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2017-2018

Connecting to
Opportunity
CENTER FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

ANNUAL
IMPACT
REPORT
Letter from the
Executive Director
Contents As a curriculum development and
community partnership center, Loyola’s
and experiences
serving as co-
Center for Experiential Learning often plays educators for students
Community Partnerships 2-3 “This is important: the role of connector. In our annual report, in the context of academic
you will see this theme of connecting to internships, service-learning,
Service-Learning 4-5 to get to know people, community in pictures, from murals around and undergraduate research.
Academic Internships 6-7 our local community to the urban skyline
listen, expand the circle of Chicago. We connect people in a variety Through all of these connections and
Undergraduate Research 8-9 partnerships that evolve, communities
of ideas. The world is of ways – we connect students to service,
internships, and research opportunities build and learning changes. Learning
Learning Portfolios 10-11
crisscrossed by roads that in the community, faculty to community happens in and with the community.
Student Engagement organizations that serve as partners in Students, faculty, and community partners
12-13
around Chicago come closer together learning, and community organizations become co-learners and co-teachers. The
walls of the classroom are broken down
Undergraduate Research and
14-15 and move apart, but the to faculty and students. However the
connections are made, the goals remain and flow into the community.
Engagement Symposium
important thing is that the same – living as a member of the In this annual report, you will see the
Social Justice Internship 16-17 community in a complex, democratic
Community Research Fellowship 18-19
they lead towards society, working toward the common good
breadth and depth of the work done by
Loyola students, faculty, and community
and a more just society.
EXPL Courses 20-21
the Good.” partners. In their words, you will see
Experiential learning helps students their stories. You will interact with their
Faculty Development Programming 22-23 POPE FR ANCIS connect their learning to their passions reflections on their experiences. Perhaps,
and talents, as well as helps students see most importantly, what is made visible
Communities in Solidarity 24 here is how learning changes us and
how their passions might impact and
Experiential Learning transform society. These connections strengthens our communities.
25
Competencies matter. Through community-based
In community,
learning, reflection, and research,
students engage in hands-on learning
in different ways and reflect on their
experiences in learning portfolios.
Faculty transform their teaching and Patrick M. Green, Ed.D.
learning, engaging students in real world Executive Director,
problems and experiences. Community Center for Experiential Learning
partners share their knowledge, skills, Clinical Instructor of Experiential Learning

Center for Experiential


Learning Mission
Mural photos by Loyola Advancing Loyola's Jesuit Catholic mission of "expanding knowledge in
University Chicago graduate
the service of humanity through learning, justice, and faith," the Center for
student Kayla Geiss
Experiential Learning is an undergraduate curriculum center that collaborates
with faculty, staff, and community partners as co-educators, to coordinate,
develop, support, and implement academic experiential learning for students.

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Community Partnerships 846 43
organizations site visits
hosted conducted by
students CEL staff

Our students’ academic internships, service-


learning, and community-based research would
not be possible without our wonderful community
partners. These mutually-beneficial relationships, “In my experience, Loyola
and the co-education provided by the organizational
staff, are a critical piece of our students’ educational
students have an incredible
experience. This academic year, Loyola students amount of passion and
worked with 846 community organizations
throughout Chicagoland and beyond.
interest in creating good for
the city of Chicago.”

99
92
%

%
of supervisors reported
satisfaction with Loyola students

had conversations with students


about their learning
“ I've been working with interns for almost 30 years, and Loyola students are by far the
best interns I've ever worked with. They are knowledgeable, thoughtful, and always
have a vested interest in our youth services. Thank you!

Our interns from Loyola have provided phenomenal work, contributed to

69
the continued professionalization of our organization's brand, helped shape
% provided students with
communications around major projects of our organization, and provide a critical eye
professional development
opportunities to our existing communications strategies.


Working with an enthusiastic student bolstered our own enthusiasm and reminded
us of the importance of our mission to serve the next generation.

Percentage Understanding Empathy and

“Students’ curiosity of supervisors


reporting
cultural and racial
differences:
Problem analysis
and critical thinking:
sensitivity to the
plight of others:

and enthusiasm are 85% 87%


96%
student growth
in various
contagious.” areas:

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Service-Learning “I am beginning to pay
31 different
attention to world news
departments
because I’ve realized that offered
just because there are service-learning
Service-Learning is a pedagogy and practice situations of injustice and courses
that provides a community-based service
experience integrated into traditional academic violence that we can’t see,
coursework. These experiences and critical that doesn’t mean we
reflection become an “integrated text” for the
course and assist with making learning the subject
should turn a blind eye. If 2,632
students completed over
matter even more dynamic and relevant including anything, if we have been
the following hallmarks:
gifted with resources and 92,000
Encounter - The opportunity to build relationships hours of service in the
with the residents of our communities is taken
time, we should community
seriously. Service-learning is more than completing CAILYNN
make it our duty
a task; it is about honoring and appreciating the MISCHKE to help one
history, knowledge, and assets of that community
and its members.
CLASS OF 2018
M A J O R : Sociology
another.”
M I N O R S : Marketing and
Engaging the Material –We want students to
Psychology
think critically about how their academic course
material is interplaying with their service-learning
and lived experiences.

Common Good – We ask students to consider their I have been involved with doing service ever since high

116
actions in the community in the context of building school and have participated in various on-campus service
toward the common good. organizations throughout all four years of my Loyola
experience. Although I have been involved with service for a service-learning courses
while, I never got the chance to actually learn about and apply were taught and students
worked with over
concepts to an actual service site until taking my engaged

“This experience was very eye-opening and


learning course.
300
My service site was Edgewater Kids United, and in order to fully agencies
meaningful to me. I wish that it was required as understand and connect with the kids, I had to put myself in a
a first-year freshman so that students have the vulnerable state in order for them to accept me into their group
and open up to me. Prior to this experience, I never was really
opportunity to explore service-learning and can inclined to work with kids; however, upon leaving my site, I’m so
then expand on it during their time at Loyola.” glad that I did so. This experience opened me up to being able
to explore outside of my comfort zone, and as a result, I had a
very positive and reassuring experience.

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723 NATALIE
PINE

Academic Internships
students enrolled in academic
internship courses, offered in CLASS OF 2018
MAJORS:

35 Social Work and


Political Science
different disciplines

Academic internships facilitate three


significant aspects of a student’s
development: personal, professional, and civic
learning. The internship is a coeducational Natalie Pine completed four Engaged research rooted in models of social work
opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, and Learning courses in the areas of Social collaboration, I realized how critical the
values that will help students participate fully Work and Political Science. These work of social workers is in navigating
and productively in a community. Students opportunities allowed her to engage the nuances of the legal system, which
enroll in an academic internship course that and interact with her passions for social is necessary for our community and our
provides experiential learning through critical justice and apply the values of her greater world.” All these opportunities
reflection, applied theory, and addressing Jesuit education. led her to be awarded the Governor’s
community/organizational development. Office, James H. Dunn Jr. Memorial
Students engage in a variety of internships She interned at Cabrini Green Legal
Fellowship.
around the Chicagoland area, Loyola’s Aid, whose mission is “To answer God’s
Washington D.C. Program, the Vietnam Center, call to seek justice and mercy for those
To view Natalie’s learning
and the John Felice Rome Center. living in poverty by providing legal portfolio, visit LUC.edu/CEL
services that strengthen lives, families,
and communities.” As an intern, she
states, “I learned more than I could

53% of Loyola students served have anticipated. From supporting


in non-profit or public incarcerated clients to working on
service internships

47 % of students were in
for-profit internships

29 % of students received

495
compensation for their
internship work
“Through my engaged learning course, I gained a
community
partners
deeper appreciation for the diverse community
and talents that connect students and promote
their careers as well as life learning opportunities.”
CHRISTINA VILL ARREAL, CLASS OF 2019, SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS MA JORS

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Undergraduate Research 257
students participated
in mentored research
through LUROP-funded
Fellowships

Undergraduate research is an integral part


of the college experience for many students
at Loyola. Through the Loyola Undergraduate 2 Rudis Fellowships

LUROP
Research Opportunities Program (LUROP), Loyola 2 The Joan and Bill Hank Center for Catholic Intellectual
Heritage Research Fellowships
students from across the University engage in
mentored research through a variety of funded 4 Women in Science Enabling Research (WISER)

fellowships. Over 250 Loyola students engaged


Fellowships Fellowships

by the numbers
4 Community Research Fellowships
in hands-on research through 15 different
4 Carbon Undergraduate Research Fellowships
funded fellowships this past year.
4 Institute of Environmental Sustainability (IES)
Undergraduate Research Fellowships
2 Rudis Fellowships

“Research is messy. It never 2


2 Rudis Fellowships
The Joan and Bill Hank Center for Catholic
5 Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL)
Research Fellowships
Intellectual2 Heritage
The Joan Research
and Bill Hank Center for Catholic Intellectual
Fellowships
goes in the direction you 4
Heritage Research Fellowships
Women in Science Enabling Research
8 Interdisciplinary Research Fellowships

(WISER) Fellowships
4 Women in Science Enabling Research (WISER) 9 Carroll and Adelaide Johnson Fellowships
think it will, but that’s not Fellowships
10 Research Mentoring Program Fellowships
4 Community Research Fellowships
necessarily a bad thing.” 4 Community Research Fellowships
Carbon Undergraduate
4 Carbon Undergraduate Research Fellowships
14 Social Justice Research Fellowships
4 10 Research Mentoring
16 BiologyProgram Fellowshipsand Biology Research
Summer Fellowships
Research Fellowships
4 Institute of Environmental Sustainability (IES) Fellowships
NICK BULTHUIS, CLASS OF 2018, BIOLOGY MA JOR, Institute ofUndergraduate
EnvironmentalResearch
Sustainability
4 Fellowships 14 Social Justice Research
82 Provost Fellowships
Fellowships for Undergraduate Research
NEUROSCIENCE AND BIOSTATISTICS MINORS (IES) Undergraduate Research Fellowships
5 Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL)
Center for Research
Urban Research and Learning 93 Mulcahy
Biology Summer Scholarsand
Fellowships Fellowships
5 Fellowships 16
(CURL) Research Fellowships Biology Research Fellowships
Tessa, a senior with a dual major in Sports 8 Interdisciplinary Research Fellowships
Provost Fellowships for
8 Interdisciplinary Research Fellowships 82
Management and Information Systems, was 9 Carroll and Adelaide Johnson Fellowships Undergraduate Research

awarded a Provost Fellowship, through which she 9 Carroll and10 ResearchJohnson


Adelaide Mentoring Program Fellowships 93
Fellowships Mulcahy Scholars Fellowships
engaged in a research opportunity related to sports 14 Social Justice Research Fellowships

analytics. She studied the gender inequity in sports 16 Biology Summer Fellowships and Biology Research
Fellowships
analytics availability and worked to “shed a little
82 Provost Fellowships for Undergraduate Research
light on the fact that the women’s college basketball
93 Mulcahy Scholars Fellowships
data analytics is just as interesting and needed as
analytics for the men’s game.” Tessa attended a
prestigious conference at Massachusetts Institute
TESSA 86
86
of Technology, one of many student researchers BOUKAL Faculty Mentors
who attended research conferences to

10
CLASS OF 2018 Majors
further develop their knowledge and gain
MAJORS: Represented
experience in presenting research. Information Systems and
Graduate Student
Sports Management
Mentors

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Learning Portfolios
16,930
learning portfolios
created by Loyola students
in the past year
A learning portfolio (ePortfolio) is a digital
collection of students’ demonstrated knowledge,
competencies, and skills represented through
learning artifacts. Learning artifacts are documents
or multimedia that are evidence of students’
learning and growth over time, such as writing
19,084
learning artifacts
samples like research papers, reflections, photos,
submitted to learning
videos, blogs, or presentations. Learning portfolios portfolios
assist students in deepening critical reflection and
integrate learning across course concepts, academic
disciplines, and co-curricular experiences.

“Through my multiple engaged


learning experiences, I was able
to apply much of what I learned
inside of the classroom to the
world around me. One concept
SARAH
I learned from this engaged JASUDOWICZ
learning experience that CLASS OF 2018
M A J O R : Biology To view Sarah’s learning
stood out is that the only way portfolio, visit LUC.edu/CEL

one is able to truly learn is to


recognize their failure and take
it as a way to motivate them to Engaged Learning
“I learned that critical reflection
continue learning.” Experiences: is pivotal in order to gain the
Ÿ Academic Internship
Ÿ Undergraduate Research
most out of this experience. I also
NOOR ABDELFAT TAH, CLASS OF 2019, PSYCHOLOGY
AND POLITICAL SCIENCE MA JORS, SPANISH MINOR
Ÿ Learning Portfolio will continue to practice critical
reflections in all that I do.”

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GIS map created by
Loyola University
Chicago graduate
student Kayla Geiss

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“This experience also connected me with other
researchers in the field, many of whom I am

Undergraduate Research and considering working with in graduate school.”

Engagement Symposium
NOOR ABDELFAT TAH, CLASS OF 2019, PSYCHOLOGY AND
POLITICAL SCIENCE MA JORS, SPANISH MINOR

The 2018 symposium celebrated the theme of Learning Together:


Deepening Inquiry, Deepening Dialogue and provided a platform
for students to share their scholarly work through posters, oral “Luke and Kevin worked together on an extensive
presentations, dance performances, and learning portfolios. This two month project that was threefold: they
past year, students presented over 250 poster presentations and 40 constructed a pollen reference slide library of
oral presentations to faculty, staff, alumni, community partners, and LUREC’s flowers; investigated the pollinator-
their peers. In addition, two dance performances were featured at the flora relationship found there; and initiated a
symposium, demonstrating creative activity and scholarship. Each preliminary survey of the monarch butterfly
of the scholarly presentations showcased the high-impact learning activity across McHenry County. Luke and
achieved through research and community engagement. Kevin made clear the importance of pollinator
sustainability to the community of McHenry
County, and they encouraged the community
to assist in that effort. Their efforts greatly
strengthened the community partner’s
WHAT SKILLS DID YOU educational programming around biodiversity
BUILD UPON FROM YOUR
SYMPOSIUM EXPERIENCE? 517 sustainability practices.”

Loyola students FR. STEPHEN MIT TEN, SJ, ADVANCED LEC TURER,

19
presented at the 2018 DIREC TOR OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AT LOYOLA
% Public speaking
Undergraduate Research UNIVERSIT Y RE TREAT AND ECOLOGY CAMPUS

and Engagement

21%
Symposium
Professionalization skills

24% Communicating with


populations outside my 256 Luke Landry and
field or discipline Poster Presentations Kevin White, recipients
of the Outstanding

44 Undergraduate

17
Research Award
% Visual communication Oral Presentations and the Community
Engagement Award
for Innovation in
Sustainability.

18% Verbal communication

2
Public-led
Research in Dance
Performances

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Social Justice Internship

For the past six years, the Social Justice


Internship Grant Program has provided the
“Without this program, I would 2,497
opportunity and the funding for ten students never have been able to hours completed
by this year’s Social
to intern for two semesters with either Catholic connect with the residents, Justice Interns
Charities or Misericordia, two of Chicago’s
top non-profit organizations. This internship families, and staff that support
experience, supported by a unique two- Misericordia. The organization
semester course, puts students in a position
is so close to Loyola, and being
$64,972
to dig deeper into the social justice issues
they are passionate about while immediately able to intern there for an entire
applying their learning at their organization. estimated value of
year made me feel much more students’ internship hours
connected to my community.” completed.

DORIAN MANION, CLASS OF 2018,ENVIRONMENTAL


SCIENCE MA JOR, POLITICAL SCIENCE AND
To view the Social Justice Interns’
learning portfolios, visit LUC.edu/CEL SUSTAINABILIT Y MANAGEMENT MINORS

“Being a part of the Social Justice Internship


program helped me realize how to put my education,
founded in social justice teaching, into practice. It was
a chance to directly link my own experiences to what I
was learning in the classroom, which I found invaluable.
CAMILLE
One of the most valuable concepts I learned was
SMITH
the idea of Asset-Based Community Development,
CLASS OF 2018 which looks at improving communities based on their
MAJORS:
already-existing strengths. This has fundamentally
Political Science and Global
and International Studies
transformed the way I plan to make a change through
M I N O R : Islamic organizing and social justice.”
World Studies

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RESEARCH
QUESTION

Why did you


migrate and
why did you stay “Working with the Community Research
Four Loyola students participated in the Community in Chicago? Fellows brought fresh perspective and insight
Research Fellowship – a unique fellowship that allows to our work at Taller de José. The process of
students to participate in research with the community. collaboratively crafting this research project
Drawing from research inquiries that address the assets enriched our understanding of our mission
and pressing needs of our communities, the research and the role we can play in serving as a
questions emerge from the community. This fellowship “Learning from local vehicle for sharing narratives from voices that
encourages the use of creative methodological are not often heard in our public discourse. It
approaches that honor the experience of community community members
was a pleasure working with the Community
members as a source of knowledge. Working with allows us to get Research Fellows, and we’re deeply grateful
Taller de José, a community resource center in the
Little Village neighborhood of Chicago, the four Loyola
a personal understanding to them for sharing their gifts with us through
their dedication, professionalism, critical
students collected narratives from the community of people’s everyday lives.” thinking, sensitivity, and courage.”
members to learn more about their experiences,
specifically their migration story and their “stay” story ILIANA BARR AGAN, ANNA MAYER, EXECUTIVE DIREC TOR
CLASS OF 2018, PSYCHOLOGY OF TALLER DE JOSÉ
(why they stayed in Chicago), and crafted individual
MA JOR AND SOCIAL WORK MINOR
narratives in English and Spanish.
Below: Loyola Community Research Fellows Elizabeth Salgado,
Iliana Barragan, and Cristina Nunez surround Taller de Jose’s
Executive Director, Anna Mayer (second from the left) at the
National Museum of Mexican Art

To view the Community


Research Fellows’
learning portfolios,
visit LUC.edu/CEL “I furthered my understanding of culture
and the importance of sharing stories. You
can learn a lot through books; however, you
learn so much more through experiences.
Someone could tell me the importance of
immigration, resilience, and narratives, but it
is not as powerful as hearing someone share
their story of resilience.”

ELIZABETH
SALGADO
CLASS OF 2018

Community Research Fellowship


MAJOR:
Human Services
M I N O R : Psychology of
Crime and Justice

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“One concept that really stood out from this course is
KAYLYNN that leadership is very complex. Leadership is a learned
KOTIK Engaged Learning
Experiences:
skill, and it is influenced by many factors, such as one's
CLASS OF 2019
M A J O R : Chemistry
Ÿ Academic Internship social identities and life experiences.” K AYLYNN KOTIK
M I N O R : Psychology
Ÿ Learning Portfolio
of Crime and Justice

EXPL 390: Seminar in Organizational


and Community Leadership
EXPL 390 is a 3-credit seminar course focused on
organizational and community leadership within
a non-profit organization, government agency,
or business. Students work a minimum of 100
“Unlike other college courses, this hours over the semester at their organization, and
explore topics such as leadership, organizational
course was a door through which I
theory, community engagement, and personal and
had the opportunity to go to the real professional development through readings, class
world and apply my knowledge, skills, discussion, and reflective assignments.

ability, and common sense to make a EXPL 290: Seminar in Community-Based


difference in another individual’s life.” Service and Leadership-Refugee Issues

REKHA THAPA-CHHETRI, CLASS OF 2018, PSYCHOLOGY MA JOR This 3-credit service-learning course examines
AND PSYCHOLOGY OF CRIME AND JUSTICE MINOR the issue of refugee resettlement in the context
of the Rogers Park/Edgewater communities. The
course was co-taught by Marie Jochum, Associate
Director of Board Relations and Mission at Catholic
Charities, and was co-located at St. Thomas of
Canterbury, the site for Catholic Charities Refugee
Resettlement initiatives. Students worked with

EXPL Courses refugees directly through Madonna Mission, a


Rogers Park non-profit organization, in addition to
developing a curriculum designed for teenagers
The Center for Experiential Learning offers a number of courses for
in the refugee resettlement program to acclimate
undergraduate students that meet the Engaged Learning University
Requirement. The EXPL courses provide students from any major an to the United States.
opportunity to engage in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary learning
experience through service-learning courses (EXPL 290: Seminar in Community-
Based Service and Leadership), academic internship courses (EXPL 390: Seminar To view Kaylynn’s learning
portfolio, visit LUC.edu/CEL
in Organizational and Community Leadership), and undergraduate research
experiences (EXPL 391: Seminar in Undergraduate Research).

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Faculty Development Programming
KEVIN COVAL
Poet

The Center for Experiential Learning launched Artistic Director,


Young Chicago Authors
the new Certificate in Experiential Learning Faculty
Founder,
Experiential Learning Faculty Fellows Development Program for Loyola’s faculty to build Louder Than A Bomb
strategies in teaching experiential learning courses and
The Center for Experiential Learning engages enhance their own pedagogy.
faculty fellows, experienced instructors who teach
The certificate program’s inaugural interdisciplinary
a variety of service-learning, academic internships,
cohort explored integrated course design, deepened
and undergraduate research courses, to help build a
their teaching practices, and learned how to engage
cohort of faculty advocates for experiential learning.
community partners in the classroom through a series of
2017 – 2019 Experiential Learning Faculty Fellows ongoing workshops and a culminating syllabus project.
Ronald Greenberg, Computer Science
Sandra Kaufmann, Dance
Cheryl McPhilimy, Communication
Catherine Putonti, Biology and Computer Science

Writing within the Jesuit Tradition

In collaboration with the Faculty Center for Ignatian


Pedagogy, the Center for Experiential Learning
launched a writing program for faculty to create
space and time for engaged scholarship and the
scholarship of teaching and learning. Each month
in the spring semester, space was reserved for
faculty to engage in scholarly writing. In addition, National Speakers
faculty connected with research-oriented campus Loyola’s Center for Experiential Learning organized
resources, including the Office of Research Services, nationally-known speakers on a variety of teaching and
the libraries, and the Institutional Review Board (IRB). learning topics, including critical social justice pedagogy,
critical service-learning, inclusive learning strategies, and
publishing scholarship. In the fall, Kevin Coval, hip-hop artist
and author of A People’s History of Chicago, conducted a
“The series nourished my love of teaching; faculty workshop on utilizing poetry for reflection, as well as DR. TANIA
MITCHELL
each workshop provided a new lens with which facilitated a Spoken Word performance on campus. In spring,
Associate Professor,
Dr. Tania Mitchell, associate professor in the Department
to see significant learning in a new light.” of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development in
College of Education and
Human Development
the College of Education and Human Development at the University of
AMY JORDAN, THE SCHOOL OF CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES, Minnesota
University of Minnesota, conducted a presentation and
SPEAKING ABOUT THE CER TIFICATE IN EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING FACULT Y DE VELOPMENT PROGR AM
workshop for faculty around critical service-learning and
employing a social justice pedagogy in the classroom.

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“CEL’s immersion visits through the
Communities in Solidarity program provide
a meaningful and extended opportunity to
engage with community partners.”
Experiential Learning Competencies
K AREN BERG, MARCELLA NIEHOFF SCHOOL OF NURSING

As Loyola University Chicago students

Communities in Solidarity engage in service-learning courses, academic


internship courses, undergraduate research
experiences, and learning portfolios, and
they critically reflect on their experiences,
The Communities in Solidarity program focuses on
immersing faculty and staff in Rogers Park and Edgewater
Percentage of they develop skills and knowledge, becoming
more directly in order to create more Engaged Learning Loyola Students more competent in a variety of areas. A
competency is often defined as the mastery
courses and opportunities for Loyola students. This program
explicitly builds Loyola’s anchor institution identity into
Reporting of learning by students through their
the curriculum. The program offers faculty immersions in Competency demonstration of knowledge, attitudes,
values, skills, and behaviors. Based upon
the Rogers Park and Edgewater communities, funding for Development in the historical tradition of Jesuit Education,
Engaged Learning courses to support student immersion
in Rogers Park and Edgewater, and support for community Service-Learning principles of Catholic Social Teaching,
and competencies from professional
partners to co-facilitate Engaged Learning courses. Courses organizations, the CEL developed the
following experiential learning competencies.
Course Funding for Engaged Learning
60%
Dance Pedagogy Course Engaged with
Peirce Elementary School Experiential Learning Competencies

Social engagement 58%


Dancers from the Dance Pedagogy course worked with 50% Ÿ Justice-orientation
a professional hip-hop artist, Monyett Crump, and an
Ÿ Social Engagement

Dialogue in community 49%


American Sign Language interpreter, Brittany Palm,​to

Critical reflection 47%


Ÿ Values-based Leadership

Collaboration 45%
create an original piece of choreography uniting ASL 40%

Integrative learning 43%


and hip-hop as movement languages. The dancers then Ÿ Dialogue in Community

Values-based leadership 39%


taught the piece to the Peirce Elementary 5th graders. Ÿ Collaboration

Project management 36%


Global awareness 35%
Self-efficacy 35%
30%
Ÿ Global Awareness
Faculty Immersions in the Rogers Park
Ÿ Self-efficacy
and Edgewater Community

Intentionality 25%
Justice-orientation 25%

20% Ÿ Intentionality
Faculty visited the Howard Area Community Center,
a social service agency that provides life-sustaining
Ÿ Project Management
services for the greater Rogers Park area. They toured Ÿ Critical Reflection
10%
HACC, learned more about their services and role in Ÿ Integrative Learning
Rogers Park, and had a strategic conversation about
potential ways to partner together.
0

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Center for Experiential Learning

1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60660


773.508.3366 | Experiential@LUC.edu
LUC.edu/experiential