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HOGWARTS Assessment Task

PRIVATE COLLEGE
Stage 6, Year 12 Food Technology (HSC) 2018
9.3 Food Product Development
TASK 2: Experimentation, Survey and Portfolio DATE OF ISSUE: Week 4, Term 1
MODE OF ASSESSMENT: In class Take-home DUE DATES:
Draft Ideas Generation: Week 10, Term 1
Draft Market Research: Week 1, Term 2
Draft Packaging and Advertising: Week 2, Term 2
DUE DATE FINAL: Week 3, Term 2
MARKS: /60 WEIGHTING: 30%
OUTCOMES TO BE ASSESSED:
H1.3 Justifies processes of food product development and manufacture in terms of market, technology and
environmental considerations
H4.1 Develops, prepares and presents food using product development processes
IN THIS TASK YOU WILL BE ASSESSED ON HOW WELL YOU:
- Propose creative solutions in designing a new food product, by implementing the steps in the food product
development process
- Effectively plans and markets a prototype
- Assess and modify your prototype
STUDENTS TO COMPLETE:
Students Name:
Food Technology Teacher’s Name:

CONTEXT:
Food product development is an integrated system involving expertise in the field of marketing and manufacture.
The food product development process applies knowledge and skills developed through a range of areas, including
nutrition, food properties and food manufacture.

TASK DESCRIPTION:
Imagine you are employed by Arnott’s to produce a new product or a new line extension of a product to launch at
the Hogwarts Private College Cook Off. This Cook Off is available to the surrounding community who would come
to try your product. You have also been asked to propose a marketing, packaging and advertising campaign.

The design brief given to you for the creation of the new product include:
- You need to choose your target market e.g. 8-15 year olds, 16-21 year olds or 21+ year olds
- You must investigate the packaging options and design an appropriate package complete with labelling
- Develop a suitable advertisement for your new food product

It is important you read the marking rubric to ensure you complete and submit all aspects of this task in
conjunction with the following information

Ideas Generation
Create 2 different products that you can make (prototypes) and submit a recipe for each. They must be made
commencing with basic ingredients. No packaged cake mixes or similar to be used. You need to consider the
preparation and cooking time. You will only have 2 periods to prepare and clean up. Sensory testing will be done in
class (you must bring additional ingredients in). See end of task for what ingredients will be provided per student.
Create a sensory evaluation sheet for testers to fill in. Include at least 20 completed sensory evaluations. Submit an
analytical report of each possible alternative products including a final evaluation on each. You may submit a
draft submission of your 2 different recipes, sensory evaluation and analytical report to your classroom teacher to
receive feedback by Week 10, Term 1.
Market Research
Develop a survey for your target market to find out what they would like, a minimum of 8 suitable questions. Submit
a blank copy of your survey, your completed surveys (at least 20) and an analysis of the findings (use graphs to
show survey results and to help visually support your comments). Submit an explanation of how this product will
sell in the marketplace. Submit a copy of the recipe for the final product proposed for marketing. Give your final
product a name. You may submit a draft submission of your survey before you distribute them and your
explanation to your classroom teacher to receive feedback by Week 1, Term 2.

Packaging and Advertising


For your chosen food product research suitable packaging styles and materials. Produce a labelled diagram of
packaging for your food product. State and justify suitable materials to be used and draw the package with correct
food labelling and marketing colours.
Design and produce a suitable advertising campaign to mark the launch of your new food product. The advertising
campaign can be for the written media i.e. papers and magazines, billboards, radio or television. Justify the
medium used for the launch campaign and how it is appropriate for the target market.
You may submit a draft submission of your labelled diagram for your packaging and justification for materials used
to your classroom teacher to receive feedback by Week 2, Term 2
NOTE: If you are doing a video campaign for television etc this must be handed in on a USB on the due date.
Submit radio campaign similarly. They must not exceed 1 minute 30 seconds. Ensure they are properly labelled
with your name.

Final Product
You are to prepare the selected recipe during the practical lesson. You must supply additional ingredients and
professionally present your food product. ALL SECTIONS OF THIS ASSESSMENT TASK I.E. RESEARCH
PORTFOLIO AND FINAL PRODUCT TO BE SUBMITTED ON THIS DAY

Ingredients provided Salt & pepper


2C flour (self-raising and plain) 1 egg
2C sugar (caster, white and icing) 150g butter
Spices Spray oil

INSTRUCTION FOR SUBMISSION:


Week 10, Term 1:
Ideas Generation: Submit the 2 recipe ideas and the analytical report on the testing of each possible alternative
products including a final evaluation on each to your classroom teacher.
Week 2, Term 2:
Market Research: Submit a copy of the recipe for the final product proposed for marketing to your classroom
teacher
Packaging and Advertising: Submit your packaging and advertising campaign to your classroom teacher either in
USB or another suitable device with your name properly labelled on it.
Final product: Bring in ingredients from home and prepare your selected recipe during the practical lesson
TIPS FOR SUCCESS:
- Show your work to your teacher for feedback after each requirement
- Reflect on your feedback and use it to complete your final submissions
- Plan your time wisely, create a plan on how you are going to manage your time
HOGWARTS Stage 6, Year 12 Food Technology (HSC)
PRIVATE Report
MARKING RUBRIC AND FEEDBACK

COLLEGE
STUDENT NAME:

CRITERIA ALLOCATED STUDENT MARK


MARKS
 An innovative recipe is presented for each trial recipe
 An extensive and analytical report is submitted on each sample tested
including positives and negatives
20-16
 A blank copy of the sensory evaluation survey in which the target market need
to fill in is submitted
 A minimum of 20 completed sensory evaluations surveys are submitted
 A recipe is presented for both trial recipe
 A thorough written report is submitted OR some samples tested with positives
and negatives
15-11
 A copy of the sensory evaluation survey in which the target market need to fill
in is submitted
 A minimum of 10 completed sensory evaluation surveys
IDEAS GENERATION
 One recipe was submitted for the recipes trailed
 A sound written report is submitted on some samples tested with positives and
negatives
10-6
 A copy of the sensory evaluation survey in which the target market need to fill
in is submitted
 A minimum of 5 completed sensory evaluation surveys
 No recipes were submitted
 A basic written report was submitted on the last trial
 A copy of the sensory evaluation survey the target market need to fill in 5-1
submitted
 Less than 5 completed sensory evaluations surveys
 No recipes were submitted
 Very limited written report on samples tested 0
 A filled in sensory evaluation was submitted
CRITERIA ALLOCATED STUDENT MARK
MARKS
 A blank copy of the survey to see if your idea is suitable for the chosen market.
Contain a minimum of 8 suitable questions
 Minimum of 20 completed surveys
 An outstanding and analytical statement summarising findings from your
market research survey giving statistics 20-16
 A copy of the final recipe to be prepared, name of the product you are selling
and quantity of product
 Detailed explanation of why your product will sell in the marketplace to your
chosen target market
 A blank copy of the survey to see if your idea is suitable for the chosen market.
Contains a maximum of 8 questions
 Maximum of 20 completed surveys
 Detailed statement summarising findings from your market research survey 15-11
 A copy of the final recipe to be prepared, name of product
 An explanation of why your product will sell in the marketplace to your chosen
Market Research target market
 A blank copy of the survey to see if your idea is suitable for the market.
Contains a maximum of 6 questions
 Maximum of 5 completed surveys
 A sound sentence summarising your findings from your market research 10-6
survey
 A copy of the final recipe to be prepared
 An explanation of why your product will sell in the marketplace
 A blank copy of the survey to see if your product is suitable for the market
 Some completed surveys
 A very limited sentence summarising your findings from your market research
5-1
survey
 A copy of the final recipe to be prepared
 A simple explanation of why your product will sell in the marketplace
 A blank copy of the survey to see if your product is suitable for the market
 Some completed surveys
0
 A copy of the final recipe to be prepared
 No explanation of why your product will sell in the marketplace
CRITERIA ALLOCATED STUDENT MARK
MARKS
 Fully labelled diagram of a proposed packaging type
 An explicit and correct nutritional panel is correctly displayed
 Full and correct labelling requirements included. Package labelling is clear,
eye-catching and professional presented 12-10
 Detailed advertising campaign directed towards target market. The
advertisement campaign could be suitable for TV, radio, billboard etc and
provides a justification
 Labelled diagram of proposed packaging including most labelling requirements
 A nutritional panel with correct information
 Correct labelling requirements included. Package labelling is clear and neatly
9-7
presented
 A coherent advertising campaign directed towards your target market
 Detailed statement as to why you decided on this advertising campaign
Packaging and  Diagram of proposed packaging included clear labelling requirements
Advertising  A nutritional panel with some information
 Labelling requirements are included and are of a sound quality. Package
6-4
labelling is not clear, and presentation is sound
 Advertising campaign is clear and is somewhat linked to target market
 Sound statement as to why you decide on this advertising campaign
 Diagram of proposed packaging included limited labelling requirements
 A nutritional panel with very limited or incorrect information
 Labelling requirements are not included. Package labelling is not clear, and
3-1
presentation is limited
 Advertising campaign is limited and not linked to target market
 Limited statement as to why you decide on this advertising campaign.
 No diagram of proposed packaging included with no labelling
 No nutritional panel
 No package labelling 0
 No advertising campaign and not linked to target market
 No statement as to why you decide on this advertising campaign
CRITERIA ALLOCATED STUDENT MARK
MARKS
 Food is cooked extremely well
 Presented at a high professional standard
8-7
 Completed in a 2-period time frame
 Final product is unique
 Final product is cooked to a high standard
 Presented at a high standard
6-5
 Completed in a 2-period time frame
Overall Product  Final product is not unique but well thought out
 Final product is cooked well
 Presented at a sound standard
4-3
 Completed in a 2-period time frame
 Final product is not unique or well though out
 Final product is completed
 Presented in an untidy rushed manner
2-1
 Completed in a 2-period time frame or not completed
 Final product is not unique
 No final product was made 0

Use this ALARM scaffold to help structure your analytical report in Ideas Generation

Identify

Identify each of your products

Describe

Provide characteristics and


features of the main
ingredients, potential packaging
options and marketing campaign
for these two potential
products

Explain

Explain how the ingredients,


potential packaging options and
marketing campaign relate with
your chosen target market
Critically Analyse

Reflect on the sensory testing


you have completed using the
two products and critically
analyse the results. Including
the positive and negative
aspects you found.

Evaluate

Make a judgement based on


your critical analysis of the
results of each potential
product. Use this evaluation to
help determine your final
product.
Evaluation

In stage 6 it is important that assessment tasks are designed effectively to test student’s
knowledge, understanding and/or skills (Butt, 2010). The acquired knowledge should be relevant
to students beyond school and make real world connections (Butt, 2010). According to NSW
Education Standards Authority (NESA) assessment is defined as information which is gathered
and interpreted (NSW Education Standards Authority, 2018a). Different forms of assessment are
used for different purposes in a school setting, these include formal or informal diagnostic,
formative and summative assessment (Harlen & James, 1997). In stage 6 two major types of
assessment are school-based including exams and assessments designed by the school and the
Higher School Certificate (HSC) which is an external standardised assessment designed by
NESA. Feedback is also essential in assessment tasks however, it needs to be effective to
illustrate student’s strengths, improvement areas and recommendations on how these
improvements can be made (Hattie & Timperley, 2007). Assessment design is another important
aspect which needs to be considered for an effective assessment. There are principles of good
assessment which need to be followed to achieve the basis of a good assessment. These include
being fair, appropriate, valid, reliable, transparent, authentic and manageable (Bloxham & Boyd,
2007). The assessment task attached is based on stage 6 Food Technology syllabus for year 12
on 9.3 Food Product Development. Students are required to imagine they are working for Arnott’s
and are asked to create a new product or line extension they will launch in Hogwarts Private
College Cook Off. They need to create a research portfolio and advertising campaign based on
the product they choose.

Assessment is the integral connection between teaching and learning within the classroom (Butt,
2010). It is a requirement of the NSW curriculum in which students in stage 6 must complete to
finish the course. Assessment measures student’s knowledge, understanding and/or skills in
relation to the syllabus outcomes. There are different forms of assessment in stage 6 which
include school-based and external assessment. School-based assessments are designed in
schools whereas external assessments such as the HSC is standardised which all students in
year 12 complete. School-based assessments can either be diagnostic, formative or summative
which are used to determine where students understanding is before the unit of work, how
students are performing during the unit of work and what the students have learnt at the end of the
unit of work, respectively (Stobart, 2008). Diagnostic and formative forms of assessment can be
either informal or formal (Harlen & James, 1997). Informal assessment is achieved through
observations, discussions or homework and is a less intimidating way of gaging where student’s
knowledge, understanding and/or skills (Harlen & James, 1997). Nevertheless, informal
assessment may not always be beneficial as it can be difficult to record individual results to
analyse and compare. Hence, formal assessment addresses this issue as students can submit it
in the form of an essay, project, report or portfolio (Harlen & James, 1997). It is easier to record
data and be used for analysis and comparison (Harlen & James, 1997). In saying this, formal
assessment has disadvantages to some students. High-stakes assessment such as the HSC may
be stressful for students thus, they may not perform well amongst other reasons (Harlen & James,
1997). However, these types of standardised assessments are necessary and teachers need to
help students develop strategies to overcome the anxiety (Harlen & James, 1997). In the
assessment task attached it is an example of a formal summative assessment which students are
required to submit at the conclusion of the unit.

Feedback is an important factor of assessment as it is needed for student’s development of


knowledge, understanding and/or skills. Feedback offers students with detailed information on
their progression according to the syllabus outcomes and recommends advice to students on how
they can advance in areas they are lacking. In order to successfully do this, feedback needs to be
effective. Hattie and Timperley (2007) proposed three questions must be addressed to establish
effective feedback. These questions include; Where am I going?, How am I going? and Where to
next? Answering these questions allows feedback to be useful and meaningful not only to the
students but also to the teacher. It is beneficial to the student as they know which areas to focus
on. It assists teachers as the information gathered can be an indication of successful or
unsuccessful teaching methods hence, deciding to change or keep them in the future. The first
question stated by Hattie and Timperley (2007) refers to learning goals students set. By
establishing these goals, it enhances positive attitudes to reach the goals and motivate students
(Bargh, Gollwitzer, Lee-Chai, Barndolla & Trotschel, 2001). This statement is supported by Black
and William (1998) as their research found a correlation between student engagement with
increased success. The second question relates to the student’s progression in the unit. While the
final question relates to what students can do in the future to improve. The three questions are
implemented in the assessment task attached as it illustrates the student’s strong points, areas of
improvement and strategies of how they can improve in the future.

Lastly, assessment design is essential when producing a task to issue to students. It is important
to have good assessment principles in the design process to make sure the assessment is
effective. These principles include fair, appropriate, valid, reliable, transparent, authentic and
manageable (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). Fair assessment tasks should be employed as it supports
equal and equitable opportunity for all students to complete the task. In the assessment attached it
contains fairness through differentiation and the scaffolds (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). Differentiation
is illustrated in the assessment as students can choose which recipe they want to make. Also,
students are given the ability to choose the presentation of the advertisement campaign for their
product. Allowing students to choose themselves provides them the opportunity to demonstrate
the knowledge, understanding and/or skills they are more familiar with for a heightened chance of
success in the task (NESA, 2018b). The scaffold provided on the other hand gives all students
assistance if required to structure their analytical report in the Ideas Generation section. This
demonstrates fairness as it does not place any students at a disadvantage as the scaffold is
provided to all students. Following this, all students have the opportunity to submit a draft on the
Ideas Generation, Market Research and Packaging and Advertising sections by the date stated on
the notification. Through this it allows opportunity for feedback in each section before the final
submission. It is suggested by Shepard (2005) that scaffolds and formative assessment are
basically the same in the sense that both assist in the development of learning. This can be
explained as scaffolding provides the structure of what students should include and this structure
can be removed when it is no longer required thus, when learning is developed (Shepard, 2005).
Formative assessment on the other hand can assist in the development of learning as it includes
feedback in which students can use to apply in the future (Shepard, 2005). Hence, this
assessment is not only summative but also possesses formative characteristic as it contains areas
for effective feedback in the draft submissions as well as after the final submission. Additionally,
assessments can only be considered as fair if students have had adequate exposure and practice
to the knowledge and skills they are required to demonstrate in the assessment task (Bloxham &
Boyd, 2007). In reference to this assessment task, students in stage 6 would need to learn how to
present a portfolio, have had practice creating different types of advertisements such as posters
etc and have had sufficient time to learn the content.

Furthermore, assessments are considered good when they are appropriate and valid (Bloxham &
Boyd, 2007). The assessment should be a reflection of what the student has been leaning in the
unit and use a valid method for outcomes to be assessed. These are demonstrated in the
assessment task as students are showcasing what they have learnt in the unit. The task can also
be considered as reliable as it is marked with a consistent marking rubric which is used for all
students doing the assessment (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). Another aspect of good assessment is
transparency where expectations are made clear through the detailed task description and
marking rubric (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). These are shown in the assessment attached and
illustrates to the students explicitly what is expected of them to successfully undertake the task.
The task makes real-world connections which increases motivation and engagement as it can
apply to students directly. It can help with further studies or career opportunities as the skills learnt
can be applied to the food industry. This makes the assessment authentic and can increase
student success (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). Students are given a sufficient amount of time to
complete the task (5 weeks) as it is a lengthy task. It has been broken down into sections and
dates of when the drafts are to be handed in have been provided so students can manage their
time effectively (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007).
In conclusion, effective assessment, feedback and assessment design in stage 6 is important for
the development of learning. It is necessary to be aware of the different forms of assessment to
utilise them appropriately. In the assessment attached it demonstrates effective feedback and
assessment design while assessing the Food Technology outcomes in the Food Froduct
Development unit.
References

Bargh, J. A., Gollwitzer, P. M., Lee-Chai, A., Barndollar, K., & Trotschel, R. (2001). The automated
will: Nonconscious activation and pursuit of behavioral goals. Journal of Personality and
Social Psychology, 81(6), 1014–1027.

Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Assessment and classroom learning. Assessment in Education,
5(1), 7–75.

Bloxham, S., & Boyd, P.F. (2007). Developing effective assessment in higher education: A
practical guide. Retrieved from
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uwsau/reader.action?docID=332673&query=

Butt, G. (2010). Making assessment matter. Retrieved from


https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uwsau/reader.action?docID=601664&query=

Harlen, W., & James, M. (1997). Assessment and learning: Differences and relationships between
formative and summative assessment. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy &
Practice, 4(3), 365-379. doi: 10.1080/0969594970040304

Hattie, J., & Timperley, H. (2007). The power of feedback. Review of Educational Research, 77(1),
81-112.

NESA. (2018b). Differentiated assessment. Retrieved 2 May, 2018, from


https://syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/support-materials/differentiated-assessment/

NSW Education Standards Authority. (2018a). Purpose of assessment. Retrieved 30 April, 2018,
from http://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/nesa/11-12/Understanding-the-
curriculum/assessment/assessment-in-practice/purpose-of-assessment

Shepard, L. A. (2005). Linking formative assessment to scaffolding. Educational Leadership,


63(3), 67-70

Stobart, G. (2008). Testing times: The uses and abuses of assessment. Retrieved from
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A%20the%20uses%20and%20abuses%20of%20assessment%202008&f=false