenolic flavonoid antioxidants and minerals. These vitamins and minerals are essential

for the proper functioning of your body.

Vegetable has a big role in our life it can be good in our healthy lifestyle,

researchers wanted to study this so to know what are the different strategies that

vegetable vendors provided to the costumers, and if how they manage their remaining

vegetable.
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Statement of the Problem

This study aims to determine the strategies provided by the vegetable vendors in

the Municipality of Victoria, their strategies and problems they met in their Business,

specifically, it sought to answer the following questions.

1. What are the profiles of vegetable vendors in the Municipality of Victoria?

2. What are the strategies employed to improve their sales?

3. What problems do they encountered on their business?

4. What recommendations can be drawn to solve/minimize the Vendors problem?

5. What is the implication of selling to ABM?

Significance of the Study

The concern of the study was the analysis of the evaluation to the vegetable

vendor at the Municipality of Victoria Tarlac Public Market. The vegetable vendor in

Public Market of Victoria will benefit to the study, by describing the strategies, problems

were seen and probable recommendations are drawn.

This study also provided an additional sources of data and additional literature to

the existing body of knowledge not only to the municipality of Victoria but also to the

constituents who will need to use the data for their own purposes.

Scope and Delimitation

This study focused on strategies provided by the vegetable owners here in the

Municipality of Victoria wherein vegetable owners were asked questions. Vegetable

vendors were also answered the questionnaire distributed by the researchers.

The researchers conducted interview and survey to the vegetable owners in the

Municipality of Victoria.
5

Definition of Terms

Acquisition. The act of acquiring something or someone acquired or gained.

(www.meriam .webster.com)

Appropriation. Act or instance of appropriating, something that has been appropriated.

(www.meriam .webster.com)

Encapsulate. To show or express the main idea or quality of (something flows in a brief

way). (www.meriam.webster.com)

Enterprise. Is another word for a profit business or company but it is most often

associated with the entrepreneurial ventures.

(www.shoppify.com/encyclopedia/enterprise.)

Fragmented. A broken part or piece of something and incompletely part.

(www.meriam.webster.com)

Manufacture. Something made frown raw materials by hand or by machinery.

(www.mariam.webster.com)

Organic. Grown or made without the use of artificial chemicals.

(www.meriam.webster.com)

Sustainable. able to be used without being completely used up or destroyed involving

methods that do not completely used up or destroy natural resources.

(www.meriam.webster.com)

Venture. An under taking involving uncertainly as to the outcome, especially a risk

dangerous one. (www.dictionary.com)

Resources. A stock or supply of money, and other assets. (ww.google.com)


CHAPTER 2

Review Related Literature And Studies

This chapter of the study presented the collected literature and studies that would

have significance and relevance to the study made.

Related Literature

Filipinos are eating less vegetable, according to a three-decade survey done by the

Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI) of the Department of Science and

Technology (DOST).

In 1978, each Filipino consumed 145 grams of vegetables per day. Three decades

later, in 2008, intake had dropped to 110 grams per day.

Sen. Cynthia Villar, chair of the Senate committee on agriculture and food, cited

these and other data in her report titled ―Agro-Ecology for Sustainable Agriculture and

Environment toward Food Security.‖ She delivered her lecture at the Southeast Asian

Agriculture and Development Seminar Series of the government-hosted Southeast Asian

Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA) based in the

University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB).

In view of the country’s unfavorable vegetable consumption picture, the

government – through the Departments of Health (DOH), Education (DepEd) and

Agriculture (DA) – has over the years been implementing programs to promote vegetable

production and consumption among Filipinos.

In her lecture, Villar noted that the DOH is promoting vegetable gardening among

Filipinos. ―By planting vegetables in our backyard, we can have our own supply and

even have opportunity to earn from it,‖ she said.


7

At the seminar, SEARCA Director Gil Saguiguit Jr. also reported DepEd’s

school-based food and nutrition program.

Saguiguit said the program was designed to improve school children’s nutritional

condition and dietary habits. Specifically, it aims to increase the knowledge and skills of

students and teachers on food production and nutrition through experiential learning

activities that would instill the importance of agriculture and the use of green

technologies.

Likewise, DA has its Gulayan ng Masa program, a hunger mitigation project that

promotes integrated home and school gardens in rural areas. It aims to reduce hunger and

improve nutrition through the promotion of school, backyard and communal gardens,

information campaigns, and provision of training and seeds.

The program, which involves local government units and other departments, is now being

assessed by SEARCA. It covers about 30 provinces from the Cordilleras to the Visayas

region, and Sulu and Tawi-Tawi in Mindanao Epidemiological evidence for the health

benefits of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables is substantial. Despite this fact large

proportions of children and

Adolescents do not meet the World Health Organization goal of a daily intake of at least

400 grams of fruit and vegetables. Longitudinal studies suggest that eating behavior such

as fruit and vegetable consumption tracks into adulthood which points at the importance

of establishing healthy eating behavior among children and adolescents.

To enable the development of relevant, effective fruit and vegetable Promoting

intervention programs and policies targeting children and adolescents it is important to


8

identify the various factors which may influence their consumption of fruit and

vegetables and both qualitative and quantitative studies are needed.

Quantitative studies are needed to quantify and rank the importance of

determinants for children's fruit and vegetable consumption and for example, to assess

sociodemographic variations in these. In the first part of this review the evidence from 98

quantitative studies of fruit and vegetable intake among children and adolescents was

analyzed. In conclusion, the determinants for high consumption levels of fruit and

vegetable supported by the strongest evidence were female gender, low age, high

socioeconomic position (SEP), high preferences for fruit and vegetables, high parental

intake of fruit and vegetables and high availability/accessibility of fruit and vegetables at

home.

Qualitative studies can add to this knowledge in several ways. They provide the

opportunity to identify yet unknown factors as the research techniques give room for

unprecedented answers as opposed to the highly structured interviews used in surveys.

Qualitative studies can thereby contribute to the development of comprehensive survey

instruments and generate hypotheses about associations which can be tested in future

quantitative studies. Furthermore, qualitative studies can generate a more thorough

understanding of fruit and vegetable consumption as they usually aim at reflecting the

diversity of views on the studied phenomenon within a given population. Finally,

qualitative methods are a useful tool within formative research aiming at designing

effective interventions tailored to a given population's own needs and contextual

conditions.
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Systematic reviews are important for evidence-based practice. Such review efforts

have almost solely been focused on quantitative studies which are also the case for

reviews concerning dietary behaviors. It is important also to review the qualitative

research to increase insight into processes which influence young people's fruit and

vegetable intake. Thus, the aim of the present paper is to present part two of a systematic

review of peer-reviewed papers, this time qualitative studies of 6-18-year-olds' views and

experiences regarding determinants of their intake of fruit and vegetables.

Epidemiologic evidence of a protective role for fruits and vegetables in cancer

prevention is substantial. The strength of this scientific base guides US national

policymaking in diet and health issues and facilitates community and local programs that

address national dietary goals to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Current

scientific evidence also suggests a protective role for fruits and vegetables in prevention

of coronary heart disease, and evidence is accumulating for a protective role in stroke. In

addition, a new scientific base is emerging to support a protective role for fruits and

vegetables in prevention of cataract formation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,

diverticulosis, and possibly, hypertension. This article provides an overview of the health

benefits associated with fruit and vegetable consumption for each of these conditions,

including brief discussions of underlying protective mechanisms, identifies key

Scientific findings regarding the health benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption, and

outlines applications of these findings for dietetics professionals. The evidence reviewed

provides additional support for increased consumption of a wide variety of vegetables, in

particular, dark-green leafy, cruciferous, and deep-yellow-orange ones, and a wide

variety of fruits, in particular, citrus and deep-yellow-orange ones. Continued attention to


10

increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is a practical and important way to optimize

nutrition to reduce disease risk and maximize good health.

Foreign literature

The increasing importance of food safety has made traceability a crucial issue in

the agribusiness industry. In this article, we have analyzed the factors that shape the

buyer-supplier relationships, and how they influence the traceability of raw materials. In

order to do so, first, we have made a literature review to develop an analytical framework.

Next, we have carried out four case studies on vegetable firms with the purpose of

uncovering the variables that characterize buyer-supplier relationships, and its influence

on traceability in this sector. Finally, we have compared the observed links with the

conceptual framework derived from the literature in order to build and improved model.

(Mª José Álvarez 1)

According to Central Statistical Office (CSO) of Poland and National Research

Institute of Agricultural and Food Economics the consumption of vegetables (excluding

potatoes) and fruits in Poland fell down from 306.1 g/person/day in 2005 to 275.2 g/

person/day in 2012 (data gathered according to analysis of home budgets). This means

that Poles eat only 68.8 % of the recommended amount of vegetables and fruits. That is

why the educational programmes focusing on the increase in fruit and vegetable

consumption are very important in the aspect of prevention of diseases related to

unbalanced nutrition. Several educational programmes have been or are held in Poland.

They are mainly designed for children, for example “Fruits in school” (promoted by

AgencjaRynku Rolnego), “Time for tomato, that is there is no way not to like polish

vegetables and fruits”, “Eat vitamins, get well soon”. However, some programmes are
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also guided to either children or adults: several editions of “5 servings of vegetables,

fruits or juice”, “Extraordinary properties of ordinary fruits”, “Don’t be a beetroot – eat

vegetables” (play on words – in Polish beetroot is also a term for someone ill-mannered

and stupid). There are also some programmes concerning nutritional education

concerning different topics, such as POL-HEALTH program for 2007-2011.

According to research the most preferable fruits for Poles are apples (37 % of all

fruits) and tropical fruits (30 %), mainly citrus and bananas. From vegetables the highly

consumed are tomatoes (17 % of all vegetables), cucumbers (12 %), carrots (11 %) and

cabbage (11 %). Even though these vegetables and fruits are mostly preferred by Poles its

consumption is lower than in countries leading in high consumption of vegetables and

fruits like Italy or Greece. The main difference in the structure of consumption between

those countries and Poland is higher consumption of tropical fruits and tomatoes [Trajer

and Dyngus, 2013].

Fruit and vegetable intake in American adults remains well below recommended

levels, despite evidence of the health benefits of diets high in fruits and vegetables.

Efforts to increase fruit and vegetable intake include behavioral-based interventions.

Generally, these interventions have demonstrated small increases in intake during the

duration of the study, although the behavioral approaches providing the greatest increase

in intake have not been clearly established. Several common behavioral theories and

approaches have been employed to promote change in health behavior, including greater

fruit and vegetable intake.

Epidemiological evidence for the health benefits of a diet rich in fruit and

vegetables is substantial [1, 2, 3]. Despite this fact large proportions of children and
12

adolescents do not meet the World Health Organization goal of a daily intake of at least

400 grams of fruit and vegetables [4, 5, 6]. Longitudinal studies suggest that eating

behaviour such as fruit and vegetable consumption tracks into adulthood which points at

the importance of establishing healthy eating behaviour among children and adolescents

[7, 8, 9].

To enable the development of relevant, effective fruit and vegetable promoting

intervention programs and policies targeting children and adolescents it is important to

identify the various factors which may influence their consumption of fruit and

vegetables and both qualitative and quantitative studies are needed [10].

Quantitative studies are needed to quantify and rank the importance of

determinants for children's fruit and vegetable consumption and for example, to assess

sociodemographic variations in these. In the first part of this review the evidence from 98

quantitative studies of fruit and vegetable intake among children and adolescents was

analysed [11]. In conclusion, the determinants for high consumption levels of fruit and

vegetable supported by the strongest evidence were female gender, low age, high

socioeconomic position (SEP), high preferences for fruit and vegetables, high parental

intake of fruit and vegetables and high availability/accessibility of fruit and vegetables at

home.

Foreign studies

According to Great Lakes Herald Traditional Indian retailers account for 12

million retail outlets all over India and more than 40 percent of them sell vegetable and

grocery ((IBEF, 2008)). Indian food retail consists of staple commodities comprising

grains, pulses, and vegetables. The Indian food retail business, especially vegetable
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retailing is witnessing a rapid growth in India's organized retail sectors. The traditional

retailing of vegetables is not very much organized, amounts to 97% of the total market

(Young,2016)is extremely localized and highly fragmented with large number of

intermediaries. The intermediaries between the customers and farmers are traditional

retailers with different outlet formats-mom and pop shops, non-permanent shops in the

market, pavement vendors, roadside vendors and push cart vegetable sellers, wholesale

traders, commission agents and auctioneers. The farmers themselves sell their products

directly to the end consumers in local markets, regulated and unregulated 'farmer markets',

or they sell to intermediaries—agents and organized retailers.

e market place is usually in close proximity to the farmland and customers

accessing the market live in and around locale. Farmers selling vegetables directly to the

customer amount to very small fraction by volume. Farmers sell bulk of their produces to

agents and auctioneers. The agents buy small quantities of produces from farmers and

transfer it to wholesalers directly or through another agent. The auctioneers are people

who enter into buying contract with farmers form whole or partial quantity of the produce

and sell the produce to an agent or a wholesaler. Auctioneers also transfer the vegetables

to wholesalers directly or through another agent. Wholesalers of vegetables sell to

retailers—both traditional and organized retailers, and to customers, who buy in large

quantity. Cart vendors, a type of traditional retailers, buy vegetables from wholesalers or

organized retailers, sell to customers in mobile carts and deliver to customers at

customer's doorsteps. Wholesale market is a vital link in vegetable supply chain. Both the

traditional and organized retailers are dependent on wholesale market with different

propositions. Chennai, the geographical area of the study has a wholesale market
14

promoted by Chennai Metropolitan Development Authority (CMDA), a regulator of

Tamil Nadu state government. The wholesale market in Chennai, Periyar Vegetable

Market at ―Koyambedu Wholesale Market Complex (KWMC) spreads over an area of

295 acres. It is located at Koyambedu, the junction of Poonamalee High Road and
11
Nesapakkam Road and can be easily accessed from all parts of the Wholesale Market for

Perishables was developed with 3,194 shops (CMDA), 2008)It is one of the largest

markets in Asia for fruits, flowers and vegetables with about 2,500 wholesale shops and

involving 10,000 daily-wage laborers’. The market generates about 100 MT of organic

wastes per day, which is being dumped into the landfill. It is necessary to study the

vegetables retail marketing of the conventional retailers as well as the modern retailers

who made their entry in the recent past in to Indian market.

Locale studies

The majority of retail vendors (64 %) and of farmers (56 %) considers the major

reason for becoming a vendor was because they are unskilled and lack of academic

education for another job. Only 7 % of the farmers and 34 % of the retailers believe that

they have a talent for marketing. This impression is reverse for wholesalers since 76 % of

them think that they are particularly skilled in Marketing while just 24 % think they are

not (table 7). As regards farmers, they usually market their vegetables by selling them to

wholesalers (59 %), followed by middleman (21 %), by retailing (15 %), while 7 % are

selling them on a consignment basis. The prices are more often dictated by the

contractors (50 %), than by the farmers themselves (37 %). Sometimes (10 %), a

compromise is reached between two parties. Eggplant (38 %), tomatoes (35 %), squash

(30 %), pak choi (25 %), head cabbage (23 %), bell pepper (20 %), string beans (15 %),
15

potatoes (14 %), chayote (12 %), carrot (11 %), sweet potato leaves (11 %) and bottle

gourd (7%) are the most popular vegetables sold by the vendors in the different public

markets of Cagayan de Oro (table 8).

Most (68 %) of the vendors purchase their vegetable supply every day, although

some (20 %) do it twice or three times a week. Frequency of purchaseis related12to

vegetables’ highly perishable state. To have fresh vegetables, vendors cannot store large

quantities of vegetables due to lack of appropriate refrigerating facilities. Most (82 %) of

the vendors believe that the consumers’ first consideration when buying is freshness

while a few (13%) think it is the texture which confirms with the expectations of the

consumers as regards quality (see table 3). Hence, maintaining the vegetables fresh is

very important to the vendor so that these will have more chances of being sold. To

prolong the freshness of vegetables, most (48 %) of the respondents sprinkle them with

water which, however can result in secondary fungal or bacterial diseases. About twenty

percent said that they just have to sell them immediately, having found no other means of

prolonging the freshness.

The vendors have different techniques of selling vegetables. While the

wholesalers remain stationary in their stalls, the retailers look for strategic places where

the consumers could easily reach them. Some retailers stay in one strategic corner while

others, especially children vendors, go around offering their vegetables to the consumers.

Separating the wholesalers and the retailers, the data show that wholesalers get an

average of 13,078 kg of vegetables from the farmers per purchase and have a daily sale of

2,403 kg. The retailers on the other hand, get 103 kilos per purchase and sell an average

of 50 kg every day. Most (72 %) of them purchase vegetables daily. This shows that
16

vendors still sell the unsold vegetables the next day, as only about half of the vegetables

they acquired are sold on the same day. When the vegetables reach their perishing state

and are not yet sold, these are usually sold at a cheaper price (48 %) or consumed (38 %).

In rare cases (15 %), unsold vegetables are thrown away. Throwing of unsold vegetables

is more common in wholesale business where 35 percent of the wholesalers do so. More

than 50 percent of the wholesalers also sell vegetables at a cheaper price when they run

the risk of not being sold at all.

In terms of add-on price, majority of the retailers (44 %) sells the vegetables at 11

to 20 percent higher than the original price. Thirty-one percent just add 5 to 10 percent to

the original price, while 13 percent have an add-on of 21 to 30 %. As regards wholesalers,

majority (63 %) reported that they add 5-10 percent to the acquisition price before selling

it, while further 38 % each add 11-20 % respectively.

About half of the materials used for packing are sacks. Furthermore, the use

containers made of rattan called 'kaing' (23 %), banana leaves (10 %), wooden crate (7%),

cardboard box or corrugated carton (4 %) as well as baskets (4 %). Sacks are readily

available and comparatively cheap. Unlike rice where all information such as price and

variety are displayed, most vegetables usually do not have price or variety tags at all. The

data show that while 17 percent of the wholesalers are labeling their produce, only 4

percent of the retailers do so. (Amelia Luz P. A.)


17
Conceptual framework

The conceptual framework includes the scope and delimitation, Questionnaires

and vegetable vendor’s profile, the flow of the study will start first with the statement of

the problems and questionnaires coming from the statement of the problems to be

answered by the respondents and also to determine their Profile.

Input Output
1. Vegetable profile
Process Analysis of the
a. Gender
Interviews strategies provided
b. Age
And By the vegetable
2. What are the strategies
surveys vendors in the
employed to improve
Municipality of
their business?
Victoria
3. What problems do they
encountered on their
Feedback
business?
Fulfillment of the
4. What recommendations
strategies
can be drawn to solve
provided by the
minimize the vendors
vegetable vendor
problem?
Good treastment to
5. What is the implication
the customers.
of selling to ABM?

Diagram 1. Research Paradigm


18

Paradigm of the Study

In the diagram, the ―Input shows the statement of the problem which indicates

the questions to the Vegetable vendors of Victoria Public Market wherein the researchers
18

will determine the strategies and the problems they met in their business, and information

provided by the vegetable vendors to make useful to the evaluation of Victoria Public

Market. While the ―Process shows the interviews and surveys. In case of doubt the

researchers will personally meet and explain the given interviews to the vegetable

vendors.
CHAPTER 3

Methods of the study and sources of data

This chapter presents the methodology employed by the researchers in achieving

the outputs of the study. It includes the research design, population of the study, sampling

design, data gathering procedure as well as statistical treatment that included in the

treatment of analysis of data.

Research Design

This study used a Proposed Comparative research design. Comparative research is

a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across

different countries or cultures. A major problem in comparative research is that the data

sets in different countries may not use the same categories, or define categories

differently. In Evaluation of the strategies provided by the vegetable owners in the

Municipality of Victoria. Proposed comparative research was use to compare their

problems they have met and common strategies they used to improve their sales.

Research locale and respondents

The subjects of the research are the Vegetable vendors in the Municipality of

Victoria were used as respondents in this study.

Sampling design

The researchers ask questions to the vegetable owners to Gathered the half of the

sample 50%, researchers will use Interview and survey questionnaire to attain the 50%

sample.
20

Data Gathering Procedure

The researchers use interview and survey as a source of data. Interview was done

to the concerned Vegetable Owners to evaluate the strategies provided by the Vegetable

Owners in the Municipality of Victoria. Survey was also conducted among the Vegetable

Owners which provided data used in knowing their common strategies, problems and

recommendations. The respondents of this study were come from Public Market of

Victoria.

Statistical treatment

Results were presented is based on the percentage and frequency for interpretation

and analysis.

Formula for percentage:

%=f/nx100

Where:

F=frequency

N=total no. of respondent


CHAPTER IV

Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data

This chapter presents the Analysis and Interpretation of data that researchers

gathered about the strategies provided by the Vegetable Vendors in the Municipality of

Victoria.

The profiles of Vegetable Vendors in Municipality of Victoria.

Table 1. Gender of Vegetable vendors

Gender Frequency Percentage Rate

Female 37 78.72% 1

Male 10 21.28% 2

Total 47 100%

 As shown on the table that the vegetable vendors profile, gender of vegetable

vendors female and male, female with (37), while male is (10)

Table 1.2 Age of vegetable vendors

Age Frequency Percentage Rate

21-30 5 10.64% 5

31-40 12 25.53% 2

41-50 16 34.04% 1

51-60 7 14.89% 3

61-70 7 14.89% 4

Total 47 100%
22

 In this table showed that the vegetable vendors profile of Vegetable vendors, age

21-30 years old with (5), and 31-40 years old is (12), while 41-50 years old is

(16),then 51-60 years old is (7), and also the 61-70years old is (7).

Table 1.3 Years in Business

Years in Business Frequency Percentage Rate

1-10 24 51.06% 1

11-20 16 34.04% 2

21-30 4 8.51% 3

31-40 2 4.26% 4

41-50 1 2.13% 5

Total 47 100%

 In this table showed that in the Vegetable Vendors years in Business 1-10 years in

Business with (24), while 11-20 years in Business (16), 21-30 years in Business is

(4), 31-40 years in Business (2), 41-50 years in Business with (1).

Strategies of Vegetable Vendors in the Municipality of Victoria

Table.2 Strategies of Vegetable Vendors

Strategies Frequency Percentage Rate

Fresh Vegetables 6 12.77% 3

Friendly 12 25.53% 2

Sales talk 21 44.68% 1


23

Low price 8 17.02% 4

Total 47 100%

 As shown on the table above that the different strategies that the Vegetable

Vendors used are fresh vegetable with (6), friendly is with (12), sales talk with

(21), while low price with (8).

Problems that Vegetable Vendors met in the Municipality of Victoria.

Table. 3 Problems met by the Vegetables Vendors

Problems Frequency Percentage Rate

Unsalable 18 38.30% 1

High price of Vegetable Dealer 4 8.51% 4

Competitor 8 17.02% 3

Decay of Product 14 29.79% 2

No Permanent Stall 3 6.38% 5

Total 47 100%

 In this table showed above that the common problems met by the Vegetable

Vendors in the Municipality of Victoria are Unsalable with (18), High price of

Vegetable dealer with (4), Competitors is (8), Decay of product with (14), No

Permanent Stall is with (3).


24

Implication

This study entitled An Evaluation of the Strategies provided by the Vegetable

Vendors In the Municipality of Victoria will give importance to the ABM students

because; it will help them on how they manage their business someday and how they

improve their sales according to their strategies Provided, in this study it may also help

ABM students to cope up their problems they will encounter on their business someday.

This Research may also help to the vegetable vendors in the Municipality of

Victoria, on their strategies they use because in this study shows that if you are vegetable

vendor you have a different strategies you may use and you have a different problems to

meet so be alert on what are may happen to your business it’s either patronize by your

costumers or not.

This may also important to the future business man and bu8siness woman,

because it will give and guide them into the better future of their business.
CHAPTER V

Summary of findings, Conclusion and Recommendation

This chapter presents the summary or the research work undertaken, the

conclusion drawn and the recommendation made as an outgrowth of this study.

Summary of Findings

This summary of finding presents the summary of respondents answer in the

survey questionnaire.

1.) What are the profiles of Vegetable Vendors in the Municipality of Victoria, In

this most of all Vegetable Vendors gender is female (37), and the most of all

age of Vegetable Vendors is at the age of (41- 50) (16), and the most

prolonged years in business vegetable Vendors is (1-10) years in business (24).

2.) What are the different strategies that vegetable Vendors use to improve their

sales, in these most common strategies that Vegetable vendors use is sales talk.

3.) What are the problems you have met in your business, in this the most

common problem that vegetable vendors met is unsalable.

Conclusion

Based on the summary of findings here are the conclusions.

1.) Most of all the profiles of Vegetable Vendors are gender female, age (41-50),

(1-10) years in business.

2.) Most of all the common strategies they used to improve their sales is sales talk.

3.) Most of all the problems they met in their business is unsalable.
26

Recommendation

Based on the summary of findings and conclusion here are the recommendation

suggested by the researchers.

1.) Researchers recommend to all of the Vegetable Vendor that they remain using the

sales talk strategy.

2.) Researchers recommend to all of the vegetable vendors that always think positive

and be friendly so that all of their product will be sold out.

3.) Researchers recommend to all of the vegetable vendors in the Municipality of

Victoria that always remain their Vegetable looks fresh.

4.) Researchers recommend that Display your products in attractive natural

containers like reed baskets, cane baskets, or wooden boxes instead of cardboard

boxes. Then Tilt boxes or baskets at an angle towards the customer. This makes

the product more approachable and appealing.

5.) Keep your displays and your containers looking full. If you run low on a product,

shift it to a smaller container to make it appear full and overflowing.


Bibliography

(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.shoppify.com/encyclopedia/enterprise.

(CMDA). (2008).

Nimdorj. (2016, 11).

Young), (. &. (2016).

IBEF. (2008).

Amelia Luz P. Agbayani, R. J.

Mª José Álvarez 1, J. A.

ww.google.com. (n.d.).

([Trajer and Dyngus)


Appendices:
Name (optional): ________________________________

Age:_________

Gender Male

Female

Business Nature: ___________________________

Years in business:__________________________

1. What are the different strategies you use to improve your sales?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
__________________
2. What are the Problems you have met on your Business?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
__________________

Name (optional): ________________________________

Age:_________

Gender Male

Female

Business Nature: ___________________________

Years in business:__________________________

1. What are the different strategies you use to improve your sales?

________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
__________________

2. What are the Problems you have met on your Business?

________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
__________________
DOCUMENTATION
CURRICULUM VITAE

GLENN T. LORENZO

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Secondary:

Victoria National High School

San Gavino Victoria, Tarlac

S.Y. 2012-2018

Primary:

Batang-Batang Elementary School

Batang Batang Victoria, Tarlac

S.Y. 2007-2012

ORGANIZATION AND CLUB AFFILIATION

 Business Club ( Member 2016-2017)

SEMINARS

 Drug Awareness

Victoria National High School

August 2016

 Earthquake Awareness

Victoria National High School

November 2016
PERSONAL INFORMATION

Date of Birth : October 26, 1999

Age : 17

Place of Birth : Victoria Tarlac

Sex : Male

Citizenship : Filipino

Civil Status : Single

Religion : Roman Catholic

Father : Nestor Lorenzo

Mother : Coralyn Lorenzo


SHIELA MARIE M. PASCUA

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Secondary

Roxas National High School

Facoma Roxas, Isabela

S.Y. 2012-2018

Primary

Bantug-Lintao Elementary School

Bantug-Lintao Roxas Isabela

S.Y. 2007-2012

ORGANIZATION AND CLUB AFFILIATION

 Supreme Students Government (Grade 9 Representative 2013-


2014)

 Business club (Member 2016-2017)

SEMINAR

 Drug Awareness

Victoria National High School

August 2016
 Pregnancy Awareness

Victoria National High School

October 2016

 Earthquake Awareness

Victoria National High School

November 2016

PERSONAL INFORMATION

Date of Birth : April 29, 2000

Age : 17

Place of Birth : Balayang Victoria, Tarlac

Sex : Female

Citizenship : Filipino

Civil Status : Single

Religion : Roman Catholic

Father : Mariano Pascua Jr.

Mother : Ma. Corazon Pascua


MICHELLE B. TADEM

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Secondary

Victoria National High School

San Gavino Victoria, Tarlac

S.Y. 2012-2018

Primary

Maluid Cabrera Elementary School

Maluid Victoria, Tarlac

S.Y. 2007-2012

ORGANIZATION AND CLUB AFFILIATION

 Business club (Member 2016-2017)

SEMINARS

 Drug Awareness

Victoria National High School

August 2016

 Pregnancy Awareness

Victoria National High School

October 2016

 Earthquake Awareness
Victoria National High School

November 2016

PERSONAL INFORMATION

Date of Birth : August 27, 1999

Age : 18

Place of Birth : Maluid Victoria, Tarlac

Sex : Female

Citizenship : Filipino

Civil Status : Single

Religion : Roman Catholic

Father : Vidal Tadem

Mother : Melody Tadem