You are on page 1of 1

Malagasy dialect divisions: genetic vs.

 emblematic criteria 
 
Alexander Adelaar 
Asia Institute, University of Melbourne 
 
Jacques Dez, the father of modern Malagasy dialectology, believed that a basic criterion 
for a genetic division of Malagasy dialects is the way they reflect Proto Austronesian *li 
and *ti. These phoneme sequences became respectively li and ti in south‐western 
dialects (including South Sakalava), and di and tsi in other dialects (including the 
dominant Merina dialect). For instance, PMP *lima 'five' became South Sakalava lime 
and Merina dimi; PMP *putiq 'white' became South Sakalava futi, Merina futsi (cf. Dez 
1963).  
  According to Pierre Simon (1988), this criterion does not hold because the 
distinctions in question also exist among the various South East Barito varieties in 
Central and South Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), which are directly related to 
Malagasy. He argues that these distinctions must already have existed at the time of the 
Malagasy migrations to East Africa and are therefore not the result of a split that took 
place in Madagascar itself. Simon's argument can also be interpreted in other ways and 
is not necessarily irreconcilable with Dez' theory. However, it is strengthened by some 
additional factors, which clearly demonstrate that the changes from *li to di and from 
*ti to tsi are no evidence for a genetic division between south‐western/non‐south‐
western dialects. Rather, these changes must have spread from the centre of 
Madagascar towards the East coast and other parts of the island, conforming to a wave 
model. 
  It is still quite possible that the south‐western dialects form a separate branch 
that split off from Proto Malagasy at an early stage, but further evidence is required to 
demonstrate this beyond reasonable doubt. Such evidence can be gleaned from the 
development of personal pronouns in the various dialects, for example. 
  Classifying Malagasy dialects is not a sheer heuristic exercise but has a direct 
bearing on theories about the settlement of Madagascar by Austronesian speakers: was 
there one migration wave, or were there several? 
 
 
References 
 
Dez, Jacques, 1963, Aperçu pour une dialectologie de la langue malgache. Bulletin de 
Madagascar 204:441–451; 205:507–520; 206:581–607; 210:973–994. 
Simon, Pierre, 1988, Ny fiteny fahizahy. reconstitution et periodisation du malgache
  ancient jusqu’au XIVe siecle. Travaux et documents 5 du CEROI. Paris: Institut
  des Langues et Civilisations Orientales.