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GARRETT COLLEGE

2009-2010 CATALOG
REVISED 1/21/2010

Garrett College ▪ 687 Mosser Road ▪ McHenry, MD 21541 ▪ 301.387.3000 ▪ www.garrettcollege.edu

Garrett College is a public, two year, associate’s degree granting institution of the State of Maryland.
DISCLAIMER
Students are not to regard the provisions of this catalog as a contract between themselves and Garrett College. In order
to continually serve the interests of the College and its students, the College reserves the right to change provisions and
requirements of this catalog. Refer to the College webpage for the most current version of the catalog. Students’
failure to read this catalog does not excuse them from the regulations and requirements contained in it.

Garrett College does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, national origin, ethnic origin, or
handicapping conditions. This nondiscrimination policy includes equal treatment for students in regard to admission,
programs/activities, financial assistance, and equal treatment of faculty and staff in employment.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS ........................................................................................................................................................... III


ACADEMIC CALENDAR ........................................................................................................................................................ IV
GENERAL INFORMATION ...................................................................................................................................................... 1
Accreditation ..........................................................................................................................................................................................1
Mission and Goals ..................................................................................................................................................................................1
Academic Programs ................................................................................................................................................................................1
The Campus ............................................................................................................................................................................................9
Affirmative Action for Educational Opportunity ....................................................................................................................................9
Accessibility for Handicapped Students ..............................................................................................................................................10
Harassment/Assault Policy ...................................................................................................................................................................10
Student Grievance Procedures .............................................................................................................................................................10
ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE ............................................................................................................................................... 11
Who May Apply? ..................................................................................................................................................................................11
How Do You Apply? ..............................................................................................................................................................................13
Student Classifications .........................................................................................................................................................................14
Acceptance of Credits Into Garrett College ..........................................................................................................................................14
Student Residency ................................................................................................................................................................................16
FINANCIAL INFORMATION................................................................................................................................................... 21
Tuition, Fees, and Other Expenses .......................................................................................................................................................21
Financial Aid Programs .........................................................................................................................................................................24
Student Labor Programs .......................................................................................................................................................................27
New Horizons Program.........................................................................................................................................................................28
STUDENT LIFE .................................................................................................................................................................. 29
Student Government ............................................................................................................................................................................29
Student Organizations and Activities ...................................................................................................................................................29
Athletics................................................................................................................................................................................................29
Residence Life.......................................................................................................................................................................................29
Food Service .........................................................................................................................................................................................29
Student Code of Conduct .....................................................................................................................................................................29
STUDENT SERVICES ........................................................................................................................................................... 31
Records and Registration .....................................................................................................................................................................31
Student Support Services .....................................................................................................................................................................32
International Students..........................................................................................................................................................................33
Health and Counseling Services ............................................................................................................................................................34
Continuing Education and Workforce Development ............................................................................................................................34
ACADEMICS..................................................................................................................................................................... 37
Academic Program Information ...........................................................................................................................................................37
Academic Regulations ..........................................................................................................................................................................39
Graduation ...........................................................................................................................................................................................45
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ...................................................................................................................................................... 49
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ...................................................................................................................................................... 95
BOARD OF TRUSTEES, ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY & STAFF ..................................................................................................... 131
Board of Trustees 2009-2010 .............................................................................................................................................................131
College Administration .......................................................................................................................................................................131
Administrative and Support Staff .......................................................................................................................................................131
Emeriti Honorees................................................................................................................................................................................132
Faculty ................................................................................................................................................................................................132
INDEX .......................................................................................................................................................................... 141

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR
FALL SEMESTER 2009
Tuesday September 8 ....................................................................................... New Student Orientation
Wednesday, September 9 ..........................................................................................First Day of Classes
Tuesday, September 15 ..................................................................................... Last Day to Drop Classes
Tuesday, September 15 ................................................................................... Last Day for 100% Refund
Wednesday, September 16 ...................................................... Last Day for Payment to Business Office
Wednesday, September 16 ...............................................Last Day for Financial Aid Bookstore Charges
Thursday, September 24 ................................................................... Last Day to Withdraw from Classes
Thursday, September 24 .................................................................................... Last Day for 50% Refund
Friday, October 23 .................................................................................... Mid-Term Grade Reports Due
Wednesday-Sunday, November 25-29 ................................................................... Thanksgiving Holiday
Friday, December 11 ................................................................................................... Last Day of Classes
Monday-Friday, December 14-18 .......................................................................................... Final Exams

INTERSESSION 2010
Monday, January 4 ............................................................................................................ College Opens
Tuesday, January 5 .....................................................................................................First Day of Classes
Tuesday, January 5 ................................................................... Last Day for Payment to Business Office
Tuesday, January 5 ............................................................Last Day for Financial Aid Bookstore Charges
Tuesday, January 5 .......................................................................................... Last Day for 100% Refund
Tuesday, January 5 ........................................................................... Last Day to Withdraw from Classes
Thursday, January 14 .................................................................................................. Last Day of Classes
Friday, January 15 .................................................................................................................. Final Exams

SPRING 2010
Tuesday, January 19 .............................................................Late Registration and Schedule Adjustment
Tuesday, January 19 .......................................................................................... New Student Orientation
Wednesday, January 20...............................................................................................First Day of Classes
Friday, January 22 ................................................................................................Last Day to Add Classes
Tuesday, January 26 ........................................................................................... Last Day to Drop Classes
Tuesday, January 26 ......................................................................................... Last Day for 100% Refund
Tuesday, January 26 .................................................................. Last Day for Payment to Business Office
Thursday, January 28 ..........................................................Last Day for Financial Aid Bookstore Charges
Monday, February 8 ........................................................................................... Last Day for 50% Refund
Monday, February 15 .......................................................................................... President’s Day Holiday
Friday, March 5 .......................................................................................... Mid-Term Grade Reports Due
Friday, March 12 ................................................................................ Last Day to Withdraw from Classes
Saturday-Sunday, March 13-21 ............................................................................................ Spring Break
Friday, April 2 ............................................................................................................Good Friday Holiday
Monday, May 3 ........................................................................................................... Last Day of Classes
Tuesday-Friday, May 4-7 ....................................................................................................... Final Exams
Saturday, May 15 ........................................................................................................... Commencement

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GENERAL INFORMATION
Workforce Development: Support the economic
ACCREDITATION development of Garrett County and the surrounding
Garrett College is a public, two-year institution region by creating a skilled workforce through credit
accredited by the Maryland Higher Education programs, as well as non-credit job readiness and
Commission and Middle States Association of Colleges workforce preparation courses; Garrett College will
and Schools. also be the provider of choice for affordable contract
and customized training in response to the emerging
needs of new and growing businesses.
MISSION AND GOALS
Garrett College provides accessible, quality education Community Service: Serve, within the scope of available
in a supportive environment to a diverse student resources, the specific needs of the community through
population. We offer associate degrees and certificate partnerships with local government, businesses,
programs as well as continuing education to meet the community and arts organizations, schools, and non-
transfer, career, workforce development, and lifelong profit agencies; and by providing continuing education
learning needs of our students and the community. We courses for personal enrichment, lifelong learning, and
are committed to the on-going development of community need.
engaging, innovative, and sustainable curricula,
programs, and initiatives that are responsive to a Effective Use of Financial, Human, and Physical
changing world. Resources: Ensure, through the application of “best
practices”, that financial, human, and physical
resources are managed effectively and efficiently for
INSTITUTIONAL GOALS
optimal results.
Accessibility: Make higher education accessible to a
diverse student population through appropriate
admissions practices, active recruitment of a diverse ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
student body, affordable tuition and fees, financial aid Garrett College operates on a semester basis and offers
and scholarship assistance, developmental studies for a variety of transfer and career advancement programs
students who are under-prepared for college-level leading to Associate in Arts or Associate in Applied
work, student support services, and delivery of courses Science degrees as well as one-year certificate
at times and via media that are responsive to student programs. An Associate of Arts in Teaching degree is
needs. also offered for Elementary Education.

Student Satisfaction and Success: Create and sustain a


supportive learning environment that encourages ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE / TRANSFER
student growth and achievement through appropriate PROGRAMS
advising and career counseling, transfer and career
preparation programs, experiential learning ARTS AND SCIENCES
opportunities, and curricular as well as extra-curricular The Arts and Sciences cover a broad range of subjects
activities that encourage student engagement and and disciplines. Students enrolled in the Arts and
responsibility. Sciences programs select a major program to graduate
with an A.A. Degree or option in preparation for
Educational Effectiveness: Ensure, through an emphasis transfer to a four-year college or university. The focus
on teaching excellence, that graduating students are of this academic major may be as diversified as fine and
able to demonstrate mastery with respect to oral and performing arts, social and behavioral sciences, liberal
written communications skills, information literacy, arts, or mathematics/sciences. Academic advisors will
critical reasoning and analysis, quantitative reasoning, assist students in appropriate course selection and
scientific literacy, and information management; that guide them in reviewing transfer requirements to four-
they have achieved the requisite levels of academic and year institutions.
technical proficiency in their major; and that, through
activities focusing on diversity and cultural awareness, Options include: Fine and Performing Arts, Liberal Arts,
they are adequately prepared to live and work in a Mathematics/Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences,
global society comprised of diverse cultures and beliefs. and Wildlife/Fisheries.

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P ROGRAM G OALS : F INE AND P ERFORMING A RTS enjoy as members of those groups, as well as the
Information Literacy Skills: Students will be able to problems they face as global citizens.
recognize when artistic research is needed and have
the ability to locate, evaluate, and effectively use the Personal and Interpersonal Skills: Students will
information. demonstrate a sense of professionalism by being on
time for classes and appointments, by showing up for
Communication Skills: Students will be able to present class, by embracing responsibility, by being considerate
or perform artistic ideas in written, visual, and oral of others, by illustrating good manners, by meeting
formats. deadlines, and by following instructions.

Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Students will be P ROGRAM G OALS : M ATHEMATICS /S CIENCES
able to critique and/or create works of art within two Information Literacy Skills: Students will incorporate
areas of concentration in the Fine Arts: Music, Art, or information literacy skills that will enable them to
Theatre. locate, evaluate, and effectively use information to
complete assignments.
Cultural and Global Perspective: Students will be able
to recognize and appreciate artistic contributions of Communication Skills: Students will demonstrate
diverse cultures, both past and present. competency in written and verbal communication
appropriate to the math/science area.
Personal and Interpersonal Skills: Students will
demonstrate appropriate discipline, demeanor, and Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Students will
ethics expected of Fine and Performing artists. develop the capacity for critical thinking through
application of deductive and inductive reasoning.
Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major:
Artistic proficiency in the student’s area of Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills:
concentration will be demonstrated through portfolio Students will acquire an informed perspective on
or performance. Students will be prepared to transfer current topics of a scientific or quantitative nature.
to 4-year institutions.
Information Management Skills: Students will use
P ROGRAM G OALS : L IBERAL A RTS appropriate software for research, communication, and
Communication Skills: Students will demonstrate oral practical application.
and written skills that will enable them to communicate
effectively in academic and business settings. Cultural and Global Perspective: Students will
demonstrate an understanding of the role of culture in
Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Students will shaping different world views, principally how different
demonstrate the ability to make informed, logical cultures view and apply the disciplines of mathematics
choices about issues brought forth from readings and and scientific inquiry.
discussions about history, literature, science, religion,
social diversity, politics, and the environment. Personal and Interpersonal Skills: Students will
demonstrate the development of personal qualities
Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills: and interpersonal skills necessary for success in the
Students will demonstrate an understanding of the workplace.
scientific method of inquiry and show an ability to
engage in numerical analysis. Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major:
Students will demonstrate mastery of the fundamental
Information Management Skills: Students will knowledge, skills, and abilities required for success in
demonstrate the ability to use a variety of print and the disciplines of mathematics and science.
electronic sources for research, communication, and
practical application, and to effectively collect, P ROGRAM G OALS : S OCIAL AND B EHAVIORAL
organize, and synthesize this information to display S CIENCES
meaningful results. Information Literacy Skills: Students will demonstrate
literacy skills that will enable them to locate, evaluate
Cultural and Global Perspective: Students will and effectively use information to complete
demonstrate an awareness of the diverse cultures and assignments.
subcultures that comprise the social fabric of which
they are a part, and an awareness of the benefits they

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Communication Skills: Students will demonstrate Communication Skills: To communicate effectively,
competency in written and verbal communication in orally and in writing, using BIT media.
the major of Social and Behavior Sciences.
Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: To use technology
Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Students will be to analyze BIT case studies. To function effectively and
able to assess claims and make judgments based on efficiently to run a business either as an individual or as
well-supported evidence in Social and Behavioral a team member. To distinguish critical from non-critical
Sciences. information in various BIT situations.

Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills: Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills: To
Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze and use technology and BIT applications to effectively
interpret the research used in Social and Behavioral collect data and analyze and display results.
Sciences.
Information Management Skills: To use BIT software for
Information Management Skills: Students will research, communication and practical application.
demonstrate the ability to use and apply electronic
media for research and oral and written presentations Cultural and Global Perspective: To value and to exhibit
in Social and Behavioral Sciences. comfort with cultural differences in BIT situations. To
demonstrate an ability to work as a team with a diverse
Cultural and Global Perspective: Students will be able group of students. To exhibit ethical behavior, value
to identify social, cultural, economic, and historical community service, and appreciate the importance of
factors that affect the dynamics of society at the global, social responsibility.
national, regional, and local levels.
Personal and Interpersonal Skills: To make students
Personal and Interpersonal Skills: Students will aware of the need for appropriate business attire
demonstrate effective coping and leadership skills that attributes and behavior that enable an individual to
facilitate self-development and personal, academic, achieve personal, academic and professional success.
and professional success. To develop leadership potential in self and others. To
apply conflict resolution skills to help settling disputes
Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major: in BIT.
Students will demonstrate academic and technical
proficiency in their area of concentration within the Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major:
Social and Behavioral Sciences. Graduates of BIT will be proficient in the knowledge,
skills and abilities to find employment in their chosen
P ROGRAM G OALS : W ILDLIFE /F ISHERIES field or to be qualified to continue their studies at
( IN DEVELOPMENT ) another institution of higher learning.
This transfer program is articulated with the Wildlife
and Fisheries Program at FSU. Students interested in GENERAL STUDIES
this program should work closely with their academic General Studies is a popular transfer program since
advisor. many students do not have a clear choice of major at
the time of their admission to college. This program
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION allows students to complete general education
The business area can accommodate a wide variety of requirements and explore various disciplines which
interests--accounting, management, marketing, sales, may assist the student in determining a program major
advertising, economics, public relations, banking and in preparation for transfer to a four-year
investing, to name a few. There are many employment college/university.
opportunities for business majors, including small
businesses, corporations, banks, or entrepreneurial P ROGRAM G OALS : G ENERAL S TUDIES
enterprises. Information Literacy Skills: Students will demonstrate
competency in information literacy skills. Information
P ROGRAM G OALS : B USINESS A DMINISTRATION literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to
Information Literacy Skills: To incorporate information recognize when information is needed and have the
literacy skills that will enable students to locate, ability to locate, evaluate, and effectively use the
evaluate and effectively use information in the needed information.
student’s program option.
Communication Skills: Students will demonstrate verbal
communication skills and the ability to produce written

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work that meets or exceeds established performance Information Literacy Skills: Students will incorporate
standards. Communication skills include making information literacy skills that will evidence their ability
connections that create meaning between one’s self to locate, evaluate, and effectively use information to
and his or her audience; speaking, reading, writing, and complete assignments.
listening effectively; using electronic media,
technology, and data effectively; having information Communication Skills: Students will demonstrate
literacy skills that enable students to find, evaluate, competency in written and verbal communication
incorporate, and present information effectively. appropriate to their teacher education focus (early
childhood, elementary, secondary education).
Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Students will
demonstrate the ability to use analysis and reasoning Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Students will
skills required to engage in clear and critical analysis of research, analyze, and evaluate learning theories,
situations, events, issues, ideas, and texts by fusing strategies, and technology relevant to classroom
experience, reason, and training into considered instruction. Students will develop and demonstrate the
judgment. ability to manage classroom activities and behavior.

Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills: Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills:
Students will demonstrate the ability to apply scientific Students will demonstrate competent understanding of
literacy and quantitative reasoning skills including the the life sciences, physical sciences, earth science, and
use of appropriate scientific, mathematical or statistical mathematics as required for teacher certification.
models in interpreting quantifiable phenomena and the
use of scientific, mathematical or statistical symbols, Information Management Skills: Students will utilize
techniques, and logic in solving problems of a technology in preparing reports and presentations
quantifiable nature. appropriate to their area of study in teacher education.

Information Management Skills: Students will Cultural and Global Perspective: Students will gain an
demonstrate the ability to use and apply electronic understanding of various cultures: their values, beliefs,
media for research, communication, and practical and contributions, as evidenced through research and
application including word processing, spreadsheets, presentations.
databases, and presentation software.
Personal and Interpersonal Skills: Students will
Cultural and Global Perspective: Students will demonstrate the ability to interact positively with
demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of teachers, peers, and children in educational settings.
global and cultural perspectives as it pertains to an Students will evidence self-confidence, cooperation,
awareness of global issues and an appreciation of and leadership skills in interpersonal interactions.
cultural dynamics through different disciplines.
Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major:
Personal and Interpersonal Skills: Students will Students will demonstrate the skills required for a
demonstrate effective application of personal and successful career in teaching including objective
interpersonal skills, attributes and behaviors that observation of students, developing lesson plans, and
enable an individual to achieve personal, academic, and classroom management.
professional success.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN TEACHING DEGREE /
TEACHER EDUCATION TRANSFER PROGRAM
The Teacher Education program prepares students who
aspire to teach at the preschool, elementary, or TEACHER EDUCATION: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
secondary level for transfer into a four-year teacher OPTION
education curriculum. Students have the opportunity to This program is designed for transfer to a four-year
participate in classroom activities in the public schools Maryland institution.
as part of their pre-professional course work.
P ROGRAM G OALS : T EACHER E DUCATION :
Options include: Early Childhood Education, Elementary
E LEMENTARY E DUCATION
Education, Physical Education & Health, and Secondary
( IN DEVELOPMENT )
Education. The Teacher Education: Elementary Education option
prepares students who aspire to teach at the
P ROGRAM G OALS : T EACHER E DUCATION
elementary level for transfer into a Maryland four-year

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teacher education curriculum. Students have the individuals with diverse learning styles and physical and
opportunity to participate in classroom activities in the mental capabilities, including those individuals with
public schools as part of their pre-professional course special needs.
work.
Personal and Interpersonal Skills: AVS students will
demonstrate effective leadership and interpersonal
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE / CAREER skills when leading, instructing, guiding, or facilitating
ADVANCEMENT recreation activities.
ADVENTURE SPORTS MANAGEMENT Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major: AVS
The Adventure Sports program offers students the students will demonstrate proficiency in the
opportunity to combine studies in business knowledge, skills and abilities required for success in
management, environmental science, and leadership the Adventure Sports industry. AVS students will
development with participation in adventure sport demonstrate technical proficiency in at least two
skills classes in preparation for entry into the job industry-recognized skill development areas.
market trained for middle management positions in
organizations specializing in adventure sport activities. BUSINESS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
Students may elect to transfer to another institution for Business and Information Technologies offer programs
further schooling, leading to a Bachelor’s Degree. designed to prepare students for the business careers
Garrett’s program is fully articulated with nearby of today and the future. The curriculum is designed to
Frostburg State University’s Department of Health, develop the skills needed to work in a business world
Physical Education, and Recreation where students that is becoming increasingly dependent on
may earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Recreation with an technology.
emphasis in Adventure Sports.
Options include: Business Management and Computer
P ROGRAM G OALS : A DVENTURE S PORTS Applications for Business
Information Literacy Skills: AVS students will
incorporate information literacy skills that will enable P ROGRAM G OALS : B USINESS M ANAGEMENT
them to locate, evaluate, and effectively use Information Literacy Skills: To incorporate information
information in a variety of contexts pertaining to the literacy skills that will enable students to locate,
recreation industry. evaluate and effectively use information in the
student’s program option.
Communication Skills: AVS students will communicate
effectively, both orally and in writing. AVS students will Communication Skills: To communicate effectively,
demonstrate effective communication skills when orally and in writing, using BIT media.
leading, instructing, guiding, or facilitating recreation
activities. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: To use technology
to analyze BIT case studies. To function effectively and
Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: AVS students will efficiently to run a business either as an individual or as
demonstrate the ability to recognize and evaluate a team member. To distinguish critical from non-critical
potentially dangerous or hazardous situations and to information in various BIT situations.
implement strategies for managing risk effectively.
Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills: To
Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills: use technology and BIT applications to effectively
AVS students will demonstrate an understanding of and collect data and analyze and display results.
appreciation for the environmental and earth sciences
as they apply to outdoor recreation activities. Information Management Skills: To use BIT software for
research, communication and practical application.
Information Management Skills: AVS students will use
computer technology effectively for communication, to Cultural and Global Perspective: To value and to exhibit
access industry-related information (e.g., weather comfort with cultural differences in BIT situations. To
reports and hydrologic data), and for other applications demonstrate an ability to work as a team with a diverse
relevant to the outdoor recreation industry. group of students. To exhibit ethical behavior, value
community service, and appreciate the importance of
Cultural and Global Perspective: AVS students will be social responsibility.
able to work comfortably with individuals from diverse
cultural and ethnic backgrounds, as well as with

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Personal and Interpersonal Skills: To make students field or to be qualified to continue their studies at
aware of the need for appropriate business attire another institution of higher learning.
attributes and behavior that enable an individual to
achieve personal, academic and professional success. COMPUTER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
To develop leadership potential in self and others. To Computer and Information Technology programs
apply conflict resolution skills to help settling disputes prepare students for technology-based careers.
in BIT. Students can earn national certifications as a Microsoft
Certified Systems Engineer, an A+ Computer Repair
Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major: Technician, or a Net+ Technician.
Graduates of BIT will be proficient in the knowledge,
skills and abilities to find employment in their chosen Options include: Computer Repair/Network Technician,
field or to be qualified to continue their studies at Graphic/Web Design, and Network Administration.
another institution of higher learning.
P ROGRAM G OALS : C OMPUTER R EPAIR /N ETWORK
P ROGRAM G OALS : BIT – C OMPUTER A PPLICATIONS T ECHNICIAN
FOR B USINESS ( IN DEVELOPMENT )
Information Literacy Skills: To incorporate information
literacy skills that will enable students to locate, P ROGRAM G OALS : G RAPHIC /W EB D ESIGN
evaluate and effectively use information in the ( IN DEVELOPMENT )
student’s program option.
P ROGRAM G OALS : N ETWORK A DMINISTRATION
Communication Skills: To communicate effectively, ( IN DEVELOPMENT )
orally and in writing, using BIT media.
JUVENILE JUSTICE
Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: To use technology
The Juvenile Justice curriculum offers a degree program
to analyze BIT case studies. To function effectively and
that prepares students with a thorough understanding
efficiently to run a business either as an individual or as
of the dynamics and theories of juvenile delinquency
a team member. To distinguish critical from non-critical
and of the scope and range of interventions for
information in various BIT situations.
delinquent and at-risk behaviors. Students study the
Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills: To unique features of the juvenile justice system, diversion
use technology and BIT applications to effectively and community justice, and interaction between
collect data and analyze and display results. delinquent youth and the myriad service providers and
professionals associated with the juvenile and justice
Information Management Skills: To use BIT software for systems.
research, communication and practical application.
The program equips students with a solid practical skills
Cultural and Global Perspective: To value and to exhibit set including conflict management, leadership, and
comfort with cultural differences in BIT situations. To experience in juvenile justice settings working with
demonstrate an ability to work as a team with a diverse adjudicated youth. The Juvenile Justice A.A.S. degree
group of students. To exhibit ethical behavior, value prepares students for employment in juvenile services
community service, and appreciate the importance of or to transfer to related justice studies beyond the
social responsibility. Associate’s degree.

Personal and Interpersonal Skills: To make students P ROGRAM G OALS : J UVENILE J USTICE
aware of the need for appropriate business attire Information Literacy Skills: Students will incorporate
attributes and behavior that enable an individual to information literacy skills that will enable them to
achieve personal, academic and professional success. locate, evaluate, and effectively use information.
To develop leadership potential in self and others. To
apply conflict resolution skills to help settling disputes Communication Skills: Students will communicate
in BIT. effectively through written and oral presentations as
part of their program requirements.
Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major:
Graduates of BIT will be proficient in the knowledge, Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Students will
skills and abilities to find employment in their chosen evaluate trends, policies, and case studies in juvenile
justice; assess claims and make judgments based upon
well-supported evidence in the field.

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Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills: those skills that enhance the level of performance in
Students will evaluate and interpret data and statistics natural resource sciences.
and incorporate this information in assignments and
reports. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Students will
critically analyze multifaceted natural resources and
Information Management Skills: Students will study environmental problems/issues and develop and
and employ forms, reports, statistics and data specific evaluate potential options and proposed solutions.
to the field of juvenile justice. Students will use various
computer applications. Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills:
Students will develop multiple proficiencies that will
Cultural and Global Perspective: Students will study and enable them to employ quantitative reasoning in
evaluate theories and case studies from culturally conjunction with the scientific method in analyses of
relative and diverse perspectives. science-based information.

Personal and Interpersonal Skills: Students will Information Management Skills: Students will
complete independent and cooperative assignments in demonstrate the ability to employ the latest
the classroom and in the community with classmates technologies, including computer hardware and
and professionals in the field. software, in the efficient management of
environmental information.
Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major:
Students will understand the history, philosophy, and Cultural and Global Perspective: Students will
current practices in juvenile justice through a demonstrate an understanding of the role of culture in
combination of classroom instruction and participation shaping different world views, principally how different
in practical application activities, including practicum cultures view the natural world and the use of natural
placements. resources and the environment.

NATURAL RESOURCES AND WILDLIFE TECHNOLOGY Personal and Interpersonal Skills: By the end of their
The Natural Resources and Wildlife Technology academic career, students will have demonstrated the
program strives to graduate technicians who are well development of personal qualities and interpersonal
prepared for employment in the field of natural skills necessary for success in the workplace.
resources management and environmental protection,
who understand and appreciate the interrelationships Academic and Technical Proficiency in the Major:
among all the components of the ecosystem, and who Students will demonstrate mastery of the fundamental
recognize the socioeconomic and political forces knowledge, skills, and abilities required for success as a
affecting resource management and environmental natural resources technician.
protection decisions. While taking a holistic approach
to resource management, the program emphasizes CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
wildlife and fisheries management and soil and water
ADVENTURE SPORTS
conservation. Career opportunities for graduates
This certificate is designed to concentrate on the
include jobs in wildlife management, fisheries
courses that are more closely aligned with the
management, environmental consulting, ecological
adventure sports industry and its needs. This option is
restoration, soil and water conservation, water quality
generally attractive to an individual who has already
monitoring, environmental inspection, nature
attained a college degree in some other field and wants
interpretation and education, and parks and recreation.
to acquire adventure sports industry related training.
P ROGRAM G OALS : N ATURAL R ESOURCES AND
ARTS & SCIENCES: SOCIAL SERVICES CERTIFICATE
W ILDLIFE T ECHNOLOGY (In development)
Information Literacy Skills: Students will incorporate
information literacy skills that will enable them to BUSINESS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
locate, evaluate, and effectively use information, Entry level management skills are acquired through
especially natural resources and environmental completion of the courses in this certificate program.
information, in both academic and career This certificate program will help students to prepare
environments. for work as an employee or owner of a business.
Communication Skills: Students will demonstrate Options include: Business Management Certificate and
competency in verbal and written skills, particularly Computer Applications for Business Certificate.

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COMMERCIAL VEHICLE TRANSPORTATION TEACHER EDUCATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD
SPECIALIST ASSISTANT
This certificate offers a professional truck driving (In development)
curriculum for the purpose of qualifying students for
entry level positions as drivers in over-the-road or local TRANSFER PROGRAMS
driving vehicles. The curriculum provides information
about trucks, truck driving and the trucking industry, A variety of transfer programs have been established
and the fundamentals of operating trucks and tractor with other regional institutions. These programs
trailers. No prior education or experience with trucks is require transfer for completion. Students interested in
required. The student, however, must meet the driver learning more about these programs should contact
qualifications set forth by the Bureau of Motor Carrier the Coordinator of Career and Transfer Services.
Safety and pass the physical examination requirements
established by the Department of Transportation PRE-NURSING A RTICULATED TRANSFER
(D.O.T.). Garrett College has an articulated nursing transfer
program with Allegany College of Maryland. Students
COMPUTER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES who are interested in pursuing a Nursing degree at
These programs are designed to prepare students to ACM may complete 31 credit hours of required
meet the demand for trained computer and preparatory non-nursing course work at Garrett
information personnel in the world of business. Many College. Interested students should contact the
of the program requirements may not be transferable Admissions Office at Garrett College for more
and may not count toward a Bachelor’s degree. information.

To earn a globally recognized Microsoft Office Specialist FRANKLIN UNIVERSITY/GARRETT COLLEGE


certification for Microsoft Office, a candidate must pass
one or more of the certification exams. Office Specialist
COMMUNITY COLLEGE ALLIANCE PROGRAM
exams provide a valid and reliable measure of technical Through a unique educational alliance with Garrett
proficiency and expertise by evaluating overall College, you have the opportunity to earn a Bachelor of
comprehension of Office applications, ability to use Science degree on-line from Franklin University in a
their advanced features, and ability to integrate the variety of majors. Franklin’s Community College
Office applications with other software applications. Alliance Program’s on-line format provides the
Core and Expert certifications are currently available flexibility to attend class and complete your
for Office XP. Earning a Microsoft Office Specialist coursework without leaving your community.
certificate proves a level of proficiency in an Office Interested students may visit
application and provides a current or potential alliance.franklin.edu/go/garrettcollege for more
employer evidence of skills. Garrett College also offers information.
applications courses that help to prepare a candidate
for Microsoft Office Specialist certification. ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS
Options include: Computer Repair/Network Technician, POST SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
Graphic Web Design, and Network Administration. Garrett College is accredited by the Maryland State
Department of Education and The Commission on
JUVENILE JUSTICE Higher Education of the Middle States Association.
A certificate in Juvenile Justice introduces students to Credits earned at Garrett College are generally
the skills and training required to gain an entry level transferable to two-year and four-year colleges and
position with the Department of Juvenile Justice universities throughout the United States.
working with youth in a residential facility.
Specific articulation agreements have been developed
Options include: Juvenile Justice Certificate and Law between Garrett College, a variety of four-year colleges
Enforcement Certificate and universities in Maryland, and several out-of-state
colleges and universities. It is recommended that
NATURAL RESOURCES AND WILDLIFE TECHNOLOGY students meet with the Coordinator of Career and
(In development) Transfer Services to discuss available options.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 8 Revised 11/12/2009
ACADEMIC COMMON MARKET computers and laptops, as well as group study rooms
The Academic Common Market (ACM) is a program equipped with electronic access for learner-centered
governed by the Southern Regional Education Board, projects.
an education consortium of 16 southern states. The
ACM affords students an opportunity to enroll in The Library staff provides one-on-one assistance for
certain out-of-state bachelor’s and graduate programs those with research needs or other questions and
that are not offered at a public in-state college or presents orientation sessions for new classes and
university, at reduced tuition rates. Students enrolled information literacy lessons as an integral part of core
in Frostburg State University’s Parks and Recreation curriculum. The collection is continuously augmented
programs may be eligible for Common Market status. with new computer resources and other materials for
Visit the Facts and Questions page at classroom and community use and for self-study.
www.mhec.state.md.us for requirements and criteria
pertaining to ACM. RESIDENCE HALLS
In 1993, Garrett Hall, Garrett’s first residence hall,
THE CAMPUS opened to house sixty on-campus students and is
located adjacent to the main campus. Our newest
housing complex, Laker Hall, opened Fall 2007 and
MAIN CAMPUS houses 124 students in apartment style living.
The original campus facility consisted of an
Administration Building, a Learning Center, and a GARRETT COLLEGE OUTREACH CENTERS
Gymnasium. The Student Center was completed in
January 1983. This facility houses the Admissions, NORTHERN OUTREACH CENTER
Registration, and Financial Aid offices, Bookstore, Laker The Garrett College Northern Outreach Center is
Cafe, and student lounge and game room. The located east of Grantsville, Maryland, close to the
Continuing Education and Training Center was added in intersection of Rt. 40 and Rt. 219. The Northern
1979 and the Information Technology Center in 1996. Outreach Center is home to Mountaintop Truck Driving
The center for Adventure and Outdoor Studies and the Institute (MTDI). The Center also offers computer and
Garrett Information Enterprise Center are recent personal interest courses, as well as classes in medical
additions. The new Learning Resource Center opened coding and billing.
in Spring 2008.
SOUTHERN OUTREACH CENTER
The Garrett College Southern Outreach Center is
LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER located at 14 North 8th Street in Oakland, Maryland.
The Learning Resource Center is a vital and integral The facility formerly housed the Oakland National
part of Garrett College providing a state of the art Guard Armory. The Director of the Adult Basic
facility that supplies patrons with the information Education program at Garrett is located at this site. The
st
literacy skills needed for the 21 century. This includes Southern Center also offers computer classes, personal
On-line databases and access to traditional print and interest classes as well as classes for child care
resource materials. It is the philosophy of the LRC to providers.
provide to the College, as well as to the local
community, a leadership role in moving patrons into
the new information age with modern electronic AFFIRMATIVE ACTION FOR
resources. It also affords opportunities for lifelong EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY
learning to all individuals: staff, faculty, students, and
Garrett College is committed to the principle and
community members.
practice of Equality of Opportunity and Affirmative
The LRC includes the Library, multi-media classroom, Action in employment and education.
writing and math labs and testing center. The Library
provides high-speed internet, including wireless I. Admission. Garrett College provides an easily
computer access to all locations within the facility and accessible education for all students who can profit
multi-media classrooms. The Library subscribes to a from college-level instruction. All high school
multitude of electronic databases to satisfy patrons’ graduates are eligible for admission to the College.
research needs. Also included is a collection of over Students who have not received a high school
28,000 books for research or personal reading, a large diploma may be admitted on a provisional basis.
collection of DVD’s and audio books, stationary No individual is denied admission to Garrett

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 9 Revised 11/12/2009
College because of race, religion, social, economic, GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES FOR EDUCATIONAL
or political affiliation.
II. Treatment. The College will also ensure that all EQUITY
students are treated without discrimination on the Any questions which arise with respect to equal
basis of race, color, sex, creed, political affiliation, treatment can be pursued with the Director of Student
marital status, national origin, age, and physical or Support Services. This person has specific knowledge
mental limitations. Specifically, this equitable about Title IX and Section 504 as well.
treatment will include the following areas:
a. Access to and participation in course If a student believes that his/her rights under Title IX
offerings and extracurricular activities, and Section 504 have been violated, (s)he should file a
including campus organizations and Professional Misconduct Complaint. Details of the
competitive athletics. complaint and appeal processes are described in the
b. Eligibility for financial aid and access to all Student Handbook and College website.
college services.
c. Use of available facilities.
ACCESSIBILITY FOR
In addition to Affirmative Action guidelines, Garrett
College monitors its policies and procedures as they
HANDICAPPED STUDENTS
relate to the following Federal Legislation: Garrett College facilities are accessible to all students in
compliance with government regulations. Special
I. Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, as services are available which enable handicapped
amended, prohibits discrimination against students students to participate in college programs. For more
on the basis of sex, including admissions and information, write or call the Director of Student
recruitment of students; denial or differential Support Services.
provision of any aid, benefits, or services in any
academic, extracurricular, research, occupational
training or other education program or activity; HARASSMENT/ASSAULT POLICY
financial or other benefits. Garrett College believes that all students and
II. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as employees deserve a safe learning and work
amended, states: “No qualified handicapped environment free from harassment or intimidation. To
person will, on the basis of handicap, be excluded promote such an atmosphere the College has clear
from participation in, or be denied the benefits of, policies regarding behavior and treatment of all
or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under members of the College community based on mutual
any program or activity which receives or benefits respect and recognized standards of behavior for
from Federal financial assistance.” educational institutions. The College does not tolerate
behavior that constitutes sexual harassment, sexual
Requests for information about these regulations and assault, or hate crimes. For details consult the Student
questions may be directed to the Director of Student or Personnel Handbooks.
Support Services, Garrett College, McHenry, Maryland
21541, or to the Director, Office for Civil Rights,
Department of Health, Education and Welfare, STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES
Washington, D.C. 20207. A student who feels that (s)he has not been treated
according to College policy or as required by applicable
state or federal regulations or law may file a grievance.
For details refer to the Student Grievance Policy in the
Student Handbook.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 10 Revised 11/12/2009
ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
student who does not hold a high school diploma from
WHO MAY APPLY? a high school accredited by one of the six regional
Garrett College has an open-door admissions policy. accrediting agencies recognized by the US Department
Applicants who are 16 years or older may be admitted of Education and the local school board or a high
to the College. Applicants should posses a diploma school equivalency recognized by his/her state of
from a high school accredited by one of the six regional residency or may be permitted to enroll as a General
accrediting agencies recognized by the US Department Studies major. (S)he will be assigned to an advisor. The
of Education and his/her local school board or a high advisor will assist the student in appropriate course
school equivalency recognized by his/her state of selection and will monitor his/her progress. When the
residency. If the applicant has attained neither, (s)he student completes 24 credit hours of academic study
may be admitted to the College on a provisional basis. and is in good academic standing (CGPA of 2.0 or
In keeping with guidelines provided by the Code of higher), (s)he may gain regular admission status to the
Maryland Regulations (COMAR 13B.00.02), program of his/her choice provided (s)he has satisfied
consideration for admission of such students will all other admission requirements for that program.
include evaluation of the students’ results on a Admission to the program, however, does not
placement indicator administered by the College and guarantee successful completion of the program.
may include other evidence of the ability to profit from
the institution. Admitted students should show an ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
ability to benefit from collegiate instruction. For information concerning the most current regulations
regarding the admission of international students, contact
ADMISSION OF STUDENTS UNDER 16 YEARS OF AGE the International Admissions Representative in the Office of
Persons under the age of 16 who have been designated Admissions.
as gifted and talented by the Garrett County Board of
Education or who provides appropriate documentation P ERMANENT R ESIDENT S TATUS A DMISSION
to support the designation of gifted and talented may A student with an Alien Registration Card has been
apply for admission to the College. Please refer to the given permanent residence in the United States as an
Designated Gifted and Talented discussion on page 13 immigrant, refugee or alien and may enroll for full- or
for more information. part-time study. Tuition costs are determined by
location of residence. Proof of permanent resident
EARLY ADMISSION OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS status is required at the time of application. Permanent
Students currently enrolled in high school may be residents should apply directly through the normal
eligible for special admission to the College under the admissions process and are qualified to apply for
Early College Admissions Program (ECAP). High school financial aid. To apply for admission, students must
students who have been pre-approved by the Garrett submit:
County Board of Education may enroll at the College
full time as an alternative to their twelfth grade in  application for admission;
order to complete a high school diploma.  transcripts translated into English from secondary
schools;
ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS  transcripts from post-secondary institutions must
Students who have attended another post-high school be translated, certified, and evaluated by an
institution must submit official transcripts prior to independent agent approved by the Dean of
being accepted by the College. Marketing and Enrollment Management;
 appropriate proof of permanent resident status in
Students who have withdrawn from another institution the form of an Alien Registration Card (I-551 or I-
while on academic probation, suspension, or dismissal 151).
status will be admitted on academic probation and will  Documentation of English Proficiency (see pg 13
be subject to the same policies as Garrett College for details)
students who are on academic probation.
N ON -U.S. S TUDENT A DMISSIONS
ADMISSION WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA International students who demonstrate appropriate
After completing the placement indicator and after an academic ability, proficiency in the English Language
institutional review of other relevant materials, the

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 11 Revised 11/12/2009
and the ability to finance all costs for their education their country and plans to return there upon
may be offered admission. completion of their education. Other items may be
required. Students are encouraged to inquire at their
Applicants must have the following documentation local U.S. Embassy or Consulate to pick up an
submitted directly to the Office of Admissions by June 1 application for a student visa. The visa permits a
for fall admission or November 1 for spring admission: student to study in the United States. It does not
guarantee entry into the United States. Final decision
 An admissions application; on admission into the United States and permitted
 Official bank statement or bank letter and a letter length of stay is made by the U.S. Citizenship and
signed by the student and sponsor or family (if Immigration Services. USCIS agents will review a
applicable) guaranteeing that the student has student’s passport, I-94 and visa at the port-of-entry. If
financial support for one year. The letter must also approved, they stamp your I-20 to indicate permission
indicate how the student will be supported for the to enter the U.S. and length of stay.
remaining years of the program;
 Official or certified true copies of secondary and
F-1 T RANSFER S TUDENT A DMISSION
postsecondary grade reports, diplomas and
Students with an F-1 visa seeking to transfer to Garrett
academic records (must include a copy in original
College from another U.S. institution must submit the
language and English translation) certifying
items required in the section on Non-U.S. Student
completion of at least the equivalent of a U.S.
Admissions plus the following documents:
academic high school diploma;
 A 250-500 word essay written in English;  A copy of the visa, passport, and I-94 form;
 Evidence of purchase of health/medical insurance  A copy of the I-20 from the previous institution;
in the native country which can be easily used in  A letter from the institution previously attended
the United States in case of an accident or injury. indicating that the student is in good standing and
Student must also have the financial ability to is “in-status” as an international student.
renew this policy each year thereafter for the  An official transcript from the institution previously
remaining years in their program; attended.
 Proof of housing arrangements. Any international  Documentation of English Proficiency (see
student who receives Garrett College financial aid Admissions Criteria for details)
(scholarship, grant, or work program) must live in
college housing on campus. The student’s previous college must send the student’s
 Documentation of English Proficiency (see SEVIS record to Garrett College before processing for
Admissions Criteria for details) admissions can be considered complete.

In addition, the student must participate in a telephone STUDENTS WITH OTHER TYPES OF VISAS
interview. Tuition rates for prospective students who are citizens
of countries other than the U.S.A. are based upon
Upon arrival, international students will be required to
immigration status as determined by Maryland state
undergo mandatory assessments. Final placement into
law. Proof of immigration status must be submitted at
courses is determined by performance on the college’s
the time of application. Such proof must be an official
assessment indicators.
document; photocopies of credentials will not be
Students who complete the above steps and who are accepted. Prospective students who cannot provide the
accepted for admission into the college will qualify for appropriate immigration status documentation will be
the U.S. immigration document I-20, Certificate of charged the Out-of-State tuition rate.
Eligibility. The I-20 is needed in order to apply for a
Prospective students who are permanent residents or
student visa also known as an F-1 visa. The F-1 visa
who have refugee or asylum status and who reside in
permits the student to study in the United States.
Garrett County are, in accordance with State law,
College acceptance and issuance of an I-20 does not
entitled to in-county tuition rates. These students are
guarantee that a student will be granted a visa.
also eligible to apply for financial aid and Garrett
College Foundation scholarships.
A PPLICATION FOR A S TUDENT OR F-1 V ISA
Students present the I-20 along with proof of English Those with other visas, including A, E, G, H-1A, H-1B, H-
proficiency, financial support for one year and proof of 2, H-4 (if dependent on a H-1A or H-1B and are under
the ability to support the student for the remaining the age of 21), I, K-1, K-2, L-1, L-2, N, O, R, and TC, may
years, and strong proof that the student has ties to be eligible for in-county or in-State tuition in

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 12 Revised 11/12/2009
accordance with State laws but are not eligible for writing sample to ensure appropriate enrollment in
federal financial aid. Prospective students on J-1 visas college writing courses. These students may be
can enroll in credit courses but cannot be degree- permitted to enroll in College-level composition
seeking. International citizens on B-1 or B-2 generally and/or math course(s).
are not permitted to enroll in credit courses. Those on 6. Students needing placement testing will be
other types of visas should check with the Office of notified in their acceptance letter. Such students
Registration and Records. must schedule a placement testing appointment
before an advising appointment can be scheduled
for registration for courses. Placement testing is
HOW DO YOU APPLY? used to assess students’ reading, writing, and
To apply for admission to the College, potential mathematic abilities. Students identified by the
students should: placement indicator as needing additional
preparation for college-level courses will be
1. Submit a completed admissions application to the required to take the prescribed pre-college level
College’s Admissions Office including courses. Some of these courses may be taken
documentation of residency. concurrently with an academic program. Students
2. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student will be assisted by an advisor in making this
Aid (FAFSA) form (available on-line at determination.
www.fafsa.ed.gov). Please keep in mind that even 7. All applicants for whom English is not their native
if a student is not eligible for state or federal language must provide evidence of English
financial aid, there are many other sources of aid proficiency as part of the application process. Any
and eligibility for these programs may require a or all of the following may be sufficient: the (1)
FAFSA application be completed. Loans may also Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL); (2)
be available at lower interest rates for students International English Language Testing Service
who have completed a FAFSA application. (IELTS); (3) graduation from an accredited U.S. high
Information on the various types of financial aid school with a transcript showing “C/C-” or better in
programs is available upon request from the required English courses; (4) grades of “C/C-” or
Financial Aid Office. better in an accredited U.S. college level English
3. High school graduates should contact their high course or (5) documentation of satisfactory
school and request an official transcript be sent to completion of a formal intensive curriculum of
the Garrett College Admissions Office. If a high English instruction at an accredited U.S. institution.
school equivalence diploma is held, an official A minimum score of 550 on the written TOEFL
record should be sent to the Admissions Office. exam, 213 on the computer exam, 80 on the
(Admission without high school diploma, refer to internet exam is required to enter most college
page 11.) level coursework. TOEFL information may be
4. If you have previously attended another college or obtained by contacting: TOEFL, P.O. Box 6151,
university, contact the institution(s) to request Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, or on the Web at
official transcript(s) be sent directly to the www.toefl.org. A minimum score of 6 is required in
Admissions Office. An admissions decision will be the IELTS. IELTS information may be obtained by
delayed until transcripts are received. (Not contacting: IELTS, British Council, 10 Spring
required of students enrolled in Commercial Gardens, London, SW1A2BN, UK, or on the web at
Vehicle Transportation Specialist Program.) www.ielts.org.
5. ACT and SAT scores, if available, should be sent to
the Admissions Office. While scores are not DESIGNATED GIFTED AND T ALENTED
required for admission, they may indicate Students under the age of 16 who have been
exemption from placement testing. ACT or SAT designated as gifted and talented by the Garrett
scores are required for admission to the Honors County Board of Education (GCBOE), those who have
Program at Garrett College. Students who have been home schooled or have attended an institution
achieved an ACT verbal score of 21 and/or an ACT not recognized by the GCBOE may apply to be admitted
math score of 21 will be exempt from completing upon appropriate validation of talent or giftedness.
the placement indicator. Similarly, students who
have taken SAT tests and have earned a verbal Students accepted under this policy may enroll in
score of 550 and/or a math score of 550 will be courses appropriate to their level of preparation and
exempt from completing the placement indicator their interests. However, students may not enroll in a
in those areas, but all students must provide a degree or certificate program or any program leading

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 13 Revised 11/12/2009
to a recognized educational credential until they are at PART-TIME DEGREE/CERTIFICATE SEEKING
least 16 years of age.
STUDENT
The parent/guardian of a gifted and talented student This classification is for the student who intends to seek
under the age of 16 who is requesting admission of a degree or certificate on a part-time basis.
his/her child must follow the procedures below:

1. A letter specifically requesting admission of a SPECIAL STUDENT


student under age 16 along with a completed The Special Student classification pertains to a student
admissions application should be submitted to the who is enrolled less than full-time and does not intend
College’s Admissions Office. to complete a program of study leading to a certificate
2. Supply verification of gifted and talented status or degree. A student must declare a program of study
from the GCBOE or one or more of the following on or before the completion of 18 credit hours or must
documents: Individualized intelligence test such as have permission to register from the Dean of Academic
WISC-R or Stanford Binet (required minimum score and Student Affairs. Special students are not eligible for
of 130); Standardized, nationally-normed financial aid.
achievement or cognitive abilities test
administered at the high school level with a DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENT
rd
minimum score in the 93 percentile; or, High school students who evidence readiness through
Standardized college entrance exam (ACT completion of the College placement indicator may be
minimum scores of 22 in verbal and mathematics; admitted to specific college courses and earn both high
PSAT or SAT minimum composite verbal and school and college credit upon satisfactory completion
mathematics score of 1200 with a minimum of 550 of the course(s). Dual enrollment courses are may be
on either subtest. This information can be offered via Interactive TV on the College or high school
obtained from the GCBOE or submitted directly campuses.
from the testing agent to the Admissions Office.
3. Following receipt of required documentation, the Dually enrolled students are held to the rules,
Admissions Office will schedule an appointment regulations, and standards of the college regardless of
with the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for an their physical location at the time the course is offered.
admission interview.
4. The Associate Dean of Academic Affairs will notify CLASS STATUS
the College’s Admissions Office of the outcome of
the interview. Freshman: A student who has completed less than 28
credit hours of college level studies.

STUDENT CLASSIFICATIONS Sophomore: A student having earned 28 or more credit


hours of college level studies.
FULL-TIME/PART-TIME STATUS
The normal course load of a full-time student is 12 to ACCEPTANCE OF CREDITS INTO
18 credit hours or 6 to 8 credit hours in Summer GARRETT COLLEGE
sessions. Loads above 18 credits or 8 credits for
Summer must be approved by the Dean of Academic Students entering Garrett College may be awarded
and Student Affairs upon the recommendation of the credits for prior educational or life experiences. Credits
advisor. accepted from other post-secondary institutions are
recorded at the top of the Garrett College transcript as
“Transfer Credits.” Credits earned via the College’s Life
FULL-TIME DEGREE/CERTIFICATE SEEKING Experience Assessment Program are also recorded at
STUDENT the top of the GC transcript. Refer to the following for
more information. A maximum of 40 non-resident
This classification is for the student who declares a
credits is allowed for a Garrett College degree.
program of study upon admission to the College and is
attending full-time. This includes students enrolled in
degree programs that may require transfer for
completion.

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Page 14 Revised 11/12/2009
TRANSFERRING CREDITS FROM OTHER for transfer, and 2) non-general education
coursework with a grade of “D” will be eligible only
COLLEGES OR UNIVERSITIES if the calculated GPA for the block of non-general
Upon matriculation, students may transfer credits into education transfer courses is 2.0 or above.
Garrett from eligible post-secondary institutions. As  For credits transferred from a Maryland non-public
part of the admissions process, students who have institution or an out-of-state institution: 1) all
attended one or more institutions prior to transferring applicable coursework with grades of “C-” or above
to Garrett College must submit an official transcript is eligible for transfer, and 2) applicable
from each institution. Once the student officially coursework with grades of “D” or above will only
registers for courses and declares a major, a transcript be considered if the cumulative GPA at the transfer
analysis will be completed by the Director of Records institution is 2.0 or above (however, a minimum
and Registration. The following regulations apply to the grade of “C-” must be earned in English
transfer of credits: Composition I for it to be transferable).

 Only official transcripts from post secondary Garrett College follows the General Education and Transfer
institutions approved by the American Council on Policies of the Maryland Higher Education Commission
Education are eligible for evaluation. Transcripts (MHEC). Title 13B Subtitle 06 Chapter 01 reprinted herein
must be received directly by the Office of Records (see page 52).
and Registration in a sealed, stamped envelope.
 Transcripts from post-secondary institutions MILITARY CREDIT
outside of the U.S. must be translated, certified,
Course equivalency credit may be granted for certain
and evaluated by an independent agent approved
military experiences as recommended by the American
by the Dean of Marketing and Enrollment
Council on Education (ACE). Courses appropriate to
Management.
Garrett’s curriculum and applicable to the student’s
 Only those credits applicable to the student’s
major program of study will be accepted. A maximum
degree are transferred in.
of 40 non-resident credits including military credits will
 A maximum of 40 non-resident credits including
transfer, military, etc., may be applied to a Garrett be accepted at Garrett.
College degree. Students requesting to have military equivalency credit are
 Credits approved for transfer will be recorded on required to contact the designated military review agency
the student’s GC transcript. and obtain an evaluation of their military experience. To
 Grades for transfer courses are not recorded on
obtain a military transcript evaluation:
the transcript and are not included in the
calculation of CGPA. SAILOR/MARINE/ACE (SMART)
 Credit hours for classes at a school operating on a (877) 253-7122
quarter hour system are converted to Semester https://smart.navy.mil
Hours. Each quarter hour of credit is worth 2/3 of
one semester hour credit. Converted hours are ARMY/ACE Registry Transcript System (AARTS)
rounded down to the nearest whole number. (866) 297-4427
 A student who has matriculated at Garrett College who http://aarts.army.mil
wishes to take a course(s) at another institution must
have the course(s) approved by the Dean of Academic Community College of the Air Force
and Student Affairs prior to taking the courses. Courses (800) 646-1858
that are not pre-approved will not be eligible for http://www.au.af.mil/au/ccaf/active_transc.htm
transfer credit.
 A student may not receive transfer credit for a The results of the examination should be sent directly to the
course in which (s)he has previously received a Office of Admissions.
failing grade at Garrett College.
 Degree-seeking students must earn at least 24 LIFE EXPERIENCE ASSESSMENT PROGRAM
credits in residence at Garrett.
 Students seeking a certificate must take at least 12 To be considered for life experience assessment
credit hours of their program at Garrett College. students must be currently enrolled at Garrett College.
 For credits transferred from a Maryland public Interested students should first meet with their
institution: 1) all applicable general education academic advisor to discuss life experience possibilities.
coursework with a grade of “D” or above is eligible LEAP application forms may be obtained in the Dean of

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 15 Revised 11/12/2009
Academic and Student Affairs and the Records and before taking the CLEP exams to determine whether or
Registration offices. Additional fees may apply. No not credits earned through the CLEP will be accepted
more than 50% of degree credits may be awarded upon transfer. Additional fees apply.
through LEAP.
CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT Students may earn credit for a course by requesting a
Students that have completed at least three semester proficiency exam in applicable courses. Not all courses
credit hours in residence at Garrett College are eligible qualify for Credit by Examination; contact the
to apply for portfolio credit. Students must submit appropriate Program Director for more information.
portfolios that illustrate the ability to match a specific Appropriate fees will apply.
course’s learning objectives and are limited to a
maximum of 15 credit hours. Students should contact CREDIT BY CERTIFICATION
the Office of Academic and Student Affairs for a list of Students who provide documentation that they have
courses for which portfolio credit may be earned. achieved the learning outcome of a course may earn
Portfolios, which are reviewed by experts in the credit for that course. Documentation must be from a
disciplines in which a student seeks credit, must be professional organization or certified instructor, such as
submitted for assessment no later than six weeks the Red Cross. Additional fees may apply.
before the final examination period for the semester in
which credit is sought. Various fees apply.
STUDENT RESIDENCY
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT For the purposes of assessing tuition charges, Garrett
Students who complete Advanced Placement (AP) College follows residency guidelines established by the
courses in high school with the allowable minimum Maryland Higher Education Commission. A student’s
score will receive, at no charge, college credit for the residency (aka domicile) is determined at the time of
course(s) when certified documentation is sent from admission to the Garrett College. Each student will sign
the testing center directly to Garrett’s Office of Records a statement affirming domicile and the factual basis for
and Registration. Advanced Placement Examinations the claim of a domicile. At the time of each subsequent
are available through the College Entrance Examination enrollment, the student will indicate whether his or her
board of the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ domicile is the same as or different from that affirmed
08540 (www.collegeboard.org/ap). A minimum score at application.
of 3 is required for most courses, with scores of 4 or 5
required on several higher level courses. For detailed The word “domicile” as used in this regulation shall
score requirements, contact the Office of Records and mean the permanent place of abode, where physical
Registration. presence and possessions are maintained with the
intention of remaining indefinitely. In the case of
COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM student applicants that receive more than half of their
College credit for learning acquired outside the financial support from another person, that person’s
traditional classroom may be obtained by taking the place of abode during the most recently completed
CLEP (College Level Examination Program) exams. CLEP calendar year will be used. For the purpose of this rule,
is a credit-by-examination program offered through the only one domicile may be maintained. Local addresses
College Board. Students wishing to seek CLEP credit which pertain only during the school year and
must obtain pre-approval from the Director of Records Residence Hall addresses will not be considered for
and Registration. determination of tuition charges.

Students must request the College Board forward CLEP The person seeking Maryland residency status shall
test scores directly to Garrett College for evaluation. have the burden of proving by clear and convincing
CLEP credit granted by another institution does not evidence that (s)he satisfies the requirements and
directly transfer to Garrett College. standards set forth herein. Assignment of residency
status will be made upon a review of the totality of
For most disciplines, a minimum score of 50 must be facts known or presented.
achieved on the exam. For Level 2 French Language or
Spanish Language exams, a score of 62 and 66 The College reserves the right to request any of the
respectively must be achieved. listed documentation and any additional information
and documentation as it deems necessary to make an
Students planning to transfer to other evaluation of residency status.
colleges/universities should contact those institutions

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 16 Revised 11/12/2009
In the event incomplete, false, or misleading c. Has paid Maryland income tax on all taxable
information is presented, the College may, at its income including all taxable income earned outside
discretion, revoke residency status and take disciplinary the State and has filed a Maryland resident income
action. Such action may include suspension or tax return.
expulsion. If a reduced tuition status was gained due to d. Has registered all owned or leased motor vehicles
false or misleading information, the College reserves in Maryland.
the right to retroactively assess the higher tuition rate e. Is registered to vote in Maryland, if registered to
for each semester affected. vote.
f. Receives no public assistance from a state other
QUALIFICATIONS FOR MARYLAND RESIDENCY than the State of Maryland or from a city, county
or municipal agency other than one in Maryland.
AND REQUIRED EVIDENCE g. Has a legal ability under Federal and Maryland law
To qualify for In-County or Out-of-County tuition status, to live permanently without interruption in
a student must demonstrate that, for at least three (3) Maryland.
consecutive months immediately prior to the first day h. Has rebutted the presumption that he or she is in
of the semester for which the student seeks IC or OC Maryland primarily to attend an educational
status, the student had the continuous intent to: institution, if the student’s circumstances have
raised the presumption.
a. Make Garrett or another Maryland county his or
her permanent home; and NEW APPLICANTS
b. Abandon his or her former home state; and
c. Reside in Garrett or another Maryland county A new student’s residence is determined at the time
indefinitely; and (s)he is admitted to the College. Burden of proof of
d. Reside in Garrett or another Maryland county residency is to be upon the student, and (s)he will be
primarily for a purpose other than that of required to sign a statement substantiating her/his
attending an educational institution in Maryland. claim.

Required Evidence of Residency In order to obtain “In-County” residency status, a


student must:
▪ A Maryland State Driver’s license or Maryland State
a. Be a U.S. Citizen, possess a U.S. Alien registration
Identification Card issued by the Department of Motor
number, or be able to present a visa in an
Vehicles no less than 3 months prior to the first day of
acceptable category according to COMAR
the semester, OR,
regulations.
b. Be financially independent (s/he has provided 51%
▪ Documentation meeting two or more of the following
or more of her/his financial support over the past
requirements for a period of at least three (3) months
year) and be able to provide one or more
prior to the first day of the semester for which the
documents that confirms the student’s primary
student seeks IC or OC status:
residence address is in Garrett County (as listed
a. Owns or rents, and has continuously occupied, above in Qualifications for Maryland Residency and
including during weekends, breaks and vacations, Required Evidence). --OR-- Be financially
living quarters in Garrett or another Maryland dependent on a supporter (a supporter is someone
county. The student must provide evidence of a who has provided 51% or more of the student’s
genuine deed or lease and documentation of rent financial support over the past year) whose
payments made. In lieu of a deed or lease, a primary residence address is in Garret County and
notarized affidavit from a landlord showing the be able to provide one or more documents (listed
address, name of the student as occupant, term of above) that confirms the supporter’s primary
residence, and history of rent payments made will residence address is in Garrett County.
be considered. A student may demonstrate that
In order to obtain “Out-of-County” residency status, a
(s)he shares living quarters which are owned or
student must:
rented and occupied by a parent, legal guardian or
spouse. a. Be a U.S. Citizen, possess a U.S. Alien registration
b. Has substantially all of his or her personal number, or be able to present a visa in an
property, such as household effects, furniture and acceptable category according to COMAR
pets in Garrett or another Maryland county. regulations.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 17 Revised 11/12/2009
b. Be financially independent (s/he has provided 51% Students wishing to participate in State-approved
or more of her/his financial support over the past tuition reduction programs must complete additional
year) and must be able to provide one or more declarations at the time of registration. The Office of
documents that confirms the student’s primary Records and Registration will review the additional
residence address is in Maryland but outside of declarations and assign residency as appropriate.
Garrett County (as listed above in Qualifications for
Maryland Residency and Required Evidence). --OR- MILITARY PERSONNEL
- Be financially dependent on a supporter (a
supporter is someone who has provided 51% or Military personnel and their dependents who have a
more of the student’s financial support over the domicile in Maryland at the time of entrance into the
past year) whose primary residence address is in armed forces and who are stationed outside the State
Maryland but outside of Garret County and be able are to be considered Maryland residents.
to provide one or more documents (listed above)
Military personnel stationed in Maryland and on active
that confirms the supporter’s primary residence
duty who did not have a domicile in Maryland at the
address is in Maryland but outside Garrett County.
time of entrance into the armed forces are to be
All other students are considered to have “Out-of- considered Maryland residents along with their
State” residency status. dependents.

Unless information is received which would contradict If the armed services member moves out of the state,
or call into question the validity of the student’s status, the dependents and spouse may maintain Maryland
the College will accept the student’s sworn statement. residency as long as they stay continuously enrolled.
In the case of contradictory information, the College
will assign residency status and the student will be FOREIGN NATIONALS
asked to provide proof of domicile. A student-applicant with an Alien Registration Card has
Students claiming Maryland residency and out-of-state been granted residence in the United States as an
students who are eligible for a reduced tuition rate immigrant, refugee or alien, and residency will be
must be able to, upon request, provide documented determined based on current place of domicile.
proof of residency. All documents must be in the name
Residency status for citizens of countries other than the
of the student (or supporter) and must reflect a period
United States is based upon immigration status.
of NOT LESS THAN 3 MONTHS prior to the first day of
However, an individual’s immigration status may not
the semester.
preclude award of Maryland residency if the individual
A student who provides untruthful responses or has the legal capacity to establish domicile in Maryland.
fraudulent documentation may be subject to the
a. Individuals holding a Student Visa (i.e., F-1 Visa)
penalty of perjury. are here on a temporary basis and cannot legally
establish domicile in Maryland. These students will
RECIPROCITY A GREEMENTS AND STATEWIDE be assigned Out-of-State residency.
DESIGNATED PROGRAMS b. Individuals holding other visas, including A, E, G, H-
Students from outside Maryland who enroll as part of a 1A, H-1B, H-2, H-4 (if dependent on a H-1A or H-1B
reciprocity agreement negotiated between Maryland and are under the age of 21), I, K-1, K-2, L-1, L-2, N,
and another state or who enroll under a special O, R, and TC are capable of establishing domicile in
program established by the Maryland Legislature or the Maryland and, therefore, may be considered for
Maryland Higher Education Commission may be eligible In-County or Out-of-County residency status based
for tuition rates equated to the In-County rates. on their place of abode.
Eligibility for Reciprocity or Statewide designation is
based upon multiple factors, such as county of RETURNING STUDENTS
residence and matriculation in an approved program of A returning student must reaffirm his/her residency
study. As these items are not confirmed at the time of status at each semester’s registration, at which time
application, such students will initially receive a the student must indicate whether his/her domicile is
residency assignment based on their true place of the same as or different from that affirmed at
residence. admission.

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Page 18 Revised 11/12/2009
Returning students claiming a change of residency must There is a three-level appeal process.
complete another Residency Declaration and provide
the documentation required to substantiate the Level 1: If the student wishes to appeal the decision
change. made by the Admissions Officer, the student must send
written notification to the Director of Records and
Registration within 15 days of the acceptance letter, or
CHANGE OF RESIDENCY before the first day of the semester, whichever occurs
A student who changes his residence during a semester first. Notification must include information
will not have her/his tuition adjusted during that substantiating the reason for the appeal request. The
semester. The new tuition rate will be applied the Director of Records and Registration will review the
following semester. argument presented in the request along with any
evidence provided and will determine the student’s
All requests for change of residence must be made in residency status.
writing, and proper proof of residence must be
presented before a change will be made. Level 2: If the student wishes to appeal the decision
made by the Director of Records and Registration, the
APPEAL PROCESS student must notify the Dean of Administration in
writing within three (3) working days of the Director of
If a student disagrees with the residency assignment, Records and Registration’s decision. The request for
the student has a right to appeal the decision. appeal must state the reason for said appeal. Upon
receipt, the Dean of Administration will notify the
Additional evidence that will be considered includes,
student of an appropriate date and time for the
but is not limited to:
student to present the evidence related to the
Source of financial support. That is, Maryland student’s residency status. Unless both the student and
employment and earnings history (not including the Dean of Administration indicate that they desire
work study, scholarships, grants, stipends, aid, the hearing to be open to the public, the hearing will be
student loans, etc.) --OR-- Evidence the student is closed to all persons other than the student, the Dean
financially dependent upon another person who is of Administration, and any witnesses for either side
a resident of Maryland. who will present evidence. The Dean of Administration
Substantial participation as a member of a will determine the students residency status based
professional, social, community, civic, political, upon the evidence provided and send written
athletic or religious organization in Maryland, notification of the decision to the student and the
including professionally related school activities Director of Records and Registration.
that demonstrate a commitment to the student’s
Level 3: A subsequent appeal by the student may be
community or to the State of Maryland.
made to the President of the College in writing within
Registration as a Maryland resident with the
five (5) working days after the Dean of Administration’s
Selective Service, if male.
written notification to the student. The written request
Evidence showing the student uses his or her for an appeal must state the reasons for appeal. The
Maryland address as his or her sole address of President will review the determination of the Dean of
record for all purposes including on health and Administration, will make a determination, and will
auto insurance records, bank accounts, tax
send written notification to the student and the
records, loan and scholarship records, school
Director of Records and Registration.
records, military records, leases, etc.
An affidavit from a person unrelated to the student Any further appeal may be made by the student
that provides objective, relevant evidence of a through appropriate non-collegiate judicial channels.
student’s conduct demonstrating the student’s
intent to live permanently in Maryland.

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Page 19 Revised 11/12/2009
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
On-line Course Fee ........................... $100 per course
TUITION, FEES, AND OTHER EXPENSES Welding Technology .................... $160.00 per course
The College reserves the right to make changes in
tuition, fees, and other charges at any time such
changes are deemed necessary by the College and the
HOUSING COSTS
Board of Trustees. Garrett College offers students a choice in residential
housing. Both halls are close to campus with a lit
TUITION walkway to the main campus.

Tuition rates apply to both full and part-time students. LAKER HALL 2009-2010
Single Room ..................................................... $6,165
Legal Resident of Garrett County
Double Room ................................................... $5,192
(or WV Reciprocity) .............................. $86 per cr. hr.
Optional Meal Plan
Resident of Maryland 10 Meal Plan ................................................. $1,980
(outside of Garrett County) ............... $216 per cr. hr. 12 Meal Plan ................................................. $2,240
16 Meal Plan ................................................. $2,590
Non-Resident of Maryland ............... $255 per cr. hr. GARRETT HALL 2009-2010
Double Room + 10 Meal Plan ........................... $4,980
Maryland High School students who qualify for Double Room + 12 Meal Plan ........................... $5,240
admission to Garrett should inquire about our 50% Double Room + 16 Meal Plan ........................... $5,590
tuition reduction policy.
PAYMENT
FEES
All tuition and fees are due at the time of registration
REGISTRATION FEE for classes and payment is due upon receipt of the bill,
A non-refundable and nontransferable registration fee by the published due date. A student may be
of $15.00 is assessed at the time of registration. Once administratively withdrawn if (s)he have not paid the
registered the student assumes the legal obligation to bill and do not have a payment plan in place by the due
pay in full all associated tuition and fees according to date. A student may request a deferred payment plan
college policy. for a fee of $25. A student using a deferred payment
plan is required to make all payments on time. A
COMBINED FEE student who does not keep current with payments may
The Combined Fee of $20 per credit hour supports the not be eligible to register for a subsequent semester.
instructional, technological, and student services When a student withdraws from the College the entire
provided by Garrett College. balance of the deferred tuition and fees becomes
immediately due.
NOTE: Maryland National Guard, High School Dual Enrolled,
and Frostburg State University ASI students will have $5.00
per credit hour of the Combined Fee waived.
REFUNDS
Refund amounts for courses vary depending upon the
MISCELLANEOUS FEES start date and duration of the course.
Adventure Sports Fees...................Variable by Course
Applied Music Fee ............................... $125.00/cr. hr. A “standard course” is a course that begins on the
Commercial Vehicle Transportation Fee ............. TBD official start of the semester/term as published in the
Deferred Payment Plan Enrollment ................. $25.00 Academic Year Calendar (AYC), and runs for the
Environmental Technology .................................. TBD semester/term.
Graduation Fee ................................................ $35.00
A “non-standard” course is one that begins either
Independent Study .................................... $25/cr. hr.
before or after the official start of the semester/term
I-TECH Fee .....................................Variable by Course
and/or is less than a standard semester/term in length.
Life Experience Assessment .......... $15 application fee
$35 assessment fee (varies)
$10 per credit awarded

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 21 Revised 11/12/2009
The Mountaintop Truck Driving Institute (MTDI) series ON-LINE COURSES ORIGINATING AT ANOTHER
of courses is administered as a group with add/drop INSTITUTION
regulations applied to the first course in the series. Students enrolled in On-line courses originating at an
institution other than Garrett College should note that
REFUND FOR A STANDARD C OURSE add, drop, withdrawal and refund date policies of
If the course is a ‘standard course’, a student may drop Garrett College apply to these courses.
the course through the first week of classes (or its
equivalent) with no academic or financial penalty. The IMPORTANT N OTE:
“Last Date to Drop a Standard Course” is published in Students should carefully look at the start and end
the AYC, and a student who drops a standard course dates of courses in which they are enrolled and the
before/on this date will be eligible for a 100% refund policies related to dropping and/or withdrawing from
for tuition and fees. standard, non-standard, MTDI, and On-line courses.
If a student has a question as to the applicable dates
A student who withdraws or is withdrawn from a
(s)he should consult the Director of Records and
‘standard course’ after the drop period, but before the
Registration.
OSRD, is eligible for a 50% refund.

A student who is withdrawn from a ‘standard course’ REPAYMENT POLICY


after the OSRD is not eligible for any refund. (S)he is
The amount of Title IV aid that a student must repay is
responsible for a all financial obligations incurred.
determined via the Federal Formula for Return of Title
IV funds as specified in Section 484B of the Higher
REFUND FOR A N ON-STANDARD COURSE Education Act. This law also specifies the order of
If a non-standard course begins before the first day of
return of the Title IV funds to the programs from which
the semester/term a student may drop the non-
they are awarded.
standard course up to two weeks before the first class
meeting. A student who drops the course up to two A repayment may be required when cash has been
weeks before the first class meeting will be eligible for disbursed to a student from financial aid funds in
a 100% refund of tuition and fees. A student who excess of the amount of aid the student earned during
remains enrolled after two weeks before the first class the term. The amount of Title IV aid earned is
meeting will be considered enrolled in the course and determined by multiplying the total of Title IV aid
will be responsible for all tuition and fees for the (other than Federal College Work Study) for which the
course. There is no partial refund for these courses. student qualified by the percentage of time during the
term that the student was enrolled.
If the non-standard course begins after the first day of
the semester/term the student must drop the course If less aid was disbursed than was earned, the student
within the drop period (the first calendar week of may receive a late disbursement for the difference. If
classes or its equivalent) for the semester/term to more aid was disbursed than earned, the amount of
receive a full refund. If a student does not drop within Title IV aid that must be returned (i.e., that was
the drop period for the semester/term the student will unearned) is determined by subtracting the earned
be considered enrolled. There is no partial refund for amount from the amount actually disbursed.
these courses.
The responsibility for returning unearned aid is
REFUND FOR THE MTDI COURSE SERIES allocated between the College and the student
A student may drop the MTDI series of courses up to according to the portion of disbursed aid that could
the first class meeting of the first course in the series have been used to cover College charges and the
with no financial or academic penalty. (S)he will be portion that could have been disbursed directly to the
eligible for a 100% refund. A student who remains student once the college charges were covered. Garrett
enrolled in the first course on the first class meeting will distribute the unearned aid back to the Title IV
day is considered enrolled in all courses in the series. programs as specified by law. The student will be
As an enrolled student (s)he is responsible for all notified of the amount the student owes to the Title IV
tuition and fees for all courses in the series and will programs and billed any amount due to the College
receive a grade in all courses. resulting from the return of Title IV funds used to cover
College charges. The student will have the choice of
either making a payment to the College and the College
returning the Title IV funds or making satisfactory

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 22 Revised 11/12/2009
payment of their portion of Title IV funds with the Schedule of Credit Classes for exact dates and other
Department of Education debt collection office. information.
 Whenever a student withdraws from the College, the
TUITION RECIPROCITY AGREEMENT entire balance of deferred tuition and fees becomes
immediately due and payable.
Students who are residents of designated West Virginia  Late fees will be assessed as appropriate. See Schedule
counties enrolled in designated career advancement of Credit Classes for further information.
programs are eligible to pay in-county tuition upon  Financial Aid recipients may charge tuition and fees
registration at Garrett College. Students in need of against their awards with prior approval of the
more information on tuition reciprocity should contact Financial Aid Officer. A copy of the award letter must
Garrett’s Admissions Office. be provided to the Business Office.
Students enrolling in career advancement programs
under West Virginia reciprocity must take the required DELINQUENT ACCOUNTS
courses listed in their program major. A late fee of $25.00 is charged for delinquent accounts.
In addition, the delinquent accounts are referred to a
PERSONS 60 YEARS OLD -OR- RETIRED AND collection agency which is currently the State of
Maryland’s Central Collection Unit. Once referred to
DISABLED CCU, a collection fee of 17% will be added to the
Tuition may be waived for any Maryland resident who account, the debt will be reported to consumer
is 60 years old or retired from the work force by reason reporting agencies, and Garrett College can no longer
of total and permanent disability. In order to obtain settle the account.
this waiver, an individual must at the time of
registration provide verification of age and/or disability RETURNED CHECKS
status. Individuals may visit
www.socialsecurity.gove/beve/ to request a “Proof of The College will charge a $35 fee for all checks returned
Income” letter (this is sometimes also referred to as a by the bank.
“budget letter,” a “benefits letter,” or a “proof of
award letter”). HOLDS AND COLLEGE INDEBTEDNESS
Garrett College utilizes a system of “Holds” when
PAYMENT RESPONSIBILITY FOR MINOR managing student accounts and records. Three types of
STUDENTS holds may be applied to a student: Academic, Student,
and Financial. Students who are in poor academic
Parents or guardians of students who are under the age standing are placed on an Academic Hold, preventing
of eighteen at the time of registration will be required further registrations without re-admission. Students
to sign a Parent/Guardian Release for Students Under with outstanding obligations such as judicial sanctions,
18 form. This agreement confirms the parents’ required administrative paperwork, etc. may receive a
obligation to accept full payment responsibility for their Student Hold, preventing further registrations until the
son or daughter who is under the age of eighteen. obligation is resolved. Students who are financially
Financial obligations include tuition, fees, and indebted to the College are placed on a Financial Hold
textbooks. Parent responsibility for student payment until the financial obligation is met. Final grades,
will continue until the student turns eighteen years of monetary awards, and transcripts will not be issued to
age; and parents must notify the Business Office when a student who has a Financial Hold. Additionally, such
they are no longer responsible for their son/daughter’s student will not be allowed to register for upcoming
financial obligations to Garrett. semesters, nor will a student be permitted to
participate in commencement and/or receive a
DEFERRED PAYMENT PLAN diploma until all financial obligations to the College
All tuition and fees are due and payable at the time of have been met.
registration. By prior arrangement, a student may defer
If an account must be turned over to a collection
part of his or her college costs. The following
agency, a $25.00 handling fee will be charged to that
procedures apply in using the deferred payment plan.
account.
 Students must go to the Business Office to enroll in a
Payment made in cash, by Cashier’s Check or Money
deferred payment plan at a cost of $25.00. See
Order, or by credit/debit card will result in the

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 23 Revised 11/12/2009
immediate removal of the student’s Financial Hold and FINANCIAL AID POLICY
restoration of privileges revoked as a result of
indebtedness to the College. ADMISSION STATUS
Only students classified as “degree-seeking” or
Payments for the removal of a Financial Hold made by “certificate-seeking” are eligible for financial aid. “Non-
personal check will require a 30-day waiting period degree” students such as those classified as ECAP are
before the restoration of privileges revoked as a result not eligible for student financial aid. However, students
of indebtedness to the College. in “non-degree transfer” programs may be eligible.

AUDITED COURSES
FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Audited courses are not counted for financial aid
The Garrett College Financial Aid Office participates in purposes and cannot be paid for with financial aid
most federally funded programs. More than 85% of all funds.
students enrolled at Garrett receive some form of
financial aid. Last year Garrett College disbursed more CONTINUING EDUCATION C OURSES
than $1,400,000 in funds from local, state, and federal In most cases, Continuing Education Courses are not
programs. eligible for financial aid. Requirements for these
programs differ from credit hour programs, and
All students are required to complete a FAFSA as part financial aid awards are not commonly given. Contact
of the admissions process. Students applying for the Financial Aid Office to obtain financial aid
financial aid are considered for all aid programs for information about these programs.
which they are eligible. The amount of the award is
based on the financial need of the student. Need is SATISFACTORY PROGRESS FOR FINANCIAL AID
determined by subtracting the student’s resources and Students must be making satisfactory academic
his/her parents’ expected contribution from the total progress in order to receive financial aid. A copy of this
student expense. The parents’ contribution is policy may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office
estimated based on family income and expenses. An and on the College website.
independent, objective, nationally recognized method
developed by the federal government is used to RETURN OF FEDERAL TITLE IV FUNDS
analyze financial circumstances. All financial aid awards The Financial Aid Office is required by federal statute to
to the students are determined by the Financial Aid recalculate federal financial aid eligibility for students
Office. who withdraw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave
of absence prior to completing 60% of a payment
Free Applications for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) are
period or term. The federal Title IV financial aid
available on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Students should
programs must be recalculated in these situations. If a
apply for financial aid as early as possible. Deadline
student leaves the institution prior to completing 60%
dates for submitting financial aid information are
of a payment period or term, the Financial Aid Office
published in the course schedule each semester.
recalculates eligibility for Title IV funds. Recalculation is
An award letter explaining the award decision and based on the percentage of earned aid using the
giving information about the aid offered is sent to each following Federal Return of Title IV Funds formula:
applicant. Percentage of payment period or term completed = the
number of days completed up to the withdrawal date
Financial aid awards are normally granted for an divided by the total days in the payment period or term.
academic year and disbursed in equal installments (Any break of five days or more is not counted as part
during the semester. If a student is awarded aid for an of the days in the term.) The percentage is also the
academic year and attends for only one semester, the percentage of earned aid.
student will receive half of the academic year award.
Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program
A student must apply for financial aid each academic based on the percentage of unearned aid using the
year. However, aid usually continues at the same level following formula: aid to be returned = (100% of the aid
each year, unless a student’s resources or his/her that could be disbursed minus the percentage of earned
parents’ expected contribution changes. Students may aid) multiplied by the total amount of aid that could
renew each year at www.fafsa.ed.gov. have been disbursed during the payment period or
term.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 24 Revised 11/12/2009
If a student earned less aid than was disbursed, the FEDERAL CAMPUS WORK STUDY
institution would be required to return a portion of the
funds and the student would be required to return a The FCWS program provides jobs for undergraduate
portion of the funds. When Title IV funds are returned, and graduate students to help pay for educational
the student borrower may owe a debit balance to the expenses. A student must establish financial need and
institution. If a student earned more aid than was maintain good academic standing in order to hold a
disbursed to him/her, the institution would owe the work-study job.
student a post-withdrawal disbursement which must
Rate: Federal Minimum Wage
be paid within 120 days of the student’s withdrawal.
Hours: 10 to 20 hours per week
The institution must return the amount of Title IV funds
for which it is responsible no later than 30 days after Students must submit a Federal Application for Student
the date of the determination of the date of the Aid, the parents’ and/or student’s federal tax returns (if
student’s withdrawal. requested), a Garrett Work Program Application and a
resume.
Refunds are allocated in the following order:

1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL


2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans
3. Federal Parent (PLUS) Loans
OPPORTUNITY GRANT (NO REPAYMENT)
4. Federal Pell Grants for which a return of funds Grant for students with exceptional need; priority is
is required given to students with Federal Pell Grants. Awards
5. Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grants for available per academic year average $400 depending
which a return of funds is required upon need and availability of funds.
6. Other assistance under this Title for which a
return of funds is required Students must submit to Garrett College a Student Aid
Report from the Federal Student Aid Program and the
Financial Aid Policies are subject to change in parents’ and/or student’s federal tax returns, if
accordance with federal and state regulations. requested.

FEDERAL PELL GRANTS (NO REPAYMENT) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN


Applicants must complete a Free Application for PROGRAM
Federal Student Aid which is available from Garrett’s SUBSIDIZED STAFFORD LOAN (NEED BASED)
Financial Aid Office. The Financial Aid Office will
This program enables students to borrow from banks in
determine the actual amount the student will receive
order to finance educational expenses. The maximum
based on a student eligibility report which the federal
loan is $3,500 for freshmen and $4,500 for sophomores
government provides. Awards per academic year range
as a community college student. Loan amounts may
from $400 to $5,350.
not exceed financial need as determined by the Federal
Requirements: Pell Grant report. Applications are processed on-line at
www.elmselect.com.
 Establish financial need as determined by the U.S.
Department of Education; Students must submit a Free Application for Federal
 be enrolled in a degree or a certificate program; Student Aid, parents’ and/or student’s federal tax
 be a citizen or a permanent resident of the United returns, if requested.
States;
 maintain satisfactory progress; and UNSUBSIDIZED STAFFORD (NOT NEED BASED)
 not be in default or owe a refund on a Federal This program is for students who do not qualify under
Grant or Federal Educational Loan. the need-based subsidized loan program. The
maximum loan is $3,500 for freshmen and $4,500 for
Students seeking a Pell Grant must submit to Garrett sophomores, less any subsidized amount. Loan
College a Student Aid Report from the Federal Student amounts may not exceed educational expenses less any
Aid Program and the parents’ and/or the student’s other financial aid. Students apply on-line at
federal tax returns, if requested. www.elmselect.com.

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Students must submit a Free Application for Federal Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid,
Student Aid, parents’ and/or student’s federal tax and apply by March 1 (February is preferred) to your
returns, if requested. State Senator. For residents of Garrett County,
Maryland, the State Senator is the Honorable John J.
FEDERAL PARENT (PLUS) LOANS Hafer, James Senate Office Building, Room 406,
This program offers a parent loan, through the federal Annapolis, Maryland 21401, telephone 410-841-3565
government, that provides additional funds for or 800-492-7122 extension 3565.
educational expenses less any other financial aid.
Applications are available from the Garrett Financial HOUSE OF DELEGATES SCHOLARSHIP
Aid Office. Apply to the applicant’s State Delegate. Delegates have
a choice of two methods of awarding these
Students may be requested to complete a Free scholarships. First, delegates may award a student a
Application for Federal Student Aid and supply parents’ scholarship in the amount of actual tuition and
federal tax returns. mandatory fees at any public college or university in
Maryland. If used at an independent college, the award
MARYLAND STATE-FUNDED FINANCIAL AID may not exceed $1,827 per semester or $3,654 per
year. Second, delegates can use a set dollar amount.
PROGRAMS Awards range from $200 to $7,300 per year. The term
PROGRAMS FOR UNDERGRADUATES of the award is for one to four years as decided by the
The programs in this section are administered by the delegate. No repayment.
MHEC and are available only to Maryland residents. To
apply for these scholarships, you must complete the Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid
Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The deadline and apply by March 1 (February preferred) to your
date to apply for these scholarships is March 1. State Delegate.
Applications are available from the Garrett Financial
The Maryland State Scholarship Administration offers
Aid Office.
additional scholarships for a variety of fields. For
additional information on Maryland State Scholarships
EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE AWARD PROGRAM -
contact the Maryland Higher Education Commission,
GUARANTEED ACCESS GRANTS AND EDUCATIONAL Office of Student Financial Aid, 839 Bestgate Road,
ASSISTANCE GRANTS Suite 400, Annapolis, Maryland 21401-3013, telephone
The purpose of the Educational Excellence Award (EEA) 410-974-0203.
Program is to provide need-based scholarship
assistance. The state’s neediest students will be GARRETT FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS
guaranteed access to postsecondary education in
Maryland through Guaranteed Access (GA) Grants. Low The Garrett Foundation, Inc., awards competitive
and middle income students will be awarded financial scholarships on the basis of merit as well as need to
assistance through Educational Assistance (EA) Grants. Garrett students every academic year. Scholarship
catalogs are available in January of each year for the
Guaranteed Access Grant Awards are made in an upcoming academic year. Information regarding
amount equal to the State Scholarship Administration’s scholarship deadlines and application procedures are
Adjusted Need rounded to the nearest $100. The included in the scholarship catalog. Scholarship
maximum award amount may not exceed the amount a catalogs may be obtained by calling the Financial Aid
student would receive to attend the University of Office.
Maryland, College Park. Educational Assistance Grant
Awards range between $200 and $2,600 per year. MILITARY ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid The G.I. Bill has provided the means for thousands of
and apply by March 1. February is preferred. veterans to earn a college degree. The G.I. Bill is money
you earn while you serve on Active Duty or in the
SENATORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Reserves in any branch of the United States Armed
$400 to $2,000. Awards and amounts of awards are Forces. Here’s how it works:
determined by State Senators. No repayment. Multiple
year awards are possible with re-application. You can select Active Duty and contribute $100 a
month for 12 months for a total of $1,200. The G.I. Bill

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 26 Revised 11/12/2009
then makes a contribution giving you total benefits up MARYLAND A RMY NATIONAL GUARD GRANT
to $14,998. When you join the Guard, you’re eligible for a $10,152
grant over the course of 36 months of college for
Choose Selective Reserve Duty and you don’t have to tuition assistance under the Montgomery G.I. Bill, plus
contribute a penny. You can earn up to $7,124 - equal an extra $7,200 over the course of 36 months of
to $197 a month - upon completion of initial skills college for those who qualify and enlist into a critical
training. MOS. You may also be eligible to receive a 50% state
tuition waiver, and when the semester is over (as long
A new GI bill post 9/11 Chapter 33 is available to those
as you’ve maintained a “C” or above) you may be
who qualify. Go to www.gibill.va.gov to determine your
reimbursed the other 50%. In addition, you may be
eligibility.
eligible for Federal tuition assistance of 75% of up to
$200 per semester hour. For more information, contact
UNITED STATES ARMY
Sgt. John Pownall at the Maryland Army National Guard
Money for College: If you qualify for the Montgomery
in Cumberland, MD. Telephone 301-777-9395 or 301-
G.I. Bill plus the Army College Fund, you could earn up
268-5022.
to $30,000 for college after completing a four year
enlistment. For those who have completed some or all
of their college studies, the Army’s Loan Repayment
UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE ALLIED MEDICAL
Program can help you pay off your qualifying student PERSONNEL PROGRAM (RAMP)
loan up to $55,000 with a three or four year Another way to serve your country part-time while
enlistment. For further information contact Sergeant attending school is the RAMP program which pays
Craig P. McVey, United States Army Field Recruiter, 100% of tuition, books, and fees. Participants are also
United States Army LaVale Recruiting Station, Braddock eligible for the new contributory United States Naval
Square Shopping Center, LaVale, Maryland 21502. Reserve G.I. Bill, which is a maximum of $143 a month
Telephone 301-729-3643. for 36 months. For more information contact Michael L.
Boyd, FT2 (SS), United States Navy Recruiter, Navy
UNITED STATES NAVY Recruiting Command, Uniontown Mall, West Main
The United States Navy will hire over 54,000 men and Street, Uniontown, Pennsylvania 15401-4389.
women this year. You could be qualified for up to Telephone 412-439-4910 or 412-439-5828.
$30,000 for college. For information contact Michael L.
Boyd, FT2 (SS), United States Navy Recruiter, Navy
Recruiting Command, Navy Recruiting Station,
STUDENT LABOR PROGRAMS
Uniontown Mall, West Main Street, Uniontown, The following Student Labor Programs are available at
Pennsylvania 15401-4839. Telephone 412-439-4910 or Garrett College:
412-439-5828.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
UNITED STATES AIR F ORCE The Federally-funded College Work Study program is a
Qualified applicants could receive up to $14,998 for need-based program designed to give students career-
college. For more information about the United States related work experience. For more information, see
Air Force contact, TSgt. Thomas Mullaney, United Federal Campus Work Study on page 25.
States Air Force Recruiting Office, Braddock Square
Shopping Center, Suite 11, LaVale, Maryland 21502. INSTITUTIONAL LABOR
Telephone 301-729-2137. The Institutional Labor program provides jobs for in-
county students (Garrett County Residents) to help pay
ARMY CONTINUING EDUCATION SYSTEM for educational expenses. Employment is not based on
financial need.
SCHOLARSHIP
United States Army soldiers can earn a certificate or Rate: Federal Minimum Wage
associates degree using Army Tuition Assistance. Many Hours: 12-20 hours per week
associate degree programs allow soldiers to complete a
degree program regardless of how much they move Students must submit to Garrett College a Garrett
around because transfer of credits is guaranteed. For Work Program Application and maintain satisfactory
more information contact James F. White, SFC, United academic progress. Other qualifications may be
States Army, Station Commander, United States Army required based up employment placement. For
Recruiting Station, Country Club Mall, LaVale, Maryland additional information about the Institutional Labor
21502. Telephone 301-729-3643. program contact the Garrett Financial Aid Office.

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENT E MPLOYMENT New Horizons Program participants may need career
Interested students should contact the International and training information, updated job skills, and self-
Admissions Representative. confidence to enter or re-enter the job market.
Services such as peer counseling, career exploration,
skills training opportunities, career workshops, and job
NEW HORIZONS PROGRAM referrals are provided free of charge for participants.
The New Horizons Program is the center for:
Limited tuition and book assistance is available to
 Single parents who are unmarried, legally individuals qualifying for the New Horizons Program
separated or divorced from a spouse and have sole who are enrolled in Career Technology Education
or joint custody of a minor child or children, or are curriculums to assist them in with their educational
currently pregnant; expenses. Child care and/or transportation assistance
 Displaced homemakers who are adults with are also available to program participants enrolled in
diminished jobs skills, who have lost their primary Career Technology Education curricula at Garrett.
source of income through death or disability of a
spouse, and who are unemployed or under- New Horizons is funded through Garrett College. Financial
employed; assistance through Perkins III from the Maryland State
 Individuals who are enrolled in Career Technology Department of Education, Division of Career Technology
Education or CTE programs non-traditional for and Adult Learning is available for tuition/books and child
their gender; care/transportation expenses. Students interested in
 Individuals who have barriers to educational learning more about the program should contact the
success including disabilities and English as a Coordinator of Career and Transfer Services.
second language.

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STUDENT LIFE
STUDENT GOVERNMENT RESIDENCE LIFE
The Student Government Association is an elected Residence life is an important part of the campus
body that provides guidance to student organizations
experience. Two professional staff and six residence
and works with Student Life staff to develop activities
assistance provide programming and support to
to enrich the student experience. By participating, a
students in the residence halls.
student has the opportunity to assume the
responsibility of leadership. Its Officers--President, Vice Garrett has two residence halls on campus, Garrett Hall
President, Secretary, and Treasurer--are elected by the and Laker Hall. Garrett Hall offers a more traditional
entire student body; its freshman and sophomore class layout of suites with two rooms and bath. There is a
representatives are elected by their respective classes. shared kitchen, lounge and laundry facility on the first
Representatives from chartered organizations are floor.
selected by those organizations. The Student
Government develops a budget with the Associate Laker Hall is an apartment-style hall. Rooms are
Dean of Student Life. SGA officers are responsible for organized around a living room and kitchen with semi-
management of the budget as required by the SGA by- private baths. Lounge facilities are located on each
laws. The budget is allocated from student fees. All SGA floor.
meetings are open, and all students are encouraged to
attend.
FOOD SERVICE
The College provides food services to resident and
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS commuter students and staff through a contractor in
AND ACTIVITIES the Laker Café and the provision of cooking facilities in
the residence halls.
Garrett College offers many extracurricular activities
for all students. These activities, some funded by The Laker Café is located in the Student Union across
Student Government, provide students with from the Learning Resources Center. Snacks and a full-
opportunities for self-expression; to make new friends, service meal menu are available for breakfast, lunch
learn new skills, develop lifelong interests, and learn and dinner on a regular schedule when classes are in
through practical experiences. All Garrett College session. Students and staff may make cash purchases
students are members of the Student Association and or may buy a meal plan that allows for the purchase of
can vote in Student Government elections. Student special meal packages or individual items.
Government consists of an executive branch
(President, Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary) Garrett Hall: A common kitchen is located on the first
and the legislative branch (four representatives.) The floor that can be used by Garrett Hall residents. Each
Student Association assists with developing and room is provided with a microwave and a small
recommending cultural, social, and educational refrigerator. Due to the limited access to cooking
activities as well as promotes student organizations. facilities, students in Garrett Hall must purchase a meal
plan.
ATHLETICS Laker Hall: There is a full kitchen in each suite in Laker
Garrett College’s athletic program utilizes its Hall. Residents may cook all their own meals or may
gymnasium, indoor field sport practice facility, and choose to purchase a meal plan.
baseball field, as well as other recreational resources of
the area. Known as the Lakers, teams compete in
intercollegiate men’s and women’s basketball, STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
women’s volleyball, men’s baseball, women’s softball, All enrolled students at Garrett College are required to
and golf. The College is a member of the Maryland follow all College policies and procedures and are
JUCO Conference, Western Pennsylvania Collegiate required to conduct themselves at all times in a
Conference, Pennsylvania Collegiate Athletic professional, ethical, and appropriate manner.
Association, Region XX, and the National Junior College
Athletic Association. Students who fail to meet the standards of behavior,
including academic behavior, as outlined in the Student

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Code of Conduct will be subject to Student Conduct Students are responsible for knowing the code, the
Review and may be subject to sanctions. Students review process, and possible sanctions. Failure to
should be aware that sanctions may include removal become knowledgeable is not an affirmative defense
from the residence halls and/or the College for a period for violation of the code.
of time or permanently.

Details of the Student Code of Conduct, Student


Conduct Review, and sanctions can be found in the
Student Handbook and on the College website.

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STUDENT SERVICES
clearly identify the part of the record they want
RECORDS AND REGISTRATION changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. The Director
The Office of the Records and Registration maintains a of Registration and Records will contact the College
single permanent record file for each matriculated official responsible for said record. If the College official
student. The file materials represent the record of a decides not to amend the record as requested by the
student’s admission and enrollment along with any student, the College official will notify the student of
action affecting a student’s enrollment at Garrett the decision and advise the student of his or her right
College. These materials are maintained for five years to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.
following the student’s last semester of enrollment. Additional information regarding the hearing
From that point on, a file retention schedule is put into procedures will be provided to the student when
action. Federal and state laws, college policy, and notified of the right to a hearing.
recommendations from professional organizations  The right to consent to disclosures of personally
govern the retention schedule. Items maintained on a identifiable information contained in the student’s
permanent basis include: grade reports, change of education records, except to the extent that FERPA
grade forms, any correspondence relating to change of authorizes disclosure without consent. One
grades or grade assignments, and any correspondence exception that permits disclosure without consent
regarding Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act is disclosure to school officials with legitimate
request, for amended file or official complaint. In educational interests. A school official is a person
addition, a copy of any letters sent to a student employed by the College in an administrative,
notifying the student of any disciplinary action affecting supervisory, academic or research, or support staff
his/her enrollment at the College will be placed in the position (including law enforcement unit personnel
file. All other correspondence and records related to and health staff); a person or company with whom
sanctions imposed through the Student Conduct the College has contracted (such as an attorney,
Review process will be held in the Office of the auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on
Associate Dean of Student Life as described in the the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an
Student Conduct Code published in the Student official committee, such as a disciplinary or
Handbook. grievance committee, or assisting another school
official in performing his or her tasks.
FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY
A school official has a legitimate educational interest if
ACT (FERPA) the official needs to review an education record in
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
affords students certain rights with respect to their Upon request, the College discloses education records
education records. These rights include: without consent to officials of another school in which
a student seeks or intends to enroll.
 The right to inspect and review the student’s education  The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department
records within 45 days of the day the College receives a of Education concerning alleged failures by Garrett
request for access. Students should submit to the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA.
Director of Records and Registration written requests The name and address of the office that administers
that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The FERPA is:
Director of Records and Registration will make
arrangements for access and notify the student of the Family Policy Compliance Office
time and place where the records may be inspected. If U.S. Department of Education
the records are not maintained by the Office of 400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Registration and Records, the Director of Registration Washington, DC 20202-4605
and Records shall advise the student of the correct
official to whom the request should be addressed.
 The right to request the amendment of the student’s D IRECTORY I NFORMATION
education records that the student believes is In accordance with the provisions of the Act, directory
inaccurate. Students may ask the College to amend a information may be disclosed without the student’s prior
record that they believe is inaccurate. They should consent unless the student submits a Non-Disclosure of
write the Director of Registration and Records and Information Form with the Office of Registration and

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Records. Non-Disclosure of Information Forms must be ACADEMIC ADVISING
submitted to the Office of Registration and Records within
two weeks after the first day of class for the semester. Academic Advising occurs in two phases: in-take
advising and program-based advising. Each new
“Directory Information” means information contained in a student is assigned an in-take advisor at the time of
student’s education record that would not generally be new student registration. The in-take advisor reviews
considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. It Placement Testing or other assessment results in the
includes, but is not limited to, the student’s name, address, areas of Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. On the
home town, telephone listing, electronic mail address, basis of these results and degree/certificate
photograph, date and place of birth, major field of study, requirements in which the student is enrolled, the
dates of attendance, grade level, enrollment status (e.g., advisor works with the students to select courses and
under-graduate or graduate; full-time or part-time), develop a course schedule for the first semester of
participation in officially recognized activities and sports, enrollment.
weight and height of members of athletic teams, degrees,
honors, and awards received, dates of conferral, and the In mid-semester of the student’s first term at the
most recent educational agency or institution attended. College, the student will be reassigned to a program
advisor. This is a faculty member in the program in
which the student is seeking a degree/certificate. The
SOLOMON AMENDMENT student will be notified of the assignment prior to pre-
The Solomon Amendment is a federal law that mandates registration for the student’s second semester.
that institutions receiving federal funding must give military Students who may need additional assistance in
recruiters access to campus and to lists of students, identifying career goals or options or who are planning
including personally identifiable student information. The to transfer to a four-year institution should also meet
Solomon Amendment supersedes FERPA. with the Coordinator of Career and Transfer Services as
soon as possible.
STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW
In compliance with the Student Right to Know Act, Garrett LEARNING SUPPORT SERVICES
College has on file a copy of the Completion/Graduation The Integrated Language Arts and Writing Lab provides
and Transfer-Out Rate. Contact the Office of Institutional materials and instruction for students who need
Research if you wish to access this information. assistance with reading comprehension, vocabulary,
spelling, and study skills. The lab also assists students
CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS ACT DISCLOSURE with grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
development, and general written communication
In accordance with The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention proficiency.
Act, the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and
Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act and the The Mathematics Lab provides instruction from basic
Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and math skills through higher level math.
Campus Crime Statistics Act, Garrett College publishes
an annual report that contains campus crime statistics Students enrolled in developmental courses may be
and certain security policy statements. Information on required to use the Math or Writing Labs as a course
campus crime rates, sexual harassment and sexual requirement. A student readmitted to the College on
assault, hate crimes may be obtained from the Director probation may also be required to use the Writing
of Campus Security and are posted on the Garrett and/or Math Lab as a condition of readmission.
College website.

Information regarding local sexual predators may be


TUTORING
obtained at www.dpscs.state.md.us/sorSearch. The College provides a variety of workshops and other
opportunities for students to gain basic skills that
improve the chances for academic success including
STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES study skills, note taking, time management, etc.
Student Support Services include Academic Advising, Students may also request a tutor in a subject area.
Math Lab, Writing Lab, Tutoring Services, Testing
Center, Career and Transfer Services, and Disability TESTING CENTER
Services. The Office of the Director of Student Support
When a student takes an exam in the Testing Center
Services is located in the Learning Resource Center.
(s)he will be asked to provide a photo ID. Detailed

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Page 32 Revised 11/12/2009
below are the types of services provided by the Testing the courses in which the student should enroll at
Center. Garrett College to maximize the transferability of the
courses.
PLACEMENT TESTING
All entering students who have not completed their TRANSFERRING FROM GARRETT
GERs in English Composition and Mathematics must Garrett College has a variety of transfer program
take a placement examination prior to registering for majors. Transfer agreements have been developed
classes. Based upon the placement score, students will with many two-year and four-year institutions which
be registered for developmental or college-level specify your course of study while at Garrett. Your
courses, as appropriate. Students who are assigned to academic program advisor and the Coordinator of
developmental English and Mathematics will also be Career and Transfer Services will work with you in
required to take additional developmental courses in setting career and educational goals; the selection of
language arts and/or preparation for college. Students appropriate transfer institutions; and the development
may be re-assigned during the first week of classes of an appropriate curriculum to prepare for transfer.
based on class assessment.
Students considering transfer to Maryland institutions
TESTING F OR ON-LINE COURSES should be aware that to maximize transfer of credits
Students enrolled in On-line courses who are required they should complete an Associate’s degree at Garrett
by their instructors to take exams in a proctored setting College prior to transfer.
may do so in the Testing Center. Three, three-hour time
blocks are scheduled each semester. Students should Transferability of courses between Maryland
check the course schedule for these times before institutions can be researched through the ARTSYS
registering for courses that will be offered On-line. system available at artweb.usmd.edu.

The key to success is working closely with an academic


TESTING F OR STUDENTS WITH DOCUMENTED advisor and the Coordinator of Career and Transfer
ACCOMMODATIONS Services as soon as possible.
Students with documented disability who require
testing accommodation may take their exams in the
Testing Center. In order to do so the student must
DISABILITY SERVICES
confirm the accommodation with his/her instructor Students seeking accommodation for a documented
during the first week of classes and prior to each exam disability should contact the Director of Student
date. The instructor will supply the exam to the Testing Support Services. The College will make reasonable
Center. accommodation for documented disabilities. It is the
responsibility of the student to provide documentation
MAKE-UP EXAMS of the disability and to be tested, at the student’s
In the rare case when a make-up exam is appropriate, expense, if documentation is lacking or is not current.
the course instructor is responsible for the
administration and proctoring of the exam. The Testing After review of the documentation, the Director of
Center does not administer or proctor make-up exams. Student Support Services will work with the student to
identify appropriate accommodation. An
accommodation plan will be developed in writing. It is
CAREER AND TRANSFER SERVICES the responsibility of the student to share the plan with
The College provides a range of programs and each instructor in whose class the student is requesting
resources through the Office of Career and Transfer accommodation.
Services to assist students in identifying career goals
and selecting classroom and out-of-classroom
experiences to support students in reaching those INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
goals. The office provides career interest assessment Garrett College recognizes that international students
software, access to job databases, and résumé writing on this campus bring with them both special resources
assistance. For details, visit the Career and Transfer and special needs. The increased international
services webpage at www.garrettcollege.edu/career. awareness, which they create, is important to the
entire academic community. At the same time, the
Students planning to continue their education at College wishes to ensure that each student has the best
another institution should consult with the Coordinator possible educational and personal experience while in
as soon as possible to identify transfer institutions and

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Page 33 Revised 11/12/2009
the U.S. To achieve these objectives, the College offers campus employment application from the International
a variety of services to international students. Admissions Representative.

COURSE LOAD HEALTH AND COUNSELING SERVICES


Students who are on an F-1 visa are under the Limited counseling and/or health services and referrals
following restrictions in terms of the number of credits to local health professionals are available through the
registered: Office of Health and Counseling Services.
 Must take a minimum of 12 credits during the Fall
and Spring semesters; there is no minimum for the CONTINUING EDUCATION
Summer. To take less than 12 credits, permission
must be obtained from the International AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT
Admissions Representative. Permission will only be Garrett’s commitment to the wider community can be
granted in accordance with federal regulations. seen in its Continuing Education and Workforce
 Must register for at least 12 on-campus, in-class Development program. The Division of Continuing
credits. Additionally, students may register for no Education and Workforce Development offers
more than 6 credits of On-line courses for a total of educational programming designed to meet lifelong
not more than 18 credits. learning needs. If you wish to upgrade work skills, learn
more about yourself, improve fitness, develop a hobby,
FINANCIAL INFORMATION enhance communication skills, expand horizons, or just
enjoy yourself, there is a course for you. Most non-
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP credit courses are available to any participant
International students are eligible to apply for a tuition regardless of past education or grade level.
scholarship of up to $2,000 per year. Students may
request an application from the International Continuing Education provides a wide variety of
Admissions Representative. learning experiences in the areas of health, personal
development, computers, business, career education,
INTERNATIONAL ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP professional growth, and recreation. Students are
International students who are eligible to play college- offered the opportunity of reaching new heights
level sports may receive an athletic scholarship. professionally, personally, and academically through
Interested international athletes should contact the participation in these community-based course
Athletic Department. offerings.

GARRETT C OLLEGE F OUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS Courses are planned in response to the needs of the
Once students have completed their first Fall semester, community, and suggestions are always welcome.
they are eligible to apply for certain scholarships Courses can be designed for a business, organization,
available through Garrett College’s Foundation. or group (small or large). Courses and mini-courses are
offered in many locations in Garrett County.
OPTIONAL PRACTICAL TRAINING P ROGRAM Customized training for businesses or organizations can
F-1 visa students are prohibited by the U.S. Citizenship also be conducted on site.
and Immigration Services (USCIS) from working off-
An area of special programming is cooperative
campus during their first academic year of U.S. study.
offerings. Cooperative offerings are courses which have
However, Optional Practical Training (OPT), a USCIS
been traditionally offered only to credit-seeking
program, offers F-1 students the opportunity to apply
students and are now also open to non-credit students.
for a work permit to work off-campus in jobs directly
These offerings provide an opportunity for students
related to their major or field of study for the purpose
who might not otherwise attend to enroll without the
of gaining practical, hands on, paid job experience at
pressures associated with credit requirements. Classes
the end of their first academic year. Students must
are available in the areas of computers, business,
apply for OPT up to 90 days prior to the end of their
health, and vocational preparation.
first academic year.
Although reasonable tuition applies to non-credit
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT E MPLOYMENT courses, Maryland Senior Citizens (60 years of age or
International students who work on-campus do not older) are exempt from payment of most tuition
need USCIS work authorization. Paid on-campus jobs charges. While Garrett County residents are given
are limited. International students may request an on-

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priority for enrollment, residents of other states and Continuing Education non-credit courses are open to all
counties are welcome to participate at slightly higher members of the community who are 16 years of age
tuition rates. Uniquely funded training possibilities are and older. No previous educational experiences are
offered for those in special need situations. Adult Basic necessary unless stated. Citations are awarded for
Education/GED Preparation is also a vital part of the certain non-credit courses.
Continuing Education emphasis.
The college has a policy of awarding Continuing
ABE courses are scheduled at various locations Education Units (CEU’s) for certain specific courses.
throughout the county. Those wishing to improve their
basic skills are encouraged to participate in these The staff of the Continuing Education and Workforce
classes focusing on functional math, reading, and Development Division of Garrett is dedicated to helping
writing. These free classes are available for learners at you invest in tomorrow by learning today.
all levels. Students wishing to attain their high school
diplomas are provided with the skills needed to
challenge the GED test.

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ACADEMICS
ACADEMIC PROGRAM INFORMATION GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
Garrett College offers a strong general education
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS program designed to enhance students’ intellectual
growth in a wide range of disciplines, in accordance
1. A minimum of 64 credits is required for a degree.
with the Code of Maryland Regulations
2. Students must take all courses required in the
curriculum. Certain requirements may be substituted 13b.06.06.01.03 (see page 135).
or waived with the approval of the Dean of Academic
and Student Affairs, see applicable guidelines found on GOALS OF THE GENERAL EDUCATION
page 47. PROGRAM
3. The General Education Requirement consists of  Students will be able to communicate effectively in
not less than 21 credits for an A.A.S. degree, 31 terms of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
credits for an A.A. degree, and 32 credits for an  Students will develop the ability to think critically,
A.A.T. degree. Consult the GER course list for solve problems, and apply the scientific method.
applicable courses.  Students will demonstrate information
4. Complete Institutional Requirements including management skills that will enable them to
earning a minimum “C-” in one 3 credit hour interpret, analyze, evaluate, and use information
Identity and Difference Course; and satisfactory effectively for lifelong learning.
completion of 2 credits of Physical Education,  Students will develop ethical and cultural
Health, or ASI coursework. awareness.
5. Each student must have a minimum cumulative grade  Students will establish educational and career
point average of 2.00 (average grade of “C”) to be goals.
eligible to receive a degree or certificate. Certain  Students will demonstrate proficiency in a focused
programs may require a CGPA above 2.00. area of educational or vocational interest.
6. Students must minimally earn a “C-” in their GER
A specific distribution of at least 20 general education
writing course as required by the degree program.
credits is required for an A.A.S. degree and at least 30
7. At least 24 credit hours of college level work must be
general education credits are required for an A.A. or
completed while in residence at Garrett College.
A.A.T. degree. Many degree programs have designated
8. The student’s record must indicate that the student
specific courses which must be taken to fulfill the
has achieved satisfactory compliance with all College
general education requirements. A general
regulations.
representation of the required hours for each degree
9. Students earning an Associate’s degree are required to
take the institution’s Outcomes Assessment test the follows:
semester of graduation.
10. Certain degree program may have additional GER S FOR A.A.S. D EGREES
requirements. English Composition ................................... 3 credits
Arts and Humanities .................................. 6 credits
Social and Behavioral Sciences .................. 3 credits
CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS Science........................................................ 4 credits
Garrett College offers a variety of certificate programs. To Mathematics .............................................. 3 credits
earn a certificate, students must complete the required Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues ....... 2 or 3 credits
courses in the program. If pre-college level courses are TOTAL CREDITS: 21/22
needed to meet course prerequisites, students must
complete the prerequisite courses at a satisfactory level. GER S FOR A.A. D EGREES
English Composition .................................. 3 credits
CHANGE OF PROGRAM Arts and Humanities .................................. 9 credits
Social and Behavioral Sciences .................. 6 credits
Students wishing to change programs must complete a Science........................................................ 7 credits
Curriculum Change Form available in the Office of Mathematics .............................................. 3 credits
Registration and Records. Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues .............. 3 credits
TOTAL CREDITS: 31

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GER S FOR A.A.T. D EGREES HIS101, Western Civilization to 1500
English Composition ...................................3 credits HIS102, West. Civilization 1500-Present
Arts and Humanities ...................................9 credits HIS105, History of World Civ. I
Social and Behavioral Sciences ...................6 credits HIS106, History of World Civ. II
Science ........................................................8 credits HIS111, American History to 1865
Mathematics ...............................................3 credits HIS112, American History Since 1865
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues ...............3 credits HIS121, Twentieth Century World
TOTAL: 32 POL140, American National Government
PSY101, General Psychology
APPROVED GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES PSY121, General Psychology (Honors)
PSY150, Psychology of Human Relations
The courses listed below have been approved as SOC101, Principles of Sociology
fulfilling the requirements of Garrett College’s General SOC201, The Family
Education program. Courses not specifically listed
below will not fulfill the general education Science:
requirements. BIO101, General Biology I
BIO102, General Biology II
English Composition: BIO104, Principles of Biology
ENG101, Composition I BIO200, Anatomy and Physiology I
ENG103, Technical Writing BIO201, Anatomy and Physiology II
ENG111, English Composition (Honors) CHE100, Intro. to College Chemistry
CHE101, General Chemistry I
Arts and Humanities: CHE102, General Chemistry II
ART101, Basic Design I ESC101, Physical Geology
ART102, Basic Design II ESC121, Physical Geography
ART103, Art Appreciation PHY100, Intro. to College Physics
ART115, Visual Imagery PHY101, General Physics I
ART201, Drawing I PHY102, General Physics II
ART206, Painting I PHY111, Gen. Physics I (Calculus Based)
ART207, Ceramics I PHY112, Gen Physics II (Calculus Based)
ART260, Art History PHY130, Physical Science
ENG102, Introduction to Literature PHY145, Meteorology
ENG112, Honors Composition and Literature PHY147, Astronomy (not a lab science)
ENG133, Images of Women in Literature
ENG163, African American Literature Mathematics:
ENG251, Survey of British Literature MAT105, College Algebra
ENG252, Survey of American Literature MAT110, Pre-Calculus
FRN101, Elementary French I MAT190, Calculus I
FRN102, Elementary French II MAT191, Calculus II
HUM210, Society and the Environment MAT210, Statistics
MUS110, Music Appreciation MAT211, Mathematical Logic (Honors)
PHL101, Introduction to Philosophy
PHL110, Intro to Logical Reasoning Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
PHL111, Intro to Philosophy (Honors) CSC105, Introduction to Computers
SPC101, Introduction to Communication CSC180, Intro to Geographic Info Systems
SPN101, Elementary Spanish I
SPN102, Elementary Spanish II
THE101, Introduction to Theatre ADDITIONAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
THE104, Fundamentals of Tech Theatre IDENTITY AND DIFFERENCE COURSES
THE106, Fundamentals of Technical Theatre: Lighting, Students should note that these may not fulfill an
Costume, Sound Identify and Difference requirement at another
institution to which the student may transfer. To be
Social and Behavioral Sciences: certain, students should check with the Coordinator of
ECN104, Introduction to Economics Career and Transfer Services.
ECN201, Prin of Economics I (MACRO)
GEO201, Cultural Geography

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GEO201 Cultural Geography (Social Sciences GER) A (93-100%) is equal to 4.0 grade points
HIS102 Western Civilization (Social Sciences GER) A- (90-92%) is equal to 3.7 grade points
th
HIS121 20 Century World (Social Sciences GER) B+ (87-89%) is equal to 3.3 grade points
HUM210 Society and the Environment (Hum. GER) B (83-86%) is equal to 3.0 grade points
POL140 American Natl Govt (Social Sciences GER) B- (80-82%) is equal to 2.7 grade points
PSY101 General Psychology (Social Sciences GER) C+ (77-79%) is equal to 2.3 grade points
PSY140 Psychology of Women C (73-76%) is equal to 2.0 grade points
PHL103 Comparative Religion C- (70-72%) is equal to 1.7 grade points
PHL112 Philosophy and Religion D+ (67-69%) is equal to 1.3 grade points
SOC101 Principles of Sociology (Social Sciences GER) D (63-66%) is equal to 1.0 grade points
SPN101 Spanish I (Humanities GER) D- (60-62%) is equal to 0.7 grade points
SPN102 Spanish II (Humanities GER) F (0-59%) is equal to 0.0 grade points

OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT All required courses for which the student has received
In compliance with the Middle States Accreditation an “F” must be retaken at Garrett College and
requirement that all institutions of higher education completed with a minimum grade of “D-” (unless
assess student learning in general education courses otherwise specified). For students in certain degree or
prior to degree completion, Garrett administers an transfer programs, it may be necessary to repeat other
Outcomes Assessment test in the Spring semester for low grades in order to meet cumulative grade point
its prospective degree graduates. The purpose of this requirements of other institutions.
assessment is to gather data on student learning in
general education at Garrett. Results permit the I Incomplete: A student who, due to extraordinary
College to evaluate curriculum and instruction at the circumstances, is not able to complete a limited
institution and to determine academic areas that need amount of work (a final paper, project or final
to be strengthened. exam) in a course prior to the end of the due date
for grades, may request an incomplete from the
Although a student’s performance on the Outcomes instructor. The student and instructor must
Assessment test will not alter his or her graduation complete a Contract for Grade of Incomplete
status, it is an institutional requirement and the results which details the work to be completed and a
will be available to those who request them. Garrett deadline for its completion which can be no later
will make every effort to ensure that the test will be than the last day of classes in the following
given at reasonable and convenient times. Students semester (excluding Intersession or Summer
who would like to be informed of their performance on sessions). Work still outstanding at the deadline
the test may request this information. The results will will receive the score of zero, which will be
be available at Garrett no later than July of the included in the final grade computation. If a grade
graduation year. is not submitted by the deadline to the Office of
Records and Registration, the instructor will be
Students may also be required to participate in other requested to record a grade of “F.” This grade may
assessments. not be appealed. All incompletes must be cleared
prior to graduation.
ACADEMIC REGULATIONS W Withdrawal: The grade assigned when the student
officially withdraws from a course after the last
ACADEMIC GRADING SYSTEM drop date (generally 20% of the course) but before
the last withdrawal date, unless a grade has
Each student’s academic progress is evaluated and
already been issued. Administrative withdrawals
reported at the end of each semester. Students are
may be authorized by college officials in special
expected to meet stated standards of the course.
cases for extraordinary circumstances.
Garrett uses a plus (+) and minus (-) grading system to
AU Audit: Student registers to participate in a course
more accurately reflect a student’s level of
but elects to receive no credit.
achievement/performance in a course. These grades
have the following equivalent quality points which are F Failure: Student attended or demonstrated
used in computing a student’s semester and cumulative attendance in the course, but failed due to poor
grade point averages. performance.

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FA Failure, Poor Attendance: Student attended some E Excellent: Superior achievement.
classes but exceeded the course absence policy.
VG Very Good: Above average achievement.
FN Failure, Non-attendance: Student attended some
classes but stopped attending at some point prior S Satisfactory: Average performance; student may
to the attendance check date. advance to next level.

FX Failure, No Show: Student never attended the PR Progress; Repeat: Student shows progress but not
course but is still on the course roster because sufficient enough to advance to next level.
(s)he did not drop or withdraw from the course or
the college. NP Not Passed: Little progress or achievement;
student must repeat the course.
CR/NC Certain internship, practicum, Intro/Basic
Adventure Sports, and physical education courses NA Not Passed, Poor Attendance: Student attended
and courses in the MTDI program are graded on a some classes but exceeded the course absence
credit/no credit basis (CR/NC). Credits earned are policy.
counted toward graduation but are not computed
NN Not Passed, Non-attendance: Student attended
into the student’s GPA.
some classes but stopped attending at some point
prior to the attendance check date.
COURSE ATTENDANCE/ABSENCE POLICY
NX Not Passed, No Show: Student never attended the
Each course instructor develops an
course but is still on the course roster because
attendance/absence policy that reflects the course
(s)he did not drop or withdraw from the course or
content and pedagogy. The course attendance policy is
the college.
published in the course syllabus. If a student must be
absent from a class, the instructor will deal with the Grades earned in pre-college courses are not computed
absence according to the course attendance/absence into a student’s semester or cumulative GPA; however,
policy. Student athletes who are absent due to a these developmental grades have the following grade
scheduled game should discuss the upcoming absence equivalents:
with the instructor. Attendance may impact a student’s
grade in the course, and a student may fail a course for E ...................................................................... A (4.0)
poor attendance. Students should know the policy and VG .................................................................... B (3.0)
plan accordingly. The College does not have a policy for S ....................................................................... C (2.0)
excused absences. Any failure to attend class is PR ..................................... no grade point equivalent
counted as an absence. Extended absence due to NP, NA, NN, NX ................................................ F (0.0)
illness, medical condition, or injury is reviewed by the
Dean of Academic and Student Affairs to determine the
appropriate course of action. See “F” grades discussed
APPEAL OF FINAL GRADE
earlier. A student may appeal the final grade received in a
course. An appeal may only be requested in cases of
PRE-COLLEGE EDUCATION: DEVELOPMENTAL clerical error or miscalculation; or if the faculty
member did not follow the procedures as stated in the
STUDIES course syllabus.
Garrett College offers foundation studies courses for
students requiring academic skill development prior to PROCEDURE
entrance into college level studies. Courses in various If a student earns a final grade with which (s)he
levels of language arts and mathematics are provided disagrees, (s)he should first approach the faculty
for students who demonstrate need for academic member who has assigned the grade in question. This
development. Credit/instructional hours for these conversation should be an open, mutual exchange; its
courses are not transferable and do not apply toward purpose is to help the student understand why the
degree or certificate completion. grade was earned and to clarify that there was no
clerical error, no miscalculation of the grade, and that
PRE-COLLEGE G RADING SYSTEM the faculty member did follow the syllabus in grading.
Pre-College level courses (i.e., courses below 100) report
student progress on the following grading scale: If the student and faculty member agree that a change
is warranted, the faculty member submits a Grade

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Change Form to the Dean of Academic and Student GRADE FORGIVENESS
Affairs. The DASA will review the request and
documentation and will, if warranted, notify the Office Students who have not attended Garrett College for a
of Records and Registration to change the grade. minimum of five years and who wish to re-enroll to
continue their education may petition for approval to
If the faculty member and student do not agree that use Garrett’s grade forgiveness policy for deficient
the change should be made, the student may appeal in grades earned during a previous enrollment.
writing to the Academic Review Board. In order to be
considered, the documentation must support one of The student must be currently enrolled at Garrett
the above criteria for grade change. College, and will work with his/her advisor to
determine which courses and submit a Grade
If the Academic Review Board determines that the Forgiveness request form to the Office of Records and
grade should be changed, the student, the faculty Registration for approval. A maximum of 16 credits
member and the DASA will be notified. The DASA will may be “forgiven”. In the case of repeated courses,
notify the Office of Records and Registration to change forgiveness must be requested for each occurrence.
the grade. If the ARB deems that no change is When the grades have been forgiven a new CGPA will
warranted, it will issue a brief, written statement to the be computed that does not include these grades.
student, faculty member, and the DASA. The decision Original grades are not expunged from the student’s
of the ARB is final. record; the courses will remain on the student’s
transcript.
TIME FRAME FOR G RADE APPEALS
Students should file appeals immediately after the Grade forgiveness may be used no more than one time,
questioned grade is assigned since faculty have an regardless of the number of times a student may begin
obligation to keep copies of student work for only one and discontinue enrollment.
term beyond a student’s enrollment in a course.
Appeals will not be heard after one semester has REPEATED COURSES
passed since the assignment of the grade in question.
A student may repeat a course for a grade once. A
student who wishes to repeat a course for a second
FACULTY INITIATED CHANGE OF GRADE time must seek permission from the Dean of Academic
If a faculty member discovers that a final grade change
and Student Affairs.
is warranted because of a mathematical miscalculation
or clerical error on his or her part, (s)he must submit a Students who are on academic probation or who have
Grade Change Form to the Director of Records and been academically dismissed from the college may be
Registration. A grade may not be changed based upon required to repeat courses and to receive a specified
work that is submitted after the date for grade grade as a condition for re-admittance to the college or
submission for the course. to continue enrollment.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE When a course is repeated the higher grade will be
used to compute the cumulative GPA. Although all
A student’s grade point average is computed by grades will be recorded on transcripts, the student may
dividing the sum of earned quality points by the sum of earn credit only once.
attempted hours for all courses receiving a grade used
in calculating the GPA (in general, letter grades A Once matriculated, a student who desires to take a
through F). Only courses taken at GC are used in the course at another institution must receive permission
GPA calculation. The computation of the grade point from the Dean of Academic and Student Affairs. A
average may be affected by repetition of courses; student may not repeat a course in which (s)he has
courses for which grades are not given, but credit is received and “F” at Garrett College at another
earned; or other academic regulations which exclude institution. Students should note that if permission is
certain courses from the grade point average such as granted, the course will not affect the student’s
developmental courses. cumulative GPA.

A student earns a semester Grade Point Average and a


Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA). The CGPA is AUDITING COURSES
computed using all enrolled semesters. A student who wishes to enroll in a course but not earn
college credit may register as an auditor. The auditing
student pays the regular tuition and fees but need not

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Page 41 Revised 11/12/2009
take course examinations or complete other meeting will be considered enrolled in the course and
assignments required of students earning credit for the will be responsible for all tuition and fees for the
course. An auditor does not earn college credit. course. There is no partial refund for these courses.
Students may not audit pre-college level coursework.
If the non-standard course begins after the first day of
A student may not change from credit to audit status or the semester/term the student must drop the course
from audit to credit status once the course has begun. within the drop period (the first calendar week of
A student may not seek to take a course for a grade in classes or its equivalent) for the semester/term to
which (s)he has received audit credit. receive a full refund. If a student does not drop within
the drop period for the semester/term the student will
ADDS, DROPS AND WITHDRAWALS be considered enrolled. There is no partial refund for
these courses.
All drop, add and withdrawal dates are published in the
Academic Year Calendar (AYC) available at the Garrett D ROPPING THE MTDI C OURSE S ERIES
College Website. A student may drop the MTDI series of courses up to
the first class meeting of the first course in the series
A “standard course” is a course that begins on the
with no financial or academic penalty. (S)he will be
official start of the semester/term as published in the
eligible for a 100% refund. A student who remains
Academic Year Calendar (AYC), and runs for the
enrolled in the first course on the first class meeting
semester/term.
day is considered enrolled in all courses in the series.
A ‘non-standard’ course is one that begins either As an enrolled student (s)he is responsible for all
before or after the official start of the semester/term tuition and fees for all courses in the series and will
or and is less than a standard semester/term in length. receive a grade in all courses.

The MTDI series of courses is administered as a group WITHDRAWING FROM A COURSE (S)
with add/drop regulations applied to the first course in A student may ask to withdraw from one or more
the series. standard courses from the end of the semester/term
drop period until the Official State Reporting Date for
ADDING A COURSE that course (approximately 20% of the course). The
A course (standard or non-standard) may not be added “Last Date to Withdraw from Standard Courses” is
after the first class session as determined by the start published in the AYC. A student who withdraws before
date of the course. Students are encouraged to make the course’s Official State Reporting date will be eligible
any schedule changes prior to the first day of classes. for a 50% refund of tuition and fees.

DROPPING A COURSE A student who withdraws from a standard course


Course drop regulations vary depending upon the type receives a “W” grade for the course. “W” grades
of course, standard or non-standard. appear on the student transcript, but are not calculated
in the student’s grade point average. Student–initiated
D ROPPING A STANDARD COURSE : withdrawals will not be permitted after a standard
If the course is a ‘standard course’, a student may drop course’s OSRD has passed.
the course through the first week of classes (or its
There is no student-initiated withdrawal option for
equivalent) with no academic or financial penalty. The
non-standard course or MTDI courses.
“Last Date to Drop a Standard Course” is published in
the AYC, and a student who drops a standard course A student with extraordinary circumstances which
before/on this date will be eligible for a 100% refund prevent the student from attending and/or effectively
for tuition and fees. participating in a course(s) and who wish to withdraw
from a standard course(s) after the OSDR for the
D ROPPING A NON - STANDARD COURSE : course(s) or a non-standard or MTDI course(s) after the
If a non-standard course begins before the first day of permissible drop date(s) (s)he must submit in writing,
the semester/term a student may drop the non- including official documentation of extenuating
standard course up to two weeks before the first class circumstance, to the Dean of Academic and Student
meeting. A student who drops the course up to two Affairs a request for an Administrative Withdrawal.
weeks before the first class meeting will be eligible for When granted, no financial refund is available and a
a 100% refund of tuition and fees. A student who “W” grade is recorded on the transcript (unless a letter
remains enrolled after two weeks before the first class grade has already been issued).

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Page 42 Revised 11/12/2009
TUITION REFUNDS enforcement agency resulting in criminal prosecution
Refunds will be determined by college refund policy with potential fine and imprisonment penalties.
dates. Refund dates vary by course; dates and
percentages are printed with each course on the Instruction in on-line courses is delivered exclusively
student’s schedule. through the computer, however, some on-site testing
and/or other activity may be required. Students may
ENROLLMENT AND G RADING STATUS also be required to participate in mandatory chat or
A student who registers for a course is considered other sessions at specified times. Students should
enrolled in the course until (s)he takes action to drop, check the course schedule carefully because start and
to withdraw, or is withdrawn. A student who is end dates for courses originating at other institutions
considered enrolled in a course (standard, non- may differ from those at Garrett College. This can affect
standard or MTDI) and who does not drop or withdraw add, drop, withdrawal, and refund polices.
during the allowable periods for the course will receive
A student interested in taking an on-line, hybrid, or
a letter grade in the course and is responsible for all
web-based course should visit www.garrettcollege.com
financial obligations.
for information regarding required resources along
Never attending or ceasing to attend a course does not with policies and procedures for on-line courses. It is
constitute dropping or withdrawing. A student who the responsibility of the student to provide his/her
never attends a class or who stops attending a class hardware and software resources, and the technical
without officially dropping/withdrawing in writing will support for those resources.
be subject to a failing grade and is responsible for
Students must have a CGPA of a minimum of 2.0 and
associated tuition and fees. No refunds will be available
have completed an on-line or on-campus orientation
in such instances.
session in order to enroll in an on-line course.
All requests for a change in enrollment status must be
filed in writing with the Office of Records and
INTERACTIVE TELEVISION (ITV)
Registration. The timing of the drop/withdrawal may Advanced communication technology enables Garrett
impact a student’s academic standing and eligibility to to offer and receive selected courses via an interactive
receive financial aid. The date of the drop/withdrawal television network broadcast from its ITV (Interactive
from a course is the date the written notice is received Television) lab. Garrett’s network is connected among
by the Office of Records and Registration. the western Maryland colleges (Hagerstown
Community College, Allegany College of Maryland, and
Frostburg State University) and Northern and Southern
ON-LINE LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES Garrett County High Schools. This unique two-way
BLACKBOARD C OURSES transmission enables participants at the On-line sites to
The College uses Blackboard course management be both seen and heard over the television network by
software as a platform for the delivery of On-line, the participants at the other connected sites.
hybrid, and web-based courses through a personal
computer (PC). These courses may originate from INDEPENDENT STUDY
Garrett College or from partner institutions in the
Limited Independent study opportunity is provided to
Western Maryland consortium or through Maryland
students to allow exploration of an area of interest
On-line (MOL).
directed by a faculty member who serves as the
Access to Blackboard-supported courses requires a supervisory instructor.
User Name and Password provided by Garrett’s
Courses that are listed in the College Catalog may not
Information Technology department. It is the
be taken as Independent Study. A student needing a
responsibility of the student to follow the College
course to satisfy a graduation requirement that is not
Computer Use Policy regarding the use of the User
scheduled to be offered in a timely manner should
Name and Password. Violation of the policy including
work with his/her academic advisor to propose a
giving access information to another individual may
course substitution or waiver of requirement for
result in loss of technology privileges and referral to the
petition to the Dean of Academic and Student Affairs.
Student Conduct Review Board. Students should be
aware that college sanctions may include dismissal, The student and faculty supervising instructor prepares
suspension, or expulsion. Such action may constitute a an Independent Study Proposal for submission to the
violation of state and/or federal law for which Office of the Dean of Academic and Student Affairs.
prosecution may be initiated by the responsible law

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 43 Revised 11/12/2009
The proposal should clearly state a plan of study THE HONORS LIST
including contact hours, hours of hands-on instruction At the end of each Fall and Spring semester, full-time
with the faculty supervising instructor, work product(s) students who complete a semester’s work of 12 or
to be completed, and the grading rubric. The Dean more hours in college-level courses and earn a
must approve the Independent Study before the semester GPA of 3.00 to 3.49 are named to the Honors
student is permitted to register for the course. List.
A student may take one Independent Study per degree THE MERIT LIST
for a maximum of 3 credit hours per degree and must At the end of each Fall and Spring semester, part-time
have a minimum CGPA of 3.0. An additional fee is students who complete a semester’s work of 6 or more
charged. hours in college-level courses and earn a semester GPA
of 3.50 or higher are named to the Merit List.
HONORS PROGRAM
Garrett’s Honors Program invites qualified students to THE RECOGNITION LIST
participate in a program of study designed to heighten At the end of each Fall and Spring semester, part-time
intellectual curiosity, encourage scholarly study, students who complete a semester’s work of 6 or more
sharpen critical analysis, and enhance the ability to hours in college-level courses and earn a semester GPA
communicate effectively. Students who complete an of 3.00 to 3.49 are named to the Recognition List.
Associate’s degree in the Honors Program are required
to take designated Honors courses and participate in GRADUATION HONORS
Honors enrichment activities. Graduation Honors include three categories applicable
to those in degree programs:
ADMISSION TO THE HONORS PROGRAM
Cum Laude ............................................. 3.50 to 3.69
You are eligible to apply for the Honors Program if you
Magna Cum Laude ................................. 3.70 to 3.84
hold a high school diploma or a GED and if you satisfy
Summa Cum Laude ................................ 3.85 to 4.00
any one of the following criteria:

 Score of 1650 on the SAT with no sub-scores below PHI THETA KAPPA
500. Students who have demonstrated academic excellence
 Score of 22 on ACT Verbal and Math tests. may be inducted into Phi Theta Kappa, a national honor
 High school transcript with a minimum 3.25 GPA in society recognizing students who have attained
academic courses. outstanding academic performance.
 Second semester students (12-18 cr.) with a 3.5 GPA
including English 101 and Math 105. To be nominated to Phi Theta Kappa, a student must be
 Evidence of considerable creative ability in writing, art, enrolled in a degree program and must have earned a
music or theatre. minimum of 24 credit hours at Garrett with a cumulative
grade point average of 3.50. Credits earned through
HOW TO APPLY Advanced Placement courses are regarded as institutional
Students interested in learning more about the Honors credits.
Program should contact the Honors Program Coordinator
A student must have completed all developmental
or the Associate Dean of Academic and Student Affairs.
requirements prior to being eligible for induction into Phi
Theta Kappa. Initiation into Phi Theta Kappa is usually held
SCHOLASTIC RECOGNITION in the Fall semester. Phi Theta Kappa students must
Garrett College recognizes the outstanding and maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.25 to be eligible for
exceptional academic achievement for both full-time scholarly recognition at graduation.
and part-time students who are currently enrolled in a
degree seeking or certificate program. ACADEMIC STANDING AND DEGREE
THE DEAN’S LIST PROGRESS
At the end of each Fall and Spring semester, full-time Students must maintain academic good standing in order to
students who complete a semester’s work of 12 or be eligible for graduation and, in many cases, to be able to
more hours in college-level courses and earn a transfer to another institution. Academic standing is
semester Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.50 or higher determined by the number of credit hours attempted and
are named to the Dean’s List.

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Page 44 Revised 11/12/2009
the student’s cumulative grade point average. Academic A PPEAL OF A CADEMIC D ISMISSAL
standing may also affect athletic and financial aid eligibility. A student who is academically dismissed may request
an appeal hearing by the Academic Review Board by
ACADEMIC GOOD STANDING contacting the Dean of Academic and Student Affairs
Academic good standing means that a student is in a within ten business days of notification of dismissal.
condition which allows the student to make progress Notification of dismissal will be sent to the mailing
toward his/her degree without pre-conditions. address on file in the Office of Records and
Registration. Failure to provide a current, accurate
When a student does not meet the requirements for good mailing address is not an affirmative defense to file an
academic standing, the student is placed on probation or is appeal. A student who fails to file within the required
dismissed. In this case, enrollment at the College may only time period will lose his/her right to appeal. The
continue under pre-conditions. decision of the Academic Review Board is final.

ACADEMIC PROBATION
A student is placed on probation if (s)he meets the GRADUATION
following standards: Students are responsible for knowing and meeting the
graduation requirements as stated in the applicable
0-15.99 credit hours attempted and CGPA of 1.50
College Catalog. The following provisions apply to part-
time as well as full-time students.
16-28.99 credit hours attempted and CGPA of 1.75
To meet the graduation requirements of Garrett
29+ credit hours attempted and CGPA of 2.00
College, the student must satisfy either the graduation
ACADEMIC DISMISSAL requirements of the catalog in effect when the student
first matriculated or the requirements of the current
A student who is on probation and does not meet the
catalog. The student must declare his/her catalog at
CGPA standard to be removed from probation in the
the time of application for graduation. This is the
following semester will be dismissed.
catalog which will be used for a graduation degree
A student who is academically dismissed from Garrett audit. The following qualifications apply to the
College at the end of Fall semester is not eligible to be provisions stated above:
enrolled in Intersession courses. A student who is
 If the college changes a program in a way that
dismissed at the end of Spring semester is not eligible
prevents students from meeting graduation
to enroll in Summer sessions. If a dismissed student has
requirements as stated in the applicable catalog,
enrolled in Intersession or Summer courses before final
the college will make accommodations that may
grades were reported, (s)he will be withdrawn from the
necessitate course substitutions but will not
courses and will be eligible for a full refund.
increase requirements.
After a minimum of one semester, a student who was  Garrett College reserves the right to make program
dismissed may request to be readmitted by submitting changes from time to time. However, the College
his/her request in writing to the Dean of Academic and will provide for course substitutions so students
Student Affairs. have reasonable opportunity to complete their
courses of study.
A student who has been readmitted after dismissal and  Because general education requirements are
who does not obtain a CGPA to be in good academic mandated by the State, students who discontinue
standing (not on probation) in the semester in which enrollment for more than one semester (Fall or
(s)he is readmitted will be dismissed from the College Spring) are obligated to conform to the most
for a minimum of two semesters (excluding recent State requirement for general education
Intersession and Summer semesters). A student who courses.
seeks readmission after his/her second dismissal must  If more than seven years have elapsed since the
file a request in writing with the Dean of Academic and student was last enrolled in college course work,
Student Affairs. (s)he will have to meet the requirements of the
current catalog when (s)he re-enrolls.
A student who was dismissed from the institution last  Students who take longer than ten years to
attended prior to admission to Garrett College and is complete a degree will be subject to the catalog
then dismissed from Garrett College will be treated as a current during the year of degree completion. The
second dismissal. College, however, will make reasonable effort to

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 45 Revised 11/12/2009
apply previously earned credits to current degree CONFERRAL OF DEGREES AND COMMENCEMENT
requirements. Degrees are conferred in August, December, and May.
 Courses in which course content changes Diplomas will be issued at the time of conferral of the
frequently and significantly, such as computer degree. Diplomas issued in August or December may be
science courses, that were taken five years prior to picked up in the Office of Academic and Student
completion of degree requirements for graduation, Affairs. A student wishing to have his/her diploma
may not be counted toward graduation and may shipped will be charged a shipping fee.
have to be repeated.
A student’s diploma will reflect the graduation year as
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS that of the Academic Year of the semester/term in
Degrees are awarded in August, December, and May which (s)he completed graduation requirements.
upon successful completion of all degree requirements:
The College holds one Commencement per year at the
 Successful completion of Garrett’s General end of the Spring semester. A student must complete
Education Requirements (GER) all degree requirements prior to the deadline for May
 Successful completion of all required major commencement, to participate in Commencement
courses in the program of study exercises and to be considered a graduate in that
 Successful completion of elective credits as Academic Year. A student who has not completed all
applicable degree requirements and meets certain criteria may
 Achievement of minimum cumulative grade point petition to participate in May Commencement.
average required for program (generally, 2.0 for
the A.A. and A.A.S. degrees, and 2.75 for A.A.T. P ETITION TO P ARTICIPATE IN M AY C OMMENCEMENT
degree) A student who needs 6 or fewer credits in no more
 Satisfactory completion of the PRAXIS examination than two courses to complete graduation requirements
for entry into education programs at four-year for May Commencement, may petition the Dean of
institutions in Maryland (A.A.T. degree seekers Academic and Student Affairs to be able to participate
only) in May Commencement.
 Completion of the Outcomes Assessment test
 Achievement of a “C-” or better in one 3 credit In order to be eligible to petition, the student must be
hour Identity and Difference course enrolled in Summer Session I to complete all remaining
 Resolution of all incomplete grades requirements. A student may request to complete such
requirements at another institution, if the transfer
Certificates are awarded upon successful completion of courses have been pre-approved. The student must
the courses listed in the student’s certificate program supply proof of registration at the transfer institution
with a minimum cumulative grade point of 2.0 unless for the petition to be approved. The courses must be
otherwise specified by the certificate requirements. completed at the transfer institution and an official
transcript must be filed with the Office of Records and
APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION Registration prior to the due date for final grades for
The completion of an Application for Graduation is Summer Session I. Otherwise, the student will not be
required of all students prior to the awarding of the recorded as a graduate and must reapply for
degree. Application deadlines are printed in the graduation.
Academic Year Calendar and applications are available
in the Office of Records and Registration. A non- Students who are permitted to participate in May
refundable, non-transferrable application fee is Commencement, but have not completed all degree
required for each graduation. requirements, will be clearly identified in the
Commencement Program.
A student must be enrolled in Garrett College and be in
the process of completing degree requirements to be NON-CLAIMED AND REPLACEMENT DIPLOMAS
eligible to submit an application for graduation. If a Diplomas will be held in the Office of Academic and
student leaves the College before completing his/her Student Affairs for up to three years. Unclaimed
degree requirements, (s)he must request readmission diplomas will then be destroyed.
and be reenrolled in order to complete his/her degree
requirements. Degree requirement completion is If a diploma has been lost or destroyed, alumni may
subject to all relevant policies in effect in that catalog request a replacement diploma. Replacement diplomas
year. will be in the format of the current Garrett College
diploma and will bear the most recent commencement

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 46 Revised 11/12/2009
date, the signatures of the current university officials, counted. If two certificates share course requirements,
and the student’s name as recorded at the time of course substitution(s) must be approved by the Dean of
graduation. “This diploma is issued in place of one Academic and Student Affairs through the Petition for
granted (month, date, year)” appears at the bottom of Change of Requirements process. Not more than two
all replacement diplomas. Additional fee applies. course substitutions may be approved per certificate.

DUAL MAJOR PETITION FOR CHANGE OF REQUIREMENTS


A student may declare a dual major to receive a degree Any student may make a written request to his/her
in two programs. In order to receive a dual major, a advisor for a course substitution or waiver of program
student must complete all requirements for both requirements due to unavoidable, extenuating
majors, with no duplication in the major requirements. circumstances. The Dean of Academic and Student
One diploma is issued with notation of the dual major. Affairs must approve all course substitutions or waivers
of degree or certificate requirements.
EARNING A SECOND DEGREE
In order to earn an additional degree at Garrett No more than three total course substitutions and
College, the following provisions apply: waivers can be approved per degree, with a maximum
of two substitutions per certificate. Within these three
 Students earning a second degree must have the a maximum of two course substitutions may be
appropriate number of General Education approved within the GER or major requirements.
Requirement (GER) credits for the A.A., A.A.S., or
A.A.T. degree (see page 37). GER courses applied
toward the first degree will be counted to
completion of GER credits for the second degree.
 All major degree requirements for both degrees
must be met independently. GER and Institutional
Requirements may be double counted.
 An additional 24 credit hours per degree must be
completed in residence at Garrett.
 Applicant must be an enrolled student at the time
of application for the degree.
 If two degrees share course requirements, course
substitution(s) must be approved by the Dean of
Academic and Student Affairs through the Petition
for Change of Requirements process. Not more
than three course substitutions may be approved
per degree.

CERTIFICATE AND A.A. / A.A.S. DEGREES ISSUED


SIMULTANEOUSLY
A certificate and degree may only be awarded
simultaneously if they are from two different
disciplines and all program requirements have been
met independently. The same courses may not be
applied to a degree and a certificate. If two certificates
share course requirements, course substitution(s) must
be approved by the Dean of Academic and Student
Affairs through the Petition for Change of
Requirements process. Not more than two course
substitutions may be approved per certificate. The
student must complete a graduation application for
each.

EARNING A SECOND CERTIFICATE


Students who wish to earn more than one certificate
should be aware that courses will not be double-

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Page 47 Revised 11/12/2009
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE / TRANSFER PROGRAMS CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
These programs are designed for transfer to a four-year These programs provide job entry skills and knowledge.
institution.
Adventure Sports Management Certificate
Arts and Sciences: Arts and Sciences:
Fine and Performing Arts Social Services Certificate
Liberal Arts Business and Information Technologies:
Mathematics/Science Business Management Certificate
Social and Behavioral Sciences Computer Applications for Business
--Psychology (FSU Transfer) Graphic Web Design Certificate
--Social Work (FSU Transfer) Commercial Vehicle Transportation Specialist
Wildlife/Fisheries Computer and Information Technologies:
Business Administration Computer Repair/Network Technician
General Studies Network Administration Certificate
Teacher Education: Juvenile Justice:
Early Childhood Education Juvenile Justice Certificate
Elementary Education Law Enforcement Certificate
Physical Education and Health Natural Resources and Wildlife Technologies
-- Coaching Concentration Teacher Education:
-- Recreation Concentration Early Childhood Assistant Certificate
-- Teaching Concentration
Secondary Education TRANSFER PROGRAMS
These programs require transfer for completion.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN TEACHING DEGREE
This program is designed for transfer to a four-year Criminal Justice
Maryland institution. Culinary Arts
Allied Health Services:
Teacher Education: Pre-Dental Hygiene
Elementary Education Option Pre-Medical Lab Technology
Pre-Medical Assistant
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE Pre-Nursing
These programs are designed for immediate entry into Pre-Occupational Therapy Assistant
the workforce. Pre-Physical Therapy Assistant
Pre-Radiology Technology
Adventure Sports Management Pre-Respiratory Therapy
Business and Information Technologies:
Business Management
Computer Applications for Business
Graphic/Web Design
Computer and Information Technologies:
Computer Repair/Network Technician
Network Administration
Juvenile Justice
Natural Resources and Wildlife Technology

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ADVENTURE SPORTS MANAGEMENT DIVISION
The Adventure Sports program offers students the opportunity to combine studies in business management,
environmental science, and leadership development with participation in adventure sport skills classes. Successful
students are prepared for entry into the job market for middle management positions in organizations specializing in
adventure sport activities. Students may elect to transfer to another institution for further schooling, leading to a
Bachelor’s Degree. Garrett’s program is fully articulated with nearby Frostburg State University’s Department of Health,
Physical Education, and Recreation where students may earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Recreation with an emphasis in
Adventure Sports.

Adventure Sports Management A.A.S. Degree ....................................................... page 52

Adventure Sports Management Certificate ............................................................. page 53

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ADVENTURE SPORTS MANAGEMENT -- ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 207

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ......................................22 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition FALL
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .......................... 3 ASI110 Back Country Living ......................... 3
Arts and Humanities ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ......................... 3
ASI Skills Classes .......................................... 3
HUM210 Society & the Environment .................. 3
ASI104 Colloquium I .............................. .0.25
Social and Behavioral Sciences
GER Soc & Behavioral Science Course ................. 3 BIO110 Natural History ............................... 4
Science ASI101 Intro ASI, Park, Recreation .......... 3
ESC121 Physical Geography TOTAL ...................................... 16.25
or PHY130 Physical Science
or BIO104 Prin. of Biology ................................ 4 INTERSESSION
Mathematics ASI164 Wilderness First Responder ............ 3
MAT105 College Algebra
or MAT210 Statistics ....................................... 3 SPRING
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues ASI206Practicum Preparation ..................... 1
CSC105 Intro to Computers ................................ 3
ASI105 Colloquium II .............................. 0.25
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2 ASI Rescue Skills Course .............................. 1
ASI Instructor Level Course ......................... 1
ASI Skills Course ..................................................... 2
Approved Identity & Difference Course ................. 0
ASI Supporting Course Work ....................... 5
CSC105 Introduction to Computers ............ 3
MAJOR COURSES: .................................................29 HUM210 Society & the Environment ...... 3
ASI110 Back Country Living .................................... 3 TOTAL...................................... 14.25
ASI Basic Skills Courses ........................................... 2
ASI Intermediate Skills Courses .............................. 3 SUMMER
ASI Instructor Level Course .................................... 1 ASI207 Practicum ....................................... 1
ASI Rescue Skills Course ......................................... 1
ASI101 Intro ASI, Park, Recreation ......................... 3 FALL
ASI164 Wilderness First Responder ....................... 3 SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3
ASI200 ASI Program Mgmt. .................................... 3 GER Social and Behavioral Science .............. 3
ASI201 Leadership/Grp Dynamics .......................... 3 ASI Skills Course .......................................... 1
ASI206 Practicum Preparation ............................... 1
ASI204 Colloquium III ............................ 0.25
ASI207 Practicum (90 hours) .................................. 1
Colloquia ................................................................ 1
ASI Supporting Course Work ....................... 4
BIO110 Natural History .......................................... 4 MAT105 or MAT210 ............................... 3
TOTAL ................................. 14.25
ELECTIVES: ............................................................12
Choose any 12 credits, in consultation with your academic SPRING
advisor, that form a cluster of courses that assists you in meeting ASI205 Colloquium IV ............................. 0.25
your career goals. Examples include course clusters in Business
ASI Skills Classes .......................................... 2
Management, Behavioral Sciences, or Leadership Development.
ASI200 ASI Program Management .............. 3
ASI Supporting Course Work ....................... 4
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................65 ASI201 Leadership/Group Dynamics ........... 3
GER Science .............................................. 4
TOTAL ................................. 16.25
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education Course list.

I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course list. Course
used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

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Page 52 Revised 11/12/2009
ADVENTURE SPORTS MANAGEMENT -- CERTIFICATE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 116

REQUIRED COURSE WORK: ................................ 27.5 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


ASI110 Back Country Living ......................... 3 FALL
ASI Basic Skills Courses................................ 2
ASI110 Back Country Living Skills ................... 3
ASI Intermediate Skills Courses ................... 3
ASI Skills Courses............................................ 4
ASI Instructor Level Skills Course ................ 1
ASI Rescue Skills Course ................................. 1
ASI Rescue Skills Course .............................. 1
ASI104 Colloquium I .................................. 0.25
ASI101 Intro to ASI, Park, Recreation .......... 3
ASI206 Practicum Preparation ....................... 1
ASI104 Colloquia .................................... 0.25
ASI101 Intro ASI, Park, Recreation .............. 3
ASI105 Colloquia .................................... 0.25
TOTAL .................................... 12.25
ASI109 Intro Therapeutic Recreation
or BUS101 Intro to Business ...................... 3
ASI164 Wilderness First Responder ............ 3
INTERSESSION
ASI194 ASI Prog/Special Populations .......... 1
ASI200 ASI Program Mgmt. ......................... 3 ASI164 Wilderness First Responder ............... 3
ASI201 Leadership/Group Dynamics .......... 3
ASI206 Practicum Preparation .................... 1
SPRING

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ..................... 27.5 ASI105 Colloquium II ................................. 0.25
ASI200 ASI Program Mgmt............................. 3
ASI201 Leadership/Group Dynamics ............. 3
ASI109 Intro Therapeutic Recreation
or BUS101 Intro to Business ........................ 3
ASI194 ASI Prog/Special Populations ............. 1
ASI Skills Course ............................................. 1
ASI Instructor Level Course ......................... 1
TOTAL .................................... 12.25

_____________

Students receiving the Adventure Sports Certificate must demonstrate mathematics competency equivalent to MAT095
Introduction to Algebra, through placement or completion of the course.

Students receiving the Adventure Sports Certificate must demonstrate English competency equivalent to ENG101/3
preparedness through placement testing or completion of the course.

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Page 53 Revised 11/12/2009
ARTS & SCIENCES DIVISION

Fine and Performing Arts A.A. Degree..................................................................... page 56

Liberal Arts A.A. Degree ............... page 57Liberal Arts Option -- Associate in Arts Degree

Mathematics / Sciences A.A. Degree ....................................................................... page 58

Social and Behavioral Sciences A.A. Degree ............................................................ page 59

Social Services Certificate ........................................................................................ page 60

Wildlife / Fisheries A.A. Degree ............................................................................... page 61

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Page 55 Revised 11/12/2009
FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 300

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................31 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing ................... 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ ......................... 3
GER Literature Course ................................. 3 GER Science ................................................... 4
GER Humanities Course ............................... 3 GER Social Science ......................................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective .......................................................... 3
Two GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences courses from Major Course ............................................. 3
two different disciplines .............................. 6 TOTAL ........................................... 16
Science
Two GER Science Courses
(at least one must be a lab course) ............. 7 SPRING
Mathematics
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................... 3
MAT105 College Algebra
MAT105 College Algebra ............................... 3
or MAT210 Introductory Statistics............. 3
Major Course ................................................. 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
PED, HEA OR ASI ............................................. 1
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3
GER Literature .............................................. .3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2 Elective ....................................................... 3
TOTAL ........................................... 16
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
Approved Identity & Difference Course ......... 0
MAJOR COURSES: .................................................18 FALL
Select SIX courses in at least two of the following areas:
GER Social Science ......................................... 3
ART, MUS, and THE.
Major Courses ............................................... 6
ELECTIVES .............................................................13 PED, HEA OR ASI ............................................. 1
Choose courses after consultation with advisor. HUM Elective ................................................. 3
Elective ...................................................... 3
TOTAL ........................................... 16
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................64

SPRING
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education
Major Courses ............................................... 6
Course list.
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................... 3
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course GER Science ............................................... 3/4
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be Electives ................................................... 3/4
reused here. TOTAL ............................................ 16

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Page 56 Revised 11/12/2009
LIBERAL ARTS OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 330

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 31 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ ......................... 3
GER Literature Course ................................. 3 GER Mathematics ......................................... 3
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3 GER Social Science ........................................ 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences HUM Elective ................................................ 3
Two GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Courses from Major Course ................................................ 3
two different disciplines ............................. 6 PED, HEA OR ASI ............................................ 1
Science TOTAL ...........................................16
Two GER Science Courses
(at least one must be a Lab course) ............ 7
Mathematics SPRING
GER Math Course ........................................ 3
GER Science ...................................................4
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
GER Literature .............................................. 3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3
Major Courses ............................................... 6
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2 Electives ....................................................... 3
TOTAL .......................................... 16
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 18 FALL
Select SIX courses in at least two of the following areas:
CSC105 Intro to Computers .......................... 3
ART, ENG, JRN, MUS,PHL and THE.
SPC101 Intro to Communication .................. 3
ELECTIVES ............................................................. 13 Major Courses ............................................... 3
Choose courses after consultation with advisor. Electives ........................................................ 7
TOTAL .......................................... 16

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64


SPRING
PED, HEA OR ASI ............................................ 1
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education
Major Courses ............................................... 6
Course list.
GER Social Science ........................................ 3
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course GER Science ............................................... 3/4
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be Electives ................................................... 2/3
reused here. TOTAL ........................................... 16

__________

Students interested in majoring in English or Journalism should follow the Liberal Arts transfer curriculum.

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Page 57 Revised 11/12/2009
MATHEMATICS / SCIENCES OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 320

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................32 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE:


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing ................... 3
FALL ..........................................................................
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ .......................... 3
GER Literature Course ................................. 3 GER Social Science ......................................... 3
GER Humanities Course ............................... 3 PED, HEA OR ASI ............................................. 1
Social and Behavioral Sciences Major Course ................................................. 4
Two GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Courses from GER Mathematics ........................................ 4
two different disciplines .............................. 6 TOTAL ........................................... 15
Science
Two GER Science Courses
(at least one must be a Lab course) ............. 7 SPRING
Mathematics
GER Science ................................................... 4
GER Math Course (MAT110 or above) ........ 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication .................... 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
Major Course .................................................. 4
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3
GER Literature ................................................ 3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2 Elective ........................................................ 3
TOTAL ............................................ 17
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
Approved Identity & Difference Course ......... 0
MAJOR COURSES: ............................................18-24 FALL
Select SIX courses in at least three of the following areas: BIO,
GER Humanities .............................................. 3
CHE, ESC, MAT, PHY.
CSC Intro to Computers ................................. 3
ELECTIVES ..........................................................6-12 Major Courses ............................................... 4
Choose courses after consultation with advisor. Electives ....................................................... 6
TOTAL ........................................... 16

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................64


SPRING
GER Social Science ......................................... 3
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education
Major Courses ............................................... 6
Course list.
GER Science ............................................... 3/4
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course Electives ..................................................... 2/3
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be PED, HEA OR ASI ........................................... 1
reused here. TOTAL ........................................... 16

__________

Students interested in majoring in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Mathematics should follow the Mathematics/Science transfer
curriculum.

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SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 310

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 31 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE:


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ ..........................3
GER Literature Course ................................. 3 GER Science ...................................................4
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3 GER Social Science .........................................3
Social and Behavioral Sciences HUM Elective .................................................3
Two GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Courses from Elective ...................................................... 3
two different disciplines ............................. 6 TOTAL ............................................16
Science
Two GER Science Courses
(at least one must be a Lab course) ............ 7 SPRING
Mathematics
GER Literature ...............................................3
GER Math Course ........................................ 3
Major Courses ................................................6
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
GER Mathematics ..........................................3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3
GER Social Science .........................................3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2 PED, HEA OR ASI ......................................... 1
TOTAL ...........................................16
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 18 FALL
Select SIX courses in at least two of the following areas:
SPC101 Intro to Communication ...................3
ECN, GEO, HIS, PSY, SOC
Major Courses ................................................6
ELECTIVES ............................................................. 13 Electives ..........................................................6
Choose courses after consultation with advisor. PED, HEA OR ASI ........................................... 1
TOTAL ...........................................16

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64


SPRING
CSC105 Intro to Computers ...........................3
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education
Major Courses ................................................6
Course list.
GER Science ............................................... 3/4
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course Electives .................................................... 3/4
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be TOTAL ...........................................16
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 59 Revised 11/12/2009
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES CERTIFICATES
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 140

REQUIRED COURSE WORK: .................................................................................................................... 27


ENG101 English Comp I—Exp. Writing ............................................................................ 3
PSY101 General Psychology ............................................................................................ 3
PSY102 Human Growth & Development ......................................................................... 3
PSY230 Psychology of Adjustment ................................................................................. 3
PSY240 Intro to Abnormal Psychology ............................................................................ 3
SOC101 Principles of Sociology ..................................................................................... 3
SOC201 The Family .......................................................................................................... 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication .................................................................................... 3
PSY/SOC Elective ............................................................................................................. 3

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 60 Revised 11/12/2009
WILDLIFE / FISHERIES OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 340

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 32 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE:


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
Arts and Humanities FALL
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ ......................... 3
ENG 102 Intro to Literature ........................ 3 CHE101 General Chemistry I ......................... 4
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3 CSC105 Intro to Computers .......................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences PED, HEA OR ASI ............................................ 1
Choose TWO from two different areas: MAT190 Calculus I ........................................ 4
ECN201, GEO201, POL140, PSY101, SOC101... 6 TOTAL .......................................... 15
Science
BIO101 General Biology I ........................... 4
CHE101 General Chemistry I ...................... 4 SPRING
Mathematics
MAT210 Intro to Statistics .......................... 3 ENG102 Intro to Literature ........................... 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues MAT210 Intro Statistics ................................. 3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3 GER Social Science ........................................ 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................... 3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2 CHE102 General Chemistry II ....................... 4
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2 TOTAL .......................................... 16
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 19 FALL
BIO102 General Biology II ............................. 4 BIO101 General Biology I .............................. 4
BIO150 General Ecology ............................... 3 ESC121 Physical Geography .......................... 4
CHE102 General Chemistry II ........................ 4 GER Social Science ........................................ 3
ESC121 Physical Geography .......................... 4 HUM Elective ................................................ 3
MAT190 Calculus I ......................................... 4 Elective ......................................................... 3
ELECTIVES: ............................................................ 11 TOTAL .......................................... 17
Check with advisor about transferability.

SPRING
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64 BIO102 General Biology II ............................. 4
PED/AS ........................................................... 1
BIO150 General Ecology ............................... 3
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education Electives ....................................................... 8
Course list. TOTAL .......................................... 16
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

__________

This transfer program is articulated with the Wildlife & Fisheries Program at Frostburg State University.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 61 Revised 11/12/2009
BUSINESS & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
Business and Information Technologies offer programs designed to prepare students for the business careers of today
and the future. The programs can accommodate a wide variety of interests--accounting, management, marketing, sales,
advertising, economics, public relations, banking and investing, to name a few. There are many employment
opportunities for business majors, including small businesses, corporations, banks, or entrepreneurial enterprises.

Business Administration A.A. Degree ...................................................................... page 64

Business Management A.A.S. Degree ..................................................................... page 65

Business Management Certificate........................................................................... page 66

Computer Applications for Business A.A.S. Degree ................................................. page 67

Computer Applications for Business Certificate ...................................................... page 68

Graphic Web Design A.A.S. Degree ......................................................................... page 69

Graphic Web Design Certificate .............................................................................. page 70

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 63 Revised 11/12/2009
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 350

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................31 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition FALL
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing ................... 3
Arts and Humanities ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ .......................... 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................... 3
GER Literature Course ................................. 3 BUS101 Intro to Business ............................... 3
GER Humanities Course ............................... 3 ACC210 Financial Accounting ......................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences MAT105 College Algebra or Elective .......... 3
PSY101 General Psychology......................... 3 TOTAL ......................................... 15
GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ....... 3 SPRING
Science
Two GER Science Courses GER Literature Course .................................... 3
(at least one must be a lab course) ............. 7 GER Science Course ........................................ 4
Mathematics ACC213 Managerial Accounting ..................... 3
MAT105 College Algebra BUS170 Intro to Management ....................... 3
or MAT210 Introductory Statistics............. 3 SPC101 Intro to Communication ................ 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues TOTAL .......................................... 16
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3 FALL
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2 BUS201 Prin of Marketing .............................. 3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2 BUS203 Business Law ..................................... 3
Approved Identity & Difference Course ......... 0 ECN201 Economics I (Macro) ......................... 3
Electives ......................................................... 3
MAJOR COURSES: .................................................24 PSY101 General Psychology ........................... 3
ACC210 Financial Accounting ...................... 3 PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1
ACC213 Managerial Accounting .................. 3 TOTAL .......................................... 16
BUS101 Intro to Business ............................ 3 SPRING
BUS170 Intro to Management..................... 3
BUS201 Prin of Marketing ........................... 3 GER Social and Behavioral Science................. 3
BUS203 Business Law .................................. 3 ECN202 Economics II (Micro) ........................ 3
ECN201 Economics I (Macro) ...................... 3 GER Humanities Course ................................. 3
ECN202 Economics II (Micro) ...................... 3 GER Science Course ........................................ 3
Electives ......................................................... 4
ELECTIVES: ..............................................................7 PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1
Check with Advisor about transferability. TOTAL .......................................... 17

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................64

GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education


Course list.

I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course


list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 64 Revised 11/12/2009
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT -- ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 201

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 22 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE:


English Composition FALL
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ ...........................3
Arts and Humanities
CSC105 Intro to Computers ............................3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3
BUS101 Intro to Business ...............................3
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3
ACC210 Financial Accounting .........................3
Social and Behavioral Sciences
MAT105 College Algebra ................................3
GER Soc & Behavioral Science Course ........ 3
PED, HEA or ASI Course ............................... 1
Science
TOTAL ..........................................16
GER Science Lab Course .............................. 4
Mathematics
MAT105 College Algebra............................. 3
SPRING
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3 SPC101 Intro to Communication ....................3
ECN104 Introduction to Economics ................3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2
BUS170 Introduction to Management ...........3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2 GER Arts and Humanities Course ...................3
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0 ACC213 Managerial Accounting .....................3
Elective ....................................................... 1
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 30
TOTAL ..........................................16
ACC210 Financial Accounting ........................ 3
ACC213 Managerial Accounting .................... 3
BUS101 Intro to Business ............................... 3 FALL
BUS170 Intro to Management ....................... 3
GER Social and Behavioral Science .................3
BUS201 Principles of Marketing .................... 3
BUS201 Principles of Marketing .....................3
BUS203 Business Law .................................... 3
BUS203 Business Law .....................................3
BUS285 Business Development Project ......... 3
Electives ..........................................................6
BUS294 Field Experience in Bus. Mgmt. ........ 3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course ............................. 1
ECN104 Introduction to Economics ............... 3
TOTAL ..........................................16
Any ACC, BUS, ECN, CAP, or CIT Course ......... 3
ELECTIVES: ............................................................ 10
Choose courses after consultation with advisor. SPRING
GER Science Course ........................................4
BUS285 Business Development Project .........3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64 BUS294 Field Experience in Bus. Mgmt. ........3
Electives ...................................................... 6
TOTAL ..........................................16

GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education


Course list.

I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course


list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 65 Revised 11/12/2009
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT -- CERTIFICATE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 101

REQUIRED COURSE WORK: ...................................18 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE:


ACC210 Financial Accounting ........................ 3
ACC213 Managerial Accounting .................... 3
FALL
BUS101 Intro to Business .............................. 3
BUS170 Intro to Management ....................... 3 ACC210 Financial Accounting ......................... 3
BUS203 Business Law .................................... 3 BUS101 Intro to Business ............................... 3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................... 3 BUS203 Business Law ..................................... 3
BAIT Elective............................................... 3
BUSINESS & INFO TECHNOLOGY ELECTIVES ............6
TOTAL ............................................ 12
CAP183 Microsoft Excel
or CAP185 Microsoft Access
or CAP196 Microsoft PowerPoint SPRING
or CAP224 Microsoft Word .......................... 3
ACC213 Managerial Accounting ..................... 3
BUS201 Principles of Marketing
BUS170 Intro to Management ....................... 3
or CAP183 Microsoft Excel
CSC105 Introduction to Computers ............... 3
or CAP185 Microsoft Access
BAIT Elective............................................... 3
or CAP196 Microsoft PowerPoint
TOTAL ........................................... 12
or CAP224 Microsoft Word
or CIT201 Web Design ................................ 3

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................24

_____________

Students receiving the Business Management Certificate must demonstrate mathematics competency equivalent to
MAT095 Introduction to Algebra and ENG101 through placement or completion of the course.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 66 Revised 11/12/2009
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 212

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 22 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I–Expos Writing ......................3
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3 CSC105 Intro to Computers ............................3
Social and Behavioral Sciences BUS101 Intro to Business ...............................3
GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ....... 3 CAP185 Microsoft Access ...............................3
Science CAP223 Desktop Publishing ............................3
GER Science Lab Course .............................. 4 PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1
Mathematics TOTAL ............................................16
MAT105 College Algebra............................. 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3 SPRING
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2 SPC101 Intro to Communication ....................3
MAT105 College Algebra ................................3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
CAP224 Microsoft Word .................................3
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0
CAP230 Adobe Photoshop..............................3
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 36 GER Arts and Humanities Course ...................3
PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1
ACC210 Financial Accounting ........................ 3
TOTAL ............................................16
BUS101 Intro to Business ............................... 3
BUS294 Field Experience ............................... 3
CAP183 Microsoft Excel ................................. 3
FALL
CAP185 Microsoft Access .............................. 3
CAP196 Microsoft PowerPoint ...................... 3 ACC210 Financial Accounting ........................3
CAP223 Desktop Publishing ........................... 3 CAP234 Intro to Animation.............................3
CAP224 Microsoft Word ................................ 3 CAP196 Microsoft PowerPoint ......................3
CAP230 Adobe Photo Shop ............................ 3 GER Social & Behavioral Sciences Course .......3
CAP234 Intro to Animation ............................ 3 Electives ...................................................... 4
CIT201Web Page Design ................................ 3 TOTAL ............................................16
Any ACC, BUS, ECN, CAP, or CIT Course ......... 3
ELECTIVES: .............................................................. 4
SPRING
Choose electives with advisor consultation.
BUS294 Field Experience ................................3
GER Science Course ........................................4
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64 CIT201 Web Page Design ................................3
CAP183 Microsoft Excel ..................................3
BAIT Elective ............................................... 3
TOTAL ............................................16

GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education


Course list.

I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course


list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 67 Revised 11/12/2009
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS -- CERTIFICATE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 114

REQUIRED COURSEWORK: ..................................................................................................................... 27


CAP183 Microsoft Excel .................................................................................................. 3
CAP185 Microsoft Access ............................................................................................... 3
CAP196 Microsoft PowerPoint ........................................................................................ 3
CAP223 Desktop Publishing............................................................................................. 3
CAP224 Microsoft Word .................................................................................................. 3
CAP230 Adobe Photoshop .............................................................................................. 3
CAP234 Introduction to Animation ................................................................................ 3
CIT201 Web Page Design ................................................................................................ 3
CSC105 Introduction to Computers ................................................................................ 3

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ......................................................................................................... 27

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 68 Revised 11/12/2009
GRAPHIC WEB DESIGN -- ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 226

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 22 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition FALL
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
ART101 Basic Design I .....................................3
Arts and Humanities
CAP185 Microsoft Access ...............................3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3
CAP223 Desktop Publishing ............................3
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3
CAP234 Animation ..........................................3
Social and Behavioral Sciences
CSC105 Intro to Computers ............................3
GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ....... 3
PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1
Science
TOTAL ............................................16
GER Science Lab Course .............................. 4
Mathematics
MAT105 College Algebra............................. 3
SPRING
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3 ART102 Basic Design II ....................................3
ART201 Drawing I ...........................................3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2
CAP230 Adobe Photoshop..............................3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2 CIT201 Web Page Design ................................3
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0 SPC101 Intro to Communication ....................3
PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 33
TOTAL ............................................16
ART101 Basic Design I .................................... 3
ART102 Basic Design II ................................... 3
ART201 Drawing I .......................................... 3 FALL
BUS101 Intro to Business ............................... 3
BUS101 Intro to Business ...............................3
BUS294 Field Experience ............................... 3
ENG101 Comp I–Expos Writing ......................3
CAP185 Microsoft Access .............................. 3
GER Humanities Course ..................................3
CAP223 Desktop Publishing ........................... 3
GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ..........3
CAP230 Adobe Photoshop ............................. 3
MAT105 College Algebra ............................ 3
CAP234 Introduction to Animation................ 3
TOTAL ............................................15
CIT201 Web Page Design. .............................. 3
Any ACC, BUS, ECN, CAP, or CIT Course ......... 3
ELECTIVES: .............................................................. 7 SPRING
Choose after consultation with advisor.
BUS294 Field Experience ..............................3
GER Science Course ........................................4
BAIT Elective ...................................................3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64 Electives ...................................................... 7
TOTAL ............................................17

GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education


Course list.

I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course


list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 69 Revised 11/12/2009
GRAPHIC WEB DESIGN -- CERTIFICATE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 126

REQUIRED COURSEWORK: ..................................................................................................................... 27


ART101 Basic Design I .................................................................................................. 3.0
ART102 Basic Design II ................................................................................................. 3.0
ART201 Drawing I ........................................................................................................ 3.0
CAP185 Microsoft Access ............................................................................................ 3.0
CAP223 Desktop Publishing ......................................................................................... 3.0
CAP230 Adobe Photoshop .......................................................................................... 3.0
CAP234 Introduction to Animation ............................................................................. 3.0
CIT201 Web Page Design ............................................................................................. 3.0
CSC105 Introduction to Computers ............................................................................. 3.0

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: .......................................................................................................... 27

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 70 Revised 11/12/2009
COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
Computer and Information Technologies programs prepare students for technology-based careers. Students can earn
national certifications as a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer, an A+ Computer Repair Technician, or a Net+
Technician.

Network Administration A.A.S. Degree ................................................................... page 72

Computer Repair/Network Technician (A+) A.A.S. Degree ...................................... page 73

Computer Repair/Network Technician Certificate .................................................. page 74

Cybersecurity Certificate ......................................................................................... page 74

Network Administration Certificate ........................................................................ page 74

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 71 Revised 11/12/2009
NETWORK ADMINISTRATION OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 221

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................22 reused here.


English Composition RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing ................... 3
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 FALL
GER Humanities Course ............................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences ENG101 Comp I–Expos Writing ................... 3.0
GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ....... 3 CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3.0
Science GER Arts and Humanities ............................ 3.0
GER Science Lab Course............................... 4 CIT264 Computer Repair Technician ........... 6.0
Mathematics PED, HEA, or ASI Course ........................... 1.0
MAT105 College Algebra ............................. 3 TOTAL ......................................... 16.0
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3
SPRING
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2
SPC101 Introduction to Communication .... 3.0
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2 MAT105 College Algebra ............................. 3.0
Approved Identity & Difference Course ......... 0 MCS125 Networking Fundamentals ........... 6.0
MAJOR COURSES: .............................................. 28.5 Electives ...................................................... 3.0
PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1.0
CIT264 Comp Repair Technician (A+) ..........6.0 TOTAL ....................................... 16.0
MCS112 Install, Config, Adm MS XP Pro......2.5
MCS113 Managing Server 2003 Env ...........2.5
MCS114 Managing Server 2003 Ntwk .........2.5 FALL
MCS115 Planning 2003 Ntwk Infrstrctr .......2.5
MCS116 Server 2003 Active Dir. Svc. ..........2.5 GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ....... 3.0
MCS117 Design Act Dir/Ntwk Infrstrctr ......1.5 MCS112 Admin MS Windows XP Pro .......... 2.5
MCS118 Design Sec Server 2003 Ntwk ........2.5 MCS113 MS Win Server 2003 Environ ........ 2.5
MCS125 Ntwking Fund. (Network+) ............6.0 MCS114 MS Win Server 2003 Network ...... 2.5
MCS115 Win Server 2003 Network Infra .... 2.5
ELECTIVES: ......................................................... 11.5 Electives .................................................... 3.0
Choose after consultation with advisor. TOTAL ........................................ 16.0

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................64 SPRING


GER Lab Science ......................................... 4.0
MCS116 Server 2003 Active Dir. Svc ........... 2.5
MCS117 Design Act Dir/Ntwk Infrstrctr ...... 1.5
MCS118 Design Sec Server 2003 Ntwk ....... 2.5
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education
Electives ..................................................... 5.5
Course list.
TOTAL ....................................... 16.0
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 72 Revised 11/12/2009
REPAIR/NETWORK TECHNICIAN (A+) OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 222

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 22 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I–Expos Writing ......................3
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3 CSC105 Introduction to Computers ................3
Social and Behavioral Sciences GER Arts and Humanities ...............................3
GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ....... 3 PED, HEA or ASI Course ..................................1
Science CIT264 Computer Repair Technician .......... 6
GER Science Lab Course .............................. 4 TOTAL ............................................16
Mathematics
MAT105 College Algebra............................. 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues SPRING
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ....................3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2 MAT105 College Algebra ................................3
MCS125 Networking Fundamentals ...............6
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
PED, HEA or ASI Course ..................................1
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0
Electives ....................................................... 3
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 27 TOTAL ............................................16
CIT264 Computer Repair Technician ............ 6
MCS125 Networking Fundamentals ............. 6
FALL
Any CAP, CIT, MCS Courses .......................... 15
Choose after consultation with academic advisor. GER Social Science ..........................................3
Electives ..........................................................6
ELECTIVES: ............................................................ 13
Computer Electives ....................................... 8
Choose after consultation with advisor.
TOTAL ............................................17

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64 SPRING


GER Science ....................................................4
Computer Electives .........................................7
Electives ........................................................ 4
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education TOTAL ............................................15
Course list.

I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course


list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 73 Revised 11/12/2009
COMPUTER REPAIR AND NETWORK TECHNICIAN -- CERTIFICATE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 122

REQUIRED COURSEWORK: ..................................................................................................................... 15


CIT264 Computer Repair Technician (A+) ....................................................................... 6
MCS125 Networking Fundamentals .............................................................................. 6
Computer Electives (consult with advisor) ...................................................................... 3

NOTE: Program may not be offered each year. Check with the Director of Business and Information Technology.

CYBERSECURITY -- CERTIFICATE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 125

REQUIRED COURSEWORK: .................................................................................................................. 25.5


CIS101 Interconnecting CISCO Network Devices ...................................................... 3.0
CIT280 Security Policy and Procedures .................................................................... 3.0
CIT281 Disaster Recovery ......................................................................................... 3.0
CIT282 Computer Forensics ...................................................................................... 3.0
CIT283 Internet Security ........................................................................................... 3.0
MCS125 Networking Fundamentals ......................................................................... 3.0
MCS112 Install, Config, and Administer MS Windows XP Pro .................................. 2.5
MCS113 Managing a MS Windows Server 2003 Environment ................................. 2.5
MCS118 Designing Security for a MS Windows Server 2003 Network ..................... 2.5

NOTE: Program may not be offered each year. Check with the Director of Business and Information Technology.

NETWORK ADMINISTRATION -- CERTIFICATE


GC CURRICULUM CODE: 121

REQUIRED COURSEWORK: .................................................................................................................. 22.5


CIT264 Computer Repair Technician (A+) ................................................................... 6.0
MCS112 Install, Config, and Administer MS Windows XP Pro .................................... 2.5
MCS113 Managing a MS Windows Server 2003 Environment ................................... 2.5
MCS114 Managing a MS Windows Server 2003 Network .......................................... 2.5
MCS115 Planning Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure ............................. 2.5
MCS116 Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Services ......................... 2.5
MCS117 Designing a MS Server 2003 Act Dir and Network Infrastructure ................ 1.5
MCS118 Designing Security for a MS Windows Server 2003 Network ....................... 2.5

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 74 Revised 11/12/2009
GENERAL STUDIES

GENERAL STUDIES -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE


GC CURRICULUM CODE: 360, 359

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 31 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ ..........................3
GER Literature Course ................................. 3 MAT105 College Algebra ................................3
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3 GER Social Science .........................................3
Social and Behavioral Sciences HUM Elective .................................................3
Choose TWO from two different areas: Elective ..........................................................3
ECN, GEO, HIS, POL, PSY, SOC ........................ 6 PED, HEA OR ASI ............................................ 1
Science TOTAL ...........................................16
Two GER Science Courses
(at least one must be a Lab course) ............ 7
Mathematics SPRING
GER Math Course ........................................ 3
GER Science ...................................................4
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
GER Literature ...............................................3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3
Electives ........................................................ 9
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2 TOTAL ...........................................16
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0
FALL
ELECTIVES: ............................................................ 31
GER Social Science .........................................3
Check with advisor about transferability.
SPC101 Intro to Communication ...................3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ...........................3
Electives ........................................................ 7
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64
TOTAL ...........................................16

GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education


SPRING
Course list.
PED, HEA OR ASI .............................................1
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course GER Science ................................................ 3/4
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be Electives ................................................. 11/12
reused here. TOTAL ...........................................16

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 75 Revised 11/12/2009
JUVENILE JUSTICE DIVISION

Juvenile Justice A.A.S. Degree.................................................................................. page 78

Juvenile Justice Certificate ....................................................................................... page 79

Law Enforcement Certificate ................................................................................... page 79

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 77 Revised 11/12/2009
JUVENILE JUSTICE -- ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 230

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................22 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition FALL
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing
ENG101 or ENG103 ..................................... 3
or ENG103 Technical Writing ..................... 3
SPC101 Intro to Communications ............... 3
Arts and Humanities
JUV120 Prin/Prac of Juv Justice .................. 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3
Major Course ............................................... 3
GER Humanities Course ............................... 3
Elective ......................................................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences
PED, HEA, or ASI ........................................... 1
PSY101 General Psychology......................... 3
TOTAL ............................................ 16
Science
GER Science Lab Course............................... 4
Mathematics
SPRING
MAT105 or MAT210 .................................... 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3 PSY101 General Psychology ......................... 3
Major Courses ............................................. 3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2
SOC160 Conflict Mgmt & Resolution .......... 3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2 GER Science Course ...................................... 4
Approved Identity & Difference Course ......... 0 TOTAL ........................................... 16
MAJOR COURSES: .................................................15
JUV120 Prin & Prac of Juv Justice ................. 3 FALL
JUV240 Models of Intervention .................... 3
MAT105 College Algebra .............................. 3
JUV280 Practicum in Juvenile Justice
GER Humanities ........................................... 3
or JUV282 Intro Delivery Support Services .. 3
JUV240 Models of Intervention .................. 3
PSY221 Adolescent Psychology .................... 3
Major Required Courses .............................. 3
SOC160 Conflict Mgmt & Resolution ............ 3
Elective ........................................................ 3
SUPPORTING COURSEWORK .................................12 PED, HEA, or ASI Course ............................. 1
TOTAL ........................................... 16
Select FOUR courses from the following:
LAW101 Intro to Law Enforcement, 3 cr.
and/or LAW110 Intro to Criminal Justice, 3 cr.
and/or JUV210 Intro to Therapeutic Rec, 3 cr. SPRING
and/or JUV230 Leadership Development, 3 cr. JUV280 or JUV282 ................................... 3 or 4
and/or PED150 First Aid, 3 cr.
PSY221 Adolescent Psychology ................... 3
and/or PSY102 Human Growth & Dev, 3 cr.
and/or SOC101 Principles of Sociology, 3 cr. Major Courses ............................................. 3
and/or SOC201 The Family, 3 cr. Electives ..................................................... 7
and/or SOC211 Social Problems, 3 cr. TOTAL ..................................... 16/17
and/or SOC215 Deviant Behavior, 3 cr.
ELECTIVES ............................................................ 13
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................64
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education Course
list.

I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course list.


Course used to fulfill another requirement may be reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 78 Revised 11/12/2009
JUVENILE JUSTICE -- CERTIFICATE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 130

REQUIRED COURSEWORK: ......................................................................................................................30


ENG103 Technical Writing ............................................................................................ 3
JUV120 Principles and Practices of Juvenile Justice ....................................................... 3
JUV280 Practicum in Juvenile Justice ............................................................................. 3

Select SEVEN of the following .................................................................................. 21:


LAW101 Intro to Law Enforcement, 3 credits
and/or LAW110 Intro to Criminal Justice, 3 credits
and/or JUV210 Intro to Therapeutic Recreation, 3 credits
and/or JUV230 Leadership Development, 3 credits
and/or PSY150 Psychology of Human Relations, 3 credits
and/or PSY221 Adolescent Psychology, 3 credits
and/or SOC101 Principles of Sociology, 3 credits
and/or SOC160 Conflict Management and Resolution, 3 credits
and/or SOC211 Social Problems, 3 credits
and/or SOC215 Deviant Behavior, 3 credits

LAW ENFORCEMENT -- CERTIFICATE


GC CURRICULUM CODE: 132

REQUIRED COURSEWORK: ......................................................................................................................27


ENG103 Technical Writing .............................................................................................. 3
JUV120 Principles and Practices of Juvenile Justice ........................................................ 3
LAW101 Introduction to Law Enforcement .................................................................... 3
LAW110 Introduction to Criminal Justice ....................................................................... 3
LAW210 Criminal Law ..................................................................................................... 3
PED150 First Aid .............................................................................................................. 3
PSY101 General Psychology ............................................................................................ 3
PSY150 Psychology of Human Relations ......................................................................... 3
SPC101 Introduction to Communication ........................................................................ 3

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 79 Revised 11/12/2009
NATURAL RESOURCES & WILDLIFE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION

Natural Resources & Wildlife Technology A.A.S. Degree ........................................ page 82

Natural Resources & Wildlife Technician Certificate ............................................... page 83

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 81 Revised 11/12/2009
NATURAL RESOURCES & WILDLIFE TECHNOLOGY -- ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 203

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................21 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition FALL
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing
or ENG103 Technical Writing ..................... 3 AGM103 Ag/Nat Res Practical Skills I .......... 1.0
Arts and Humanities ASI110 Back Country Living Skills .............. 3.0
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 BIO104 Principles of Biology ...................... 4.0
HUM210 Society & Environment ................ 3 BIO120 Dendrology ................................. 3.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences MAT105 College Algebra ............................ 3.0
PSY101 General Psychology NRW101 NRWT Seminar I ......................... 0.5
or PSY150 GER Social Science Requirement ............. 3.0
or SOC101 .................................................. 3 TOTAL ....................................... 17.5
Science SPRING
BIO104 Principles of Biology ........................ 4
Mathematics AGM104 Ag/Nat Res Practical Skills II ........... 1
MAT105 College Algebra ............................. 3 CSC180 Introduction to GIS ........................... 2
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues ENG103 Technical Writing ............................ 3
CSC180 Intro to GIS ..................................... 2 ENT170 Geospatial Data Coll/Analysis ........... 4
HUM210 Society and The Environment ........ 3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................3 NRW105 Env Sc/Contemp NatRes Issues ..... 2
ASI110 Back Country Living Skills ........................... 3 NRW181 Wildlife Biology ........................... 3
Approved Identity & Difference Course ................. 0 TOTAL ........................................... 18
MAJOR COURSES: .................................................46 SUMMER
NRW103 Ag/Nat Res Practical Skills I ............ 1 NRW180 Herbaceous Plant Identification ... 2
NRW104 Ag/Nat Res Practical Skills II ............ 1 TOTAL ............................................. 2
ESC210 Soils .............................................. 3
FALL
ESC265 Soil & Water Conservation ............... 4
BIO120 Dendrology ....................................... 3 AGM210 Soils ................................................ 3
BIO150 General Ecology ................................ 3 BIO150 General Ecology ................................ 3
ENT170 Geospatial Data Coll/Analysis .......... 4 ENT201 Chem/Quant Mthds for Ag/NR ........ 2
ENT201 Chem/Quant Mthds for Ag/NR ......... 2 NRW270 Forest Measurement ..................... 2
ENT225 Water Quality Assessment ............... 3 NRW283 Fisheries Biology/Management ..... 3
NRW101 NRWT Seminar I ..........................0.5 NRW286 Wildlife Tech/Habitat Mgmt I ..... 3
NRW105 Env Sc/Contemp NatRes Issues ....... 2 TOTAL .......................................... 16
NRW180 Herbaceous Plant Identification .... 2
SPRING
NRW181 Wildlife Biology .............................. 3
NRW270 Forest Measurements .................... 2 AGM265 Soil and Water Conservation ...... 4.0
NRW275 Forest Management ....................... 3 ENT225 Water Quality Assessment ............ 3.0
NRW283 Fish Biology & Mgmt ...................... 3 NRW275 Forest Management ................... 3.0
NRW286 Wildlife Tech/Habitat Mgmt I ......... 3 NRW287Wildlife Tech/Habitat Mgmt II ..... 3.0
NRW287 Wildlife Tech/Habitat Mgt II ........... 3 NRW289 NRWT Seminar II ................................ 0.5
NRW289 NRWT Seminar II ......................... 0.5 SPC101 Introduction to Communication ........ 3.0
TOTAL ................................................ 16.5
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................70
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education Course
list.
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course list.
Course used to fulfill another requirement may be reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 82 Revised 11/12/2009
NATURAL RESOURCES & WILDLIFE TECHNOLOGY -- CERTIFICATE
CURRICULUM CODE: 119

REQUIRED COURSE WORK ................................................................................................................... 35.5


AGM103 Ag/Nat Res Practical Skills I ........................................................................... 1.0
AGM104 Ag/Nat Res Practical Skills II .......................................................................... 1.0
ASI110 Back Country Living Skills ................................................................................. 3.0
BIO104 Principles of Biology ........................................................................................ 4.0
BIO120 Dendrology ....................................................................................................... 3.0
BIO150 General Ecology .............................................................................................. 3.0
ENG103 Technical Writing ........................................................................................... 3.0
CSC180 Introduction to GIS .......................................................................................... 2.0
ENT170 Geospatial Data Coll/Analysis ......................................................................... 4.0
MAT105 College Algebra .............................................................................................. 3.0
NRW101 NRWT Seminar I .......................................................................................... 0.5
NRW105 Env Sc/Contemp NatRes Issues ..................................................................... 2.0
NRW181 Wildlife Biology ............................................................................................. 3.0
PSY 101, 150, or SOC 101 ............................................................................................. 3.0
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ....................................................................................................... 35.5

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
FALL
AGM103 Ag/Nat Res Practical Skills I ........................................................................... 1.0
ASI110 Back Country Living Skills ................................................................................. 3.0
BIO104 Principles of Biology ........................................................................................ 4.0
BIO120 Dendrology ...................................................................................................... 3.0
MAT105 College Algebra ............................................................................................. 3.0
NRW101 NRWT Seminar I ............................................................................................ 0.5
GER Social Science ..................................................................................................... 3.0
TOTAL ........................................................................................................ 17.5
SPRING
AGM104 Ag/Nat Res Practical Skills II .......................................................................... 1.0
BIO150 General Ecology .............................................................................................. 3.0
ENG103 Technical Writing ........................................................................................... 3.0
ENT170 Geospatial Data Coll/Analysis ........................................................................ 4.0
CSC180 Introduction to GIS .......................................................................................... 2.0
NRW105 Env Sc/Contemp NatRes Issues .................................................................... 2.0
NRW181 Wildlife Biology ........................................................................................... 3.0
TOTAL ........................................................................................................ 18.0

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 83 Revised 11/12/2009
TEACHER EDUCATION DIVISION

Early Childhood A.A. Degree.................................................................................... page 86

Elementary Education A.A. Degree ......................................................................... page 87

Elementary Education A.A.T. Degree ...................................................................... page 88

Physical Education & Health A.A. Degree ................................................................ page 89

Secondary Education A.A. Degree ........................................................................... page 90

Early Childhood Assistant Certificate ...................................................................... page 91

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 85 Revised 11/12/2009
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 378

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................31 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing ................... 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I–Expos Writing ...................... 3
ENG102 Comp II—Intro to Literature .......... 3 PSY101 General Psychology ........................... 3
GER Humanities Course ............................... 3 EDU101 Early Childhood I .............................. 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences SPC101 Intro to Communication .................... 3
PSY101 General Psychology......................... 3 GER Science Course ...................................... 4
GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ....... 3 TOTAL ........................................... 16
Science
Two GER Science Courses ............................ 7
Mathematics SPRING
MAT105 College Algebra ............................. 3
ENG102 Comp II–Intro to Literature .............. 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
PSY102 Human Growth & Development ....... 3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3
MAT105 College Algebra ................................ 3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2 GER Science Course ........................................ 4
CSC105 Intro to Computers .......................... 3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
TOTAL ............................................ 16
Approved Identity & Difference Course ......... 0
MAJOR COURSES: .................................................24
FALL
EDU101 Early Childhood Educ. I ..................... 3
EDU102 Early Childhood Educ. II .................... 3 EDU210 Intro to Exceptional Indiv. ................ 3
EDU210 Intro Exceptional Individual .............. 3 GER Arts and Humanities ............................... 3
EDU270 Process & Acquis. of Reading ........... 3 Education Major Electives .............................. 6
EDU280 Practicum in Early Childhood............ 3 Elective ........................................................... 3
PSY102 Human Growth & Development ........ 3 PED, HEA, or ASI Course ................................ 1
Select SIX credits from the following.............. 6 TOTAL ............................................ 16
EDU193 Creative Storytelling, 3 cr.
and/or EDU201 Foundations of Education, 3 cr.
and/or EDU220 Children’s Literature, 3 cr. SPRING
and/or PSY211 Educational Psychology, 3 cr. EDU270 Proc & Acquisition of Reading .......... 3
and/or SOC201 The Family, 3 cr. EDU280 Practicum in Education .................... 3
and/or SOC211 Social Problems, 3 cr. GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course .......... 3
ELECTIVES ...............................................................7 Education Major Elective ............................... 3
Choose after consultation with advisor. Elective ........................................................... 3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course ............................... 1
TOTAL ............................................ 16
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................64

GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education


Course list.

I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course


list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 86 Revised 11/12/2009
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 370

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 31 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 EDU105 Career Analysis in Ed.........................1
GER Literature Course ................................. 3 ENG101 Comp I--Expository Writing ..............3
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3 GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ..........3
Social and Behavioral Sciences GER Science Course ........................................4
Two GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Courses GER Math Course............................................3
from two different disciplines ..................... 6 Elective ....................................................... 2
Science TOTAL ...........................................16
Two GER Science Courses from two
different disciplines..................................... 8
Mathematics SPRING
GER Math Course ........................................ 3
EDU201 Foundations of Education .................3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
SPC101 Intro to Communication ....................3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3
GER Literature Course ....................................3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2 GER Science Course ........................................4
Elective ...........................................................3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0
TOTAL ...........................................17
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 16
EDU105 Career Analysis in Ed ....................... 1
FALL
EDU201 Foundations of Ed ........................... 3
EDU270 Process/Acquisition of Reading ....... 3 CSC105 Introduction to Computers ................3
MAT121 Elementary Math I .......................... 3 GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ..........3
MAT122 Elementary Math II ......................... 3 PSY211 Educational Psychology .....................3
PSY211 Educational Psych ............................ 3 MAT121 Elementary Mathematics I ...............3
Elective ...........................................................3
ELECTIVES: ............................................................ 14
PED, HEA or ASI Course .............................. 1
Choose after consultation with advisor.
TOTAL ...........................................16

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................ 64 SPRING


EDU270 Processing/Acquisition of Reading ..3
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education GER Humanities Course ..................................3
Course list. MAT122 Elementary Math II ..........................3
Electives ....................................................... 6
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course TOTAL ...........................................15
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 87 Revised 11/12/2009
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION -- ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN TEACHING DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 380

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................32 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition FALL
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing ................... 3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3
Arts and Humanities
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writ ......................... 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3
EDU105 Career Analysis in Education ........... 1
ENG102 Comp II–Intro to Literature ........... 3
MAT105 College Algebra ............................... 3
ART115 Visual Imagery ................................ 3
PSY101 General Psychology .......................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences
SPC101 Intro to Communication ............... 3
PSY101 General Psychology......................... 3
TOTAL ............................................ 16
SOC101 Principles of Sociology ................... 3
Science SPRING
BIO104 Principles of Biology ........................ 4
BIO104 Principles of Biology ........................ 4
PHY130 Physical Science.............................. 4
EDU201 Foundations of Education ............... 3
Mathematics
ENG102 Comp II – Intro to Literature .......... 3
MAT105 College Algebra ............................. 3
MAT210 Introductory Statistics .................... 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
PED117 Personal Health & Fitness ................ 2
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3
SOC101 Principles of Sociology ................. 3
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2 TOTAL ............................................ 18
PED117 Personalized Health & Fitness........... 2 FALL
Approved Identity & Difference Course ......... 0
EDU210 Intro Exceptional Individual ............. 3
MAJOR COURSES: .................................................32 ESC101 Physical Geology
or ESC121 Physical Geography ..................... 4
EDU105 Career Analysis in Education .......... 1
HIS Course ...................................................... 3
EDU201 Foundations of Education ............... 3
MAT121 Elementary Math I ........................... 3
EDU210 Intro Exceptional Individual ............ 3
PSY211 Educational Psychology ................. 3
EDU270 Process/Acquisition of Reading ...... 3
TOTAL ............................................ 16
ESC101 Physical Geology
or SC121 Physical Geography ....................... 4 SPRING
GEO201 Cultural Geography ........................ 3
ART115 Visual Imagery .................................. 3
HIS111 American History to 1865
EDU270 Process/Acquisition of Reading ........ 3
or HIS112 American History since 1865
GEO201 Cultural Geography .......................... 3
or HIS121 Twentieth Century World .......... 3
MAT122 Elementary Math II .......................... 3
MAT121 Elementary Math I ......................... 3
PHY130 Physical Science ............................ 4
MAT122 Elementary Math II ........................ 3
TOTAL ............................................ 16
MAT210 Introductory Statistics .................... 3
PSY211 Educational Psych ............................ 3

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: .........................66

GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education


ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
Course list.
Must pass PRAXIS examination
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course Minimum CGPA 2.75
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 88 Revised 11/12/2009
PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 372, 376, 377

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: ....................................... 32 EDU210 Intro Exceptional Individual ..............3


PSY102 Human Growth & Development ........3
English Composition
PSY211 Educational Psychology .....................3
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................. 3
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ....................... 65
ENG102 Comp II--Intro to Literature .......... 3
GER Humanities Course .............................. 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education
PSY101 General Psychology ........................ 3 Course list.
GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Courses ..... 3
Science I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course
BIO104 Principles of Biology ....................... 4 list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
ESC121 Physical Geography ........................ 4 reused here.
Mathematics
MAT105 College Algebra............................. 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................ 3 FALL
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................ 2 ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .....................3
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2 HEA151 Personal Health ................................3
Approved Identity & Difference Course ........ 0 SPC101 Intro to Communication ...................3
GER Arts and Humanities Course ...................3
MAJOR COURSES: ................................................. 12 PED, HEA OR ASI Physical Activity .................1
ASI101 Intro Recreation, Parks, Adv. Sp. ....... 3 PSY101 General Psychology ....................... 3
HEA151 Personal Health ................................ 3 TOTAL ...........................................16
PED150 First Aid............................................. 3 SPRING
PED or ASI Physical Activities ......................... 2
PED210 Practicum.......................................... 1 ENG102 Comp II--Intro to Literature ..............3
BIO104 Principles of Biology ...........................4
ELECTIVES: ....................................................... 3 or 4 PED150 First Aid .............................................3
(BIO 200, Anatomy & Physiology, recommended) ASI101 Intro Recreation, Parks, Adv. Sp. ........3
Select one of three concentrations: PED, HEA OR ASI Physical Activity ..................1
Major Concentration Course ...................... 3
COACHING CONCENTRATION (GC Code 372): ....... 16 TOTAL ...........................................17
BIO130 Principles of Nutrition ....................... 3 FALL
BIO201 Anatomy & Physiology II ................... 4
EDU201 Foundations of Education ................ 3 Major Concentration Courses ........................6
PSY102 Human Growth & Development ....... 3 CSC105 Intro to Computers ............................3
PSY211 Educational Psychology ..................... 3 PED, HEA OR ASI .............................................2
GER Science Course ........................................4
RECREATION CONCENTRATION (GC Code 376): .... 16 PED210 Practicum ...................................... 1
BIO110 Natural History .................................. 4 TOTAL ...........................................16
BUS101 Intro to Business ............................... 3 SPRING
BUS170 Intro to Management ....................... 3
ASI109 Intro Therapeutic Recreation............. 3 GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Course ..........3
PED, HEA OR ASI Activities ............................. 3 MAT105 College Algebra ...............................3
Major Concentration Courses ........................7
TEACHING CONCENTRATION (GC Code 377) ......... 16 Elective ...........................................................3
BIO201 Anatomy & Physiology II ................... 4 TOTAL ...........................................16
EDU201 Foundations of Education ................ 3

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 89 Revised 11/12/2009
SECONDARY EDUCATION OPTION -- ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 371

GER REQUIRED CREDITS: .......................................31 RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


English Composition
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing ................... 3
FALL
Arts and Humanities
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................. 3 ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing .................... 3
GER Literature Course ................................. 3 GER Social Science ......................................... 3
GER Humanities Course ............................... 3 GER Mathematics .......................................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences EDU Major Elective ........................................ 3
Two GER Soc & Behavioral Sciences Courses from Elective .......................................................... 3
two different disciplines .............................. 6 EDU105 Career Analysis in Ed .................... 1
Science TOTAL ........................................... 16
Two GER Science Courses from two
different disciplines ..................................... 7
Mathematics SPRING
GER Math Course......................................... 3
GER Literature ............................................... 3
Interdisciplinary/Emerging Issues
SPC101 Intro to Communication ................... 3
CSC105 Intro to Computers ......................... 3
GER Science ................................................... 4
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS: ............................2 PED, HEA OR ASI Activity ................................ 1
Elective ...................................................... 5
PED, HEA, or ASI Course(s) ............................. 2
TOTAL ........................................... 16
Approved Identity & Difference Course ......... 0
MAJOR COURSES: .................................................19
FALL
PSY211 Educational Psych ............................. 3
EDU201 Foundations of Ed ............................ 3 GER Humanities ............................................. 3
EDU105 Career Analysis in Ed. ....................... 1 GER Social Science ......................................... 3
Courses related to major and minor teaching PSY211 Ed Psychology ................................... 3
area for the secondary school level ............ 12 EDU Major Elective ........................................ 3
GER Science .................................................... 3
ELECTIVES: ............................................................12
PED, HEA OR ASI Activity ............................ 1
Choose after consultation with advisor.
TOTAL ........................................... 16

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: ........................64


SPRING
EDU201 Foundations of Ed ............................ 3
GER Courses must be on the Approved General Education EDU Major Electives ....................................... 6
Course list. CSC105 Intro to Computers ........................... 3
Electives .................................................. 3/4
I&D Course must be on the Identity and Difference Course TOTAL ..................................... 15/16
list. Course used to fulfill another requirement may be
reused here.

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 90 Revised 11/12/2009
EARLY CHILDHOOD ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE
GC CURRICULUM CODE: 170

REQUIRED COURSE WORK: .....................................................................................................................27


EDU101 Early Childhood I ............................................................................................... 3
EDU280 Seminar / Practicum in Education ..................................................................... 3
ENG101 Comp I--Expos Writing ...................................................................................... 3
PSY102 Human Growth & Development ......................................................................... 3
PSY220 Child Psychology ................................................................................................. 3
SOC201 The Family .......................................................................................................... 3
SPC101 Intro to Communication ..................................................................................... 3
EDU/PSY Electives ........................................................................................................... 6

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 91 Revised 11/12/2009
TRANSPORTATION DIVISION

COMMERCIAL VEHICLE TRANSPORTATION SPECIALIST -- CERTIFICATE


GC CURRICULUM CODE: 107

REQUIRED COURSE WORK: .....................................................................................................................16


CVS101 Introduction to Commercial Vehicle Transportation ........................................ 3
CVS102 Operation of The Commercial Transportation Vehicle ..................................... 4
CVS103 Commercial Vehicles and Specialized Equipment ............................................ 2
CVS104 Commercial Vehicle Driving I ............................................................................ 2
CVS105 Commercial Vehicle Driving II ........................................................................... 3
CVS106 Management Skills ............................................................................................. 1
CVS107 Certification Preparation .................................................................................. 1

2009-2010 College Catalog


Page 93 Revised 11/12/2009
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CO-REQUISITES AND PREREQUISITES
To succeed in most academic courses, a student should have minimum reading competencies equivalent to the eleventh
grade level or enroll in Language Arts 091. English 101 writing competencies are required for most science, humanities,
social science, and business courses.

Course descriptions list the specific prerequisites for each course. The level of English, reading, or mathematics
indicated must be completed prior to entry into the course unless the skill level has a “c” noted after it. The “c” means
that the academic skill level may be taken concurrently with the specific course. This is a co-requisite. The absence of a
skill level after the course description means that no prerequisite is required.

Students should confer with academic advisors in planning their course work. Adhering to prerequisites and co-
requisites assures students of having the academic skills necessary to be successful in college courses.

ACCOUNTING ADVENTURE SPORTS


ACC210 Financial Accounting (3 credits) ASI101 Introduction to Recreation, Parks and
This course covers the accounting cycle and preparation of Adventure Sports (3 credits)
financial statements. Course emphasizes the application of An overview of the recreation and adventure sports
accounting statements required to make informed decisions. industries, including an analysis of the parks systems in
General Accepted Accounting Principles and ethics are various states and the nation.
examined throughout the course as they relate to each area. Instructional Hours: 3
Instructional Hours: 3 Prerequisite: ENG092c
Prerequisite: ENG092c, MAT095c
ACC213 Managerial Accounting (3 credits) ASI104 Adventure Sports Colloquium I (0.25 credits)
The course will examine the accounting concepts used for Students meet to share information with speakers from the
internal decision making. Topics will include job order cost field of adventure sports. Typically, the speakers are small
and process cost, budgeting, cost-behavior, differential business owners within the field of adventure or work for
analysis, and cost-volume-profit analysis. agencies that offer adventure as a product. Students are
Instructional Hours: 3 presented with information from these speakers and have
Prerequisite: ACC210 or ACC211 the opportunity to ask questions about the field.
(CR/NC grade)
ACC290 Special Topics in Accounting (1 credit)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
ASI105 Adventure Sports Colloquium II (0.25 credits)
supervision of a College faculty member. A continuation of ASI 104.
Instructional Hours: 1 (CR/NC grade)
Prerequisite: ACC211 ASI109 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation in the
ACC291 Special Topics in Accounting (2 credits) Adventure Setting (3 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the This course presents an overview of services, agencies, and
supervision of a College faculty member. programs designed to meet the developmental,
Instructional Hours: 2 psychological, recreational, and therapeutic needs of special
Prerequisite: ACC211 populations.
Instructional Hours: 3
ACC292-299 Special Topics in Accounting (3 credits) Prerequisite: ENG092
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Corequisite: ASI194
supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 3 ASI110 Back Country Living Skills (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ACC211 A course designed to introduce students to the basic skills
and practices necessary to successfully and safely exist in the
backcountry setting. Topics include proper dress, nutrition,
backcountry navigation, personal hygiene, and shelter
systems employing leave no trace (LNT) and low impact
techniques. (Intro)
Instructional Hours: 4

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ASI111 Beginning Orienteering (1 credit) ASI130 Intro. to Whitewater Kayaking (1 credit)
A course involved with the use of special maps (orienteering A course concerned with fundamental knowledge and skills
maps) and magnetic compass in an effort to traverse a preset needed to safely paddle a kayak in moving water through
course, usually in a forested area. Students will learn basic class II whitewater. Course contains information on and/or
map and compass skills and develop good technique of the skill development in the areas of equipment, clothing, safety
sport of orienteering. (Intro) in and around moving water, paddling theory, strokes,
(CR/NC grade) maneuvers, rescue, group organization, reading and running
Instructional Hours: 2 rivers. (Intro)
Prerequisite: None (CR/NC grade)
Instructional Hours: 2
ASI113 GPS Navigation in Adventure Sports (1 credit) Prerequisite: None
(Course description will be forthcoming.)
(CR/NC grade) ASI131 Intro. to Whitewater Paddlesports (1 credit)
This course is designed to introduce individuals to the
ASI115 Wilderness Survival Skills (1 credit) fundamentals of whitewater paddlesports. Participants will
An introductory course teaching the theory and skills manuever a variety of whitewater crafts, both individually
associated with surviving in wilderness locations. Course and in groups, through class I - IV whitewater. Topics include:
addresses survival preparation, survival first aid, water and Individual and group responsibilities and safety, the nature
food procurement, survival clothing and equipment, fire and care of equipment, the relationship between
craft, emergency signals, individual and group survival paddlesports and the natural environment, trends and issues
shelters, nighttime survival, and nighttime direction finding. in paddlesports, and river dynamics.
(Intro) Instructional Hours: 2
(CR/NC grade)
Instructional Hours: 2 ASI133 Intro. to Whitewater Canoeing (1 credit)
Prerequisite: None An introductory course in the skill of paddling an open canoe
in mild whitewater conditions (class III and less). Topics
ASI117 Cold Weather Outdoor Living Skills (1 credit) include: paddling strokes, the dynamics of moving water,
A course dealing with the special problems and equipment, and safety/rescue in moving water. (Intro)
considerations of outdoor living skills in temperatures below (CR/NC grade)
50 degrees Fahrenheit. Typically, the course is offered during Instructional Hours: 2
the month of January and thus the temperatures could range Prerequisite: None
well below 0 degrees Fahrenheit. Students learn how to
dress, travel with equipment, prepare food, construct ASI136 Intro. to Rafting and River Guiding (1 credit)
shelters, and maintain a healthy spirit in the adverse An introductory course designed to instruct the fundamentals
conditions of cold, wet environs. (Intermediate) of the sport of whitewater paddle rafting. Students are
(CR/NC grade) presented information about rafting equipment, proper
Instructional Hours: 2 preparation for a river trip, paddling strokes, control of a raft,
Prerequisite: ASI110 or Permission of Instructor river dynamics, maneuvering in whitewater, reading the river,
proper commands to give for safely descending and
ASI120 Intro. to Traditional Rock Climbing (1 cr) controlling a raft in rapids, river safety and rescue, and care
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic for and minor repair of a raft. This course uses the American
concepts associated with traditional and top rope rock Canoe Association’s whitewater rafting curriculum. Course
climbing. Emphasis will be given to basic knots, belay meets requirements for the ACA paddle rafting curriculum.
techniques and movement skills as well as to gaining general (Intro)
exposure to, and experience in, traditional rock climbing (CR/NC grade)
techniques. (Intro) Instructional Hours: 2
(CR/NC grade) Prerequisite: None
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: ASI110/ Permission of Instructor ASI138 Introduction to Sea Kayaking (1 credit)
A course concerned with the development of knowledge and
ASI121 Rock Craft 1 (1 credit) skills necessary to safely operate an ocean/sea kayak in calm
This course is designed to build upon the skills, experience, water, surf, and open sea environments. Material covered
and knowledge gained in ASI120. Students will focus on includes an introduction to equipment and history of the
becoming competent seconds to a traditional lead climber. sport, kayak strokes, considering environmental factors such
Emphasis will be given to belaying, ground anchors, cleaning as wind, waves, and surf, self rescue, assisted rescues, and
protection and rope management in a multi-pitch setting. navigation. (Intro)
Top rope site management techniques will also be discussed (CR/NC grade)
and practiced. (CR/NC grade) Instructional Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 2 Prerequisite: None
Prerequisite: ASI120c

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ASI140 Intro. to Cross Country Mountain Biking (1 cr.) ASI160 Swift Water Rescue (1 credit)
A course designed to develop in students the necessary skills A course in the methods of rescuing persons in swift water
for cross country mountain bike riding. Students will be conditions. Students study the dynamics of moving water,
introduced to trail riding on woods roads and single track natural and man made hazards, swimming the rapids to assist
trails over moderate terrain in whatever weather prevails. in a rescue, how to deal with strainers, use of throw rope,
Topics include: basic bike maintenance and repair, bike riding rope rescue techniques, and the use of a rescue vest. Special
technique for downhilling and climbing techniques, clothing, topics are added as appropriate by the instructor. (Rescue)
risk management, nutrition, and hydration. (Intro) (CR/NC grade)
(CR/NC grade) Instructional Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 2 Prerequisite: None
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
ASI162 Fundamentals of Search and Rescue (NASAR
ASI145 Mountain Bike Mechanics I (1 credit) Certification) (1 credit)
This course is designed to develop in students the skills and A course to instruct individuals in the methods of searching
competencies needed to become a bike assembler/entry- for lost persons. Topics include search and rescue (SAR)
level mechanic at a professionally managed bike shop. hierarchy, personal preparedness, rescue, search, and
Emphasis will be given to knowledge and utilization of specific preventative search and rescue. Course is hands-on oriented
tools and timely assembly of a mountain bike. (Intro) and includes one overnight experience. SARTEC II certification
(CR/NC grade) offered. (Intro)
Instructional Hours: 2 (CR/NC grade)
Instructional Hours: 2
ASI150 Beginning Alpine Skiing (1 credit)
Prerequisite: None
Students will acquire basic skiing techniques through
instruction from Professional Ski Instructors of America (PSIA) ASI164 Advanced Level First Aid & CPR (3 credits)
teachers. Levels 1, 2, 3, and 4 will be presented to the An advanced level first aid and CPR course for individuals
students, thus taking them from walking on flat ground with having professional responsibilities in the adventure industry.
skis, through skidding turns, and ending with wide track The certification awarded with this course depends upon the
parallel skiing. (Intro) availability of instructional staff. Examples of certifications
(CR/NC grade) include the American Red Cross Emergency Response, the
Instructional Hours: 2 National Ski Patrol Outdoor Emergency Care, or a Wilderness
Prerequisite: None First Responder course. In any case, a professional level CPR
would be awarded.
ASI154 Beginning Snowboarding (1 credit)
Instructional Hours: 3
A course designed to introduce students to the methods of
Prerequisite: None
alpine snowboarding. Topics include equipment selection and
basic snowboarding techniques. Students will descend green ASI170 Guiding and Instructing in
circle (beginner) and some blue square (intermediate) slopes Adventuresports (3 credits)
at a local ski area. (Intro) This course is designed to prepare the student for Guiding
(CR/NC grade) and Instructing in the Adventuresports field. Drawing on
Instructional Hours: 2 curricula from the American Canoe Association, (A.C.A.), the
Prerequisite: None Professional Ski Instructors of America (P.S.I.A.), the American
Mountain Guides Association (A.M.G.A.), the National
ASI158 Cross Country Skiing (1 credit) Outdoor Leadership School (N.O.L.S.), and the Wilderness
A beginning course in the basics of Nordic/cross country Education Association (W.E.A.), content will focus on:
skiing. Topics include: proper dress for Nordic skiing, standing Teaching and Learning Styles, Assessment, Lesson Planning,
and moving on flat terrain, kick and glide techniques, snow Curriculum Design, Delivery Options, and Evaluation.
plow stops, snow plow turns, step turns, kick turns, and basic Students wil be required to design a course and facilitate a
downhill technique. (Intro) classroom session.
(CR/NC grade) Instructional Hours: 3
Instructional Hours: 2 Prerequisite: None
Prerequisite: None
ASI180 Introduction to New Games-Initiatives/Low
ASI159 Intro. to Telemark Skiing (1 credit) Ropes Challenge Course (1 credit)
A course designed to develop the technique necessary to A course designed to build interaction within a group by use
safely and properly practice the sport of Back country or of relating games and the low (approximately 3 feet or lower)
telemark skiing. Topics include free heel equipment, wedge ropes course. (Intro)
turns, basic telemark turning, basic alpine turning, and some (CR/NC grade)
advanced telemark technique tips. (Intro) Instructional Hours: 2
(CR/NC grade) Prerequisite: None
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: None

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ASI190 Beginning Open Water SCUBA (1 credit) ASI220 Rock Craft 2 (1 credit)
A first course in open water SCUBA leading to the certification The course is designed to build upon the skills, experience
necessary in order to fill ones SCUBA tanks with air. Beginning and knowledge gained in ASI121. Students will focus on
Open Water SCUBA certification offered. (Intro) becoming competent seconds to a traditional lead climber.
(CR/NC grade) Emphasis will be given to belaying, ground anchors, cleaning
Instructional Hours: 2 protection and rope management in a multi-pitch setting.
Prerequisite: None Top rope site management techniques will also be discussed
and practiced. (Intermediate)Instructional Hours: 2
ASI200 Adventure Sports Program Planning and Prerequisite: ASI121c
Management (3 credits)
The planning, scheduling, and implementation of recreational ASI221 Rock Craft 4 (1 credit)
activities and events are presented in this course. Students This course is designed to build upon the skills, experience
will learn through lecture, simulation, and practical and knowledge gained in ASI220. Students will be introduced
experience the procedures involved in developing, staffing, to the skills necessary to lead traditional rock climbs.
budgeting, and managing risks for adventure sports programs Emphasis will be given to placing protection, anchor building
for diverse audiences. and rope management in a multi-pitch setting. Top rope site
Instructional Hours: 3 management techniques will also be discussed and practiced.
Prerequisite: ENG092 and ASI101 or Permission of Instructor (Intermediate)
Instructional Hours: 2
ASI201 Leadership and Group Dynamics of Prerequisite: ASI220 or Permission of Instructor
Adventuresports (3 cr)
This course is designed to introduce students to the tools ASI222 Rock Craft 5 (1 credit)
needed for planning and operating a professional level This course is designed to build upon the skills, experience
adventure outing. Emphasis will be given to risk and knowledge gained in ASI221. Students will practice the
management, group process, ethical issues in leadership, skills necessary to lead traditional rock climbs. Emphasis will
leadership models, experiential education models, and be given to placing protection, anchor building and rope
effective leadership skills. management in a multi-pitch setting. Students may earn the
Instructional Hours: 3 opportunity to lead a traditional rock climb. Top rope site
Prerequisite: ASI101 or Consent or Instructor management techniques will also be discussed and practiced.
(Intermediate)
ASI204 Adventure Sports Colloquium III (0.25 credits) Instructional Hours: 2
A continuation of ASI105. Prerequisite: ASI221 or Permission of Instructor
(CR/NC grade)
ASI226 Ice Climbing (1 credit)
ASI205 Adventure Sports Colloquium IV (0.25 credits) This course is designed to build upon the skills, experience
A continuation of ASI204. and knowledge gained in ASI120. Students will be introduced
(CR/NC grade) to the basic skills needed to climb ice formations. Emphasis
will be given to equipment, movement skills, and
ASI206 Practicum Preparation (1 credit)
understanding ice formation and deformation.
Students will work with staff from the job placement office of
(Intermediate)
Garrett College to develop job search skills as well as begin
Instructional Hours: 2
the process of seeking an internship.
Prerequisite: ASI110 & ASI120 or Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None ASI230 Whitewater Kayaking Techniques I (1 credit)
A continuation of ASI 130. Course improves on paddling
ASI207 Practicum Internship (1 credit)
techniques and river maneuvers. Paddling skill is elevated to
Students complete a 90 hour (minimum) internship under the
class III whitewater. (Intermediate)
guidance of an Adventure Sports program faculty.
Instructional Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: ASI130c or Permission of Instructor
Prerequisite: ASI206c
ASI231 Whitewater Kayaking Techniques II (1 credit)
ASI208 Practicum III (1 credit)
A course designed to test paddling techniques in class III/IV
Included in the curriculum for Frostburg State University
whitewater. Emphasis on technical correctness and
students earning an A.A.S. degree at Garrett College.
application of strokes and more advanced surfing and river
ASI212 Eastern Mountaineering (1 credit) navigation. Trip planning, leadership, and rescue of others are
A skill development expedition for beginner and intermediate taught and practiced.
mountaineers seeking both wilderness travel and Instructional Hours: 2
mountaineering skill development. Topics include: self belay, Prerequisite: ASI230c or Permission of Instructor
self arrests, snow travel, rope team management, and the
use of ice axes and crampons. (Intermediate)
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: ASI110 or Permission of Instructor

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ASI232 Whitewater Freestyle Kayaking (1 credit) and some black diamond (advanced) slopes at a local ski area.
An introduction to playboating using planing hull kayaks. (Intermediate)
Course focuses on class II/III wave and hole surfing, playing Instructional Hours: 2
eddy lines, and a brief introduction to rules and regulations Prerequisite: ASI154 or Permission of Instructor
for freestyle competition. (Intermediate)
ASI255 Snowboarding Techniques II (1 credit)
Instructional Hours: 2
A continuation of ASI 254. Students learn more advanced
Prerequisite: ASI130 or Permission of Instructor
snowboarding techniques, particularly on intermediate and
ASI233 Whitewater Canoeing Techniques I (1 credit) advanced slopes at a local ski area. (Intermediate)
A continuation of ASI 133. Course improves on paddling Instructional Hours: 2
techniques and river maneuvers and elevates the paddling Prerequisite: ASI110 & ASI254 or Permission of Instructor
skills to class III+ whitewater. (Intermediate)
ASI258 Cross Country Skiing Techniques I (1 credit)
Instructional Hours: 2
Builds on basic skills introduced in ASI158, Introduction to
Prerequisite: ASI133
Cross Country Skiing. New techniques introduced are skating,
ASI236 Whitewater Rafting Tech. Development (1 cr) off trail or backcountry skiing, and higher efficiency track
This course emphasizes the American Canoe Association skating.
whitewater rafting curriculum. It is intended to develop the Instructional Hours: 2
techniques necessary to pass the ACA Whitewater Rafting Prerequisite: ASI158
Instructor Certification. (Intermediate)
ASI259 Telemark Skiing Techniques I (1 credit)
Instructional Hours: 2
This course is designed to build on those skills that were
Prerequisite: ASI136c or Permission of Instructor
introduced in ASI159, Introduction to Telemark Skiing. New
ASI238 Sea Kayaking Techniques I (1 credit) techniques include: backcountry travel, intermediate
This course is designed to build on the basic technical telemark techniques, avalanche awareness, individual and
paddling and rescue skills introduced in ASI138 taking these group responsibilities and safety, the nature and care of
techniques to a variety of new open water and tidal equipment, the relationship between skiing and the natural
environments. New skills will focus on trip planning, open environment, plus trends and issues in the ski industry.
water navigation, group management and surf zone paddling. Instructional Hours: 2
(Intermediate) Prerequisite: ASI159c
Instructional Hours: 2
ASI260 Rock Craft 3: Vertical Rock Rescue (1 credit)
Prerequisite: ASI138c
This course is designed with the intention that students will
ASI240 Interm. Cross Country Mountain Biking (1 cr) gain the essential skills necessary to perform a competent
This is an intermediate course for cross country mountain rescue of a partner utilizing standard equipment carried by
bike riders. Terrain covered will be rugged and the pace traditional rock climbers. Emphasis will be given to belay
strenuous in whatever weather prevails. Topics include: bike escapes, knot passes, rescue rappels, litter lowers and litter
handling, night riding, downhilling and climbing techniques carries. (Rescue)
on single track trails, obstacle negotiation, an introduction to Instructional Hours: 2
racing philosophy, nutrition, hydration, clothing, and risk Prerequisite: ASI220 or Permission of Instructor
management. (Intermediate)
ASI262 National Ski Patrol Training (1 credit)
Instructional Hours: 2
Students who have been accepted into a candidate program
Prerequisite: ASI140 or Permission of Instructor
of the National Ski Patrol System may enroll in this course. To
ASI250 Alpine Skiing Techniques I (1 credit) become a candidate, individual must check with a particular
A continuation of ASI150, students will be presented levels 5, ski area as to their procedure. Normally, this is done the ski
6, and 7 from PSIA teachers. Content will begin with wide season prior to the individual’s actual training. (Rescue)
track parallel skiing and advance to parallel skiing, carved Instructional Hours: 2
turns, and an introduction to steeper slope skiing with Prerequisite: Candidate in NSPS
moguls. (Intermediate)
Instructional Hours: 2 ASI264 Rescue Diving (1 credit)
Prerequisite: ASI150 or Permission of Instructor Training awarding certification allowing a diver to retrieve
submerged materials. (Rescue)
ASI251 Alpine Skiing Techniques II (1 credit) Instructional Hours: 2
A continuation of ASI250, students will be presented levels 8, Prerequisite: ASI290
9 and 10 from PSIA teachers. Content focuses on steep slope
skiing with moguls and covers diverging and converging step ASI270 Rock Craft 6: Rock Climbing Instructor
turns. (Intermediate) Development (Maryland Certification Course) (1 cr)
Instructional Hours: 2 This course is designed to meet Maryland Department of
Prerequisite: ASI110 & ASI250 or Permission of Instructor Health and Human Hygiene regulations for the safe and
proper offering of top rope climbing in residential camp
ASI254 Snowboarding Techniques I (1 credit) settings and to prepare interested students for the Maryland
A continuation of ASI 154. Students learn more advanced State Top Rope Site Manager Exam (offered seperately.)
snowboarding techniques. Students will descend green, blue, Emphasis will be given to top rope setup and facilitation,

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rappel setup and facilitation, rescue scenarios, managing risk ASI277 Whitewater Rafting Instructor
and professionalism. Students will have the opportunity to Training (1 credit)
facilitate a rock climbing and rappelling experience for a A course designed to test whitewater rafting techniques in
client group. (Instructor) class III/IV whitewater. American Canoe Association
Instructional Hours: 2 whitewater rafting certification offered. (Instructor)
Prerequisite: ASI170, ASI220 or Permission of Instructor Instructional Hours: 2
ASI271 Wilderness Guide Instructor Development Prerequisite: ASI170, ASI236 or Permission of Instructor
(Leave No Trace Master Educator) (1 credit) ASI279 Challenge Course Facilitation (1 credit)
This course is designed to provide participants with a Course description is forthcoming.
comprehensive overview of Leave No Trace skills and ethics
through practical application in a field-based setting. The first ASI280 Intermediate Ropes Course (1 credit)
day is spent in a classroom, introducing the course and A course designed to build self confidence and self reliance
schedule, providing in-depth information on the overall Leave as well as group interaction and support through the use of a
No Trace program and the Center for Outdoor Ethics, high ropes course. (Intermediate)
reviewing gear, and packing. The remaining days are spent in Instructional Hours: 2
the field on a backcountry trip learning and practicing the Prerequisite: ASI110 & ASI180 or Permission of Instructor
principles of Leave No Trace. Successful completion of the ASI290 Intermediate Open Water SCUBA (1 credit)
course will enable students to train others in Leave No Trace
A continuation of ASI 190 with certification allowing the diver
skills s well as facilitate Leave No Trace Trainer courses and
to descend to greater depths. Advanced Open Water SCUBA
Awareness Workshops.
certification offered. (Intermediate)
Laboratory Hours: 1
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: ASI110
Prerequisite: ASI190 & ASI110 or Permission of Instructor
ASI273 Mountain Bike Guide Development and ASI291 Special Topics in Adventuresports (2 credits)
Certification (1 credit) Students will study a topic of special interest under the
A course designed to develop in students the necessary skills supervision of a College faculty member.
for leading mountain bike tours. Students will be introduced Instructional Hours: 2
to the skills needed to manage mountain bike tours. Topics Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
include: managing biking groups in the back country, teaching
Leave No Trace Principles, managing risk for group mountain ASI292-298 Special Topics in Adventuresports(3 credits)
bike riders, site selection for teaching mountain biking, and Students will study a topic of special interest under the
all other topics covered in Introduction to Mountain Biking. supervision of a College faculty member.
Students will be required to teach a minimum of 1/2 day Instructional Hours: 3
biking curriculum to novice riders. (Instructor) Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: ASI170, ASI240c or Permission of Instructor
ART
ASI274 Ski School Instructor Training (1 credit)
Students clinic under PSIA instructors for the purpose of ART101 Basic Design I (3 credits)
developing techniques needed to become a Level I PSIA A fundamental course in the art of two-dimensional design,
Instructor in either Alpine skiing or snowboarding. Enrollees including freehand drawing and various media in the study of
must qualify by demonstrating abilities. (Instructor) the elements and principles of design. Prerequisite to 2-D
Instructional Hours: 2 studio courses.
Prerequisite: Appropriate demonstrated ability Instructional Hours: 2
ASI275 Whitewater Canoe Instructor Training (1 cr) Laboratory Hours: 2
Modeled after the American Canoeing Association instructor Prerequisite: None
program, students enrolled must meet the ACA requirements ART102 Basic Design II (3 credits)
for the passing of the Whitewater Certification portion of A fundamental course in the art of three-dimensional design,
their program. For more information, contact the Adventure including sculptural processes with various media in the study
Sports program director. (Instructor) of the elements and principles of design. Prerequisite to 3-D
Instructional Hours: 2 studio courses.
Prerequisite: ASI233 Instructional Hours: 2
ASI276 Whitewater Kayak Instructor Training (1 cr) Laboratory Hours: 2
Modeled after the American Canoeing Association instructor Prerequisite: None
program, students enrolled must meet the ACA requirements ART103 Art Appreciation (3 credits)
for passing the Whitewater Certification portion of their A course that introduces a student to art in its various forms
program. For more information, contact the Adventure Sports and develops an appreciation of the visual arts. The study
program director. (Instructor) includes a survey of media, styles and structures, theories
Instructional Hours: 2 and criticism of art.
Prerequisite: ASI170, ASI231 or Permission of Instructor Instructional Hours: 3

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Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c course is the understanding and manipulation of clay through
hand building with experiences in glazing, throwing, and kiln
ART108 Introduction to Graphic Design (3 credits) operations.
A course in the development of techniques and skills used in Instructional Hours: 2
the production of visual material for the printed media. The Laboratory Hours: 2
study includes the relationships between visual imagery and Prerequisite: None
letter forms and solutions to various problems in graphic
communications. ART208 Printmaking I (3 credits)
Instructional Hours: 2 An introduction to the processes of relief, intaglio and
Laboratory Hours: 2 serigraphic printmaking. An investigation of materials and
Prerequisite: ART101 or Permission of Instructor techniques for the production of both formal and expressive
imagery, with an emphasis on the relationships of media and
ART115 Visual Imagery (3 credits) image.
A course designed to provide experience and theory in art Instructional Hours: 2
techniques, media, ideas, and teaching methods for Early Laboratory Hours: 2
Childhood and Elementary Education majors. Prerequisite: None
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: None ART246 Painting II (3 credits)
A course that provides further experiences with painting and
ART120 Art Workshop (3 credits) techniques and concepts. The continuation of the study of
A course that introduces a student to the media, techniques, composition and color in a particular painting medium, with
and basic concepts of a particular form of art. The specific an emphasis on the development of individual imagery and
focus of the course, such as fibre arts, stained glass, expression.
puppetry, or film making will be determined each semester. Instructional Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 2 Laboratory Hours: 2
Laboratory Hours: 2
Prerequisite: None ART247 Ceramics II (3 credits)
A course that provides further experiences with ceramic
ART201 Drawing I (3 credits) techniques and concepts. The study involves advanced
A course in freehand drawing that explores various media methods in creating pottery and sculptural forms through
approaches and concepts with an emphasis on visualization hand building and throwing, and through experimentation in
and composition. The study involves the creative rendering of glazing.
natural objects and the human figure, and includes the Instructional Hours: 2
development of personal expression with an individual Laboratory Hours: 2
project in drawing. Prerequisite: ART207
Instructional Hours: 2
Laboratory Hours: 2 ART248 Printmaking II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: None A course that provides further experiences with printmaking
techniques and concepts. Demonstration and
ART205 Sculpture I (3 credits) experimentation with color and advanced processes with an
A studio course that explores the possibilities of various emphasis on image refinement, studio disciplines and
materials and methods of sculpture. An investigation of form individual research.
and space through the techniques of modeling, carving, Instructional Hours: 3
casting and assemblage, with an emphasis on the Prerequisite: ART208
relationships of concept, structure and the nature of
materials. ART290 Special Topics in Art (1 credit)
Instructional Hours: 2 Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Laboratory Hours: 2 supervision of a College faculty member.
Prerequisite: None Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
ART206 Painting I (3 credits)
A studio course that includes instruction and experimentation ART291 Special Topics in Art (2 credits)
in various stylistic approaches to oil painting. The emphasis of Students will study a topic of special interest under the
the course is the development of painting skills and a creative supervision of a College faculty member.
understanding of color and composition. The history of Instructional Hours: 2
painting, individual painters, and concepts of art are studied. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 2
Laboratory Hours: 2 ART292-299 Special Topics in Art (3 credits)
Prerequisite: None Students will study a topic of special interest under the
supervision of a College faculty member.
ART207 Ceramics I (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 2
A studio course that explores the possibilities of the materials Laboratory Hours: 2
and methods of ceramics for the production of functional and Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
nonfunctional pottery and sculpture. The emphasis of the

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BIO130 Principles of Nutrition (3 credits)
BIOLOGY This course is designed to develop an understanding of the
essentials of nutrition in regard to general health, prevention
BIO101 General Biology I (4 credits) of disease, and the functions of nutrients in body building.
The first course of a two-course sequence in basic biology. Emphasis will be placed on nutritional requirements for
This course covers the scientific method, cell biology, individuals in different stages of development, proper food
biochemistry, photosynthesis and respiration, genetics, selection, preparation, and specific nutritional problems of
evolutionary theory, and an introduction to the classification our times.
of organisms. It is strongly suggested that students have a Instructional Hours: 3
solid background in high school biology, or have taken Prerequisite: ENG092c
BIO104.
Instructional Hours: 3 BIO141 General Microbiology (4 credits)
Laboratory Hours: 2 An introductory course in basic microbiology with selected
Prerequisite: ENG092c applied techniques in the areas of culture, identification,
limited physiology of normal flora and well-known pathogens.
BIO102 General Biology II (4 credits) Host responses to disease, organism transmission, and the
The second course of a two-course sequence in basic biology relationship of organisms to man, animals, and environment
for majors. This course covers the classification, structures, will be examined.
and function of the kingdoms of life (bacteria, protist, fungi, Instructional Hours: 3
plants, and animals) with emphasis placed on the human Laboratory Hours: 3
body systems. Prerequisite: BIO101/104; ENG092c or Permission of
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructor
Laboratory Hours: 2
Prerequisite: BIO101/104 or Permission of Instructor BIO150 General Ecology (3 credits)
Basic principles of ecology. Interrelationships between
BIO103 Medical Terminology (3 credits) animals and plants and their natural environments. Special
A course designed to provide a clear understanding of emphasis is placed on the structure and composition of
medical terms with emphasis on building a professional terrestrial and aquatic communities and population
vocabulary required of the beginning medical office worker. dynamics. The course is designed to provide the basic
Lab exercises will emphasize the study of body systems. knowledge necessary for further studies in Wildlife
Instructional Hours: 3 Management.
Prerequisite: LGA091 Instructional Hours: 2
Laboratory Hours: 4
BIO104 Principles of Biology (4 credits) Prerequisite: BIO101/104c
A course designed to acquaint non-biology students with the
general aspects of biology. Topics covered include BIO200 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 credits)
biochemistry, cytology, physiology, genetics, ecology, relation A study of human structure and function with major
to both plants and animals. Special emphasis is placed on emphasis on the basis of structure and function, body
human biology. Laboratory exercises demonstrate basic organization, tissues, body fluids and their regulation, and
biological principles. This course is not open to students who selected systems, including the integumentary, articular,
have completed BIO101 and/or BIO102. skeletal, muscular, and circulatory.
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructional Hours: 3
Laboratory Hours: 2 Laboratory Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG092c Prerequisite: BIO101 or 104, ENG092 or Permission of
Instructor
BIO110 Natural History (4 credits)
A course in the basic principles of natural history including BIO201 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 credits)
ecosystem structure and function, plant and animal Second course in a sequence examining the structure and
identification, and geology. Field trips to local ecosystems function of the circulatory, reproductive, urinary, digestive
exemplify those principles. endocrine systems, nervous systems and the special senses.
Instructional Hours: 2 This course will emphasize normal human anatomy and
Laboratory Hours: 4 physiology and common pathologic conditions.
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c Instructional Hours: 3
Laboratory Hours: 3
BIO120 Dendrology (3 credits) Prerequisite: BIO200 or Permission of Instructor
Classification, distribution, and identification of gymnosperm
and angiosperm trees. Laboratory emphasis is placed on the BIO210 Plant Systematics (4 credits)
use of dichotomous keys on leaves and twigs for summer and Classification, identification, and ecology of local vascular
winter identification of timber trees. plants. Laboratory topics include the use of dichotomous
Laboratory Hours: 6 keys, identification, collection, and preservation of plant
Prerequisite: None specimens.
Instructional Hours: 3
Laboratory Hours: 2

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Prerequisite: BIO120 or Permission of Instructor BUS105 Personal Finance (1 credit)
Practical guidance in analyzing and making personal financial
BIO222 Herpetology (3 credits)
decisions. Areas covered will include budgeting, credit,
A course covering the identification, classification, biology,
savings, investments, and personal insurance.
habitat requirements, and conservation of amphibians and
Instructional Hours: 1
reptiles. Species found in the central Appalachian/mid-
Prerequisite: LGA091, MAT095
Atlantic region are emphasized.
Instructional Hours: 2 BUS150 Personal and Consumer Finance (3 credits)
Laboratory Hours: 3 This course examines technology and its impact, real-world
Prerequisite: NRW181 or Permission of Instructor decision making, and provides the student with a strong
foundation for current and future personal economic
BIO250 Neotropical Natural History (3 credits) activities.
A field course in the basic principles and methodologies of Instructional Hours: 3
natural history studies in a tropical environment. Topics Prerequisite: LGA091; MAT095
include climates and ecosystems, rainforest structure and
diversity, evolutionary patterns, coevolutionary complexities BUS160 Introduction to Small Business (3 credits)
and the ecology of fruit, the neotropical pharmacy, land use The organization and operation of small enterprises in
in the neotropics, savannas and dry forest, mangroves and retailing, wholesaling, manufacturing and service trades.
coral reefs, and deforestation and conservation of Deals with practical, everyday problems of an independent
biodiversity. Field and lab activities will focus on amphibians, entrepreneur.
reptiles, birds and mammals. Students will study the Instructional Hours: 3
taxonomy and ecology of each of these faunal groups and will Prerequisite: BUS101
develop skills in locating, observing, handling, and field
BUS170 Introduction to Management (3 credits)
identification of common neotropical species.
This course examines in depth the principles and
Instructional Hours: 2
responsibilities of managers. Theories of management as well
Laboratory Hours: 2
as practical applications of management techniques are
Prerequisite: ENG101/103; Permission of Instructor
emphasized.
BIO290 Special Problems in Biology (1 credit) Instructional Hours: 3
Designed to permit a student to undertake special individual Prerequisite: BUS101, ENG101/103/111c
work in a biological science area. Study projects are under the
BUS201 Principles of Marketing (3 credits)
direct supervision of the instructor.
An analysis of the principles of marketing and emphasizing
Instructional Hours: Variable
managerial efficiency in the marketing process. The student is
Prerequisite: BIO101/102 and Permission of Instructor
encouraged to apply analysis to marketing problems.
BIO291 Special Problems in Biology (2 credits) Instructional Hours: 3
Designed to permit a student to undertake special individual Prerequisite: BUS101, ENG101/103/111c
work in a biological science area. Study projects are under the
BUS203 Business Law (3 credits)
direct supervision of the instructor.
Basic principles and application of business law in society.
Instructional Hours: Variable
Topics include introduction to law, court procedure,
Prerequisite: BIO101/102 and Permission of Instructor
contracts, sales, commercial paper, real and personal
BIO292-299 Special Problems in Biology (3 credits) property, agency partnerships, corporations and related
Designed to permit a student to undertake special individual areas.
work in a biological science area. Study projects are under the Instructional Hours: 3
direct supervision of the instructor. Prerequisite: BUS101c, ENG101/103/111c
Instructional Hours: Variable
BUS214 Introduction to Business Ethics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: BIO101/102 and Permission of Instructor
This course will explore such problem areas as the morality of
capitalism, the social responsibility of business, the concept
of corporate responsibility, business and the environment,
BUSINESS the rights and responsibilities of employees, whistle blowing,
the ethics of advertising, and ethics in multinational
BUS101 Introduction to Business (3 credits) corporations. Interesting current events in the news relating
An introductory course that surveys the nature of business, to ethical business decision-making will be addressed.
its opportunities, and its environment. Topics covered include Instructional Hours: 3
various types of ownership, organization, management, Prerequisite: BUS101
marketing, human resources, accounting, and finance.
Instructional Hours: 3 BUS225 Intro. to Financial Management (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LGA091, MAT095c This course is designed to give students a background in the
field of financial management. Topics studied will include
financial statements and analysis, cash flow and financial
planning, cost of capital, stock valuation, liabilities
management, and dividend policy.

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Instructional Hours: 3 BUS294 Field Experience in Business (3 credits)
Prerequisite: BUS101; ACC211/PI Students are involved in a field experience related to
business. Career-related activities are supervised within the
BUS230 Human Resource Management (3 credits)
participating organization. Students record their activities,
This course will give an overview of the practical and
projects, and assignments for discussion and evaluation.
theoretical considerations concerning the management of
Emphasis will be given to defining an appropriate internship
personnel. Covers all aspects of staffing including recruiting,
site, resume development, interviewing, and gaining job
interviewing, selection, and placement. This course will
experience to bolster the learner’s ability for post graduation
examine a human resource manager’s role regarding training
employment.
and development, performance appraisal, labor relations and
Instructional Hours: 3
compensation. Also includes laws affecting employee rights
Prerequisite: Minimum 30 credit hours, 12 of which in
and management responsibility (Americans with Disabilities
discipline
Act, Civil Rights Act, Equal Pay Act, and Sexual Harassment).
Preferably a student will have completed or be enrolled in:
Instructional Hours: 3
ACC211, ACC213, BUS101, BUS170, BUS201, BUS203, and
Prerequisite: BUS101; ENG101/103
ECN104.
BUS282 Practicum in Business (3 credits) BUS292-299 Special Topics in Business (3 credits)
Students are involved in a field experience related to
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
business. Career-related activities are supervised within the
supervision of a College faculty member.
participating organization. Students record their activities,
Instructional Hours: 3
projects, and assignments for discussion and evaluation.
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Students complete a 90-hour (minimum) internship under the
guidance of a business professional.
Laboratory Hours: 6.5 CHEMISTRY
Prerequisite: BUS101, 170c, 201c, 203c; ACC211, 213c
BUS285 Business Development Project (3 credits) CHE100 Introduction to College Chemistry (4 credits)
This is the capstone course in the Associate in Applied Science An introductory course in the fundamentals of chemistry.
(A.A.S.) In the business Management degree program. This Some topics to be included are atomic theory, bonding,
course emphasizes the development of strategy formulation periodicity, stoichiometry, solutions, ionizations, acids-bases,
and policy development as it relates to the operation of a and equilibrium. Also, selected topics will be chosen from
business. The focus of the course is the analysis of business organic and biochemistry.
and industry problems utilizing a computer simulation. Instructional Hours: 3
Students are given practice in analyzing companies, Laboratory Hours: 2
discovering problems and developing solutions in the areas of Prerequisite: ENG092c; MAT098c
marketing, research and development (R&D), production,
finance and total quality management (TQM). CHE101 General Chemistry I (4 credits)
Instructional Hours: 3 A course intended for students whose curricula require a year
Prerequisite: 30 hours in program of which 12 hours in or more of chemistry. The general theories and principles of
Business chemistry are introduced and emphasized in the lecture and
Consult with Advisor. reinforced in the laboratory work. Some topics included are
atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical
BUS289 Entrepreneurship (3 credits) bonding and structure, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular
This course is intended to provide understanding of the theory, solution chemistry, and redox reactions.
complexities of launching a new business. Topics for Instructional Hours: 3
investigation include developing a business plan, identifying Laboratory Hours: 3
and marketing to potential customers, financial planning, and Prerequisite: ENG092; MAT105c
legal risks and benefits.
Instructional Hours: 3 CHE102 General Chemistry II (4 credits)
A continuation of CHE 101 with topics that include
BUS290 Special Topics in Business (1 credit) equilibrium, kinetics, electrochemistry, coordination
Students will study a topic of special interest under the chemistry, descriptive chemistry, thermochemistry, and
supervision of a College faculty member. organic chemistry.
Instructional Hours: 1 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor Laboratory Hours: 3
Prerequisite: CHE101
BUS291 Special Topics in Business (2 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

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lower, side, right and left hand turns) and convex mirrors will
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE TRANSPORTATION be covered. Students will be shown the following procedures
SPECIALIST on the driving range: off-set alley, sight-side parallel parking,
blind-side parallel parking, along with up-shifting and
downshifting. Students will also refine their skills learned in
CVS101 Introduction to Commercial Vehicle prior courses.
Transportation (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 15
Career opportunities in the profession will be explored. The Prerequisite: CVS101, 102, and 103
physical, mental and psychological challenges of the career
will be discussed. The basic principles and practices of the CVS105 Commercial Vehicle Driving II (3 credits)
commercial vehicle transportation industry are introduced to Students will improve skills learned in CVS 104 and advance
students. Students will study state laws and regulations to more complex maneuvering skills, such as straight line
governing safety in the commercial transportation industry. backing, serpentine backing, parking, and docking. Loading,
The various types of tractors, trailers and other specialized securing, and unloading cargo will also be emphasized. In
rigs will be examined and discussed. The unique features and addition, students will be introduced to road skills. Topics to
driving challenges associated with each type of commercial be covered include: proper lane positioning, up-shifting and
vehicle will be reviewed. Students will be shown the following downshifting, building torque to climb hills, keeping engine in
procedures on the driving range: introduction to pre-trip proper operating range, use of retarders to descend hills
inspection, coupling and uncoupling a tractor and trailer, safely, using service brakes to achieve maximum stopping
proper use of mirrors, putting the vehicle in motion, proper capacity, operating vehicles in different terrain, and
braking practices along with completing a visual search and explaining road conditions for maximum safety. Students will
hazard perception. begin over-the-road driving along with refining their skills
Instructional Hours: 9 learned in prior courses.
Prerequisite: None Instructional Hours: 18
Prerequisite: CVS101, 102, 103, and 104
CVS102 Operation of The Commercial Transportation CVS106 Management Skills (1 credit)
Vehicle (4 credits) This course will cover the management of essential planning,
Students will study basic functions and operations of the documentation, and response requirements by the
commercial transportation vehicle, including the dashboard commercial vehicle specialist. Topics will include vehicle
and gauges, transmission, air systems and air brakes, engines, inspection, cargo documentation, the log book, map reading,
tires, steering apparatus, suspension components, and handling of hazardous materials, and response to vehicular
Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. In addition, accidents and fires. In addition, railroad crossing, proper
load securement, proper loading and unloading, as well as intersection crossing, and following distance assured for safe
types of dunnage used to secure loads will be discussed along stopping of a loaded vehicle will be covered. Students will
with pre-trip inspections, cargo documentation, log books refine their skills by reviewing the demonstrating pre-trip
and regulations, map reading, hazardous materials, accidents inspection, proficiency on the range doing various
and fires. Students will be shown the following procedures on maneuvers, and over-the-road driving.
the driving range: straight line backing, serpentine backing, Instructional Hours: 3
and proper use of mirrors for turning while backing. Students Prerequisite: CVS101, 102, 103, 104, and 105
will also refine their skills learned in the prior course.
Instructional Hours: 15 CVS107 Certification Preparation (1 credit)
Prerequisite: CVS101 In preparation for the State driving examination for the CDL,
Class A license by the various State Motor Vehicle
CVS103 Commercial Vehicles and Specialized Administrations, this course will provide the student with a
Equipment (2 credits) review of pertinent laws, regulations and concepts as well as
The various types of tractors, trailers, and other specialized practice related to performing the required driving skills.
rigs will be examined in this course. Students will study the Students will refine their skills by reviewing and
unique features and driving challenges associated with each demonstrating pre-trip inspection, proficiency on the range
type of commercial vehicle. In addition, regulations and doing various maneuvers, and over-the-road driving.
inspections for DOT regarding types of trailers including Instructional Hours: 4
tankers, food stuff trailers, and pressurized tankers will be Prerequisite: CVS101, 102, 103, 104, 105, and 106
covered. Students will be shown the following procedures on
the driving range: stop line and 45-degree docking. Students
will also refine their skills learned in prior courses. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Instructional Hours: 6
Prerequisite: CVS101 and 102
CAP119 Intro. to Computer-Aided Drafting (3 credits)
CVS104 Commercial Vehicle Driving I (2 credits) This course is designed to introduce students to Computer
Students will be introduced to the fundamental skills of Aided Drafting. Basic CAD operations will be covered, along
putting the vehicle in motion and implementing safe driving with terminology and applications. AutoCAD software will be
techniques in backing, coupling and uncoupling, and braking. used.
In addition, cornering techniques, clearances (both upper and Instructional Hours: 2

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Laboratory Hours: 2 CAP224 Word Processing Applications: MS Word for
Prerequisite: CSC105 or Permission of Instructor Microsoft Office Specialist Certification (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to word processing using
CAP122 Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting (3 credits)
Microsoft Windows interface with Word. Students will create,
A continuation of CA 119, with emphasis on increasing the
edit, and print various types of documents. The basic
student’s ability to work with more advanced computer-aided
Microsoft Word features will be explored.
drafting operations. AutoCAD software will be used.
Instructional Hours: 3
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: CSC105 or Permission of Instructor
Laboratory Hours: 2
Prerequisite: CAP119 CAP230 Image Editing: Adobe Photoshop (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with hands-on
CAP183 Computerized Spreadsheets: Microsoft Excel
experience with basic to advanced image editing and
for Microsoft Office Specialist Certification (3 credits)
manipulation. Students will work with the tools used to edit
This course introduces students to the capabilities of the
images in a variety of creative ways. This course prepares the
computerized spreadsheet software, Microsoft Excel for
student for electronic design and exposes them to the
Windows. Specific topics include the worksheet and entering
solutions to digital artistic expression.
data, Auto fill, workbooks, database management, using
Instructional Hours: 3
toolbars, dragging and dropping, view manager, Autosum,
Prerequisite: CSC105 or Permission of Instructor
crosstabs, object linking and embedding, and graphics
components. Students will be able to apply the commands, CAP234 Introduction to Animation (3 credits)
functions, formulas, and techniques to practical business This course is designed to provide students with an
accounting and management problems. This course targets introduction to animation for the web.
certification in computerized spreadsheets using Microsoft Instructional Hours: 3
Excel. The basic features of Microsoft Excel will be explored. Prerequisite: CSC105/PI
This course will help to prepare the student for Microsoft
Office Specialist certification. CAP290 Special Topics in Computer Applications(1 credit)
Instructional Hours: 3 Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Prerequisite: CSC105 or Permission of Instructor supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 1
CAP185 Computerized Database: Microsoft Access for Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Microsoft Office Specialist Certification (3 credits)
This course introduces the student to the capabilities of the CAP291 Special Topics in Computer Applications
computerized database software, Microsoft Access for (2 credits)
Windows platform. Specific topics include creating a new Students will study a topic of special interest under the
database, creating a table, adding additional records, using a supervision of a College faculty member.
form to view data, creating a graph, querying a database, Instructional Hours: 2
sorting data, maintaining a database, searching for records, Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
and creating validation rules. CAP292-299 Special Topics in Computer Applications
Instructional Hours: 3
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: CSC105 or Permission of Instructor
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
CAP196 Computerized Presentations: Power Point for supervision of a College faculty member.
Microsoft Office Specialist Certification (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 3
This course is a course targeting certification in presentation Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
software using Microsoft PowerPoint. Students will learn the
basics of creating computerized presentations. Also included
will be converting existing information into a presentation, COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
embellishing a presentation with text effects, illustrating a
presentation, and communicating with graphs. The basic and CIT201 Web Page Design (3 credits)
advanced features of Microsoft PowerPoint will be explored. This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of
This course will help to prepare the student for Microsoft creating web pages, formatting web pages, enhancing web
Office Specialist certification. pages, and managing entire web sites.
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: CSC105/PI Prerequisite: CSC105 or Permission of Instructor
CAP223 Desktop Publishing (3 credits) CIT230 Security + (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with hands-on Instructor-led course provides students with the knowledge
experience with the basics of desktop publishing. Students and skills to begin supporting network security within an
will work with the tools used to layout pages for publications. organization.
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: CSC105/PI Prerequisite: None

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CIT248 Visual Basic Programming (3 credits) electronic evidence came into being. The course will also
Course description is forthcoming. acquaint students with legal concerns and compare public
and private sector cases.
CIT252 Telecommuting (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 3
This course will examine the basics of Telecommuting.
Telecommuting provides individuals with the opportunity to CIT283 Internet Security (3 credits)
work at home for companies throughout the United States. This course is designed to educate students in the
The course will examine the basics of how to get reliable, technologies, terms, and processes related to Internet
secure access to your companies network and the Internet. security. The course will teach students about the concepts
Students will learn how to select the best telecommuting and techniques related to general security, network security,
options and how to make connections with companies that operating system security, and methods for testing security.
have telecommuting opportunities. Both UNIX and Microsoft Windows operating systems will be
Instructional Hours: 3 discussed. This course will prepare students for the CIW
Prerequisite: CSC105 Security Professional exam.
Instructional Hours: 3
CIT264 Computer Repair Technician A+ (6 credits)
This course teaches the skills necessary for someone to MCS101 Updating Support Skills From MS Windows
analyze computer problems so as to determine whether they NT 4.0 To Windows 2000 (2.5 credits)
are hardware or software related. Students will be able to The goal of this course is to provide Microsoft Windows NT
completely disassemble any computer for rebuild, part 4.0 support professionals with the knowledge and skills
replacement or upgrade. Additionally, students will learn how necessary to support Microsoft Windows 2000-based
to design, monitor and control and company’s computer networks. This is a performance-based course, designed upon
maintenance system and provide recommendations on the job-related tasks a support professional must perform
compatible replacement hardware and software additions. using new or modified features in the Windows 2000
Prerequisite: High School Dual Enrolled Program/Permission operating system.
of Instructor Instructional Hours: 7
Prerequisite: Students must be a current Microsoft Certified
CIT280 Security Policy and Procedures (3 credits) Sys
This course will prepare students for their future role as
business decision-makers. The course will examine MCS102 Designing a MS Windows 2000 Directory
information security within a real-world context by including Services Infrastructure (1.5 credits)
examples of issues faced by today’s professionals. The course This course provides students with the knowledge and skills
addresses the managerial and technical aspects of necessary to design a Microsoft Windows 2000 directory
information security for the future systems security decision services infrastructure in an enterprise network.
maker. The course will examine examples of information Instructional Hours: 7
security issues, tools, and practices implemented in today’s Prerequisite: Students must be a current Microsoft Certified
businesses. Included will be exercises and cases to reinforce Sys
the concepts and techniques being studied. The course will
MCS103 MS Windows 2000 Network and Operating
present a balance of managerial and technical aspects of the
discipline and address the knowledge areas of the Certified
System Essentials (1.5 credits)
Information Systems Security Professional Certification. This course is to provide individuals who are new to Microsoft
Instructional Hours: 3 Windows 2000 with the knowledge necessary to understand
and identify the tasks involved in supporting Windows 2000
CIT281 Disaster Recovery (3 credits) networks. This is an introductory course designed to provide
This course presents methods to identify vulnerabilities and an overview of networking concepts and how they are
take appropriate countermeasures to prevent and mitigate implemented in Windows 2000.
failure risks for an organization. The course will provide the Instructional Hours: 7
networking professional with a foundation in disaster Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
recovery principles including preparation of a disaster
recovery plan, assessment of risks in the enterprise,
MCS104 Supporting Microsoft Windows 2000
development of policies and procedures, understanding the Professional and Server (2.5 credits)
roles and relationships of various members of an This course provides students with the knowledge and skills
organization, implementing the plan, testing and rehearsing necessary to install and configure Microsoft Windows 2000
the plan, and actually recovering from a disaster. Professional on stand-alone computers and on client
Instructional Hours: 3 computers that are part of a workgroup or a domain. In
addition, the course provides the skills and knowledge
CIT282 Computer Forensics (3 credits) necessary to install and configure Windows 2000 Server to
This course will present methods to properly conduct a create file, print, and Terminal servers.
computer forensics investigation beginning with a discussion Instructional Hours: 7
of ethics and whole mapping to the objectives of the Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
International Association of Computer Investigation
Specialists (IACIS) certification. Students will be introduced to
the history of computer forensics and how the use of

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MCS105 Supporting a Microsoft Windows 2000 core requirement on the new MCSE track for Windows Server
Network Infrastructure (2.5 credits) 2003.
This course is for new-to-product support professionals who Instructional Hours: 7
will be responsible for installing, configuring, managing, and Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
supporting a network infrastructure that uses the Microsoft MCS113 Managing A Microsoft Windows Server 2003
Windows 2000 Server products.
Environment (2.5 credits)
Instructional Hours: 7
Students will be introduced to Microsoft Windows Server
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
2003 through lectures, demon-strations, discussions, and
MCS106 Implementing and Administering MS hands-on labs. Windows Server 2003 course shows you how
Windows 2000 Directory (2.5 credits) to set up and support the Windows Server 2003 operating
This course is designed to provide students with the system. As students build these real-world system support
knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, and skills, they are also preparing for MCP Exam 70-290, a core
administer Microsoft Windows 2000 Active Directory requirement on the new MCSA/MCSE tracks for Windows
services. The course also focuses on implementing Group Server 2003.
Policy and understanding the Group Policy tasks required to Instructional Hours: 7
centrally manage users and computers. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 7 MCS114 Managing a Microsoft Windows Network
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Environment (2.5 credits)
MCS109 Designing A Microsoft Windows 2000 This course teaches students, through lectures, discussions,
Migration Strategy (1 credit) demonstrations, and lab exercises, the skills and knowledge
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to administer and support a Microsoft Windows
necessary to select and design a strategy to migrate from a Server 2003 network and to prepare for Microsoft Certified
Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 directory services Systems Administrator (MCSA/MCSE) certification. It is a
infrastructure to a Microsoft Windows 2000 Active Directory comprehensive course that begins with an introduction to the
service by describing the planning processes and implications Windows Server 2003 networking architecture and covers a
involved. broad spectrum of essential topics. This course provides
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor students with the skills necessary to complete Exam No. 70-
291, one of the Core requirements of the new Windows
MCS110 Designing A Microsoft Windows 2000 Server 2003 MCSA/MCSE certification.
Networking Services Infrastructure (2 credits) Instructional Hours: 7
This course provides senior support professionals with the Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
information and skills needed to create a networking services
infrastructure design that supports the required network MCS115 Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network
applications. Each module provides a solution based on the Infrastructure (2.5 credits)
needs of the organization. The Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor course delivers the extensive technical knowledge required to
provide secure and reliable networking services to your
MCS111 Managing a Microsoft Windows 2000 organization. Learn how to install, manage, and troubleshoot
Network Environment (2.5 credits) the network protocols and services in the Windows Server
The goal of this course is to provide knowledge required by 2003 operating system. Our Windows Server 2003 Network
System Administrators, Network Administrators, and IT Infrastructure course provides students with the skills
professionals who implement, manage, and troubleshoot necessary to complete Exam No. 70-293, one of the Core
existing network and server environments based on the requirements of the new Windows Server 2003 MCSA/MCSE
Microsoft Windows 2000 platform. The course focuses on certification.
developing the skills for performing desktop and server Instructional Hours: 7
installation and configuration tasks, as well as network and Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
operating system management tasks in a Microsoft Windows
environment. MCS116 Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active
Instructional Hours: 7 Directory Services (2.5 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor This course will introduce you to Microsoft Windows Server
2003 Active Directory and prepare you to plan, configure, and
MCS112 Microsoft Windows XP Professional(2.5 administer your Active Directory infrastructure. Microsoft’s
credits) Active Directory service, a key component of the Windows
This course will introduce students to Microsoft Windows XP Server 2003 operating system, automatically manages
Professional through lectures, demonstrations, discussions, Windows users, computers, applications, and network
and hands-on lab exercises. Students work through the lesson resources to keep your company’s directories in sync. As
modules and hands-on labs for practical experience installing, students build these real-world system support skills, they are
administering, and troubleshooting this next-generation also preparing for MCP Exam 70-294, a core requirement on
desktop environment. As you build these real-world system the MCSE track for Windows Server 2003.
support skills, you’re also preparing for MCP Exam 70-270, a Instructional Hours: 7

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Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor structures and file processing concepts. Major emphasis is
given to computer programming problem analysis and
MCS117 Designing a MS Windows Server 2003 Active planning with structured flowcharting techniques. The
Directory and Network Infrastructure (1.5 credits) student will also be exposed to several common
This course will teach students, through lectures, discussions, programming languages.
paper exercises, and projects, how to design a Microsoft Instructional Hours: 4
Windows Server 2003 Directory Services Infrastructure.
Students will learn how to assemble a design team and how CSC180 Introduction to Geographic Information
to analyze current business and technical environments. They Systems (2 credits)
will also learn that one of the best ways to gather information Geographic Information Systems (GIS) combines spatial data
is to develop worksheets that outline what they need to (maps) with tabular data (databases) for the purpose of
know about each environment. The course is appropriate for analyzing the environment. This course will introduce
students who want to become a network designer or who students to the principles and practice of GIS while providing
plan to take the MCP Exam 70-297: Designing a Microsoft experience using ArcView and the ArcView extension Spatial
Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Services Analyst. This course will develop both a theoretical
Infrastructure. understanding of GIS and experience in accessing GIS data
Instructional Hours: 7 sets. Students will be exposed to raster and vector GIS.
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor Instructional Hours: 2
Laboratory Hours: 2
MCS118 Designing Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Prerequisite: MAT105
Network Security (2.5 credits)
This course will teach students how to design security for a CSC290 Special Topics in Computer Science (1 credit)
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 network through lectures, Students will study a topic of special interest under the
discussions, paper exercises, and lab projects. Students will supervision of a College faculty member.
learn how to assemble a design team and how to analyze Instructional Hours: 1
current business and technical environments. After Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
completing the business and technical analyses, the students
CSC291 Special Topics in Computer Science (2 credits)
will learn how to design a security solution, a Public Key
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Infrastructure (PKI), and Windows Server 2003 network
supervision of a College faculty member.
services security. The course prepares the student for exam
Instructional Hours: 2
70-298, one of the Core-Elective exams offered by Microsoft
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
for Windows Server 2003 MCSE certification.
Instructional Hours: 7 CSC292-299 Special Topics in Computer Science(3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor Students will study a topic of special interest under the
supervision of a College faculty member.
MCS125 Networking Fundamentals (6 credits)
Instructional Hours: 3
This course teaches students the fundamentals and basics of
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
networking. Through hands-on training, students learn the
vendor-independent networking skills and concepts that
affect all aspects of networking, such as installing and EARTH SCIENCE
configuring the TCP/IP client. The course helps prepare
students for CompTIA’s Network+ Examination.
Instructional Hours: 6
ESC101 Physical Geology (4 credits)
A study of the physical and structural features of the earth
Prerequisite: CIT 264 or Permission of Instructor
and of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that
produced them. Topics included are earth materials, erosion,
COMPUTER SCIENCE mountain building, origin of the earth, and some recent
geological theories. Interpretation of geologic features and
identification of common rocks and minerals will be
CSC105 Introduction to Computers (3 credits) emphasized in the laboratory.
This introductory course is designed to familiarize students Instructional Hours: 3
with the general concepts of computers and information Laboratory Hours: 2
sciences. The course will introduce students to the features Prerequisite: ENG092c
and uses of common applications software such as word
processing, spreadsheet, database, and operating systems ESC121 Physical Geography (4 credits)
such as Windows. Students will also learn about the various This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and
hardware components and basic computer terminology. principles of physical geography. Topics include earth-sun
Instructional Hours: 3 relations, map reading and interpretation, elements of
weather, climate and climatic regions, fundamental geologic
CSC123 Programming Logic (3 credits) processes, land forms, soils, and biogeography.
This is the first course in the study of computer programming Instructional Hours: 3
languages. Topics covered will include details of computer Laboratory Hours: 2
logic, data storage concepts, computer arithmetic, control Prerequisite: ENG092c; MAT095

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ESC210 Soils (3 credits) ECN202 Principles of Economics II (MICRO) (3 credits)
An introduction to the physical and chemical properties of An introduction to the analysis of price theory, cost and
soils, their classification and identification, and their production, market structure, consumer behavior, firm
important management characteristics. Discussion and decision making, and government regulation. International
investigation of methods for improving the chemical, physical trade and economic development concepts found under
and biological characteristics of soils to give better plant various market conditions are covered.
growth are provided. Instructional Hours: 3
Instructional Hours: 2 Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
Laboratory Hours: 2
Prerequisite: ENT201c or Permission of Instructor ECN290 Special Topics in Economics (1 credit)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
ESC265 Soil and Water Conservation (4 credits) supervision of a College faculty member.
This course addresses the principles of meterology and Instructional Hours: 1
hydrology affecting soil and water conservation practices and Prerequisite: ECN201
the fundamentals of water resources management. The
planning, design, and application of various soil and water ECN291 Special Topics in Economics (2 credits)
conservation measures will be covered, with particular Students will study a topic of special interest under the
emphasis given to sediment and erosion control practices. supervision of a College faculty member.
Wetlands identification and delineation will also be covered. Instructional Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 2 Prerequisite: ECN201
Laboratory Hours: 4 ECN292-299 Special Topics in Economics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ESC210; Permission of Instructor Students will study a topic of special interest under the
ESC290 Special Topics in Earth Science (1 credit) supervision of a College faculty member.
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Instructional Hours: 3
supervision of a College faculty member. Prerequisite: ECN201
Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
EDUCATION
ESC291 Special Topics in Earth Science (2 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the EDU101 Early Childhood Education I (3 credits)
supervision of a College faculty member. This course presents an introduction to the profession of
Instructional Hours: 2 early childhood education. Historic, theoretical, and
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor philosophical considerations are examined as well as early
childhood growth and development. Curriculum in early
childhood programs is studied, and the role of the family and
ESC292-299 Special Topics in Earth Science (3 credits) community is discussed.
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Instructional Hours: 3
supervision of a College faculty member. Prerequisite: ENG092c
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor EDU102 Early Childhood Education II (3 credits)
Early Childhood II is designed to provide students with the
knowledge, skills, and disposition to effectively assess needs
ECONOMICS as well as to establish and maintain instructional
environments appropriate for infant, toddler, preschool, and
primary school aged children. Practical work will include
ECN104 Introduction to Economics (3 credits) creating materials and practicing methods for organizing
This is a survey course covering basic economic concepts. physically and mentally healthy classroom settings. Students
Price, market structure, the business enterprise, labor, will also study the influences on the development and
monetary systems and national income are some of the learning of young children. This course encourages reflection
topics covered. The course will include basic principles of about, as well as dedication and advocacy for young children.
both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Instructional Hours: 3
Instructional Hours: 3 Prerequisite: EDU101
Prerequisite: MAT095, ENG092c
EDU104 Movement Experiences with Children(3 credits)
ECN201 Principles of Economics I (MACRO) (3 credits) This course will survey the basic aspects of movement
An introduction to the analysis of economic principles and education focusing on the structure and foundation
problems, prices, the determination and distribution of knowledge of movement, the identification of the process of
income, business organization, money and banking, public becoming physically educated. Emphasis will be on
finance, international trade, business cycles, government movement experiences at the preschool and elementary
economic policies, and various macroeconomic problems. school level.
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c, MAT098 Prerequisite: ENG092c

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EDU105 Career Analysis in Education (1 credit) Instructional Hours: 3
This course provides a preliminary self-assessment of how the Prerequisite: ENG092c
students’ interests and abilities match the demands of the
EDU270 Process and Acquisition of Reading (3 credits)
education profession. Students will be introduced to an
The process of language development, including the impact
analysis of education and teachers’ roles in both schools and
of phonetic awareness, and how the brain responds to
the community.
reading acquisition is studied. Practical applications of
Instructional Hours: 1
research on language acquisition and use are discussed.
Prerequisite: None
Understanding the role of experiential background, prior
EDU190 Special Topics in Education: Creative knowledge, and motivation to beginning readers is
Storytelling (1 credit) emphasized.
A course designed for educators, but open to others who Instructional Hours: 3
wish to develop their presentations involving visual, auditory Prerequisite: None
and kinesthetic strategies. Students will develop creative EDU280 Seminar and Practicum in Education(3 credits)
storytelling skills to improve their presentation and writing This course provides the students with a 90 hour field
skills. experience in an educational agency related to the student’s
Instructional Hours: 1 vocational goals. Activities include supervised practice in the
Prerequisite: None field and lecture-seminar discussions. Written reports of the
student’s training experience are prepared for class
EDU193 Creative Storytelling (3 credits)
discussion. (CR/NC grade)
A course designed for educators, but open to others who
Prerequisite: 15 credit hours in Human Services,
wish to develop their presentations involving visual, auditory
ENG101/103/111
and kinesthetic strategies. Students will develop creative
storytelling skills to improve their presentation and writing EDU293-299 Special Topics in Education (3 credits)
skills. Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Instructional Hours: 3 supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 3
EDU200 Teaching Laboratory (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Students develop teaching activities which are video-taped
and critiqued in preparation for entry into baccalaureate
Teacher Education programs.
Laboratory Hours: 14
ENGLISH
Prerequisite: PSY211
P RE -C OLLEGE S EQUENCE - T HESE COURSES ARE NOT
EDU201 Foundations of Education (3 credits) TRANSFERABLE AND DO NOT COUNT TOWARD GRADUATION
This course surveys the field of Education and the profession REQUIREMENTS .
of teaching. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the
structure of the educational system including governance,
finances, curriculum and instruction. Contemporary issues in ENG090 Basic Writing I (3 credits)
education will be discussed. Students will be required to do a This course focuses on teaching students to write well-
classroom project in a public school classroom. constructed sentences leading to effective topic sentences
Instructional Hours: 3 and well-developed paragraphs. This course is not
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111 transferable and does not count towards graduation
requirements.
EDU210 Intro to the Exceptional Individual (3 credits)
Instructional Hours: 3
The etiology, diagnosis, physical, mental, emotional and
Prerequisite: College Placement Indicator
social characteristics of exceptional individuals are studied in
this course. Topics included in this course are mental ENG091 Basic Writing II (3 credits)
retardation, learning disabilities, orthopedic handicaps, This course is a paragraph and essay writing course, especially
emotional and behavior disorders, speech and emphasizing short essay organization and development.
communication disorders, and giftedness. This course will Methods of developing essays, from narrating an event to
stress the educational needs of exceptional individuals arguing for or against a particular point of view, are explored.
including preventive and remedial education. Common errors in grammar and mechanics are also covered
Instructional Hours: 3 at length. This course is not transferable and does not count
Prerequisite: ENG092 towards graduation requirements.
Instructional Hours: 3
EDU220 Children’s Literature (3 credits)
Prerequisite: College Placement Indicator
A survey of the history of varied types of children’s literature
and criteria for evaluating them. The course presents ENG092 Preparation for College Writing (3 credits)
techniques for determining and guiding children’s reading English 92 coffers students further instruction in developing,
interests toward an appreciation of good literature. Students revising, and polishing multi-paragraph essays; it particularly
read anthologies and outstanding children’s books, as well as emphasizes essay organization, development, and focus in
sources of literary criticism. the context of subject, audience, and purpose. Methods of

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developing essays, from narrating an event to arguing for or ENG104 Argumentation and Persuasive Research
against a particular point of view, are explored. Integrated Writing (3 credits)
language arts (i.e., the integration of reading and writing) is A course designed to prepare students for advanced
emphasized as students work towards implementing basic composition at transfer institutions. Students will write and
research and demonstrating information literacy in extensively revise several essays incorporating multiple print
assignments. Common errors in grammar and mechanics are and non-print sources to substantiate arguable thesis
also covered at length as are methods for achieving sentence statements. The course includes an introduction to classical
variety and diverse writing styles dependent upon subject, rhetoric and arguing to inquire, to convince, to persuade, and
audience, and purpose. to negotiate. Research skills, organization, and style are
Instructional Hours: 3 emphasized.
Prerequisite: ES1, RS1 or College Placement Indicator Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111 with a grade of C- or better
C OLLEGE -L EVEL S EQUENCE
ENG133 Images of Women in Literature (3 credits)
ENG101 Composition I -- Expository Writing (3 credits) A course that considers images of women in literature has
A course in writing expository and research-based essays that both reflected them and helped to create them. Through an
emphasize the development of clear theses through various historical approach, students will see how women’s role in
rhetorical modes including description, narration, literature has changed as it has in life.
comparison-contrast, analogy, definition, analysis, Instructional Hours: 3
classification, argumentation, and persuasion. Students will Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111
write and extensively revise before submitting for a grade a
minimum of five expository papers, four-to-six typed, double- ENG163 African-American Literature (3 credits)
spaced pages. Additionally, students are strongly encouraged African-American Literature is a survey of nonfiction, fiction,
to visit the Writing Center for help on papers prior to turning poetry, and drama designed to present an insight into the
in work to be graded. As writer voices develop, students use richness of the African-American culture. The course begins
print and non-print sources to help support theses, leading to with a historical overview of African-American literature and
writing adhering to MLA guidelines. All students must earn a presents a variety of selections written by black American
minimal grade of C- in English 101 or repeat the course. authors, covering a wide range of themes.
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ES1, RS1, or College Placement Indicator Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111
ENG102 Composition II -- Introduction to ENG208 Creative Writing (3 credits)
Literature (3 credits) A course in the writing of imaginative literature, particularly
This course emphasizes critical writing about literature, the short story and poetry. It combines lecture, reading, and
including interpretation, analysis, and evaluation, as well as a discussion of professional models of writing with workshop
critical review of issues common to the human experience. sessions in the classrooms.
Students will become familiar with analytical approaches to Instructional Hours: 3
writing about literature and will write a minimum of four Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
essays using multiple print and non-print sources to support
arguable thesis statements. To better understand writer, text,
ENG209 Special Topics in Creative Writing (3 credits)
and audience, students will explore the social, historical, and Special Topics in Creative Writing is designed for students
cultural contexts within which works are created. who desire to perfect their skills and to refine their style in
Instructional Hours: 3 one particular kind of writing: short story, novella, children’s
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111 with C- or better stories, poetry, or magazine articles; it is also designed for a
student who desires to complete a specialized writing project.
ENG103 Technical Writing (3 credits) Students will learn fundamental concepts and techniques of
A course designed to develop practical skills in the writing writing as they work in their chosen genre. Course content
and interpretation of technical reports, memoranda, progress will be determined by the instructor in accordance with group
reports, media charts and graphs, technical journal articles, or individual interests and needs. The course may be offered
and oral presentation of reports. Students will be expected in a traditional classroom format or as an individualized
to complete extended documented reports illustrating program of study.
competency in technical writing and standard English skills. Instructional Hours: 3
Students will write and extensively revise a series of Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
assignments designed to help them achieve proficiency in a
variety of writing skills. Students taking this course to fulfill
ENG210 Fiction Writing (3 credits)
their GER writing requirement must earn a minimal grade of Fiction Writing is directed at writing the short story. The
C- or repeat the course. course combines lectures, workshops, readings and
Instructional Hours: 3 discussions; these activities lead to each student’s producing
Prerequisite: ES1, RS1, or College Placement Indicator two or more viable stories.
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111 or Permission of Instructor

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ENG222 Children’s Literature (3 credits)
A survey of the history of varied types of children’s literature
ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY
and criteria for evaluating them. The course presents
techniques for determining and guiding children’s reading ENT170 Geospatial Data Collection & Analysis(4 credits)
interests toward an appreciation of good literature. Students This course combines material formerly covered in ENT 160,
read anthologies and outstanding children’s books, as well as Surveying and Map Interpretation, with new material relating
sources of literary criticism. to the theory and application of Global Positioning Systems
Instructional Hours: 3 (GPS) technology. The course covers the basic concepts that
Prerequisite: ENG092c are fundamental to the collection and use of any spatial
information: coordinate systems, geodesy, datums, scale, and
ENG250 Survey of World Literature (3 credits) projections; sources and applications of various types of
World Literature (World Masterpieces) is the study of a geospatial information including maps, aerial photographs,
selection of Western literature containing works written and remote sensing images; basic [land] surveying techniques
originally in ancient and modern foreign languages. The including distance measurement, differential and profile
literatures represented include Greek, Latin, Hebrew, leveling, [compass] traversing, and topographic mapping; and
Icelandic, Irish, Norse, French, Italian, German, Spanish, the theory of operation and use of GPS technology for
Russian, Norwegian, and Nigerian. Selections stretch in time surveying, mapping, and navigation.
from 800 BC to the twentieth century. Instructional Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 3 Laboratory Hours: 4
Prerequisite: ENG101; RS1 Prerequisite: MAT105; CSC180c
ENG251 Survey of British Literature (3 credits) ENT201 Chemistry and Quantitative Methods for
A survey of British literature from Beowulf to the present. Agriculture and Natural Resources (2 credits)
Includes major works from the Middle Ages the Sixteenth Taken concurrently with AGM 210 and NRW 270, and as a
Century, the Early Seventeenth Century, the Restoration and prerequisite for ENT 225, this course serves as a lab to help
Eighteenth Century, the Romantic Period, the Victorian Age, students master the essential calculations and chemistry
and the Twentieth Century. principles necessary for successful completion of the
Instructional Hours: 3 Agricultural Management and Natural Resources and Wildlife
Prerequisite: ENG250 Technology programs.
ENG252 Survey of American Literature (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 1
A survey of American literature from the colonial period to Laboratory Hours: 2
the present. Includes major works from Early America, the Prerequisite: AGM210c, NRW270c
Revolution, the Civil War Era, World War I, and World War II. ENT225 Water Quality Assessment (3 credits)
Examines the historical, cultural, economic, political, and A course covering the chemical and biological assessment of
religious events that influenced the development of American water quality. Topics include the physical and chemical
literature. characteristics of water, basic stream and lake biology, the
Instructional Hours: 3 use of water quality testing kits, and rapid biological
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111 assessment techniques. Field experience is stressed.
ENG290 Special Topics in English (1 credit) Instructional Hours: 1
Students will study a topic of special interest under Laboratory Hours: 4
supervision of a College faculty member. Prerequisite: CHE100/ENT201/Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 1 ENT290 Special Topics in Environmental Technology(1 credit)
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111 Students will study a topic of special interest under the
ENG291 Special Topics in English (2 credits) supervision of a College faculty member.
Students will study a topic of special interest under Instructional Hours: 1
supervision of a College faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 2 ENT291 Special Topics in Environmental Technology(2
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111
credits)
ENG292-299 Special Topics in Literature (3 credits) Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Students will study a topic of special interest under supervision of a College faculty member.
supervision of a College faculty member. Instructional Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 3 Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111
ENT292-299 Special Topics in Environmental
Technology (3 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

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GEO291 Special Topics in Geography (2 credits)
FRENCH Students will study a topic of special interest under
supervision of a College faculty member.
FRN101 Elementary French I (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 2
A course designed primarily for rapid oral communication in Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
French. Students will learn to carry on short dialogues with
adequate oral comprehension, and to use bilingual dictionary GEO292 Special Topics in Geography (3 credits)
for vocabulary development and reading comprehension. Students will study a topic of special interest under
Fundamental grammatical constructions and basic verb supervision of a College faculty member.
conjugation will be taught through supplementary written Instructional Hours: 3
exercises. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
HEALTH
FRN102 Elementary French II (3 credits)
A course that continues the study of French vocabulary and HEA151 Personal Health (3 credits)
grammar as it develops fundamental skills of speaking, A basic course designed to study the positive aspects of
reading, and writing. mental and physical health and interpersonal relationships.
Instructional Hours: 3 Emphasis is placed on self evaluation and self actualization.
Prerequisite: FRN101 Topics such as drugs, alcohol, disease, sex education, and
human physiology will be discussed.
Instructional Hours: 3
GEOGRAPHY Prerequisite: ENG092c

GEO201 Cultural Geography (3 credits) HEA290 Special Topics in Health (1 credit)


A study of man’s distribution in regional settings with Students will study a topic of special interest under the
emphasis on interrelationships of cultural diversity, economic supervision of a College faculty member.
development, and patterns of living. Instructional Hours: 1
Instructional Hours: 3 Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Prerequisite: ENG092c
GEO281 Travel Study in Geography (1 credit) HEA291 Special Topics in Health (2 credits)
This course provides students with the opportunity to learn Students will study a topic of special interest under the
about geographical concepts and cultures through travel and supervision of a College faculty member.
experience. Specific course objectives and content are Instructional Hours: 2
coordinated with each travel program. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: N/A HEA292-299 Special Topics in Health (3 credits)
Prerequisite: None Students will study a topic of special interest under the
GEO282 Travel Study in Geography (2 credits) supervision of a College faculty member.
This course provides students with the opportunity to learn Instructional Hours: 3
about geographical concepts and cultures through travel Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
experience. Specific course objectives and content are
coordinated with each travel program.
Instructional Hours: N/A HISTORY
Prerequisite: None
HIS101 History of Western Civilization to 1500 (3
GEO283 Travel Study in Geography (3 credits)
credits)
This course provides students with the opportunity to learn
This is a 3-credit-hour college-level history course. In this
geographical concepts and cultures through travel
course you will be covering the development of Western
experience. Specific course objectives and content are
Society from the beginning of civilization to approximately
coordinated with each travel program.
1550 and the Voyages of Discovery. While the student should
Instructional Hours: N/A
obviosly make note of important factual information, special
Prerequisite: None
emphasis will be on the major “ideas or themes” of western
GEO290 Special Topics in Geography (1 credit) history.
Students will study a topic of special interest under Instructional Hours: 3
supervision of a College faculty member. Prerequisite: ENG092 to have included documented research
Instructional Hours: 1 essay
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
HIS102 History of Western Civilization Since 1500(3 credits)
This is a survey course that highlights the important political,
economic, and social events that have shaped Western

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Civilization from the Age of Constitutionalism and Absolutism HIS292-299 Special Topics in History (3 credits)
to the present. Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Instructional Hours: 3 supervision of a College faculty member.
Prerequisite: ENG092 to have included documented research Instructional Hours: 3
essay Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
HIS105 World Civilizations to The Late 1600s (3 credits)
This course examines the history, customs, and cultures of all HUMANITIES
major world civilizations. Values, discoveries, and
contributions to society will also be explored up to the late
seventeenth century. HUM100 Introduction to Humanities (3 credits)
Instructional Hours: 3 A course that introduces the student to the broad concept of
Prerequisite: ENG092 to have included documented research humanities through experiences in literature, philosophy,
essay music, and art. Works from these disciplines will be studied as
they reflect humanity’s values and attempts to express
HIS106 World Civilizations Since Mid-1600s (3 credits) meaning in a changing world. Elective credit only.
This course examines the history, customs, and cultures of all Instructional Hours: 3
major world civilizations from the mid-1600’s through the Prerequisite: ENG092c
twentieth century. Values, discoveries, and contributions of
both men and women will also be explored. HUM210 Society and The Environment (3 credits)
Instructional Hours: 3 This course focuses on the ethical, moral, social, and
Prerequisite: ENG092 to have included documented research aesthetic issues surrounding the preservation, conservation,
essay and management of the environment. Sources include art,
philosophy, and literature by a variety of figures who have
HIS111 American History to 1865 (3 credits) heightened environmental awareness, including the historical
A survey of American history through the Civil War. Included and contemporary writings of Thoreau, Muir, Carson, Dillard
are our European heritage, achievement of political and others. Continued work in writing expository prose with
independence, territorial expansion, economic development an emphasis on interpretation, analysis, and evaluation is an
and the Civil War. important component of the class.
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG092 to have included documented research Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111 with a grade of C- or better
essay
HUM290 Special Topics in Humanities (1 credit)
HIS112 American History Since 1865 (3 credits) Students will study a topic of special interest under
A survey of American history since 1865. Topics include supervision of a College faculty member.
industrialization, immigration, progressive era, overseas Instructional Hours: 1
expansion, American involvement in the World Wars, the Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Cold War, and our entry into the 21st century.
Instructional Hours: 3 HUM291 Special Topics in Humanities (2 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG092 to have included documented research Students will study a topic of special interest under
essay supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 2
HIS121 Twentieth Century World (3 credits) Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
A survey of the major social, political, and economic
developments of the Twentieth Century with the purpose of HUM292-299 Special Topics in Humanities (3 credits)
understanding contemporary global problems. Students will study a topic of special interest under
Instructional Hours: 3 supervision of a College faculty member.
Prerequisite: ENG092 to have included documented research Instructional Hours: 3
essay Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

HIS290 Special Topics in History (1 credit)


Students will study a topic of special interest under the JOURNALISM
supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 1 JRN101 Journalism (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor Primarily a print journalism reporting course teaching
HIS291 Special Topics in History (2 credits) professional skills: writing style, interviewing, and editing.
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Freedom of the press, objective reporting, broadcast
supervision of a College faculty member. journalism, the student press, and reporter’s ethics are
Instructional Hours: 2 among the topics discussed. Students write, edit and lay out
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor the school newspaper.
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c

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JRN111-114 Applied Journalism (1 credit) JUV240 Models of Intervention (3 credits)
An opportunity for students to design and pursue an This course provides an overview of six major models of
independent course of study in journalism. Students may Juvenile Justice intervention. Topics include safety and
work on the student newspaper, write freelance feature security, indications and counter-indications for specific
articles for publications, shoot and lay out photo essays, or interventions, settings, efficacy of interventions, interactions
research an historical or current journalism topic. A contract of related systems, and future trends.
between students and instructor for credit work is signed at Instructional Hours: 3
the start of the semester. The student’s work is reviewed Prerequisite: JUV120/220
through the semester. Students may enroll in only one
applied journalism class per term. JUV280 Practicum in Juvenile Justice (3 credits)
Instructional Hours: Arrange This course provides a site-based experience in a juvenile
JRN101-113 sequentially justice setting. Students will engage in the duties and
responsibilities of youth supervisors under the direction and
JRN290 Special Topics in Journalism (1 credit) supervision of authorized personnel.
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Instructional Hours: 3
supervision of a College faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of Program Director
Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor JUV282 Introduction to Delivery of Support Services to
Adjudicated Youth (4 credits)
JRN291 Special Topics in Journalism (2 credits) This course offers skills development instruction and practical
Students will study a topic of special interest under the application for students in an academic setting for
supervision of a College faculty member. adjudicated youth. Topics include tutoring and intervention
Instructional Hours: 2 strategies, motivational skills, specific software applications,
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor debriefing and troubleshooting, communication skills, and
assessment.
JRN292-299 Special Topics in Journalism (3 credits)
Instructional Hours: 3
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Laboratory Hours: 2
supervision of a College faculty member.
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
LANGUAGE ARTS
JUVENILE JUSTICE
LGA090 Introduction to Language Arts I (3 credits)
A course in two modules presented consecutively. The first
JUV120 Principles and Practices of Juvenile Justice(3
module presents word attack skills, dictionary skills, reading
credits) for the main idea; the second module presents
This course introduces students to the various aspects of and comprehension skills, drawing inferences and conclusions,
current practices in the juvenile justice system. Topics include and distinguishing between fact and opinion. This course is
accountability issues, safety and security demands, standards not transferable and does not count toward graduation
and rules, movements toward diversion and requirements.
deinstitutionalization, police interaction, court process, due Instructional Hours: 3
process, and community intervention. Prerequisite: College Placement Indicator
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG092c LGA091 Introduction to Language Arts II (3 credits)
A course that focuses on comprehension, drawing inferences
JUV220 Juvenile Delinquency (3 credits) and conclusions, distinguishing between fact and opinion,
This course introduces students to the concept of juvenile skimming and scanning. This course is not transferable and
delinquency and examines its causes and consequences. does not count toward graduation requirements.
Topics include individual, sociological, and developmental Instructional Hours: 3
views of delinquency; substance abuse and delinquency; Prerequisite: LGA090 or College Placement Indicator
gangs; police involvement; and trends in juvenile delinquency
and delinquency prevention. LGA095 Creating Connections: Reading, Writing and
Instructional Hours: 3 Thinking Critically About Issues (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG092c This course prepares students for the demands of college
reading and writing through an integrated approach to
JUV230 Leadership Development (3 credits)
language arts development. Students will develop reading
This course is designed to provide emerging and existing
and writing strategies through exploration and discussion of a
leaders the opportunity to explore the concept of leadership
variety of topics including current social, political, and
and to develop and improve skills. Approaches to leadership
economic issues. Instruction will emphasize critical thinking,
are explored as well as the moral and ethical responsibilities
reading, and writing and the integration of these processes to
of leaders.
maximize learning. This course is not transferable and does
Instructional Hours: 3
not count toward meeting graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: ENG092c; Permission of Instructor

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Instructional Hours: 6 LAW207 Inside-Out Exchange: Exploring Issues of
Prerequisite: College Placement Indicator Crime and Justice (3 credits)
This course is an opportunity for a small group of students
LGA100 Applying Language Arts (3 credits)
from Garrett College and a small group of residents of a
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply
correctional facility to exchange ideas and perceptions about
critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they explore
crime and justice, the justice system, corrections and
specific contemporary topics, to be determined each
imprisonment. It is a chance for all participants to gain a
semester by the instructor. This course is designed for
deeper understanding of the justice system through the
students who have completed developmental studies, and
marriage of theoretical knowledge and the practical
enrollment is by recommendation and/or permission of the
experience achieved by weekly meetings extended
instructor. Elective credit only.
throughout the semester. Topics include motivation for
Instructional Hours: 3
committing crime, analysis of the criminal justice system,
Prerequisite: LGA091 and/or ENG091
punishment and rehabilitation, victim impact, and restorative
justice.
LAW ENFORCEMENT Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

LAW101 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3 credits) LAW210 Criminal Law (3 credits)


This introductory course describes the role of law Basic principles of criminal law are studied with emphasis on
enforcement in a democratic society. The history and statutes pertaining to search, seizure, arrest, and rules of
philosophy of law enforcement are studied in relationship to evidence. Major classifications of crimes are covered as well
current practices in law enforcement. Problems and solutions as recent Supreme Court decisions related to law
in reducing crime are discussed. enforcement and the criminal code of Maryland.
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG092c Prerequisite: ENG092c; LAW110

LAW110 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)


This course focuses on the purpose and function of the LEARNING SKILLS
criminal justice system and how it functions in society. Course
content covers criminal behavior and the justice system, LRN101 College Seminar (1 credit)
police functions and the role of law enforcement, legal Designed to aid students in the transition from high school to
aspects of criminal justice and the courts, corrections, and college level course work and for students who have been
juvenile justice. away from the educational system for an extended period,
Instructional Hours: 3 this course will emphasize skills essential for academic
Prerequisite: ENG101c survival. It will include techniques for student success, college
resources, study skills, note-taking, test preparation
LAW201 American Constitutional Law (3 credits) techniques, computer utilization, motivational factors and
Students will be introduced to the workings of the U.S. academic honesty. This course is open to students enrolled at
Constitution through reading the Constitution, relevant the ENG 92 level or above. It is not open to students tracked
Supreme Court decisions and learned commentary, federal in English developmental studies. May be used as an elective
court opinions, and certain constitutional rights of the credit only. May not be taken subsequent to successful
indivdual. Emphasis will be upon the provisions of the completion of LRN106.
Constitution that address the three branches of government Instructional Hours: 1
as well as those that structure the relationship between Prerequisite: ENG092c
federal and state entities, including the federal court system.
Instructional Hours: 3 LRN106 Introduction to College (3 credits)
Prerequisite: None A comprehensive introductory course designed to aid
students in the transition to college level courses. Skills
LAW205 Ethics in Criminal Justice (3 credits) essential for academic success and college survival will be
This course will provide the student with a historical emphasized. Students will engage in a comprehensive review
perspective of the moral and ethical issues encountered in of application skills necessary for success through study skills,
the criminal justice system and examines the consequences note-taking, critical thinking, problem solving, time
of ethical and legal transgressions by criminal justice management, test preparation, computer utilization,
practitioners. Topics include police misconduct, diversity, health issues, and academic honesty. Students in
attorney/client relationships, prosecutorial misconduct, and developmental English and reading are required to enroll in
sentencing behavior. this course. Recommended for students who desire a
Instructional Hours: 3 comprehensive review of the skills necessary for success in
Prerequisite: LAW110 college level courses. Elective credit only. May not be taken
subsequent to successful completion of LRN101.
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: College Placement Indicator

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Prerequisite: MAT095 or equivalent competencies
MATHEMATICS
MAT098 Intermediate Algebra* (3 credits)
A preparatory course designed to extend understanding of
P RE -C OLLEGE S EQUENCE - T HESE COURSES ARE NOT
basic algebra concepts, including use of the graphing
TRANSFERABLE AND DO NOT COUNT TOWARD GRADUATION
calculator. Students will use problem solving techniques to
REQUIREMENTS .
develop cognitive thinking skills. The course will focus on sets,
relations and functions (both linear and quadratic),
MAT080-088 Individualized Learning in Mathematics*(4 credits)elementary number theory, and matrices. (Graphing
A series of courses designed for the individual needing special calculator required.)
arithmetic learning assistance. Individual learning plans are Instructional Hours: 3
written and students progress through the program by Prerequisite: MAT095 or equivalent competencies
demonstrating mastery of concepts with technological and
MAT099 Algebra II with College Geometry* (4 credits)
manipulative support activities. Progress through the series is
A preparatory course designed for students who took algebra
handled by the Mathematics Department.
II and geometry in high school but are in need of a review of
Instructional Hours: 4
core concepts and exposure to graphing calculator and
Prerequisite: College Placement Indicator
computer skills prior to entering college algebra. (Graphing
MAT089 Basic Mathematics I--Preparatory calculator required.)
Mathematics* (4 credits) Instructional Hours: 4
A preparatory course designed for the individual needing the Prerequisite: Departmental Approval
opportunity to practice arithmetic skills to include: whole
numbers, fractions and decimals, per cents, ratio and C OLLEGE L EVEL S EQUENCE
proportion, and basic geometric formulas. Students
MAT105 College Algebra (3 credits)
demonstrate mastery of concepts with technological and
A course offered in a multimedia classroom. Topics include
manipulative support activities to encourage problem solving,
algebra operations, base conversion, exponents and radicals,
communication and reasoning and connections. (Graphing
factoring, functions, systems of equations and inequalities,
calculator required.)
the number system, complex numbers, absolute values,
Instructional Hours: 4
binomial theorem, basic matrix operations, polynomials and
Prerequisite: College Placement Indicator
graphing calculator problems. (Graphing calculator required.)
MAT090 Basic Mathematics II with Emphasis on Pre- Instructional Hours: 3
Algebra* (6 credits) Laboratory Hours: As Assigned
A preparatory course designed for the individual needing to Prerequisite: MAT097 and 098 or equivalent competencies
develop pre-algebra skills including measurement, the real MAT107 Trigonometry (3 credits)
number system, integer arithmetic operations with positive
A course offered in a multimedia classroom. Definitions of the
and negative exponents, number concepts and relationships,
functions and variations, degree and radian measure, inverse
patterns, linear equations and graphing. (Graphing calculator
functions and graphs, polar coordinates, complex numbers
required.)
and applications of plane trigonometry. (Graphing calculator
Instructional Hours: 6
required.)
Prerequisite: College Placement Indicator
Instructional Hours: 3
MAT095 Introduction to Algebra* (3 credits) Laboratory Hours: As Assigned
A preparatory activity course designed for the individual Prerequisite: MAT105 or equivalent competencies
needing the opportunity to develop basic algebra skills MAT110 Pre-Calculus (4 credits)
including the understanding of the number system,
A course offered in a multimedia classroom. A treatment of
operations with positive and negative exponents, variable
the fundamental notations of algebra, trigonometry, and
and linear equations, graphing, second degree equations,
analytic geometry to be successful in calculus I is offered.
factoring, fractional exponents and quadratic equations using
Topics include elementary conics, polar coordinates,
problem solving and communication techniques. (Graphing
identities, complex numbers, logarithms, elementary
calculator required.)
transcendental functions, their graphs, their inverses, and
Instructional Hours: 3
systems of equations using computers and graphing
Prerequisite: MAT090 or equivalent competencies
calculators. Derive is used as the computer software package.
MAT097 Geometry* (3 credits) (Graphing calculator required.)
A course that deals with the essentials of geometry, Instructional Hours: 4
developing the basic concepts of congruence, similarity, Laboratory Hours: As Assigned
measure, symmetry, theorems, etc. This includes a study of Prerequisite: MAT105 or equivalent competencies
lines, planes, triangles, polygons and circles. Areas and MAT116 Graphing Calculator (1 credit)
volumes are investigated. The Geometer’s Sketchpad
This course, which features detailed exploration of graphing
software is used for visualization purposes. (Graphing
calculators and their functions, leads students to develop an
calculator required.)
understanding of logical thinking skills and mathematical
Instructional Hours: 3

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relationships as well as emphasizing problem-solving abilities. sequences, indeterminate forms and improper integrals,
Gaining proficiency in operating a Casio FX 2.0, students will parametrized curves, polar coordinates and conic sections,
learn multiple uses of the instrument. The purpose of this partial derivatives, multiple integrals and vector analysis.
course is to prepare the student for success in math courses; Mathcad is used as the computer software package.
the course will also benefit students enrolled in science (Graphing calculator required.)
courses. Instructional Hours: 4
Instructional Hours: 1 Laboratory Hours: As Assigned
Prerequisite: MAT105 Prerequisite: MAT191
MAT121 Elementary Mathematics I (3 credits) MAT210 Introductory Statistics (3 credits)
A course offered in a multimedia classroom. It is designed for A course offered in a multimedia classroom for students
students majoring in elementary education. The course whose field of study requires knowledge of the methods of
content includes problem solving in set theory, logic, and statistical inference. Topics include organization of data,
mathematical reasoning. Sets, cardinal numbers, operational elementary probability, the binomial distribution, the normal
algorithms, topics from number theory, rational numbers, distribution, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals.
real numbers, and geometry are instructed using cooperative (Graphing calculator required.)
group techniques. The Geometer’s Sketchpad and Derive Instructional Hours: 3
software are used for visualization purposes. The class is Laboratory Hours: As Assigned
open to majors in Elementary Education ONLY. (Graphing Prerequisite: MAT098
calculator required.)
Instructional Hours: 3 MAT250 Differential Equations (3 credits)
Laboratory Hours: As Assigned Solutions to ordinary differential equations. Methods of
Prerequisite: MAT105 or equivalent competencies solution include exact differentials and integrating factors.
The method of undetermined coefficients series, the LaPlace
MAT122 Elementary Mathematics II (3 credits) Transform. A major part of the course will be devoted to
A course offered in a multimedia classroom. Topics include applications. (Graphing calculator required.)
graphing calculator use, understanding geometry coordinates Instructional Hours: 3
and mathematical systems. The relation between algebra and Prerequisite: MAT191; MAT210
geometry is established with an emphasis on probability and
statistics. Students continue to use Geometer’s Sketchpad MAT280 Matrix Algebra (3 credits)
and Derive software for visualization purposes. The class is A course offered in a multi-media classroom to introduce
open to majors in Elementary Education ONLY. (Graphing students to the study of matrix algebra. Topics include the
calculator required.) study of systems of linear equations and matrices,
Instructional Hours: 3 determinants, vectors and vector spaces, and linear
Laboratory Hours: As Assigned transformations. Mathcad is used as the computer software
Prerequisite: MAT121 package. (Graphing calculator required.)
Instructional Hours: 3
MAT190 Calculus I (4 credits) Laboratory Hours: As Assigned
A course offered in a multimedia classroom. Topics include Prerequisite: MAT190; MAT191
graphing calculator use, introduction to analytic geometry,
and a review of absolute values and inequalities. Computers MAT289 Research in Mathematics (3 credits)
are used to study limits and continuity of functions, This mathematics course is designed to introduce students to
derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, research in the area of mathematics education. Topics
applications of the derivative, and implicit differentiation, and include cognitive aspects of Algebra learning, technological
an introduction to vector calculus. (Graphing calculator considerations, curriculum development, and the future of
required.) mathematics education. Students practice effective teaching,
Instructional Hours: 4 data gathering and report generation on a regular basis.
Laboratory Hours: As Assigned Word processing and spreadsheeting software use is required
Prerequisite: MAT110 or its equivalent (Graphing calculator required.)
Instructional Hours: 3
MAT191 Calculus II (4 credits) Laboratory Hours: As Assigned
A course offered in a multimedia classroom. Topics include Prerequisite: MAT105; MAT210
graphing calculator use, techniques of integration,
applications of integration, improper integrals, infinite series, MAT290 Special Topics in Math (1 credit)
polar coordinates and rotation of axes. (Graphing calculator Students will study a topic of special interest under the
required.) supervision of a College faculty member. (Graphing
Instructional Hours: 4 calculator required.)
Laboratory Hours: As Assigned Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: MAT190 or its equivalent Prerequisite: MAT105

MAT192 Calculus III (4 credits)


A course offered in a multimedia classroom. Topics include,
but are not limited to, the study of infinite series and

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MAT291 Special Topics in Math (2 credits) MUS119-122 Instrumental Music (Pipes & Drums)(1 cr)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Study and performance of ensemble literature. Open to
supervision of a College faculty member. (Graphing qualified students of band and orchestra instruments or
calculator required.) piano.
Instructional Hours: 2 Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: MAT105 Prerequisite: None
MAT292-299 Special Topics in Math (3 credits) MUS119A-122A Instrumental Music (Community
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Band) (1 credit)
supervision of a College faculty member. (Graphing Study and performance of ensemble literature. Open to
calculator required.) qualified students of band and orchestra instruments or
Instructional Hours: 3 piano.
Prerequisite: MAT105 Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: None

MUS129 Applied Music (Voice) (1 credit)


MUSIC An examination of breathing techniques, tone projection,
diction, phrasing, and vocal control relative to voice. An
MUS110 Music Appreciation (3 credits) introduction to all musical concepts, techniques, and
A course designed to widen the student’s horizon of musical interpretive skills which follow relative to voice.
awareness with emphasis upon stimulating the enjoyment of Instructional Hours: 3.5
music. It includes the study of musical elements and guides Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
the student toward intelligent and discriminating listening.
Designed for both majors and non-majors. MUS130-132 Applied Music (Voice) (1 credit)
Instructional Hours: 3 Continuation of skills mastered in MUS 129 with addition of
Prerequisite: ENG092c Art Songs and German Lieder.
Instructional Hours: 3.5
MUS111-114 Chorus (1 credit) Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Public performances of acapella and accompanied choral NOTE: MUS130, 131, and 132 are not for “pop” singers.
works, includes sacred and secular music, as well as popular Students in MUS131 and 132 must have a Level II knowledge
music. No previous choral experience necessary. of piano.
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: None MUS139 Applied Instrumental (Private Instruction)(1 credit)
A study of tone quality, pitches, articulation, scales, arpeggios
MUS115 The Musical Encounter (3 credits) and phrasing with a goal toward standardized capabilities. It
The Musical Encounter focuses upon three fundamental is intended that this course introduce all musical concepts,
concepts: diversity, change and developing listening techniques and proficiencies which follow. (Beginning
techniques and attitudes necessary to accommodate a students are accepted.)
modern, eclectic musical taste. An interdisciplinary approach Instructional Hours: 3.5
to the artistic nature of musical expression, the course Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
introduces special topics with guest lecturers in the areas of
performance, composition, art and drama. The overall MUS140-142 Applied Instrumental (1 credit)
mission is to both introduce the student to a comprehensive A continuation of skills mastered in MUS 139.
study of the musical art, while also broadening the listening Instructional Hours: 3.5
experience and appreciation of contrasting genres of music. Prerequisite: MUS139
Instructional Hours: 3
MUS149 Applied Piano (Class Piano/Organ) (1 credit)
Prerequisite: ENG092c
An introduction to keyboard nomenclature, fingering, hand
MUS116 Music in Religious Thought & Practice(3 credits) positions, chords, articulation, pedaling, scales, arpeggios and
A course designed to heighten the student’s knowledge and phrasing. The course is foundational to all piano/keyboard
interest in the development of sacred music. In discovering concepts which follow.
the various forms and styles of sacred music, the art would be Instructional Hours: 3.5
presented in conjunction with its theological and sociological Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
background. Assignments would include attendance of one
MUS150-152 Applied Piano (1 credit)
formally scheduled concert of sacred music of the student’s
A continuation of mastered skills with the addition of those
choice, a written critique of that concert, as well as listening,
improvisational techniques and chord notations relative to
reading and written assignments.
classroom use.
Instructional Hours: 3
Instructional Hours: 3.5
Prerequisite: None
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
NOTE: The Music Department reserves the right to drop from
advanced applied courses any student whose proficiency is
not commensurate with course standards. Evaluation juries
are held at the end of each semester. There is a laboratory

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fee for each applied course. Each applied course requires 7 in agriculture and natural resources. Topics include principles
contact sessions with the instructor and approximately 39 of building construction, basic carpentry, basic electrical
hours practice time. wiring, plumbing, masonry, and welding. Safety is emphasized
Laboratory Hours: 3
MUS290 Music Special Topics (1 credit) Prerequisite: None
An opportunity to provide to the student credit offerings in
specific ensembles such as woodwind quartet, brass quintet, NRW105 Environmental Science and Contemporary
select chorus, etc. Opportunity is also provided for special Natural Resource Issues (2 credits)
music symposiums and seminars. Actual courses vary and are NRW 105 is a two credit hour course designed to provide
submitted by syllabi to the Dean of Academic Affairs for each those students seeking only a technical degree in natural
offering. resource management and wildlife technology with a basic
Instructional Hours: 1 overview of the fundamentals of environmental science. This
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor course focuses on the environment and many of the external
conditions that influence the life, development, and future of
MUS291 Music Special Topics (2 credits)
humankind. Discussion of various environmental factors, in a
Larger applied and special project offerings in music under
scientific context, will be a regular part of this course. Outside
the direction of music faculty are approved for study.
of the scientific context, discussions will also deal with
Instructional Hours: 2
ethical, socioeconomic, and political factors that affect
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
environmental protection and natural resource management,
MUS292 Music Special Topics (3 credits) including environmental law and regulation.
An opportunity to present students with full lecture courses Laboratory Hours: 4
in specific study areas in music such as “Theory for Non- Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
Majors,” “Synthesizer Operation and Program Writing,”
NRW106 Environmental Science and Contemporary
“Music in The Romantic Era,” etc. This section is reserved for
Natural Resource Issues (3 credits)
lecture offerings, and syllabi are approved by the Dean of
An overview of the natural environment; that is, all the
Academic Affairs for each offering.
external conditions and influences that affect the life,
Instructional Hours: 3
development and, ultimately, the survival of humankind.
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Discussion of various environmental factors, especially in
their scientific context. Ethical, socioeconomic, and political
NATURAL RESOURCES AND WILDLIFE concerns that affect environmental management and
protection. A survey of environmental laws and regulations.
TECHNOLOGY Laboratory Hours: 4
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
NRW101 Natural Resources & Wildlife Technology NRW180 Herbaceous Plant Identification (2 credits)
Seminar I (0.5 credits) An intensive, field-oriented course instructing students in the
A seminar/discussion course introducing students to the identification of herbaceous vascular plants of the mid-
Natural Resources & Wildlife Technology Program. Topics will Atlantic and central Appalachians regions. Wetland plants will
include an overview of the natural resource conservation and be emphasized. The use of taxonomic keys to identify plants,
environmental protection field, career opportunities, and the terminology associated with the use of such keys, will
overview of the NRWT program, expectations of NRWT be covered.
students, and strategies for success in the program. Speakers Laboratory Hours: 4
from various employment areas in natural resources and Prerequisite: BIO120 or Permission of Instructor
wildlife technology will supplement class discussions. Open to
NRWT students or those exploring the NRWT major. NRW181 Wildlife Biology (3 credits)
Instructional Hours: .5 A course familiarizing students with important North
Prerequisite: None American game and nongame wildlife species, with emphasis
on species of the mid-Atlantic and central Appalachians
NRW103 Agricultural and Natural Resources Practical regions. Students will learn the identification and life histories
Skills I (1 credit) of these species. Two field trips to the Delmarva peninsula
The first course of a two-semester sequence exposing will be included.
students to the basic practical skills required for technicians Laboratory Hours: 6
in agriculture and natural resources. Topics include hunter Prerequisite: ENG092c or Permission of Instructor
and firearm safety, boat operation and maintenance, small
engine maintenance, chain saw operation, and tractor and NRW199 Natural Resources & Wildlife Technology
farm machinery operation. Safety is emphasized. Practicum (1 credit)
Laboratory Hours: 3 A semester- or summer-long field experience (exact dates to
be determined by the College in cooperation with the
NRW104 Agricultural and Natural Resources Practical employer) involving supervised, voluntary or compensated
Skills II (1 credit) employment in some area of natural resources and wildlife
The second course of a two-semester sequence exposing technology. The student and the College will work together to
students to the basic practical skills required for technicians

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arrange the practicum. Grading will be based on supervisor and habitat management practices employed by wildlife
evaluations. managers. Hands-on techniques covered include: trapping
Prerequisite: None and marking animals; monitoring wildlife movements,
including through the use of radiotelemetry; population size
NRW270 Forest Measurements (2 credits) estimation; determining wildlife food habits; determining age
A course covering the basics of timber surveying and and sex of wildlife species; necropsy procedures; and crop
measurement of forest products. Topics include timber damage surveys. Habitat management topics include:
cruising and other field procedures, map use and assessment of available food, water, cover, and space for
interpretation techniques in forestry, grading and scaling wildlife; habitat manipulation techniques used in forested,
techniques, and use of log rules and volume tables. The wetland, agricultural, and urban/suburban environments; and
course will involve classroom instruction and significant field preparation of habitat management plans. Field experience is
experience. stressed.
Instructional Hours: 2 Instructional Hours: 2
Laboratory Hours: 2 Laboratory Hours: 4
Prerequisite: BIO120, ENT201c Prerequisite: NRW286 or Permission of Instructor
NRW275 Forest Management (3 credits) NRW289 Natural Resources & Wildlife Technology
A course covering the basic principles and procedures
Seminar II (0.5 credits)
involved in managing forest resources. Topics include
A seminar/discussion course preparing the graduating
principles of forestry science, silvicultural systems and
Natural Resources & Wildlife Technology student for
practices, harvesting practices, forest economics, multiple use
entrance into the job market. Topics will include a review of
in forestry, and preparation of a forest management plan.
job opportunities, job search strategies, resume preparation,
Field experience will be stressed. Students will develop a
state and federal government job application, interviewing
forest management plan for a chosen portion of land during
skills, and professional appearance and behavior appropriate
the semester.
for NRWT program graduates. Speakers and videos will
Instructional Hours: 2
supplement class discussion. Open to NRWT students only.
Laboratory Hours: 4
Instructional Hours: 1.5
Prerequisite: NRW270 or Permission of Instructor

NRW283 Fisheries Biology and Management (3 credits) Students must be in the last or next to last semester of study.
The principles of fisheries science with emphasis on the
NRW290 Special Topics in Natural Resources &
fundamentals of fisheries biology and management. Includes
Wildlife Technology (1 credit)
study of fish identification, food habits, age and growth,
Students with advanced standing having completed the basic
population dynamics, stream and lake surveys, and
courses may undertake special or individual work in their
management of natural populations.
major area with the consent of the instructor.
Instructional Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 1
Laboratory Hours: 4
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Prerequisite: BIO150c or Permission of Instructor

NRW286 Wildlife Techniques and Habitat NRW291 Special Topics in Natural Resources &
Management I (3 credits) Wildlife Technology (2 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under
The first course in a two-semester sequence covering basic
supervision of a College faculty member.
principles of wildlife management and hands-on techniques
Instructional Hours: 2
and habitat management practices employed by wildlife
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
managers. Hands-on techniques covered include: trapping
and marking animals; monitoring wildlife movements, NRW292-299 Special Topics in Natural Resources &
including through the use of radiotelemetry; population size Wildlife Technology (3 credits)
estimation; determining wildlife food habits; determining age Students will study a topic of special interest under
and sex of wildlife species; necropsy procedures; and crop supervision of a College faculty member.
damage surveys. Habitat management topics include: Instructional Hours: 3
assessment of available food, water, cover, and space for Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
wildlife, habitat manipulation techniques used in forested,
wetland, agricultural, and urban/suburban environments; and
preparation of habitat management plans. Field experience is PHILOSOPHY
stressed.
Instructional Hours: 2
Laboratory Hours: 4 PHL101 Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: BIO150c, NRW181 or Permission of Instructor This course introduces the beginning philosophy student to
seven foundational questions that have inspired the western
NRW287 Wildlife Techniques and Habitat philosophic enterprise for two-and-one-half millennia: Am I
Management II (3 credits) both a body and a mind? Do I have free will? Does God exist?
Second course in a two-semester sequence covering basic What is knowledge, and how is it acquired? How can I
principles of wildlife management and hands-on techniques distinguish right from wrong? Am I immortal? What is the

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meaning of life? To give a balanced perspective on these Instructional Hours: 3
controversial issues, students study representative Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
philosophers primarily drawn from the modern and twentieth
century periods including such luminaries as Socrates, St. PHL290 Special Topics in Philosophy (1 credit)
Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Students will study a topic of special interest under the
David Hume, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, Friedrich supervision of a College faculty member.
Nietzsche, William James, Soren Kierkegaard, John Dewey, Instructional Hours: 1
and Jean-Paul Sartre. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 3 PHL291 Special Topics in Philosophy (2 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c Students will study a topic of special interest under the
PHL110 Introduction To Logical Reasoning (3 credits) supervision of a College faculty member.
A practical course designed to introduce the student to Instructional Hours: 2
elementary logic and methods of logical thinking as Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
encountered in the sciences, social sciences, business, and
humanities. Content will focus on the nature of reasoning,
PHL292-299 Special Topics in Philosophy (3 credits)
argument analysis, informal and common fallacies of Students will study a topic of special interest under the
supervision of a College faculty member.
reasoning, and language skills. This course is recommended
Instructional Hours: 3
as a valuable supplemental course in any academic
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
curriculum.
Instructional Hours: 3
PHL112 Philosophy of Religion (3 credits) PHYSICAL EDUCATION
This introduction to the Philosophy of Religion is to be
distinguished from a course in Comparative Religion. In this PED103 Beginning Swimming (1 credit)
course students examine and discuss perennial problems that Beginning techniques in water skills for the non-swimmer.
have persisted throughout the development of religious Emphasis on basic strokes.
thought primarily in the western world but also in non- Instructional Hours: 2
western traditions. Among the main questions to be Prerequisite: None
considered are the following: What is God’s nature? Does
God exist? How is evil possible in God’s creation? How can PED104 Advanced Swimming (1 credit)
God foretell the future? Is God’s existence compatible with Instruction for students who have previous swimming
human free will? How is it possible for the individual experience. Emphasis will be placed on the advanced
personality to survive death? Through assigned readings and techniques in water skills.
classroom presentations, students will also become exposed Instructional Hours: 2
to luminaries in the history of philosophic thought such as Prerequisite: PED103 or Permission of Instructor
Plato, Aristotle, St. Anselm, St. Augustine, St. Thomas
PED110 Golf (1 credit)
Aquinas, Rene Descartes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Soren
A course designed to develop the student’s skills and strategy
Kierkegaard, and Jean-Paul Sartre.
related to golf as a lifetime sport. The course will also
Instructional Hours: 3
concentrate on terminology and etiquette. History of the
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
sport will be discussed. Student participation will be
PHL113 Symbolic Logic (3 credits) emphasized.
Symbolic logic is a tool of thought developed to make Instructional Hours: 2
reasoning more exact. It is especially useful for disciplines Prerequisite: None
requiring precision of thought such as the sciences. In this
PED112 Basketball (1 credit)
course students are introduced to symbolic languages which
Emphasis is placed on individual skills, team play and rules.
allow them to translate sentences of natural languages like
Instructional Hours: 2
English into an unambiguous symbolic notation. Students also
Prerequisite: None
learn how to deploy logical systems in order to determine the
validity of reasoning. Students are presented with problems PED117 Personalized Health & Fitness (2 credits)
requiring them to develop strategies for problem resolution, This course is concerned with present and future fitness,
the validity of reasoning. They learn how to analyze problems including facts and fallacies related to cardiovascular
and develop strategies for resolution. The course follows a efficiency, strength, flexibility, weight control, motivation,
developmental sequence of study starting with the and self-assessment methods. The course is designed to give
propositional calculus and proceeding through quantification students an opportunity to assess their current physical and
theory, the logic of relations, and the predicate calculus with mental status as well as prepare a personalized fitness profile
identity. These studies acquaint students with the languages which can be utilized as a guide for future fitness
underlying computer programs and help them understand participation.
how formal systems such as mathematical languages Instructional Hours: 1
function. The course will be useful to students preparing for Laboratory Hours: 2
careers in engineering, science, technology, computer Prerequisite: ENG092c
science, and artificial intelligence.

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PED118 Weight Training (1 credit) PED252 Camp Administration (3 credits)
Instruction in fundamentals of body building and fitness. Each A course designed to challenge and prepare students
student is given an individual workout routine with emphasis interested in designing and implementing a sports camp.
on conditioning and safety. Areas covered will include teaching skills, counseling, budget
Instructional Hours: 2 considerations, staffing, officiating and basic CPR skills. A
Prerequisite: None project notebook outlining all teaching skills and
requirements will be required of all students. Instruction
PED119 Aerobic Exercise (1 credit) could include residence hall and night activities counseling.
Introduces the student to a program of exercise and Students complete a 90-hour (minimum) camp internship
movement to music. Emphasis will be given to movement under the guidance of a camp director.
which increases heart and lung efficiency and to exercise Instructional Hours: 3
which strengthens and tones muscles. Laboratory Hours: 2
Instructional Hours: 2 Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Prerequisite: None
PED260 Lifeguard Training - Pool and
PED150 First Aid (3 credits) Waterfront (1 credit)
Standard procedures of first aid. Emphasis given to This course teaches the participants to lifeguard swimming
circumstances and practices requiring immediate care pools and open water facilities (camps, rivers, bays) and to
relevant to those in more remote areas where professional provide emergency medical care as needed. It provides all
medical assistance may not be available in a short time. candidates with an expertise in water safety. Students
Instructional Hours: 3 passing the skills and written tests at the conclusion of the
Prerequisite: RS1 course will receive certifications that are valid for three years
in lifeguard training, waterfront lifeguarding, CPR for the
PED210 Physical Education Practicum (1 credit)
Professional Rescuer and First Aid. These lifeguards will be
A field experience involving voluntary or compensated
qualified to work at any water facility and may continue on to
supervised employment in some area of physical education.
more advanced courses or become instructors.
The student and instructor will work together to arrange the
Instructional Hours: 2
practicum. Grading will be based on supervisor evaluations.
Laboratory Hours: 28
The course will be taken after completion of the student’s
Prerequisite: Pass entrance exam on about a Level V ability
freshman year and consist of thirty hours of work assignment.
Laboratory Hours: 30 PED290 Special Topics in Health and Physical
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor Education (1 credit)
PED222 Theory of Baseball (2 credits) Faculty-directed research on selected topics in
A study of the fundamentals, advanced techniques, methods, health/physical education.
strategy, rules, methods of officiating and practice drills basic Instructional Hours: N/A
to baseball. Prerequisite: None
Instructional Hours: 2 PED291 Special Topics in Health and Physical
Prerequisite: ENG092c Education (2 credits)
PED224 Theory of Basketball (2 credits) Students will study a topic of special interest under the
A study of the fundamentals, advanced techniques, methods supervision of a College faculty member.
of officiating, strategy, rules, methods and practice drills basic Instructional Hours: 2
to basketball. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 2 PED292-299 Special Topics in Health and Physical
Prerequisite: ENG092c
Education (3 credits)
PED246 Jazz Dance (1 credit) Students will study a topic of special interest under the
This course concerns itself with the study of basic jazz supervision of a College faculty member.
techniques: level change, weight shift, dynamic alignment, Instructional Hours: 3
breath support and expression, and application of jazz dance Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
vocabulary.
Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: None PHYSICS
PED250 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries(3 credits)
PHY101 General Physics I (4 credits)
This course encompasses the general knowledge and
A study of the general principles of physics. Topics included
concepts underlying athletic training and the application of
are force and motion, gravitation, energy and momentum,
these concepts in recognizing, treating and rehabilitating
rigid body motion, fluids, vibrations and waves, heat, the
those injuries resulting from athletic participation.
structure of matter, and acoustics. Lab and lecture are taught
Instructional Hours: 3
consecutively.
Prerequisite: BIO200, ENG092c
Instructional Hours: 3
Laboratory Hours: 3

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Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c; MAT110 PHY290 Special Topics in Physics (1 credit)
Designed to permit a student of advanced standing to
PHY102 General Physics II (4 credits)
undertake special or individual work in a physical science area
A continuation of PHY 101. Topics included are electricity,
with consent of the instructor.
magnetism, electromagnetic induction, waves, and light. Lab
Instructional Hours: 1
and lecture are taught consecutively.
Prerequisite: PHY100
Instructional Hours: 3
Laboratory Hours: 3 PHY291 Special Topics in Physics (2 credits)
Prerequisite: PHY101 Students will study a topic of special interest under
supervision of a College faculty member.
PHY111 General Physics I (Calculus Based) (5 credits)
Instructional Hours: 2
A calculus based introduction to general physics concepts
Prerequisite: PHY100
primarily for those students who plan to enroll in science,
technology, and engineering programs. The course topics will PHY292-299 Special Topics in Physics (3 credits)
include mechanics, kinematics, dynamics, energy, and Students will study a topic of special interest under
momentum. Lab and lecture are taught consecutively. supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 4 Instructional Hours: 3
Laboratory Hours: 3 Prerequisite: PHY100
Prerequisite: MAT190c; ENG101/103/111c

PHY112 General Physics II (Calculus Based) (5 credits) POLITICAL SCIENCE


A continuation of calculus based physics concepts primarily
for those students who plan to enroll in science and
engineering programs. The course topics focus on the POL090 Special Topics in Political Science (1 credit)
theoretical and experimental foundation of physics including, Current selected topics designed to permit the student to
but not limited to, electricity and magnetism, undertake special studies in Political Science.
thermodynamics, Colomb’s law, and Gauss’ law. Lab and Instructional Hours: 1
lecture are taught consecutively. Prerequisite: None
Instructional Hours: 4 POL101 Government in Modern Society (3 credits)
Laboratory Hours: 3
An introduction to the basic concepts of political science. The
Prerequisite: MAT190; PHY111
acquisition and maintenance of political power, the varieties
PHY130 Physical Science (4 credits) of political ideologies and institutions, and the prospects for
A general study of physical phenomena and their role in democratic government are examined.
modern society. Topics of study include basic concepts of Instructional Hours: 3
physics, chemistry and astronomy, with emphasis given to Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
conceptual understanding and the development of POL140 American National Government (3 credits)
calculation skills. The process of scientific inquiry,
A detailed study of the Constitution, the legislature, executive
investigating the properties of material substances, and
and judicial branches, political parties, and policy-making at
developing scientific representation will be emphasized in the
the national level. The development of the student’s
laboratory.
judgment of U.S. domestic and foreign policies is fostered.
Instructional Hours: 3
Instructional Hours: 3
Laboratory Hours: 2
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
Prerequisite: MAT095, ENG092c
POL141 State and Local Government (3 credits)
PHY145 Meteorology (4 credits) Major forms of local, state and regional governments in the
This course is offered in conjunction with the American
United States, with special emphasis on those of the State of
Meteorological Society (AMS). Emphasis is placed on
Maryland. Problems of federalism, including revenue sharing,
movements and processes of the atmosphere, radiation and
are reviewed.
atmospheric heating, global circulation, weather systems,
Instructional Hours: 3
fronts and air masses, cloud physics, severe weather, and
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
basic forecasting skills. Included are two laboratory activities
each week based on current weather data provided by the POL291 Special Topics in Political Science (2 credits)
AMS. Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Instructional Hours: 4 supervision of a College faculty member.
Prerequisite: None Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
PHY147 Astronomy (3 credits)
An introductory course describing the history of astronomy, POL292-299 Special Topics in Political
the solar system, coordinate systems, time, constellations Science (3 credits)
and stars. Students will study a topic of special interest under
Instructional Hours: 3 supervision of a College faculty member.
Prerequisite: None Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

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Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG092
PSYCHOLOGY
PSY211 Educational Psychology (3 credits)
This course presents an examination of the dynamics of
PSY101 General Psychology (3 credits) learning processes in human behavior. The relationships
Deals with the psychologist’s attempt to understand among psychological theories, principles of learning,
humanity. Topics include psychological and physiological aptitudes, and abilities are studied. Testing and special
processes; biological foundations of behavior; biological base learners are also discussed.
for integrated behavior; methods of psychology, tests and Instructional Hours: 3
measurements, experimental design; intelligence; segments Prerequisite: PSY101
of the psychological process including motives, emotions,
sensation and perception, processes of learning; personality PSY220 Child Psychology (3 credits)
and adjustment; and neurosis, psychosis, and psychotherapy. A systematic, integrated, and interpretative study of the
Instructional Hours: 3 growth and development of the child from conception to
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c puberty. Attention is focused on physical growth, influences
of environment, behavioral development, play and activities,
PSY102 Human Growth and Development (3 credits) an overview of preschool years, the child’s relationships with
This course emphasizes principles underlying human behavior family, peers and society. Problems of mental health, parent-
and development. Primary attention is given to child, peer-child, and school-child are examined through the
understanding school-age children, but overall human use of research and case material.
development from conception to death is explored. Students Instructional Hours: 3
get the opportunity to develop proficiency in observing, Prerequisite: PSY101/102, ENG101/103/111
recording and analyzing behavior through actual observation
of children in classroom and other situations. PSY221 Adolescent Psychology (3 credits)
Instructional Hours: 3 Special attention is given to developmental tasks and
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111 problems of adolescence--particularly to concept of self.
Course includes the view of the adolescent as a product of
PSY121 General Psychology: Honors (3 credits) heredity and environment; the influence of physiological,
This course is designed to introduce the student to the social, emotional and intellectual changes on the adolescent
scientific study of human and animal behavior. Basic research personality and adjustment; and social forces affecting him or
findings, methodology, and theoretical, social, and ethical her.
issues will be explored. Honor students will be actively Instructional Hours: 3
involved in developing their critical thinking skills by analyzing Prerequisite: PSY101
and synthesizing supplemental readings, course work and life
experiences to reach personally relevant and meaningful PSY230 Psychology of Adjustment (3 credits)
conclusions regarding the material provided. Participating in This course examines the adjustment process in normal
debates on controversial topics, designing a psychology individuals. The course combines lecture, discussion and
research project, writing reports and giving oral presentations small group interaction. Students will be expected to
on the diversity of human behavior is required. participate in self-exploration through the use of verbal and
Instructional Hours: 3 nonverbal interpersonal techniques.
Prerequisite: ENG111c Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: PSY101, ENG101/103/111
PSY140 Psychology of Women (3 credits)
PSY235 Intro. to Forensic Psychology (3 credits)
This course is designed to investigate the physical, mental,
This course provides an introduction to forensic psychology.
social, and emotional development of women from a
Topics include history of the relationship between psychology
psychological perspective. Emphasis will be given to
and the law; procedural and ethical issues; the diverse roles
examining the popular but unfounded negative stereotypes
of forensic psychologists including assessment, treatment,
of women as well as determining the more realistic aspect of
consultation and expert testimony, research, and influencing
the psychological development of women and the
public policy.
subsequent effect it has on adjustment, life-style and
Instructional Hours: 3
emotional problems.
Prerequisite: PSY101, LAW110, Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: PSY101 PSY240 Intro. to Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
History of the study of psychopathology; concepts of models
PSY150 Psychology of Human Relations (3 credits)
of positive mental health; major syndromes of deviant
Psychology of Human Relations will explore the fundamental
behavior, including psychoneurosis, psychosis, personality
principles underlying human interactions in the work place.
disorders and affective disorders; theories of deviant
Students will develop their knowledge base in the field of
behavior and community mental health are studied.
human relations and organizational behavior. Students will
Instructional Hours: 3
explore, acquire and apply communication skills necessary to
Prerequisite: PSY101, ENG101/103/111
effectively function interpersonally and in organizational
structures. The course is designed to be highly interactive.

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PSY290 Special Topics in Psychology (1 credit) stratification, analysis of various types of groups and their
A topic of special interest may be offered as a special topics interrelationships, social class and social change, ethnic
course. Faculty-directed research may also be offered as a groups, problems of population growth and the development
special topics course. of human resources.
Instructional Hours: 1 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: PSY101 or Permission of Instructor Prerequisite: ENG092c

PSY291 Special Topics in Psychology (2 credits)


SOC110 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
A topic of special interest may be offered as a special topics
This course focuses on the purpose and function of the
course. Faculty-directed research may also be offered as a
criminal justice system and how it functions in society. Course
special topics course.
content covers criminal behavior and the justice system,
Instructional Hours: 2
police functions and the role of law enforcement, legal
Prerequisite: PSY101 or Permission of Instructor
aspects of criminal justice and the courts, corrections, and
PSY292-299 Special Topics in Psychology (3 credits) juvenile justice.
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Instructional Hours: 3
supervision of a College faculty member. Prerequisite: ENG101c
Instructional Hours: 3 SOC160 Conflict Management and
Prerequisite: PSY101/102 Resolution (3 credits)
This course emphasizes the principles underlying the
management and resolution of conflict arising in various
SOCIAL SCIENCE societal contexts. Course content includes identifying sources
of conflict, discussing various theories on how to resolve
SST100 Human Society (3 credits) conflict, and exploring problem solving strategies leading to
This course emphasizes the study of human society through conflict resolution.
the utilization of significant concepts taken mainly from the Instructional Hours: 3
disciplines of psychology, sociology, economics, Prerequisite: ENG092c
anthropology, and history. Major topics include personality
development, principles of culture, group interaction, SOC201 The Family (3 credits)
economic systems, inflation, modernization and demographic Nature and functions of the family in sociological perspective,
trends and analysis. This is an introductory interdisciplinary courtship and marriage systems in the United States, the
social science course and should not be taken by students dynamics of pair interaction before and after marriage,
who have taken other social science courses. Elective credit influence of the family in individual social development, and
only. family interaction.
Instructional Hours: 3 Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG092c Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c

SST290 Special Topics in Social Science (1 credit) SOC211 Social Problems (3 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the This course examines the cause of social disorganization in
supervision of a College faculty member. modern society. Included are the concerns of personal
Instructional Hours: 1 deviation and the value conflict as well as such contemporary
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor concerns as drugs, alcohol abuse, mental illness, family
conflict and crime.
SST291 Special Topics in Social Science (2 credits) Instructional Hours: 3
Students will study a topic of special interest under the Prerequisite: SOC101
supervision of a College faculty member.
Instructional Hours: 2 SOC215 Deviant Behavior (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor This course will analyze the various forms of deviant behavior
in contemporary society. Consideration will be given to
SST292-299 Special Topics in Social Science (3 credits) theories of deviance, behavioral manifestations and
Students will study a topic of special interest under the treatment of deviant behavior.
supervision of a College faculty member. Instructional Hours: 3
Instructional Hours: 3 Prerequisite: PSY101
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
SOC220 Juvenile Delinquency (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the concept of juvenile
SOCIOLOGY delinquency and examines its causes and consequences.
Topics include individual, sociological, and developmental
SOC101 Principles of Sociology (3 credits) views of delinquency; substance abuse and delinquency;
An introduction to the primary concepts, terminology, and gangs; police involvement; and trends in juvenile delinquency
methods of investigation employed in the analysis of social and delinquency prevention.
institutions. Topics include processes leading to social Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG092c

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SOC230 Principles of Anthropology (3 credits) SPN102 Elementary Spanish II (3 credits)
A general introduction to cultural anthropology covering The development of basic language skills is continued as
basic theories, research methods and a variety of topical students expand vocabulary and grammar and gain oral,
areas including language, religion, gender, ethnicity, kinship, aural, and reading proficiencies in Spanish.
family, economic life, political organization and culture Instructional Hours: 3
change. Prerequisite: SPN101
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c
SPEECH
SOC231 Leadership Development (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide emerging and existing
leaders the opportunity to explore the concept of leadership SPC101 Introduction to Communication (3 credits)
and to develop and improve skills. Approaches to leadership This course is designed to introduce the student to the
are explored as well as the moral and ethical responsibilities fundamentals of human communication and public address.
of leaders. Students will study the basic elements of the communication
Instructional Hours: 3 process; basic techniques of interpersonal communication;
Prerequisite: ENG092c; Permission of Instructor elements of speech composition and speech presentation
skills applied to informative and persuasive speaking.
SOC260 Gender Roles (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 3
An introduction to a contemporary scholarship on gender. Prerequisite: ENG092c
Primary concepts, terminology, and methods of investigation
employed in the analysis of gender roles will be examined. SPC270 Maryland Student Legislature I (1 credit)
Topics include the biology and cultural construction of This course is designed to enable each student delegate the
gender, stereotypes, identity development, sexuality, social opportunity to develop his or her public speaking skills; the
behavior, cognition and education, the paradox of ability to effectively engage in debate; and to actively
relationships, reconceptualizing the family, social institutions, participate in the process of government.
health, mental health and psychopathology. Instructional Hours: 1
Instructional Hours: 3 Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111, SPC101
Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c SPC271 Maryland Student Legislature II (1 credit)
SOC290 Special Topics in Sociology (1 credit) This course is designed to enable each student delegate the
Students will study a topic of special interest under the opportunity to develop his or her public speaking skills; the
supervision of a College faculty member. ability to effectively engage in debate; to actively participate
Instructional Hours: 1 in the process of government.
Prerequisite: SOC101 Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: SPC270
SOC291 Special Topics in Sociology (2 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the SPC290 Special Topics in Speech (1 credit)
supervision of a College faculty member. Students study a topic of special interest under the
Instructional Hours: 2 supervision of a College faculty member.
Prerequisite: SOC101 Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: SPC101
SOC292-299 Special Topics in Sociology (3 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the SPC291 Special Topics in Speech (2 credits)
supervision of a College faculty member. Students study a topic of special interest under the
Instructional Hours: 3 supervision of a College faculty member.
Prerequisite: SOC101 Instructional Hours: 2
Prerequisite: SPC101

SPC292-299 Special Topics in Speech (3 credits)


SPANISH Students study a topic of special interest under the
supervision of a College faculty member.
SPN101 Elementary Spanish I (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 3
A course designed primarily for rapid oral communication in Prerequisite: SPC101
Spanish. Students will learn to carry on short dialogues with
adequate oral comprehension, and to use a bilingual
dictionary for vocabulary development and reading THEATRE
comprehension. Fundamental grammatical constructions and
basic verb conjunctions will be taught through supplementary THE101 Introduction to The Theatre (3 credits)
written exercises. An introduction to the theatre arts with emphasis on history,
Instructional Hours: 3 theatrical forms, plays and playwrights, play analysis; and
Prerequisite: ENG101c theatre arts and crafts.
Instructional Hours: 3

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Prerequisite: ENG101/103/111c THE211-214 Theatre Performance Skills (1 credit)
Studies in theatre performance skills, Subject matter and
THE104 Fundamentals of Technical Theatre:
number of sections varies from semester to semester.
Stagecraft (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 1
Introduction to stagecraft through lecture and practical Prerequisite: None
experience. Concentration on production organization and
theatre space, tools and materials, scenery construction, THE290 Special Topics in Theatre (1 credit)
basic scene painting, and stage properties. Students will study a topic of special interest under the
Instructional Hours: 1.5 supervision of a College faculty member.
Laboratory Hours: 1.5 Instructional Hours: 1
Prerequisite: ENG090c Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

THE105 Fundamentals of Acting I (3 credits) THE291 Special Topics in Theatre (2 credits)


Introduction to the basic principles of acting with emphasis Students will study a topic of special interest under the
on relaxation and concentration; movement and mime; supervision of a College faculty member.
imagination and improvisation; dramatic action; and Instructional Hours: 2
knowledge of theatrical space. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: RS1 THE292-299 Special Topics in Theatre (3 credits)
Students will study a topic of special interest under the
THE106 Fundamentals of Technical Theatre: Lighting, supervision of a College faculty member.
Costume, Sound (3 credits) Instructional Hours: 3
Introduction to lighting, costuming, and sound technology Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
through lecture and practical experience. Concentration on
lighting equipment and procedures; tools, techniques and
materials of costume construction; sound equipment and WELDING TECHNOLOGY
application.
Instructional Hours: 1.5 WLD135 Fundamentals of Welding (2 credits)
Laboratory Hours: 1.5 Lectures, demonstrations and laboratory work relating to
Prerequisite: ENG090c methods and types of equipment used in the welding process
with special emphasis on maintenance. The fundamentals of
THE107 Fundamentals of Acting II (3 credits)
arc- and oxyacetylene will be studied in detail as well as
Continuation of THE 105 with emphasis on character analysis
properties of metals in relation to maintenance welding.
and creation, voice development, and movement. Empathic
Instructional Hours: 1
and comic techniques will be developed through scene study
Laboratory Hours: 3
and performance.
Prerequisite: None
Instructional Hours: 3
Prerequisite: THE105 or Permission of Instructor WLD136 Intermediate Welding I (2 credits)
This course is designed for students who wish to pursue
THE111-114 Theatre Workshop (1 credit)
additional knowledge and skills in the welding trade. Topics
Practical experience in the various aspects of technical
to be covered include: lap, tee and fillet welds on light steel;
production: acting, directing, design; technical theatre,
beads and manipulation of welding rod on heavy steel plate;
publicity; and box-office.
butt and lap welds on heavy steel plate; brazing and running
Instructional Hours: Arrange
beads with bronze rod; building up on cast iron; silver
Prerequisite: None
soldering ferrows and nonferrous metals; and introduction to
THE204 Introduction to Stage Design (3 credits) vertical welding.
Exploration and application of two- and three-dimensional Laboratory Hours: 4
design principles to scenery, costuming, and lighting. Prerequisite: WLD135 or Permission of Instructor
Concentration on script analysis, design development, and
WLD137 Intermediate Welding II (2 credits)
color theory.
This course is designed for the student who wishes to gain
Instructional Hours: 3
additional knowledge and welding skills in the areas of gas
Prerequisite: THE104/106; ART101/102 or Permission of
metal arc processes, welding of carbon and low-alloy steels,
Instructor
stainless steel, cast iron, cast steel and metal surfacing
THE210 Introduction to Directing (3 credits) processes.
Introduction to the theory and practice of directing live Laboratory Hours: 4
theatre with emphasis on script analysis, director-actor- Prerequisite: WLD136 or Permission of Instructor
designer communication, ground plan development, and
WLD138 Advanced Welding (2 credits)
composition.
The Advanced Welding course is designed for those students
Instructional Hours: 3
who wish to develop additional skill in MIG and TIG welding.
Prerequisite: THE104; THE105
In this course students will learn and employ the welding
procedures and practices required for passing the American

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Welding Society (AWS) MIG/TIG certification test for both
mild steel pipe and mild steel up to one inch in thickness.
(This certification is the standard D1.1 2000 SMAW/GTAW.)
AWS certification is recognized throughout the United States
and Puerto Rico. Students who wish to take the AWS
certification test at the conclusion of the course may do so
for an additional fee.
Prerequisite: WLD137 or Permission of Instructor

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES, ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY & STAFF
O FFICE OF T HE D EAN OF A CADEMIC AND S TUDENT
BOARD OF TRUSTEES A FFAIRS
2009-2010 Dean of Academic & Student Affairs ....... Rebecca McBride DiLiddo, Ph.D.
Vianne Bell Lillian R. Mitchell Executive Secretary .................... Jeanne R. Meyers, B.S.
Jason Rush Dale W. Schroyer Faculty Secretary............................ Cindy A. Lowdermilk
Ruth M. Seib Linda S. Sherbin Coordinator of Early Intervention
Duane E. Yoder Program: College & Me ....... Joseph L. Winters, M.Ed.
Jeanne H. Neff, Secretary-Treasurer Associate Dean of Academic Affairs ...... Philip Rivera, M.I.A.
Professor of Art ................... Ronald K. Skidmore, M.F.A.
Professor of Biology ............... Carolyn S. Deniker, M.Ed.
COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION Professor of English/Coordinator of Honors ..................
....................................................Gregory Jenkins, Ph.D.
President.................................................... Jeanne H. Neff Professor of Language Arts ........ Lonnie Brewster, Ed.D.
Wheeling Jesuit University, B.A. Professor of Philosophy ......... Stephen J. Herman, Ph.D.
Rice University, M.A. Professor of Psychology ........... Terry L. Kasecamp, M.S.
Carnegie-Mellon University, D.Arts Professor of Social Sciences ..... Elizabeth H. Luers, M.A.
Professor of Speech & Theatre ......................................
Dean of Academic & Student Affairs ....Rebecca McBride DiLiddo ........................................... Robert B. Sincell, Jr., M.F.A.
Milligan College, B.S. Professor of Mathematics ............. Jeffrey S. Reitz, Ph.D.
Ohio State University, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Sciences .... Linda L. Griffith, M.S.
Associate Dean of Student Life ........... Stacy Paul Miller, J.D.
Dean of Administration & Finance................. Josephine B. Gilman
Coordinator of Health Services .. Jamie Resh-Kamp, R.N.
Antioch University, B.A.
Coordinator of Residence Life ........... Kate Heiser, M.Ed.
Johns Hopkins University, M.P.H.
Asst. Coordinator of Residence Life . Kailee Craig, B.A.
Interim Dean of Continuing Education & Workforce Counselor ....................................... Madonna Pool, M.S.
Development ................................................................. Julie L. Yoder Director of Adventure Sports Michael L. Logsdon, M.S.E.E.
Frostburg State University, B.S. Secretary ............................................Sharon Elsey, A.A.
Associate Professor of Adventure Sports .......................
Dean of Marketing & Enrollment Management .... Ann Wellham ............................................. Therese M. Peterson, M.S.
Towson State University, B.S. Assistant Professor of Adventure Sports .......................
Northern Michigan University, M.A. ................................................ Andrew C. Hershey, M.S.
Frostburg State University, M.B.A. Interim Director of Athletics .............Dan Sidorowicz, M.Ed.
Athletic Trainer .................................. Mark Myers, M.S.
Dean of Information Technology .....................Catherine M. Torok Head Baseball Coach .................. Eric G. Hallenbeck, B.S.
University of Pittsburgh, B.S.
Head Men’s Basketball & Golf CoachDennis Gibson, B.A.
Indiana University of Pennsylvania, M.Ed. Head Women’s Basketball Coach ..... Thea Garland, B.A.
Director of Personnel..................................................... Linda K. Fike Head Women’s Volleyball Coach ...... Natasha Pashchuk
Garrett College, A.A. Head Softball Coach ............................... Terry Chapman
West Virginia University, B.A., M.S. Director of Business & Information Technology ....... Qing Yuan, Ed.D.
Professor of Business ................ Pramod Kapoor, M.B.A.
Director of Institutional Planning...........................James L. Allen Jr. Professor of Computers .......... Ronald L. Bertolina, M.S.
University of Delaware, B.S. Instr. of Business & Economics ..... Thomas Zwaan, M.A.
State University of New York, M.S. Director of Juvenile Justice ...............Elizabeth G. Biser, M.S.
(Sabbatical-Fall 2009)
Temp. Director of Juvenile Justice . Donald G. Markl, M.S.M.
ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPPORT STAFF (Fall 2009)
Director & Professor of Natural Resources & Wildlife
Technology ............................................. Kevin Dodge, M.S.
O FFICE OF T HE P RESIDENT Asst. Director/Assoc. Prof., Natural Resources &
President .................................................... Jeanne H. Neff, D.A. Wildlife Technology .................... Peter L. Skylstad, M.S.
Executive Assistant ........................... Marcia Knepp, B.S. Director of the Library ...................... Dana Shimrock, M.L.S.
Office Assistant .................................... Kalie Ashby, B.S. Cataloger/Systems Librarian ..... Ellen H Sheaffer, M.L.S.
Director of Personnel .................................. Linda Fike, M.S. Acquisitions, Serials, and Ref. Librarian.... Judith S. Sconyers, B.A.
Payroll & Personnel Asst .................. Nancy Garlitz, A.A. Circulation Coor & Asst Systems Librarian ....Linda D. Tomblin, A.A.
Director of Inst’l Planning ................. James L. Allen Jr., M.S. Director of Rec. & Registration ..... Kimberly L. DeGiovanni, B.A.
Inst’l Research Analyst ................ James McCrobie, A.A. Rec. & Registration Asst. ... Robin J. Swearengen, A.A.S.

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Director of Student Support Services .......To Be Determined Coord. of Distance Learning & Instr. Design ..... Denise Friend, M.B.A.
Coordinator of Career & Transfer Services ..................... Information Technology Support Tech .. John Vought, A.A.S.
................................................... Judy A. Carbone, M.Ed. Information Technology Assistant ..... Dee Durst, A.A./A.A.S.
Mathematics Center Coordinator . Timothy Foster, M.S. Management Info. Systems Administrator .. Kevin Bass, A.A.
Writing Center Coordinator ....... Jack E. DuBose, M.B.A. Network Administrator .......................... Brian Wagerer, B.S.
Network Security Specialist ..................... To Be Determined
O FFICE OF T HE D EAN OF A DMINISTRATION AND Software Support Technician ............. Garland Kearney, A.A.
F INANCE
O FFICE OF T HE D EAN OF M ARKETING AND
Dean of Administration & Finance .Josephine B. Gilman, M.P.H. E NROLLMENT M ANAGEMENT
Administrative Assistant ............................... Julia Zaiser
Bookstore Manager ....................... Marguerite Perfetti, B.S. Dean of Mktg & Enrollment Mgmt.. Ann Wellham, M.A./M.B.A.
Copy Center Manager .......................... Vaughn Vitez, A.A.S. Administrative Assistant ...................... Susan Stem, A.A.
Copy Center Assistant ........................ Kimberly Beaulieu Switchboard/Receptionist/Secretary ...... Mildred Bray
Security Coordinator ............................. Shelly Menear, B.A. Director of Admissions........................... Rachelle Davis, B.A.
Dir. of the Business Office ... Katherine B. Browning, B.S., C.P.A. Admissions Recruiter .......................Dennis Gibson, B.A.
Staff Accountant ............................. Carrie Hackett, A.A. Admissions Recruiter ................. Eric G. Hallenbeck, B.S.
Staff Accountant ............................... Trisha Mayles, B.S. Coord. of Mktg Communications/Adm. Rep .......Melissa Parker, B.A.
Accounts Payable Clerk........... Bonnie Broadwater, A.A. Graphic Designer ................................ Scott Stallings, A.A.S.
Accounting Clerk ............................... Chrissy Keller, A.A. Webmaster ........................................ Linda Stevanus, A.A.S.
Director of Financial Aid ....... Mary (Cissy) VanSickle, M.B.A.
Asst Dir of Financial Aid ........Pamela M.L. Warnick, B.A.
Financial Aid Counselor ..................... Kathy Fauber, B.S.
EMERITI HONOREES
Director of Campus Facilities ............ Jerry Zimmerman, B.S. Joan B. Crawford ................. Professor of English, Emerita
Assistant Director of Campus Facilities ........John B. Furr University of Pittsburgh, A.B.
Bldg Maintenance Coordinator .... Michael Sweitzer Frostburg State University, M.A.
Bldg Systems Coordinator .......Hugh A. Schrier, A.A.
Electrician .......................................... Steve Putlovis Lillian R. Mitchell............Dean of Academic & Student Affairs, Emerita
Facilities Maintenance Technician........ Harold Resh Towson State University, B.S.
Construction and Repair Technician .. Roger G. Sines Johns Hopkins University, M.A.
Maintenance Technician II ..............Rodney Reckart Catholic University, Ph.D.
Facilities Maintenance Technician.......Calvin Simms
Grounds and Shop Coordinator ........ Randy Murphy
Grounds Technician ........... Frederick Holtschneider
FACULTY
Grounds Technician ........................... Robert Wilson F ULL -T IME F ACULTY
Custodial Coordinator ............................ Larry Suter
Lead Custodial Technician ...........To Be Determined Ronald L. Bertolina ................................ Professor of Computers
Custodial Technician.......................... Jason Younkin Allegany College of Maryland, A.A.
Frostburg State University, B.S.
Robert Morris University, M.S.
O FFICE OF T HE D EAN OF C ONTINUING E DUCATION &
W ORKFORCE D EVELOPMENT Lonnie Brewster ............................... Professor of Language Arts
Glenville State University, B.A.
Interim Dean of Continuing Education and Workforce Adams State College, M.A.
Development ................................................. Julie L. Yoder, B.A. West Virginia University, Ed.D.
Coordinator of Operations ............................... Jean Tressler
Secretary ............................................. Carol L. Newman Carolyn S. Deniker ....................................... Professor of Biology
Secretary ............................................ Sarah Friend, A.A. University of Maryland, M.Ed.
Program Assistant .................................. Mary Dale, A.A. Frostburg State University, B.S., M.Ed.
Program Director ............................. Connie Meyers, M.B.A. Kevin Dodge ............................... Professor of Wildlife & Biology
Program Coordinator .................................. Maney Gale Utah State University
Program Director ........................................ Sue Fowler, B.A. Southwest Missouri State University, B.S.
Coor. Northern Outreach Center .............Terry Beachy, B.A. Michigan Technological University, M.S.
Coor. Southern Outreach Center..... Patricia Helmick-Baer, A.A. West Virginia University
Dir. of Garrett Info. Enterprise Center......... Lydia G. Reiser, B.S.
Linda L. Griffith ............................Associate Professor of Science
Fairmont State College, B.S.
O FFICE OF T HE D EAN OF I NFORMATION West Virginia University, M.S.
T ECHNOLOGY Hood College
Dean of Information Technology...... Catherine M. Torok, M.Ed. Stephen J. Herman ................................ Professor of Philosophy
Administrative Assistant ..................... Sue Smith, A.A.S. Paterson State College, B.A.
Classroom Support Technician .................To Be Determined University of Massachusetts, M.A., Ph.D.

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Andrew C. Hershey ......Assistant Professor of Adventure Sports George Washington University, B.A.
Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania, B.S., M.S. University of Missouri, M.Ed.
Gregory Jenkins............................................Professor of English Gregory W. Carrico ...Adjunct Instructor of Welding Technology
Frostburg State University, B.S. Garrett College, Certificate
West Virginia University, M.A.
James Damato .............................. Adjunct Instructor of Biology
Penn State University, Ph.D.
St. Peter’s College, B.S.
Pramod Kapoor ......................................... Professor of Business Jersey City State College, M.A.
University of Baroda, India, B.S. University of Florida, M.S.
University of Minnesota, B.S., M.B.A. Colorado State University, Ph.D.
Terry Brauer Kasecamp ......................... Professor of Psychology Jack DuBose ................................... Adjunct Instructor of English
Frostburg State University, B. S., M.S. University of Maryland, B.A.
Frostburg State University, M.B.A.
Elizabeth H. Luers ........................... Professor of Social Sciences
St. Joseph College Nancy L. Feather ........................ Adjunct Instructor of Sociology
Frostburg State University, B.A., M.A. West Virginia University, B.A., M.S.W.
Therese M. Peterson ... Associate Professor of Adventure Sports Kelley Flaherty .............................. Adjunct Instructor of Biology
James Madison University, B.S. Pennsylvania State University, B.S.
West Virginia University, M.S. California University of Pennsylvania, M.S.
West Virginia University
Jeffrey S. Reitz .................................... Professor of Mathematics
Penn State University, B.S. Timothy Foster .................... Adjunct Instructor of Mathematics
State University of New York, M.A., Ph.D. Garrett College, A.A.
Frostburg State University, B.S., M.S.
Robert B. Sincell, Jr. ................ Professor of Speech and Theatre
West Virginia Wesleyan College, B.A. Miranda Gallagher ............... Adjunct Instructor of Mathematics
West Virginia University, M.F.A. Garrett College, A.A.
Frostburg State University, B.S., M.A.T.
Ronald Skidmore ................................................ Professor of Art
Frostburg State University, B.S. Dennis Gibson ................... Head Men’s Basketball & Golf Coach
West Virginia University, M.F.A. Garrett College
West Virginia University, B.A.
Peter L. Skylstad .... Assoc Prof, Nat’l Resources & Wildlife Tech.
Texas Tech University, B.A., M.S. Eric G. Hallenbeck ....... Adjunct Instructor of Physical Education
Frostburg State University, B.S.
Thomas Zwaan .................Instructor of Business and Economics
University of Delaware, B.S., M.A. Gail Herman .............................. Adjunct Instructor of Education
Paterson State College, B.A.
P ART -T IME F ACULTY & C OACHES University of Massachusetts, M.A.
University of Connecticut, Ph.D.
Terry M. Beachy ...........Adjunct Instr. of Computer Applications
Garrett College, A.A.S. Jeri Jones .................................. Adjunct Instructor of Education
Allegany College, A.A. University of Houston, B.S.
University of Maryland University College, B.A. Virginia Commonwealth University, M.Ed.

Mark D. Beals . Adjunct Instr. of Nat’l Resources & Wildlife Tech Tara Kealy ..................................... Adjunct Instructor of Spanish
Garrett College, A.A.S. West Virginia University, B.A., M.A.
West Virginia University, B.F.S. Alan W. Klotz ...... Adj. Instr. of Nat’l Resources & Wildlife Tech.
Ronald M. Beiler .. Adjunct Instructor of Computer Applications East Stroudsburg University, B.S.

Judith G. Best ....... Adjunct Instructor of Developmental English William H. Knepp .................Adjunct Instructor of Earth Science
Clarion University of Pennsylvania, B.S. Garrett College, A.A.
Frostburg State University, M.Ed. University of Maryland, B.S.
West Virginia University, M.S.
Melinda Bishoff .................................... Adjunct Instructor of Art
Fairmont State University, A.A., B.A. Rick A. Latshaw ....Adj. Instr. of Nat’l Resources & Wildlife Tech.
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Amanda Bray ...... Adjunct Instructor of Developmental Mathematics West Virginia University, B.S.
Garrett College, A.A.S.
Franklin University, B.S. Jennifer Lehmann .......................... Adjunct Instructor of English
Concordia University, B.A.
Danny Broadwater......Adjunct Instr. of Developmental Mathematics Hollins University, M.A.
Frostburg State University, B.S.
Donald G. Markl ................Adjunct Instructor of Juvenile Justice
Judy A. Carbone .......................... Adjunct Instructor of Business Community College of the Air Force, A.A.

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Trident Technical College, A.A. Kaplan University
Bowie State University, B.S.
Elizabeth Show ...........Adj. Instr. of Physical Education & Health
Regis University, M.S.M.
Waynesburg College, B.S.
Linda May-Gerard ....Adj. Instr. of Developmental Mathematics University of Pittsburgh, M.S.
Garrett College, A.A.
Cynthia Smith ..................................... Adjunct Instructor of Law
West Virginia University, B.A., M.A.
Johns Hopkins University, B.S., M.S.
Connie D. Meyers ........................Adjunct Instructor of Business
Mary Stanton .. Adj Instr of Dev’l Mathematics & Language Arts
Garrett College, A.A.
Zion Christian College, B.A.
Bowie State University, B.S.
Alderson-Broaddus College
Franklin University, M.B.A.
Barry A. Stephens ..... Adj. Instr. of Developmental Mathematics
Michael Nedrow .......Adj. Instr. of Developmental Mathematics
Garrett College, A.A.
Frostburg State University, B.S.
Berea College, B.A.
Angela Plaugher-Brown ...........Adjunct Instructor of Psychology Frostburg State University, M.Ed.
Frostburg State University, B.S.
Margaret Uphold ....... Adj. Instructor of Developmental English
Argosy University, Ph.D.
Allegany College of Maryland, A.A.
Nancy J. Priselac .......................Adjunct Instructor Mathematics Frostburg State College, B.S., M.B.A.
Waynesburg College, B.S.
Gary A. Wakefield . Adjunct Instructor of Sociology & Education
West Virginia University, M.A., Ed.D.
State University of New York, B.S., M.S.
Scott W. Richardson ..... Adjunct Instructor of Adventure Sports Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, M.R.E.
Garrett College, A.A.S. West Virginia University, Ed.D.
Shepherd College, B.S.
Emily Werthman ........ Adj. Instructor of Developmental English
University of North Texas, M.S.
University of Wisconsin, B.S.
Amy Riffle-Kouyeas ......................... Adjunct Instructor of Music
Beverly Williams .......................... Adjunct Instructor of Business
Frostburg State University, B.S.
St. Leo College, B.A.
West Virginia University, M.M.
Florida Institute of Technology, M.S.
Jill Schaumloeffel ...... Adj. Instr. of Computer Information Tech. Central Michigan University, M.S.
Michigan State University, B.S.

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TITLE 13B - MARYLAND HIGHER EDUCATION COMMISSION
SUBTITLE 06 - GENERAL EDUCATION AND TRANSFER
CHAPTER 01 – PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION
AUTHORITY: EDUCATION ARTICLE, § 11-201—11-206, ANNOTATED CODE OF MARYLAND

.01 SCOPE AND APPLICABILITY. the meaning of life. Courses in the (17) “Transfer student” means a student
humanities may include the language, entering an institution for the first time
This chapter applies only to public institutions history, literature, and philosophy of having successfully completed a minimum
of higher education. Western and other cultures. of 12 semester hours at another
.02 DEFINITIONS. institution which is applicable for credit at
(10) “Mathematics” means courses that the institution the student is entering.
A. In this chapter, the following terms have provide students with numerical,
the meanings indicated. analytical, statistical, and problem-solving .02-1 ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS TO PUBLIC
skills. INSTITUTIONS.
B. Terms defined.
(11) “Native student” means a student whose A. Admission to Institutions.
(1) “A.A. degree” means the Associate of Arts initial college enrollment was at a given
degree. institution of higher education and who (1) A student attending a public institution
has not transferred to another institution who has completed an A.A., A.A.S., or A.S.
(2) “A.A.S. degree” means the Associate of degree or who has completed 56 or more
of higher education since that initial
Applied Sciences degree. semester hours of credit, may not be
enrollment.
denied direct transfer to another public
(3) “Arts” means courses that examine
(12) “Parallel program” means the program of institution if the student attained a
aesthetics and the development of the
study or courses at one institution of cumulative grade point average of at least
aesthetic form and explore the
higher education which has comparable 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent in
relationship between theory and practice.
objectives as those at another higher parallel courses, except as provided in
Courses in this area may include fine arts,
education institution, for example, a §A(4) of this regulation.
performing and studio arts, appreciation
transfer program in psychology in a
of the arts, and history of the arts. (2) A student attending a public institution
community college is definable as a
parallel program to a baccalaureate who has not completed an A.A., A.A.S., or
(4) “A.S. degree” means the Associate of
psychology program at a 4-year institution A.S. degree or who has completed fewer
Sciences degree.
of higher education. than 56 semester hours of credit, is
(5) “Biological and physical sciences” means eligible to transfer to a public institution
courses that examine living systems and (13) “Receiving institution” means the regardless of the number of credit hours
the physical universe. They introduce institution of higher education at which a earned if the student:
students to the variety of methods used to transfer student currently desires to
enroll. (a) Satisfied the admission criteria of
collect, interpret, and apply scientific data,
the receiving public institution as a high
and to an understanding of the
(14) “Recommended transfer program” means school senior; and
relationship between scientific theory and
a planned program of courses, both
application. (b) Attained at least a cumulative grade
general education and courses in the
major, taken at a community college, point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or its
(6) “English composition courses” means
which is applicable to a baccalaureate equivalent in parallel courses.
courses that provide students with
communication knowledge and skills program at a receiving institution, and (3) A student attending a public institution
appropriate to various writing situations, ordinarily the first 2 years of the who did not satisfy the admission criteria
including intellectual inquiry and academic baccalaureate degree. of a receiving public institution as a high
research. school senior, but who has earned
(15) “Sending institution” means the
institution of higher education of most sufficient credits at a public institution to
(7) “General education” means the
recent previous enrollment by a transfer be classified by the receiving public
foundation of the higher education
student at which transferable academic institution as a sophomore, shall meet the
curriculum providing a coherent
credit was earned. stated admission criteria developed and
intellectual experience for all students.
published by the receiving public
(8) “General education program” means a (16) “Social and behavioral sciences” means institution for transfer.
program that is designed to: courses that examine the psychology of
individuals and the ways in which (4) If the number of students seeking
(a) Introduce undergraduates to the individuals, groups, or segments of society admission exceeds the number that can
fundamental knowledge, skills, and values behave, function, and influence one be accommodated at a receiving public
that are essential to the study of academic another. The courses include, but are not institution, admission decisions shall be:
disciplines; limited to, subjects which focus on: (a) Based on criteria developed and
(b) Encourage the pursuit of life-long (a) History and cultural diversity; published by the receiving public
learning; and institution; and
(b) Concepts of groups, work, and
(c) Foster the development of political systems; (b) Made to provide fair and equal
educated members of the community and treatment for native and transfer
the world. (c) Applications of qualitative and students.
quantitative data to social issues; and
(9) “Humanities” means courses that examine B. Admission to Programs.
the values and cultural heritage that (d) Interdependence of individuals,
society, and the physical environment. (1) A receiving public institution may require
establish the framework for inquiry into
higher performance standards for

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admission to some programs if the (a) Arts and humanities, be applied only to one area of general
standards and criteria for admission to the education.
program: (b) Social and behavioral sciences,
G. A public institution may allow a speech
(a) Are developed and published by the (c) Biological and physical sciences, communication or foreign language
receiving public institution; and (d) Mathematics, and course to be part of the arts and
humanities category.
(b) Maintain fair and equal treatment (e) English composition; or
for native and transfer students. H. Composition and literature courses may
(2) Conforming with COMAR be placed in the arts and humanities area
(2) If the number of students seeking 13B.02.02.16D(2)(b)-----(c). if literature is included as part of the
admission exceeds the number that can content of the course.
be accommodated in a particular B. Each core course used to satisfy the
professional or specialized program, distribution requirements of §A(1) of this I. Public institutions may not include
admission decisions shall be: regulation shall carry at least 3 semester physical education skills courses as part of
hours. the general education requirements.
(a) Based on criteria developed and
published by the receiving public C. General education programs of public J. General education courses shall reflect
institution; and institutions shall require at least: current scholarship in the discipline and
provide reference to theoretical
(b) Made to provide fair and equal (1) One course in each of two disciplines in
frameworks and methods of inquiry
treatment for native and transfer arts and humanities;
appropriate to academic disciplines.
students.
(2) One course in each of two disciplines in
K. Courses that are theoretical may include
(3) Courses taken at a public institution as social and behavioral sciences;
applications, but all applications courses
part of a recommended transfer program shall include theoretical components if
(3) Two science courses, at least one of which
leading toward a baccalaureate degree they are to be included as meeting general
shall be a laboratory course;
shall be applicable to related programs at education requirements.
a receiving public institution granting the (4) One course in mathematics at or above
baccalaureate degree. the level of college algebra; and L. Public institutions may incorporate
knowledge and skills involving the use of
C. Receiving Institution Program (5) One course in English composition. quantitative data, effective writing,
Responsibility. information retrieval, and information
D. Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues.
(1) The faculty of a receiving public institution literacy when possible in the general
is responsible for development and (1) In addition to the five required areas in §A education program.
determination of the program of this regulation, a public institution may
include up to 8 semester hours in a sixth M. Notwithstanding §A(1) of this regulation, a
requirements in major fields of study for a public 4-year institution may require 48
baccalaureate degree, including courses in category that addresses emerging issues
that institutions have identified as semester hours of required core courses if
the major field of study taken in the lower courses upon which the institution’s
division. essential to a full program of general
education for their students. These curriculum is based carry 4 semester
(2) A receiving public institution may set courses may: hours.
program requirements in major fields of N. Public institutions shall develop systems to
study which simultaneously fulfill general (a) Be integrated into other general
education courses or may be presented as ensure that courses approved for inclusion
education requirements. on the list of general education courses
separate courses; and
(3) A receiving public institution, in are designed and assessed to comply with
developing lower division course work, (b) Include courses that: the requirements of this chapter.
shall exchange information with other (i) Provide an interdisciplinary .04 TRANSFER OF GENERAL EDUCATION CREDIT.
public institutions to facilitate the transfer examination of issues across the five
of credits into its programs. areas, or A. A student transferring to one public
institution from another public institution
.03 GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR PUBLIC (ii) Address other categories of shall receive general education credit for
INSTITUTIONS. knowledge, skills, and values that lie work completed at the student’s sending
A. While public institutions have the outside of the five areas. institution as provided by this chapter.
autonomy to design their general (2) Public institutions may not include the B. A completed general education program
education program to meet their unique courses in this section in a general shall transfer without further review or
needs and mission, that program shall education program unless they provide approval by the receiving institution and
conform to the definitions and common academic content and rigor equivalent to without the need for a course-by-course
standards in this chapter. A public the areas in §A(1) of this regulation. match.
institution shall satisfy the general
education requirement by: E. General education programs leading to C. Courses that are defined as general
the A.A.S. degree shall include at least 20 education by one institution shall transfer
(1) Requiring each program leading to the semester hours from the same course list as general education even if the receiving
A.A. or A.S. degree to include not less than designated by the sending institution for institution does not have that specific
30 and not more than 36 semester hours, the A.A. and A.S. degrees. The A.A.S. course or has not designated that course
and each baccalaureate degree program degree shall include at least one 3- as general education.
to include not less than 40 and not more semester-hour course from each of the
than 46 semester hours of required core five areas listed in §A(1) of this regulation. D. The receiving institution shall give lower-
courses, with the core requiring, at a division general education credits to a
minimum, course work in each of the F. A course in a discipline listed in more than transferring student who has taken any
following five areas: one of the areas of general education may part of the lower-division general

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education credits described in Regulation .05 TRANSFER OF NONGENERAL EDUCATION (4) The receiving institution shall inform a
.03 of this chapter at a public institution PROGRAM CREDIT. transfer student of the procedures for
for any general education courses validation of course work for which there
successfully completed at the sending A. Transfer to Another Public Institution. is no clear equivalency. Examples of
institution. (1) Credit earned at any public institution in validation procedures include ACE
the State is transferable to any other recommendations, portfolio assessment,
E. Except as provided in Regulation .03M of credit through challenge, examinations,
this chapter, a receiving institution may public institution if the:
and satisfactory completion of the next
not require a transfer student who has (a) Credit is from a college or university course in sequence in the academic area.
completed the requisite number of parallel course or program;
general education credits at any public (5) The receiving baccalaureate degree-
college or university to take, as a condition (b) Grades in the block of courses transferred granting institution shall use validation
of graduation, more than 10-----16 average 2.0 or higher; and procedures when a transferring student
additional semester hours of general successfully completes a course at the
(c) Acceptance of the credit is consistent with
education and specific courses required of lower-division level that the receiving
the policies of the receiving institution
all students at the receiving institution, institution offers at the upper-division
governing native students following the
with the total number not to exceed 46 level. The validated credits earned for the
same program.
semester hours. This provision does not course shall be substituted for the upper-
relieve students of the obligation to (2) If a native student’s “D” grade in a specific division course.
complete specific academic program course is acceptable in a program, then a
requirements or course prerequisites D. Program Articulation.
“D” earned by a transfer student in the
required by a receiving institution. same course at a sending institution is also (1) Recommended transfer programs shall be
acceptable in the program. Conversely, if a developed through consultation between
F. A sending institution shall designate on or
native student is required to earn a grade the sending and receiving institutions. A
with the student transcript those courses
of “C” or better in a required course, the recommended transfer program
that have met its general education
transfer student shall also be required to represents an agreement between the
requirements, as well as indicate whether
earn a grade of “C” or better to meet the two institutions that allows students
the student has completed the general
same requirement. aspiring to the baccalaureate degree to
education program.
plan their programs. These programs
B. Credit earned in or transferred from a
G. A.A.S. Degrees. constitute freshman/sophomore level
community college is limited to:
course work to be taken at the community
(1) While there may be variance in the college in fulfillment of the receiving
(1) 1/2 the baccalaureate degree program
numbers of hours of general education institution’s lower division course work
requirement, but may not be more than
required for A.A., A.S., and A.A.S. degrees requirement.
70 semester hours; and
at a given institution, the courses
identified as meeting general education (2) The first 2 years of the undergraduate (2) Recommended transfer programs in effect
requirements for all degrees shall come education experience. at the time that this regulation takes
from the same general education course effect, which conform to this chapter, may
list and exclude technical or career C. Nontraditional Credit. be retained.
courses. (1) The assignment of credit for AP, CLEP, or .06 ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND GENERAL WELL-BEING
(2) An A.A.S. student who transfers into a other nationally recognized standardized OF TRANSFER STUDENTS.
receiving institution with fewer than the examination scores presented by transfer
total number of general education credits students is determined according to the A. Sending Institutions.
designated by the receiving institution same standards that apply to native
(1) Community colleges shall encourage their
shall complete the difference in credits students in the receiving institution, and
students to complete the associate degree
according to the distribution as designated the assignment shall be consistent with
or to complete 56 hours in a
by the receiving institution. Except as the State minimum requirements.
recommended transfer program which
provided in Regulation .03M of this (2) Transfer of credit from the following areas includes both general education courses
chapter, the total general education shall be consistent with COMAR and courses applicable toward the
credits for baccalaureate degree-granting 13B.02.02. and shall be evaluated by the program at the receiving institution.
public receiving institutions may not receiving institution on a course-by-course
exceed 46 semester hours. (2) Community college students are
basis:
encouraged to choose as early as possible
H. Student Responsibilities. A student is held: (a) Technical courses from career the institution and program into which
(1) Accountable for the loss of credits that: programs; they expect to transfer.

(a) Result from changes in the (b) Course credit awarded through (3) The sending institution shall:
student’s selection of the major program articulation agreements with other
(a) Provide to community college
of study, segments or agencies;
students information about the specific
(b) Were earned for remedial course (c) Credit awarded for clinical practice transferability of courses at 4-year
work, or or cooperative education experiences; and colleges;

(c) Exceed the total course credits (d) Credit awarded for life and work (b) Transmit information about
accepted in transfer as allowed by this experiences. transfer students who are capable of
chapter; and honors work or independent study to the
(3) The basis for the awarding of the credit receiving institution; and
(2) Responsible for meeting all requirements shall be indicated on the student’s
of the academic program of the receiving transcript by the receiving institution. (c) Promptly supply the receiving
institution. institution with all the required
documents if the student has met all

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financial and other obligations of the disruption. Transfer students are not receiving institution within 20 working
sending institution for transfer. required to repeat equivalent course work days of receiving notice of the denial of
successfully completed at a community credit.
B. Receiving Institutions. college.
C. Response by Receiving Institution.
(1) Admission requirements and curriculum .08 TRANSFER MEDIATION COMMITTEE.
prerequisites shall be stated explicitly in (1) A receiving institution shall:
institutional publications. A. There is a Transfer Mediation Committee,
appointed by the Secretary, which is (a) Establish expeditious and simplified
(2) A receiving institution shall admit transfer representative of the public 4-year procedures governing the appeal of a
students from newly established public colleges and universities and the denial of transfer of credit; and
colleges that are functioning with the community colleges.
approval of the Maryland Higher (b) Respond to a student’s appeal
Education Commission on the same basis B. Sending and receiving institutions that within 10 working days.
as applicants from regionally accredited disagree on the transferability of general (2) An institution may either grant or deny an
colleges. education courses as defined by this appeal. The institution’s reasons for
chapter shall submit their disagreements denying the appeal shall be consistent
(3) A receiving institution shall evaluate the to the Transfer Mediation Committee. The
transcript of a degree-seeking transfer with this chapter and conveyed to the
Transfer Mediation Committee shall student in written form.
student as expeditiously as possible, and address general questions regarding
notify the student of the results not later existing or past courses only, not (3) Unless a student appeals to the sending
than mid-semester of the student’s first individual student cases, and shall also institution, the written decision in §C(2) of
semester of enrollment at the receiving address questions raised by institutions this regulation constitutes the receiving
institution, if all official transcripts have about the acceptability of new general institution’s final decision and is not
been received at least 15 working days education courses. As appropriate, the subject to appeal.
before mid-semester. The receiving Committee shall consult with faculty on
institution shall inform a student of the D. Appeal to Sending Institution.
curricular issues.
courses which are acceptable for transfer
(1) If a student has been denied transfer
credit and the courses which are C. The findings of the Transfer Mediation
credit after an appeal to the receiving
applicable to the student’s intended Committee are considered binding on
institution, the student may request the
program of study. both parties.
sending institution to intercede on the
(4) A receiving institution shall give a transfer .09 APPEAL PROCESS. student’s behalf by contacting the transfer
student the option of satisfying coordinator of the sending institution.
institutional graduation requirements that A. Notice of Denial of Transfer Credit by a
Receiving Institution. (2) A student shall make an appeal to the
were in effect at the receiving institution
sending institution within 10 working days
at the time the student enrolled as a (1) Except as provided in §A(2) of this of having received the decision of the
freshman at the sending institution. In the regulation, a receiving institution shall receiving institution.
case of major requirements, a transfer inform a transfer student in writing of the
student may satisfy the major denial of transfer credit not later than E. Consultation Between Sending and
requirements in effect at the time when mid-semester of the transfer student’s Receiving Institutions.
the student was identifiable as pursuing first semester, if all official transcripts
the recommended transfer program at the (1) Representatives of the two institutions
have been received at least 15 working
sending institution. These conditions are shall have 15 working days to resolve the
days before mid-semester.
applicable to a student who has been issues involved in an appeal.
continuously enrolled at the sending (2) If transcripts are submitted after 15
(2) As a result of a consultation in this section,
institution. working days before mid-semester of a
the receiving institution may affirm,
student’s first semester, the receiving
.07 PROGRAMMATIC CURRENCY. modify, or reverse its earlier decision.
institution shall inform the student of
A. A receiving institution shall provide to the credit denied within 20 working days of (3) The receiving institution shall inform a
community college current and accurate receipt of the official transcript. student in writing of the result of the
information on recommended transfer consultation.
(3) A receiving institution shall include in the
programs and the transferability status of notice of denial of transfer credit: (4) The decision arising out of a consultation
courses. Community college students shall constitutes the final decision of the
have access to this information. (a) A statement of the student’s right
receiving institution and is not subject to
to appeal; and
B. Recommended transfer programs shall be appeal.
developed with each community college (b) A notification that the appeal
.10 PERIODIC REVIEW.
whenever new baccalaureate programs process is available in the institution’s
are approved by the degree-granting catalog. A. Report by Receiving Institution.
institution.
(4) The statement of the student’s right to (1) A receiving institution shall report
C. When considering curricular changes, appeal the denial shall include notice of annually the progress of students who
institutions shall notify each other of the the time limitations in §B of this transfer from 2-year and 4-year
proposed changes that might affect regulation. institutions within the State to each
transfer students. An appropriate community college and to the Secretary of
B. A student believing that the receiving
mechanism shall be created to ensure that the Maryland Higher Education
institution has denied the student transfer
both 2-year and 4-year public colleges Commission.
credits in violation of this chapter may
provide input or comments to the
initiate an appeal by contacting the (2) An annual report shall include ongoing
institution proposing the change.
receiving institution’s transfer coordinator reports on the subsequent academic
Sufficient lead time shall be provided to
or other responsible official of the success of enrolled transfer students,
effect the change with minimum

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including graduation rates, by major and procedures outlined in this chapter Effective date: December 4, 1995 (22:24 Md. R. 1901)
subject areas. and interpreting transfer policies to the Regulation .02B amended effective July 1, 1996
individual student and to the institution. (23:13 Md. R. 946)
(3) A receiving institution shall include in the
reports comparable information on the C. The Maryland Higher Education Regulation .02-1 adopted effective April 6, 1998 (25:7
progress of native students. Commission shall establish a permanent Md. R. 528)
Student Transfer Advisory Committee that
B. Transfer Coordinator. A public institution Regulation .03 amended effective July 1, 1996 (23:13
meets regularly to review transfer issues Md. R. 946)
of higher education shall designate a and recommend policy changes as
transfer coordinator, who serves as a needed. The Student Transfer Advisory Regulation .05A amended effective July 1, 1996
resource person to transfer students at Committee shall address issues of (23:13 Md. R. 946)
either the sending or receiving campus. interpretation and implementation of this
The transfer coordinator is responsible for chapter.
overseeing the application of the policies

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INDEX
Academic Advising ................................................................ 32 Career Advancement Programs ...............................................5
Academic Common Market .................................................... 9 Career Services ......................................................................33
Academic Dismissal ............................................................... 45 Certificate Programs ................................................................7
Appeal .............................................................................. 45 Certificate Requirements..........................................................37
Academic Good Standing ...................................................... 45 Change of Program ..................................................................37
Academic Grading System .................................................... 39 Change of Program Requirements ........................................47
Academic Probation.............................................................. 45 Chemistry ............................................................................104
Academic Program Information ............................................... 37 Class Status ............................................................................14
Academic Programs ................................................................ 1 CLEP .......................................................................................16
Academic Regulations ........................................................... 39 College Administration ........................................................131
Academic Standing and Degree Progress ............................. 44 College Level Examination Program (CLEP) ................................16
Acceptance of Credits Into Garrett College .......................... 14 College Work Study ...............................................................27
Accessibility for Handicapped Students ................................ 10 Commencement ....................................................................46
Accounting ............................................................................ 95 Commercial Vehicle Transportation Specialist ....................105
Accreditation .......................................................................... 1 Commercial Vehicle Transportation Specialist – CERT ..........93
Adding Courses ..................................................................... 42 Community College Alliance Program .....................................8
Adds, Drops and Withdrawals .............................................. 42 Computer Applications ........................................................105
Administrative and Support Staff............................................ 131 Computer Applications For Business – A.A.S. ........................67
Admissions ...................................................................... 11, 13 Computer Applications For Business – Certificate .................68
Designated Gifted and Talented ....................................... 13 Computer Information Technology .....................................106
High School Students ........................................................ 11 Computer Repair and Network Technician – CERT ................74
International Students ...................................................... 11 Computer Science................................................................109
Transfer Students ............................................................. 11 Conferral of Degrees and Commencement ...........................46
Under 16 Years of Age ...................................................... 11 Continuing Education and Workforce Development .............34
Without a High School Diploma ....................................... 11 Co-Requisites and Prerequisites ............................................95
Adult Basic Education ........................................................... 34 Counseling .............................................................................34
Advanced Placement Credit .................................................. 16 Course Attendance Policy ......................................................40
Adventure Sports .................................................................. 95 Course Descriptions ...............................................................95
Adventure Sports Management – A.A.S. ................................... 52 Course Load ...........................................................................14
Adventure Sports Management - Certificate ........................ 53 Credit by Examination ...........................................................16
Affirmative Action for Educational Opportunity ..................... 9 Cybersecurity – CERT .............................................................74
Air Force................................................................................ 27 Dean’s List .............................................................................44
Appeal Deferred Payment Plan .........................................................23
Academic Dismissal .......................................................... 45 Degree Conferral ...................................................................46
Appeals Degree Requirements ............................................................37
Final Grade ....................................................................... 40 Degrees
Residency ......................................................................... 19 Dual Certificate and AA/AAS Degree .................................47
Army ..................................................................................... 27 Dual Major ........................................................................47
Continuing Education System Scholarship ....................... 27 Earning A Second Certificate .............................................47
National Guard Grant ....................................................... 27 Petition for Change of Requirements ................................47
Art ....................................................................................... 100 Second Degree ..................................................................47
Articulation Agreements ......................................................... 8 Substitutions .....................................................................47
Associate in Applied Science ................................................... 5 Waivers .............................................................................47
Associate in Arts Degree Programs ......................................... 1 Delinquent Accounts .............................................................23
Associate in Arts in Teaching Degree ...................................... 4 Designated Gifted and Talented ............................................13
Athletics ................................................................................ 29 Developmental Coursework ..................................................40
Attendance Policy ................................................................. 40 Diplomas ................................................................................46
Auditing Courses ................................................................... 41 Non-claimed ......................................................................46
Awards .................................................................................. 44 Replacements ....................................................................46
Biology ................................................................................ 102 Directory Information ............................................................31
Blackboard Courses .............................................................. 43 Disability Services ..................................................................33
Board of Trustees................................................................ 131 Disabled .................................................................................23
Business .............................................................................. 103 Dismissal
Business Administration – A.A. ............................................. 64 Academic ...........................................................................45
Business Management – A.A.S.............................................. 65 Appeal ...............................................................................45
Business Management – Certificate ..................................... 66 Displaced Homemakers .........................................................28
Cafe ....................................................................................... 29 Distance Learning ..................................................................43
Calculating Grade Point Average .......................................... 41 Dropping Courses ..................................................................42

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Dual Enrollment Students......................................................... 14 Grievance Procedures ........................................................... 10
Dual Major............................................................................. 47 Educational Equity ............................................................ 10
Early Childhood Education – A.A. .......................................... 86 Guaranteed Access Grants .................................................... 26
Earth Science ....................................................................... 109 Harassment/Assault Policy.................................................... 10
Economics ........................................................................... 110 Health.................................................................................. 114
Education ............................................................................ 110 Health Services ...................................................................... 34
Educational Assistance Grants .............................................. 26 High School Students ............................................................ 14
Educational Excellence Award Program ................................ 26 History ................................................................................. 114
Educational Opportunity ......................................................... 9 Holds ..................................................................................... 23
Elementary Education – A.A. ................................................. 87 Honors List ............................................................................ 44
Elementary Education – A.A.T. .............................................. 88 Honors Program .................................................................... 44
Emeriti Honorees ................................................................ 132 House of Delegates Scholarship ............................................ 26
English ................................................................................. 111 Housing Costs ........................................................................ 21
English Proficiency................................................................. 13 How Do You Apply?............................................................... 13
Enrollment and Grading Status ............................................. 43 Humanities .......................................................................... 115
Environmental Technology.................................................. 113 Identity and Difference Courses............................................ 38
Faculty ................................................................................. 132 Independent Study................................................................ 43
Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) ................. 31 Institutional Goals ................................................................... 1
Federal Campus Work Study ................................................. 25 Institutional Labor Pool ......................................................... 27
Federal Direct Loan Program................................................. 25 International Student Admissions ......................................... 11
Federal Parent (PLUS) Loans ................................................. 26 International Students
Federal Pell Grants ................................................................ 25 Course Load ...................................................................... 34
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant ......... 25 F-1 Transfer Students ....................................................... 12
Fees ....................................................................................... 21 F-1 Visa Applications ......................................................... 12
Financial Aid Financial Information........................................................ 34
Federally Funded .............................................................. 25 On-Campus Employment .................................................. 34
State Funded Program ...................................................... 26 Optional Practical Training Program ................................. 34
Financial Aid Policy ................................................................ 24 Scholarships ...................................................................... 34
Financial Aid Programs .......................................................... 24 Services ............................................................................. 33
Fine and Performing Arts– A.A. ............................................. 56 Journalism ........................................................................... 115
Food Service .......................................................................... 29 Juvenile Justice.................................................................... 116
Franklin University .................................................................. 8 Juvenile Justice – A.A.S. ........................................................ 78
French ................................................................................. 114 Juvenile Justice – CERT .......................................................... 79
Full-Time Students ................................................................... 14 Laker Hall .............................................................................. 29
Garrett College Outreach Centers ........................................... 9 Language Arts ..................................................................... 116
Garrett Foundation Scholarships........................................... 26 Law Enforcement ................................................................ 117
Garrett Hall ............................................................................ 29 Learning Resources Center ..................................................... 9
GED Testing ........................................................................... 34 Learning Skills...................................................................... 117
General Education Requirements ............................................. 37 Learning Support Services ..................................................... 32
Approved Courses ............................................................. 38 Liberal Arts – A.A. .................................................................. 57
General Studies – A.A. ........................................................... 75 Life Experience Assessment Program ................................... 15
Geography ........................................................................... 114 Loan Programs ...................................................................... 25
GI Bill ..................................................................................... 26 Main Campus .......................................................................... 9
Grade Equivalent Maryland On-line .................................................................. 43
College-level Coursework ................................................. 39 Maryland State-Funded Financial Aid Programs ................... 26
Pre-College-level Coursework ........................................... 40 Mathematics ....................................................................... 118
Grade Forgiveness ................................................................. 41 Mathematics/Sciences – A.A................................................. 58
Grade Point Average ............................................................. 41 Merit List ............................................................................... 44
Grades ................................................................................... 39 Military Assistance Programs ................................................ 26
Appeal ............................................................................... 40 Military Credit ......................................................................... 15
College-level Coursework ................................................. 39 Mission and Goals ................................................................... 1
Pre-College-level Coursework ........................................... 40 MTDI
Graduation ............................................................................ 45 Adds, Drops, and Withdrawals ......................................... 42
Applying For ...................................................................... 46 Music ................................................................................... 120
Commencement ............................................................... 46 Natural Resources & Wildlife Technology – A.A.S................. 82
Conferral of Degrees ......................................................... 46 Natural Resources & Wildlife Technology – CERT ................. 83
Requirements ................................................................... 46 Natural Resources and Wildlife Technology ....................... 121
Special Petition to Participate in May Commencement ... 46 Navy ...................................................................................... 27
Graduation Honors ................................................................ 44 Network Administration – A.A.S. .......................................... 72
Grants .................................................................................... 25 Network Administration – CERT............................................ 74
Graphic Web Design – A.A.S. ........................................... 69, 70 New Horizons Program ......................................................... 28

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Off Campus Services ............................................................. 34 Social and Behavioral Sciences – A.A. ....................................59
On-line Courses Social and Behavioral Sciences – CERT ..................................60
Testing .............................................................................. 33 Social Science ......................................................................127
On-line Learning.................................................................... 43 Sociology .............................................................................127
Outcomes Assessment .......................................................... 39 Solomon Amendment............................................................32
Outreach Centers .................................................................... 9 Spanish ................................................................................128
Parent (PLUS) Loans .............................................................. 26 Special Needs ........................................................................33
Part-Time Students ................................................................. 14 Special Student ......................................................................14
Payment Responsibility for Minor Students ......................... 23 Speech .................................................................................128
Phi Theta Kappa .................................................................... 44 Stafford Loan .........................................................................25
Philosophy .......................................................................... 122 Student Activities...................................................................29
Physical Education .............................................................. 123 Student Classifications ...........................................................14
Physical Education & Health – A.A. ....................................... 89 Student Code of Conduct ......................................................29
Physics ................................................................................ 124 Student Government .............................................................29
Political Science .................................................................. 125 Student Labor Programs ........................................................27
Portfolio Assessment ............................................................ 16 Student Organizations ...........................................................29
Pre-College Education—Development Studies ..................... 40 Student Records ....................................................................31
Pre-Nursing Articulated Transfer ............................................ 8 Student Residency ...................................................................16
Probation Student Right to Know ...........................................................32
Academic .......................................................................... 45 Student Support Services ......................................................32
Programs of Study .................................................................. 1 Subsidized Stafford Loan .......................................................25
AA Degrees ......................................................................... 1 Substitutions ..........................................................................47
AAS Degrees ....................................................................... 5 Teacher Education – CERT .....................................................91
AAT Degrees ....................................................................... 4 Testing
Certificates ......................................................................... 7 Make-up Exams .................................................................33
Non-degree Transfer Programs .......................................... 8 On-line Courses .................................................................33
Psychology .......................................................................... 126 Students with Documented Special Needs .......................33
Readmission Testing Center .......................................................................32
Grade Forgiveness ............................................................ 41 The Campus .............................................................................9
Recognition List..................................................................... 44 Theatre ................................................................................128
Records and Registration ...................................................... 31 Transfer Programs ...................................................................8
Refund Policy ........................................................................ 21 AA Degrees ..........................................................................1
Refunds AAT Degrees ........................................................................4
Tuition .............................................................................. 42 Transfer Services ...................................................................33
Registration........................................................................... 31 Transferring Credits ...............................................................15
Remedial Coursework ........................................................... 40 Transferring from Garrett .........................................................33
Repair/Network Technician – A.A.S. ..................................... 73 Tuition ...................................................................................21
Repayment Policy ................................................................. 22 Tuition Reciprocity Agreement ..............................................23
Repeated Courses ................................................................. 41 Tuition Refunds .....................................................................42
Residence Life ....................................................................... 29 Tuition, Fees, and Other Expenses ........................................21
Residency .............................................................................. 16 Tutoring .................................................................................32
Changing ........................................................................... 19 United States Air Force ..........................................................27
Foreign Nationals ............................................................. 18 United States Army................................................................27
Military Personnel ............................................................ 18 United States Naval Reserve Allied Medical Personnel
Retirees ................................................................................. 23 Program (RAMP) ...............................................................27
Returned Checks ................................................................... 23 United States Navy ................................................................27
Schedule Changes ................................................................. 42 Waivers ..................................................................................47
Scholarships .......................................................................... 26 Welding Technology ............................................................129
Scholastic Recognition .......................................................... 44 West Virginia Reciprocity.......................................................23
Secondary Education – A.A. .................................................. 90 Who May Apply? ...................................................................11
Senatorial Scholarship .......................................................... 26 Wildlife / Fisheries – A.A........................................................61
Senior Citizens ...................................................................... 23 Withdraw ...............................................................................42
Single Parents ....................................................................... 28

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