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Paparimu School

AG Day 2018
Saturday 29th September 2018

Yes, it’s nearing that time of year again. If you have not yet done so, it’s
time to select that animal, get out those essential bits and pieces and, of
most importance, tune the children in for the BIG DAY!

Important Dates...

§ Animals must be born between 1 June and 31 August 2018.

§ We would appreciate your expression of interest registration form


(indicating the animal you will be bringing) to be returned to the
school office completed in as much detail as you know by Monday 2nd
July (last week of Term). This is so the PTA can best organise
ribbon orders for the day.

§ We will send out final registration forms at the start of Term 3 for you
to put completed details of animal entries (once known).

§ The day will commence at 9am. All participants need to sign in at the
school tent by 9.15am.

Please mark your calendar as this is an important event in the


School Programme and classed as a regular school day.

Animal Entries:
Farm Animal AND/OR Pet
(if the child can manage looking after both a calf club animal
AND a pet, they may enter in both categories)
See the following pages for animal entry information.

Creative Project Entries:


Rainbow of Colour AND/OR Scratch & Sniff
AND/OR KIWIANA ART
Students may enter as many categories of projects as they wish.
The project category is compulsory for those not entering an animal.
See near the end of this booklet for creative project entry information.
Pet & Chicken Entries
Pet and chicken entries will also require a journal to be presented. This
should have information about the pet/chicken. For example:
• Pet/Chicken’s name and date of birth (if known)
• Information about the breed/type of animal (gained from research)
• How the child looks after the pet/chicken
• Any other relevant information.

Children not rearing an animal will be required to


complete a creative project.
These will be judged 1st, 2nd and 3rd
for both Ako 1 and Ako 2.
Information about the creative projects is available
near the end of this booklet.

Other Points to Note...


§ Entry Fees are again in the form of a donation. No donation will be
considered too small or too large.

§ Entry Forms (at the back of this booklet).

§ Volunteers are needed to assist with looking after groups of children


as they progress through the various stages. You are asked to
indicate your availability on the Entry Form.

If you require any further information, please contact the school office,
phone 2925861.

Anyone able to assist with sponsors is asked to contact


the school office.

PET ENTRIES
Pet entries can be animals of any age that fit the ‘pet’ category. These may be rabbits,
cats, guinea pigs, rats, mice etc. We encourage participation in the pet category for
students who are unable to raise a calf club animal.

Students will need to complete the journal about their pet (see above) and ensure it
has a secure cage for display on the day. Please note, dogs are not allowed due to
historical school rules.
Paparimu School Calf Club/Pet Day
Rearing Information
This is designed as an aid to assist you in the rearing of Calves, Lambs and Kid Goats for
Calf Club/Pet Day.

FEEDING
§ Mix milk powders according to the instructions.
§ Make sure the animal has had colostrum from its mother for at least two days. This
can usually been sourced from your local vet.
§ Recipe for colostrum substitute: 1 pint made up milk, 1 TBSP Glucose, 1 tsp Cod Liver Oil. Give
this to them for the first couple of days if colostrum cannot be found.
§ At approximately 7 - 10 days calves can have meal introduced.
§ Kid goats and lambs can have meal introduced at about 3 weeks.
§ When changing an animal’s diet, do it gradually.
§ Allow the animals to graze on pasture at an early age. Give a little hay.
§ Provide good quality drinking water.
§ Always be hygienic when mixing milk powders and feed - use clean containers or
bottles.
§ At weaning, the animals may need a drench for parasites.
§ Wean on to good quality grass that is not too short.
§ Meal feeding can continue.

WEATHER AND SHELTER


§ Exposure to the weather has a great influence over the animal’s growth and health
§ during weaning.
§ Animals that are wet and cold are more susceptible to infections.
§ Adequate shelter is essential while the animals are very young.
§ A warm, dry, stress-free environment reduces the chance of disease and infection
§ and helps with growth.
§ For lambs and kid goats a kennel is adequate. Kid goats have no natural oils in their
§ hair so they feel the cold easily.
§ Have the animals in a sheltered area, if possible, especially from prevailing winds.
§ If artificial shelter such as a pen is used, allow the animals to choose to use it or
not.

COMMON DISEASES/PROCEDURES THAT MAY OCCUR WHILE REARING


YOUNG ANIMALS
Dehorning
If required this should be done early, check with a farmer or a vet.
Dietary Scours
§ This is when the calves, lambs or kid goats have diarrhoea which is usually a pale
yellow or white in colour.
§ It is usually caused by over-feeding or changing the animal’s diet too quickly.
§ You may put Kaelin in the milk or electrolyte needs to be used as per instructions.
§ Scour ban is another product which is used (available from your local VET).

Pneumonia
§ This usually occurs when the animals are exposed to harsh weather conditions
without adequate shelter provided. The wind and rain together are the worst.
§ Symptoms: heavy breathing which is often noisy, coughing and often a watery to
whitish discharge from the nose as well as the temperature being up. The animal
eats little or nothing.
§ To treat this, place the animal in a warm dry area or shed and give drinking water.
§ Antibiotics will need to be given.

Foot rot or Scald


§ Avoid animals coming into muddy feeding places. Kids may get scald if the ground is
too wet.
§ It is an infection of the soft tissue immediately above or between the claws on the
hoof.
§ Symptoms: Animals can become lame. The foot can become hot and swelling can
occur.
§ Treatment: Spray the product FIL on to the infected area. Bluestone can also be
used.

Navel Infection
§ This occurs in the early days of the animal being born.
§ Infection enters the animal via the umbilical cord when the cord has not dried. It
causes the animal to have swollen joints. They become listless and some may not be
able to get up.
§ Treatment: Dip the cord into iodine to prevent this. In severe cases anti-biotics will
need to be used.
§ Have animals in a clean environment.

Internal and External Parasites


§ At weaning give worm and lice treatment. These may be in the form of a drench,
pour-on or injection depending on the product.
§ Internal Parasites is noticed by persistent watery green scour without straining. It
leads to a gradual but steady loss of condition. The coat becomes hard, the animal
loses appetite, the eyes become dull and the animal becomes weaker.
§ The animals can become infected by eating short grass and always grazing on the
same area of ground.
§ Lice is very common in young stock. Lice causes loss of hair, flaky skin and itching.
§ They lose condition and can become anaemic. It is spread easily by direct contact.
§ Ringworm is caused by a fungus which affects the surface of the skin and hair
roots. It appears as roughly circular bare or raised dry rough areas of different
sizes on any part of the body. The fungus spreads to other animals by direct
contact. Iodine can be an effective treatment, but seek advice.

If you need some assistance with your animals, please contact your local vet.
CALVES
Choosing a Calf
Choose a healthy, friendly calf of a:

Dairy (milking) breed e.g. Friesan, Jersey, Ayrshire or a cross. It must be a heifer (girl) for the dairy
section.

Beef breeds of Hereford, Angus, Murray grey, Simmental, etc. or other crosses. A beef calf
can be either a heifer or a bull (boy).

Exotic breed of Charolais, Limousin, etc.

The calf must be born between 1st June and 31st August. You must take charge of the calf within seven
days of its birth and thereafter, as far as reasonably possible, care for the calf up to and including calf club
day.

Feeding
The calf must have colostrum (first milk from its mother for the first four days). This is full of antibodies that
protect the calf from disease. Colostrum can be purchased from the vets and can be kept frozen. If you
receive a day old animal that has been abandoned and hasn’t been able to feed properly, it is important
that you give it some colostrum in place of what it would normally have received off its mother. Decide
what calf milk powder you are going to use and don’t change it as this can upset the calf’s tummy. Mix the
milk following the instructions on the packet. Be accurate and weigh the correct amount of powder for the
first time. Start off giving about 1 litre of milk twice a day, at 4 days of age and gradually increasing
500mls per week to a maximum of 3 litres twice a daily for a big beef or Freisan calf and about 2.5 litres for
a smaller or Jersey calf. From two weeks of age you can offer hay and calf grower meal. Have fresh
clean water, changed daily, available at all times. You can feed the calf on a bottle or a bucket.
Remember to be hygienic and use clean containers/bottles. The calf can be weaned 10 – 12 weeks of
age. This means stopping one feed a day for a few days then stop all milk feeds. Give hay and meal to
help the weaning process and not to stress the calf too much. Calves are judged on dairy condition and if
it is too fat it could be marked down. Calves should not be raised on its mother or foster mother.

Leading
Your calf needs to be used to you so talk to it often even when leading. A halter and lead is required.
Teach to lead before a feed, the calf must be on your right hand side, hold the lead about 10 – 30 cm from
the halter palm upwards and pass the lead across your body and also hold in your left hand with knuckles
upwards, there should be 30 – 40cm of tail end hanging straight from the left hand – no coils or loops
around your hand as this is very dangerous (if the calf runs off you could be dragged). Start gradually
once a day and increase as the calf gets more willing to walk alongside. Tying the calf up for short periods
and while grooming helps them get used to their halter. If your calf is being stubborn and won’t walk push
on the calf tail top and release as soon as it starts to walk. Patience is required but if you stick at it you will
get results. Ask someone who has done it before to help. Set up the course at home to practice. When
competing you will be marked down if you jerk the halter, slap, elbow or push the calf with your body,
remember the halter is your steering wheel, accelerator and brake so get into good habits now.
Procedure On The Day
All calves must be TB tagged and have TB forms completed when leaving the home farm. To buy TB tags
you need to first register and get a herd number. Phone Animal Health Board on 0800 437 243 to register.

Collect your number and find your ring, then settle your calf in, make sure you have a bucket of fresh
water. Be ready when called. You will compete in leading, rearing, and either dairy or beef type.

§ Adults may assist to wash calves that arrive dirty, but any subsequent grooming and handling
must be done by the children only.
§ Calves must not be clipped or oiled (clipping is an animal welfare issue).
§ No calf shall lose points if it has more than four teats – this is to apply only in child effort classes.
Not acceptable in dairy type classes.
.

Judges are looking for:


§ Healthy appearance -evidence of correct feeding
§ Clean, pliable skin
§ Absence of skin parasites
§ Well groomed -head to tail
§ A well led calf

Website
www.calfclub.co.nz for more information.
LAMBS
Choosing a Lamb
When you get your lamb it may only be a few days old. It needs to be kept warm, with a clean dry bed to
sleep in. New lambs sleep most of the time in between feeds. You can put your lamb outside when it is
warm and sunny, but otherwise it must be inside out of the cold wind and rain as it has no mother to
snuggle up to, to keep warm. Your lamb will look towards your family for food and company which is
normally supplied by its mother. So spend lots of time playing with and enjoying your new friend.

Selection
No selection is necessary as all lambs are suitable. There is no judging on breed or type.

Ideas to help with Rearing Your Lamb

§ After your lamb is 2 weeks old you can start leading it.
§ Use a short rope (1 metre) and encourage it to walk by your side.
§ As the lamb gets older and more confident with you lead him over little
obstacles, (bits of wood etc.) and around stakes. You can even set out a course
the same as the one you will be using on Calf Club Day to practice on.
§ The judging for the lamb calling includes the catching & retrieving of the lamb,
as well as the initial calling.
§ A lamb requires shelter from wind and rain - an old dog kennel is ideal as a
shelter.
§ Young lambs should be fed as often as possible during the day. The more the lamb associates its
owner with a feed, the more successful will the calling of the lamb be. 'A little and often' is the best
approach to feeding.
§ Lambs can be fed straight cow’s milk or milk powder. The temperature of
the milk is important - blood heat is best. Always follow the directions
carefully on the milk powder packet.
§ If a lamb is fed milk that is too hot or too cold or too rich it may develop
scours. If this happens, feed it electrolytes (purchase from your local vet)
for 2 -3 feeds and then half strength milk for 2 - 3 feeds before going back
to normal strength. If it continues to scour for longer than 2 -3 days then
seek help.
§ If the lamb goes off its food or appears listless then something is wrong and
you may need to get help.
§ Generally though lambs, if healthy at birth, remain healthy.

Docking and Vaccination:


While it is not necessary to have the lamb's tail docked for Calf Club Day, it is a good idea to have it done
at 3 - 4 weeks old. It will help keep the lamb cleaner and more pleasant to be handled. If possible the lamb
should be vaccinated at this time, at least for pulpy kidney.

Leading
§ The right hand should grip the lead, palm upwards, and some 15cm from the collar.
§ The left hand should grip the lead, knuckles upwards.
§ Stand beside the shoulder of the lamb at all times.
§ Try to keep the lamb moving at a reasonable pace, walking at the same pace as your lamb and
keeping your position beside or slightly in front of the shoulder of the lamb.
§ See that the collar is not too tight or too loose.
The following actions should be penalised:
o Releasing the grip on the rope with the right hand at any time.
o Touching the lamb with the hand during the competition.
o Slapping the lamb with the hand.
o Slapping the lamb on the back with the rope.
o Jerking the lead.

Calling
Generally, the distance, used for judging, between the lamb and the child for calling will be between 8 & 10
metres. The judges often vary the distances between points according to the age of the children and space
available. Try to get your child to call loudly so that the lamb can hear. Always calling the lamb by name
before feeding them gets them used to this routine. Reward them with a drink or treat.

Appearance
The judges generally look for a lamb that is obviously well fed and cared for – a bright eyed, clean animal
will attract attention. Lambs should be in natural condition. No brushing, NEVER use soap/shampoo as it
will remove the natural oils. If the lamb is very dirty you can wash excess dirt off with cold water. Light
dagging is allowed, but not further trimming.

Special Things to remember:


· Make your lamb your best buddy (give it lots of pats and cuddles)
· Spend lots of time with it - talk and play with it
· Take a little 'surprise' with you each time you go to see it (bread, raisin, apple-core) so that it will always
run up to you!

Procedure on the day


When you arrive collect your number. Find out where the ring is and settle in with your lamb. Remember
to bring a water container for your lamb. Be ready when called.

Leading
Your lamb must walk beside you, stop when you stop and wait five seconds then start off again when you
walk off.

Calling
The steward will hold your lamb while you walk approximately 10m away, you will turn and call your lamb
to you. Use your usual voice and be loud and clear. It’s best to only give your lamb half its bottle on calf
club morning to keep it a little hungry as it will call/lead better. When you have finished give your lamb the
rest of its bottle.

Rearing
This is judged on the lamb size for its age, so remember how old your lamb is and its DOB. The lamb is
also judged for excellence of health.

After Calf Club Day


If your lamb is eight weeks or up it may be gradually weaned by cutting down its feeds, it is ok now to
water down the milk. This encourages the lamb to eat more grass. It will take the lamb a while to adjust,
don’t forget to play with your lamb in the paddock as it gets used to the change of routine.
CHICKENS
Rearing
§ When you receive your chickens see that they are warm as this is their first need - chickens will not
start to feed if they are cold. Temperatures should be33 Celsius for the first week and reduced
weekly until down to about 15 Celsius.
§ They can be kept in a hot water cupboard for the first couple of nights until other arrangements are
made.
§ A 40 to 60 watt bulb suspended over a suitable box and about 300mm above the chickens will
provide a suitable temperature.
§ Food and Water.
§ Give the chickens access to cool water in a suitable receptacle so that the chickens do not get wet.
They will then be in a condition to start feeding.
§ The most suitable food is chick rearing crumbles, which contain the correct vitamins, or fine chick
grain. These are obtainable from feed merchants and
most stock and station agents.
§ If you have not got these, the chickens may be started on course oatmeal or rolled oats. Even a hard
boiled egg chopped finely will assist.
§ The rule of thumb for feeding - make sure the chicken eat all their food in 15 minutes, twice a day,
otherwise they are getting too much to eat.

General
§ See that all facilities are kept extremely clean at all times.
§ As the chickens grow, their house must be enlarged.
§ You will require a box about 1 metre x 300mm x 500mm deep.
§ Cover the box with chicken mesh. Have a solid lid at one end so you can put food
and water in.
§ You will need:
⇒ 60 watt light bulb and light fitting
⇒ water dish (not too deep -a chicken can drown in water).
⇒ preserving jar on a saucer is a good drinking dish.
⇒ feed dish.
§ You can either hang or fix your light bulb at one end of the box.
§ Have the food and water at the other end.
§ Put shredded paper on the floor.
§ Go to your local feed merchant and get some "Chick Starter".
§ DO NOT OVER HANDLE your chickens.

Things to Do if your chickens don't look well


• Make sure they are warm and not in a draught
• Make sure they are inside in the warm not outside in the cold.
• Make sure they have food and fresh water
• Make sure one chicken is not being bullied by the others
• Clean chickens are chicken that are cleaned out every day.
Judges are looking for:

Rearing
The judge will look at the condition of the chicken. They will be looking to see if it is healthy and has been
well looked after.

Handling
The judge will ask the children to take their chicken out of its cage and present it to them. It is also at this
stage that they will ask to see the trick that has been practiced. This is an important part of the handling
as it will help demonstrate how often the child has handled the chicken. Examples of tricks are climbing
from one end of an arm to the other, going through a tunnel, climbing a ladder, lying in a dolls pram, sitting
on your shoulder. Your trick should be something you can put together yourself and can bring on the day.
It is ideal to start after your chicken is a month old, be patient and only practice for a short time each day.

When bringing your chicken to Calf Club day it must be in a cage.


Only one chicken is allowed per cage.

You will need to complete a journal to go with your chicken – see page 2.
GOATS
§ Children entering will be placed into a mixed group for judging.
§ Date of Birth of Calf: Between 1 June and 31 August (a minimum of six weeks desirable).
§ Competitors shall take charge of their goat within one week after birth and thereafter as far as
possible, care personally for their animal throughout the competition.
§ Competitors shall use suitable food in any amount except that the animal shall not be reared on its
mother or a foster mother.
§ Competitors shall lead their own entries before the judges unless the judges grant permission
otherwise.
§ Animals shall be judged in each child group on:
Leading, Calling & Rearing

IMPORTANT
In the goat section the child will be judged upon how he/she works with their animal. The child will not be
penalised for doing things incorrectly, but will gain points on how well they encourage, communicate, give
direction and work with their goat.

Leading
§ The goat is placed between the Judge and the Child.
§ The right hand should be grip the lead close to the collar.
§ The left hand should grip the end of the lead.
§ The child should stand beside the shoulder of the goat.
§ When leading, the child should walk beside the goat.
§ Communicate with your goat positively.
§ Try to keep the goat moving at a reasonable pace, but you should walk at the
same pace.
§ See that the collar is not too tight or too loose, too big or too long and not
too heavy.
§ You will not be penalised if you touch the goat or release your grip on the
lead.
§ Leading course plan at end of this booklet

Calling
Generally the distance, used for judging, between the lamb and the child for calling will be between 8 & 10
metres. The judges often vary the distances between points according to the age of the children and space
available. A steward will hold the goat while the child runs to a point about 8-10 metres. Away when the
judge tells the child, the child then calls the goat

HINTS
§ Make sure you are able to unclip the lead from the collar easily.
§ Call the goat's name in a loud, clear voice so the goat can hear.
§ Make sure the goat is ready before you begin to call.
Judges are looking for:
Each child will be asked three questions. This is to find out whether the child
has been involved in the care of the goat. This covers half the points in this
section.

The other half of the points are on the appearance of the goat and its general well being.

§ a goat requires shelter such as a dog kennel.


§ Older children should know:
the breed of their goat.
the age of the goat.
how it has been fed and how often.
what to do for foot scold.
how to treat scours.
how a goat feeds when weaned.

Feeding
§ Young goats should be fed as often as possible during the day.
§ The more the goat associates its owner with a feed, the more successful calling
the goat will be.
§ "A little and often" is the best approach to feeding. The temperature of the
milk is important - blood heat is best. If a goat is fed milk that is too hot or too
cold or too rich it may develop scours. If this happens, feed it electrolytes
(purchase from the local vet) for 2- 3 feeds and then half strength milk for 2 -3
feeds before going back to normal strength. If it continues to scour for longer
than 2 -3 days, seek help.
§ If the goat goes off its food or appears listless then something is wrong and you
may need to get help.
§ Generally though goats, if healthy at birth remain healthy.

PREPARATION OF THE GOAT THE DAY BEFORE THE EVENT


§ Goats can be bathed, but have to be dried with towels.
§ Clip feet if necessary.
§ Brush the goat.
§ If the goat is well cared for and housed satisfactorily it will not get dirty.
§ On the day remember to bring your goat something to drink.

After Calf Club Day


If your kid is twelve weeks, it may be gradually weaned by cutting down its feeds, it is ok now to water
down the milk. This encourages the kid to eat more grass. It will take the kid a while to adjust, don’t forget
to play with your kid in the paddock as it gets used to the change of routine.

Goats require three monthly worming as they do not build a resistance to worms like sheep do. They need
somewhere to get out of the rain as they do not have a fat layer to keep them warm like sheep and their
hair is not waterproof like fleece. They must have water available at all times.
COURSES
LAMB/KID LEADING/CALLING COURSE
COURSES
CALF LEADING COURSE


Creative Project Entries
Students may enter in as many categories of creative projects (below) as they wish.

Students with an animal may choose to enter this competition, but do not have to.

The project category is compulsory for those not entering an animal.

Creative Project Entry Choices:


* Rainbow of Colour – growing flowers in a planter
* Scratch and Sniff – growing herbs in a planter
* Kiwiana Art – Kiwiana artwork on corrugated iron
Rainbow of Colour 

You will be judged on your range of colour, the design and/or the arrangement of the
flowers and how well the plants have grown. A reminding this is actually growing plants, not
a flower arrangement. 


Scratch and Sniff 



You will be judged on the range of herbs you have grown and how well they have grown. 


Kiwiana Art
This is an artwork on a piece of corrugated iron, themed ‘Kiwiana’. See the information
provided.

Expectations of Entry
With each section of growing flowers or herbs, the student must produce the plant and the
following information:
• The name of the plant and/or plants they have grown. 

• A brief summary of how they grew it. 

• A brief summary of what they learnt about growing this particular plant. 

As the focus is on growing the exhibits; answers do not need to be more than 50 words.

Competition and Organisation


All entries need to be delivered to the school no later than 9am on Friday 28th September
for judging.
RAINBOW OF COLOUR!
Growing Flowers in a Planter

You can grow bright and colourful flowers in a planter for Calf Club/Pet Day!
You will need:
• A large wooden, plastic or pottery container with drainage holes in the
bottom. Don’t make it too big, or you will not be able to get it to school!
Feel free to be creative with your choice of planter!
• Good top soil or compost.
• Between 6 and 10 seedlings. Marigolds are good. So are pansies and
polyanthus, but chose anything that you think will look bright and cheerful
when they are flowering. Pick plants that have lots of buds, not open
flowers.
• A watering can or a hose that reaches your little garden. 


When to start: 


• Your plants will only flower for about 4 weeks and you want them to look
great for Calf Club/Pet Day, so think about planting them in or shortly
after the July holidays.
What to do when you plant:
ü Water the soil thoroughly.
ü Dig holes in the soil for each plant. 

ü Think carefully about which flowers will look best in the middle, and which
should go at the sides.
ü Soak the plants in their pots or tray.
ü Carefully lift each little plant out of its pot or tray. If it is hard to pull out,
turn the 
pot upside down and tap it with your trowel. That should make
the plant fall out, so 
make sure you still have your hand around it. 

ü Put the roots of the plant in the hole and carefully press the soil around
the edges. Don’t plant it too deeply, but don’t leave the roots outside the
soil either! 

ü Put some slug bait or crushed egg shells around the edge of your flower
garden. 

Caring for your garden: 

• Put your planter in a warm sunny place.
• Water the plants EVERY day.
• Pick off any dead flowers.
• Replace any plants that have finished flowering.

Please consider donating your flower planter project to the school to beautify
our school environment at the completion of Calf Club/Pet Day.


SCRATCH & SNIFF!
Growing Herbs in a Planter

You can grow tasty, useful herbs in a planter for Calf Club/Pet Day!
You will need:
• A large wooden, plastic or pottery container with drainage holes in the
bottom. Don’t make it too big, or you will not be able to get it to school!
• Good top soil or compost.
• Between 6 and 10 seedlings. Parsley works well but gets quite big.
Chives are good, and so are marjoram and thyme. Basil can be pretty
tricky at this time of the year.
• A watering can or a hose that reaches your little garden. 

When to start:
• Your plants will last for a very long time, so you can start right away!
What to do when you plant:
ü Water the soil thoroughly.
ü Dig holes in the soil for each plant. 

ü Think carefully about which herbs will look best in the middle, and which
should go at the sides.
ü Soak the plants in their pots or tray.
ü Carefully lift each little plant out of its pot or tray. If it is hard to pull out,
turn the 
pot upside down and tap it with your trowel. That should make
the plant fall out, so make sure you still have your hand around it. 

ü Put the roots of the plant in the hole and carefully press the soil around
the edges. Don’t plant it too deeply, but don’t leave the roots outside the
soil either! 

ü Put some slug bait or crushed egg shells around the edge of your herb
garden. 

Caring for your garden: 

• Put your planter in a warm sunny place.
• Water the plants EVERY day.
• Pick pieces off for cooking with and prune any that start to get too big. 

Please consider donating your herb planter project to the school to beautify
our school environment at the completion of Calf Club/Pet Day.
KIWIANA ART
Kiwiana artwork on corrugated iron
ALL entries into the Kiwiana Art category must:
• Entries must be on corrugated iron
• Minimum size is 40c by 40cm and the maximum size is 100cm by 100cm
• Be child created
• Be colourful and represent Kiwiana
• Have something unique or memorable about it (remember the Kiwiana theme!)
• Can be freestanding or hanging
• Be 2D or 3D
• Be suitable for display in the outdoors

The Competition
Research corrugated iron artworks and kiwiana to get some ideas.
Create your artwork following the above size guidelines using your own choice of materials
(eg. paint).
Ensure your artwork is able to be moved and delivered to school the day prior to Calf Club
(29th September).

Present your artwork with a 50-100 word description.

Please consider donating your Kiwiana Artwork project to the school to


beautify our school environment at the completion of Calf Club/Pet Day.