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about digifabTURINg

digifabTURINg is an applied research cluster fo-


cussed on digital fabrication, robotic processes and
material sciences engaged in architecture, design
and art. It uses computation as a tool to bridge the
gap between industrial robotics and human creativ-
ity.

digifabTURINg rises from the collaboration be-


tween Fablab Torino, Officine Innesto and Co-de-iT,
with the support of COMAU Robotics and Toolbox
Coworking.

digifabTURINg is

Andrea Graziano _ computation and fabrication


Stefano Paradiso _ hardware and electronics
Marco Palma _ computation and fabrication
Bruno Demasi _ hardware and crafts
table of contents

0_INTRO ................................................................................................................. 4
0.0_A.A.R.M. the project ................................................................................... 5
0.1_A.A.R.M. goals and objectives ................................................................... 6

1_RESEARCH .......................................................................................................... 8
1.0_inFORMed MATTER .................................................................................... 10
1.1_TOOLS ......................................................................................................... 12
1.2_inFORMed CLAY ......................................................................................... 16
1.1.0_CLAY ATLAS ..................................................................................... 42
1.3_inFORMed POLYMERS ................................................................................ 48
1.4_inFORMed BIOLOGIC ................................................................................. 62
1.5_inFORMed FLEXIBLE ................................................................................... 72

2_EDUCATION ........................................................................................................ 82
2.0_inFORMed Matter Workshop Series ......................................................... 84
2.1_MASTER THESIS .......................................................................................... 88
2.1.0_LAPO NALDONI Volatile Ground .................................................... 90
2.1.1_LORENZO SELVA Releasing Complex Tectonics .............................. 92
2.2_IED MONSTER TILING ................................................................................. 94

3_COLLABORATIONS ............................................................................................. 100


3.0_FRANCESCA PERONA Ceramics for the Anthropocene ............................. 102
3.1_IANIS LALLEMAND Unspecified Clay ......................................................... 108
3.2_MAURIZIO MONTALTI Bio Ex-Machina .................................................... 114
3.3_EXTRAS ....................................................................................................... 120

4_OUTCOMES ....................................................................................................... 124

5_ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .................................................................................... 138

3
00
introduction

4
0.0 _ the project

A.A.R.M. - Algorithm Art Robot Material - is one of the


20 winners of ORA! Linguaggi contemporanei, produzi-
oni innovative, a competition promoted by Compagnia
di San Paolo in October 2015.
Through a transdisciplinary approach combining ar-
eas such as computational design, digital manufactur-
ing, robotics and material investigation, A.A.R.M. ad-
dressed the creative and artistic opportunities enabled
by robotic additive manufacturing technologies.
A.A.R.M. focussed on the production of a series of ob-
jects for the home environment, emblematic of such
experimentation and manifesto of new design and pro-
duction possibilities.
One of the A.A.R.M. fundamental goals is the publica-
tion of the physical and digital tools produced along the
research path within an Open Source framework, with
the precise intention of making the experience repli-
cable at different levels, from students to researchers,
from professionals to industry.
Along two years of development A.A.R.M. enabled
professional collaborations with actors belonging to
different disciplinary areas (design, art, engineering,
architecture, university, industry and crafts); made
possible the organization of 4 international workshops
to test the cultural and technological transfer of the in-
vestigated topics; finally it enabled 3 residencies with
artists and designers to share ideas and to test the pos-
sibilities of a common research ground.

5
0.0 _ goals & objectives

This publication ultimate goal is the sharing of ideas


and results of a two-years-long applied research proj-
ect oriented to the experimental use of industrial ro-
botic tools for non-industrial and creative purposes.

Industrial robotic arms are not a young technology:


they have been actively populating factories for the
last 30 years with the main purpose of efficiently re-
place and automate repetitive and precision-oriented
human tasks. Their life is usually programmed for the
execution of the same identical routine or single set
of operations. On the other hand, A.A.R.M. aims at
disrupting this repetition/efficiency-based industrial
paradigm. Taking full advantage of the numerical na-
ture of the robotic arm and with the aid of a in-house
developed intuitive programming interface, the ma-
chine operations can be easily customized for bespoke
creative purposes. A.A.R.M. is also an attempt of com-
municating a non-dystopian role of robotics in the con-
temporary society, aiming at making them become a
necessary tool for humans to express creative thinking,
shape new artistic languages and imagine innovative
means of craftsmanship, design and production.
As a testbed for technical and cultural transferability of
the investigated topics, digifabTURINg organized a se-
ries of four international workshops open to students,
researchers and professionals. Every workshop has
been related to a specific material system: clay, poly-
mers, biologic material and textiles.

6
In 2015 Compagnia di San Paolo promoted an open call
for projects - Bando ORA! Linguaggi contemporanei
produzioni innovative - to trigger investigations for
innovative modes of production for the contamination of
artistic languages and contemprary culture.

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01
research
1.0 _ inFORMed matter

The inFORMed matter research project focuses on the


exploration of additive fabrication processes (such
as n-Dimensional printing, guided growth and/or as-
sembly), aiming to inform (i.e. to give form) as in to
produce form through the morphogenetic properties
and capacities of matter by embedding further infor-
mation structures during the fabrication process itself
by means of mechanical (robots, printers, etc.) and/or
biological (organisms – even synthetically built ones)
constructor agents. Its goal is to go beyond the current
state of prototyping, according to which the physical
prototype should be as close as possible to a clone of
its digital counterpart, thus making fabrication a purely
replicational phase. Instead, by coding and embedding
additional levels of information aimed at mapping and/
or defining material features and behaviors as well as
different deployment patterns from which physical and
aesthetic properties arise, the production and digital
fabrication phase becomes an integral part of the de-
sign process. By exploring the code-matter-machine
(whether mechanical or biological) interaction process
we can study the potential emergent behaviors of the
system as well as learn and exert a new sensibility to
the computational design/fabrication process by tap-
ping into the self-organization properties of matter as a
key factor in determining characteristics of the output
shape.

10
The final output is then the result of influence, coop-
eration and conflict of these aspects upon, with and
onto one another. Only successfully combining compu-
tational simulation, material properties and capacities
and machine constraints and opportunities we can ef-
fectively evaluate and push further the design process
potential and foster design and fabrication skills and
sensibilities that will form the basis of a more compre-
hensive awareness in regard to the relations between
computation and material aspects.
Digital informations
(left) inform matierial
behaviours (right).

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1.1 _ tools

Industrial robotic arms are generic machines. They ac-


quire specificity only through the application of a func-
tional tool, or end-effector. The ones we developed
in house have different nature (pneumatic, electronic,
mechanical) depending on the qualities of the depos-
ited material (mycelia paste, clay, thermoplastics) as
well as their physical properties (softness/hardness,
wetness/dryness) and shape (filament/pellet). Their
design is meant to be simple and easy to fabricate with
cheap off-the-shelf materials and affordable electronic
components.

Blueprints and fabrication drawings are free to down-


load at github.com/Digifabturing

Pneumatic-mechanic Claystruder (top) and electronic polymers FDM


extruder (bottom) axonometric drawings. Blueprints and fabrication
drawings are free to download at github.com/Digifabturing

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Pneumatic-mechanic Claystruder (left), patisserie nozzles
set (left) and electronic polymers pellet extruder (right)

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1.2 _ inFORMed clay
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Since the team’s established experience with the ma-
terial and since its soft and viscous nature, clay became
the perfect testbed for the first material explorations
with the robotic setup. Ranging from the first small-
scale samples to the 1:1 architectural scale proto-
types, a wide set of patterns, geometries and material
behaviors have been designed, fabricated and baked.
Some of the experiments address precision and con-
trol, while other ones explicitly let the material express
its fluid properties into possibilities of a new aesthetic
vocabulary.

All experiments have been realized with a manually


mixed, inexpensive, industrially produced white Grés
(firing temperature of 900°C).

Robotic clay setup (top) and detail of inFORMed clay matter (bottom).
Machine and material informations affect the matter self-articulation.

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A.A.R.M. envisions machines as active tools to expand human creativity. Robotics and
craftsmenship inform one another so to trigger unexpected expressive possibilities.

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Selection of dried and fired small-scale clay samples.
Picture courtesy of Maurizio Montalti
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Smalll scale samples, close-up.
Picture courtesy of Maurizio Montalti.

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Gravity Serie, fired grès, 2017.

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Gravity Serie close-ups, fired grès, 2017.

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Reaction-Diffusion Serie, fired grès, 2017.

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Reaction-Diffusion Serie close-up, fired grès, 2017.

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Six Axis Serie, fired grès, 2017.

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Lamination Serie, fired grès, 2017.

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Tiles Serie drying process.

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Tiles Serie close-ups, fired grès, 2017.

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1.2.0 _ clay atlas

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Industrial matrix-based production processes need
repetition and serialization in order to be econom-
ically sustainable. Post-industrial numerical-based
processes, like robotic digital fabrication, are free
from such constraints, allowing formal variation,
customization and precision at no extra production
costs. In order to make this concept explicit, an at-
las of variations has been realized.

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Using the cylinder as basic geometric unit, design
and fabrication parameters have been algorithmically
tweaked and modified in order to visually express con-
cepts like variation, differentiation and self-similarity,
thus manifesting the wide range of creative potential
as well as the inherent production flexibility of robotic
fabrication.

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1.3 _ inFORMed polymers
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Thermoplastic polymers like PLA, ABS or PET are stan-
dard materials for desktop 3D printing applications:
heated up at temperature ranging from 190°C to
250°C, the material is melted and deposited using the
previous layer of deposited material as the support for
the next one.

Trying to escape the boundaries of this fabrication


strategy, the first research steps were made towards
the investigation of the so-called Mid-Air Deposition:
if heated plastic material is quickly cooled down, it will
then manage to self-support its own weight, thus en-
abling ‘3D printed’ vertical, inclined and support-free
horizontal lines. This process involves a high accuracy
robotic control and needed a long period of testing
and failures. Yet, once harnessed, the process is able
to generate freeform, strong and lightweight truss-like
structures with possible applications ranging from con-
struction components to furniture objects.

Another research branch involving polymers started


by questioning standard 3D printing technology. Its
two biggest limitations are so far defined by scale and
time: printing a 30x30x30 cm object could take from
6 to 12 hours depending on different conditions. By
equipping our big-sized robot with a custom-made 3D
printing extruder, a scale jump could be achieved (Co-
mau NJ60 robot arm hoizontal reach is 2.25m), while,
at the same time, printing time was reduced by a factor
of two, thus providing a high-quality and time-effcient
prototyping platform.

Robotic polymers setup (top) and detail of inFORMed


Polymers Mid-Air Deposition (bottom).

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inFORMed Polymers Mid-Air Deposition. PLA truss production.

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inFORMed Polymers layer-based deposition. PETG lamps production.

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Spatial structure prototype, PLA, 2016
Picture courtesy Maurizio Montalti

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Dining table prototype, PLA and PETG (legs), wood (frame), PC (top), 2017

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Suspension lamps serie, PETG, 2017

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1.4 _ inFORMed biologic
inFORMed Bio Matter robotic setup.

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Exploring the potential of biologic materials for robotic
3D-printing applications requires a first fundamental
research and investigation step into the process of de-
fining the right material recipe. With the fundamental
support of Maurizio Montalti’s knowledge and experi-
ence, several work sessions were organized to scien-
tifically explore the possible combinations of biologi-
cal ‘ingredients’ that could result in a homogeneous,
3D-printable, fungi-based compound. The fundamen-
tal component of the mixture is cellulose (i.e. wood
chips), whih acts as support material and nutrient for
the living organisms (i.e. fungi). Defining the nature and
the proportions of the other ingredients represents the
main research challenge: fungal spores (e.g. mycelium,
plerotus, applantrum), binding agent (e.g. corn starch,
agar-agar, guar flour, tapioca) and water amount.
The research physical outcome is - by now - a set of
small-scale experiments expressing the properties of
the different material compounds, showing a visible
range in terms of colonization success, colour, surface
texture as well as inherent and invisible properties like
physical and mechanical performance.
The exhibited objects represent the very first step of
a complex and articulated material research oriented
to future applications in the field of product design,
building components and architecture for space colo-
nization.

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Materials and tools close-up (top), mixing phase setup (bottom).

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Small scale samples of robotically driven deposition of mycelium-based compund.
Fungal cells developement (2 weeks) renders artifacts in a white soft surface finishing.
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Samples of robotically driven deposition of various mycelium-based compunds.
Grawth process is illustrated (left-to-right) over a 3 weeks time span.
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1.5 _ inFORMed flexible
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Tension-active structures are ruled by behaviors which
are comparable to the working principles of camping
pop-up tents. The inFORMed Flexible Matter research
investigates how stiffness and elasticity, when hetero-
geneously distributed through algorithmically generat-
ed patterns, are able to inform a material system made
up of two material components: a thermoplastic poly-
mer (Polypropylene) printed on a flat pre-tensioned
fabric sheet (Lycra). When the fabric is released, the
tensional difference between the materials generates
a curvature pattern that unfolds three-dimensionally,
deploying structural stiffness and a plethora of other re-
lated properties. The printed pattern drives local differ-
entiation according to the divergent tendencies of the
two materials involved, converging towards a complex,
articulated equilibrium. During a three-days workshop,
the system has been explored at two different scales
using two different printing setups: a Delta WASP 2040
3D printer with a 20x20cm printbed and 1.75mm PP
filament, and a 6 Axis Comau NJ60 industrial robot
with a 50x50cm printbed and a 2.85mm filament. The
precious informations and knowledge acquired during
the workshop were later applied to produce a set of
robotically fabricated lamp prototypes.

Robotically deposited polypropylene on lycra in both


tensioned (top) and released configuration (bottom).

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Big-scale setup for the inFORMed Flexible Matter workshop
(Comau NJ60 robotic arm, custom made tensioning frame)
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Small-scale setup for the inFORMed Flexible Matter Workshop
(Delta WASP 2040 3D printer, custom made tensioning frame)
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Results of the inFORMed Flexible Matter Workshop

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Equilibrium Serie close-up, PP and lycra, 2017.
Picture courtesy of Maurizio Montalti.

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02
education
2.0 _ inFORMed Matter Worksh

As a testbed for technical and cultural transferability of


the investigated topics, digifabTURINg organized a se-
ries of four international workshops open to students,
researchers and professionals. Every workshop has been
related to a specific material system: clay, polymers, bio-
logic material and lycra+polymers (flexible).

Embedded in the framework of the inFORMed Matter


Research Project (Co-de-iT, 2015), the main goal of the
inFORMed Matter Workshops is to step beyond the cur-
rent state of prototyping, according to which the physi-
cal prototype is considered as a clone of its digital coun-
terpart, thus making fabrication a purely replicational
phase. Instead, by computationally embedding addition-
al levels of information, emergent physical and aesthetic
properties arise, transforming the production process
into an exploration of the design space. By exploring
the code-material-robot interaction process participants
could explore the emergent behaviors of the material
system as well as learn and exert a new design sensibility.

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hops Serie

We sincerely thank all participants and guest tutors


who joined our workshops:

inFORMed CLAY: Claudio Bracco, Matteo Salsi, Elena


Reggio ,Tommaso Venturini

inFORMed POLYMERS: Tudor Cosmatu Alessandro


Tassinari, Simona Tusacciu

inFORMed BIO: Maurizio Montalti (tutor), Rodolfo


Baïz, Claudio Bracco, Alberto Casarotto, Dario Castel-
lari, Giovanni Checchia, Elise Elsacker, Luca Giacolini,
Giulia Grassi, Pauline Koch, Angela Lee, Filippo Mag-
nani, Giulia Molinari, Patricia Wu Wu

inFORMed FLEXIBLE: Alessio Erioli, Lapo Naldoni (tu-


tors), Andrea Bellentani, Hasnaa Benlafkih, Chiara
Benzi, Angelo Figliola, Valeria Francescato, Maria Gen-
evieve Bezzone, Alice Gardini, Danilo Spiga, Stavroula
Tsafou

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Snapshots from the inFORMed Matter Workshops Serie 2017.

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2.1 _ master theses
digifabTURINg supported the physical validation and
prototyping phases of two Master Theses students tu-
tored by professor Alessio Erioli from the Architecture
Department of Università di Bologna:

Lapo Naldoni, Volatile Ground, 2016


Lorenzo Selva, Releasing Complex Tectonics, 2017

Volatile Ground front cover and image from the fabrication process

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Releasing Complex Tectonics front cover and image from the fabrication process

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2.1.0 _ Lapo Naldoni
Volatile Ground

Lapo Naldoni’ s thesis aims at researching rammed


earth constructions for the building of temporary shel-
ter systems embedded in protected natural contexts.
Economic and technologic progress led to a global
standardization of construction methodologies. As
a consequence, the typical traits of biologic systems
characterizing human settlements were lost, e.g. part-
to-whole interconnections, diversity, redundancy,
cross-scale structural distribution, self-organization
and self-adaptation. Furthermore, production systems
based on linear economies still rely on a massive ex-
ploitation of raw materials at the global scale, resulting
in material fluxes and waste accumulations. Volatility is
considered as a variable condition of the system, able
to generate continuous morphologic mutations due to
topological reorganizations of on-site found raw mate-
rials. The use of additive manufacturing technologies
makes a continuous redefinition of rammed-earth-like
material applications possible in contemporary archi-
tectural applications, opening up possibilities for more
flexible and lightweight tectonics.

Student Lapo Naldoni


Advisor Alessio Erioli
Co-advisor Alberto Casarotto
Faculty Università di Bologna
Year 2016

Multi-axial clay printing on hyperbolic fabric scaffolding, close-up.

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2.1.1 _ Lorenzo Selva
Releasing Complex Tectonics

Lorenzo Selva’ s thesis investigates non-standard-ge-


ometry architectural objects coupled with an optimal
digital fabrication framework oriented to flexibly man-
age their complex production process. Releasing Com-
plex Tectonics explores the idea of robotically depos-
iting tridimensional meshes - i.e. leaking formworks
- with embedded the double functionality of formwork
and rebar. It represents the possibility of a digitally
based additive process, with a high degree of spatial
and geometric control for both on-site fabrication and
off-site prefabrication. This process can potentially de-
couple the morphology of the final product from the
complexity of the operations needed for its produc-
tion.

Student Lorenzo Selva


Advisor Alessio Erioli
Co-advisors Andrea Graziano, Marco Palma, Stefano
Paradiso, Luca Patruno
Faculty Università di Bologna
Year 2017

Spatially-deposited doubly-curved ABS tiling units, close-up.

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2.2 _ IED Monster Tiling
Master in Smart Building
and Sustainable Design

MonsterTiling is a system of intelligent components for


architectural skins developed by the students of IED To-
rino Master in Smart Building and Sustainable Design.
They have been developed in order to enhance pas-
sive behaviour on external layer of the building enve-
lope with the final goal to reduce energy needs. Each
component is specialised for different and unique per-
formances. Insulation, thermal mass, shading, solar
radiation, natural ventilation are some of the factors
engaged. Four kind of components have been de-
signed by the students of the Master in Smart Build-
ings and Sustainable Design of IED Torino. A total of 24
prototypes have been 3d printed with a robotic arm.
Each component has a dimension of 25x10x25(h)cm,
and they stand together over a wooden back-frame to
create a vertical surface of 110×200(h)cm to act as a
demonstrator.

Students Shadi Abou Samra, Gaetano Di Fede, Beatrice


Feneri, Davide Iannici, Filippo La Placa, Maria Lucia Rai-
ola, Giulia Roccasalva, Daria Taeb, Yury Gabriela Espino-
za Lopez
Teaching staff Cesare Griffa (coordinator), Andrea Gra-
ziano, Marco Palma, Bruno De Masi, Giacomo Leonzi,
Paolo Scoglio, Riccardo Rigo
Partners & Supporters Fablab Torino, Officine Innesto,
Rubner, IED Torino

IED MonsterTilies assembled prototype , close-up

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Production (top) and assembly (bottom) processes of MonsterTling.

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Close-up of active (sensor and electronics) and passive (clay bricks) MonsterTiling components.

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03
collaborations

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One fundamental goal of the A.A.R.M. project was to
connect digifabTURINg with subjects operating in the
creative area - e.g. artists, designers, architects - with
the purpose of establishing fruitful project-based col-
laborations. How deeply can a (robotic) technology
impact on the development of a creative and artistic
process? How much can an established artistic vision
be contaminated by technological advances? By div-
ing into three different projects we had the chance
to share our questions and reflections with Francesca
Perona, Maurizio Montalti and Ianis Lallemand, artists
whose work stands at the interface between art, re-
seach and technology.

Along the project span digifabTURINg had the op-


portunity to test the reliability of the investigated
technologies to consult different partners around
computation and robotic additive manufacturing for
non-industrial applications in diverse market areas:
robotics (Comau Robotics), advertising (Xister for
Nastro Azzurro), indusrtial manufacturing (MgM Ro-
botics) and creative manufacturing (The Fablab).
Besides their final output, these four selected projects
represent a signal for a future digifabTURINg evolution.
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3.0 _ Francesca Perona
Ceramics for the Anthropocene

Francesca Perona is a London-based designer whose


practice spans across textiles, design research, product
innovation and interactive installations. digifabTURINg
supported the digital-to-physical pipeline for the realiza-
tion of Ceramics for the Anthropocene, an artwork result-
ing from the collaboration with the traditional ceramics
craftsman Marco Tortarolo and Smart Grid engineering
researchers from the Unige Department of Engineer-
ing. Thanks to extensive conversations with engineering
researchers working on the innovative pilot Smart Grid
Savona Campus plant and the Albisolese ceramics crafts-
men community, Ceramics for the Anthropocene reflects
on the concept of self-sufficiency, based on insights on
the relationship between local heritage and future cities,
indigenous resources and sustainable development. The
artwork aims to bring awareness to the positive impact
of ‘clean’ employment of locally available resource, em-
powered by innovative technologies, and at the same
time shine a light on global, often unsustainably sourced
raw materials. The project was developed during the
Radicate.eu european Sm/ART 2 residency. The artwork
is part of the prestigious Museo della Ceramica di Savona
collection.

Artwork Francesca Perona


Artistic Direction Tiziana Casapietra (Radicate)
Robotic Fabrication digifabTURINg
Ceramics Laboratorio di Marco Tortarolo
Partners & Supporters Compagnia di Sanpaolo, Museo
della Ceramica di Savona, Fondazione Agostino de Mari,
Università degli Studi di Genova, Campus Savona, Fablab
Torino

Ceramics for the Anthropocene, final piece close-up.

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Hand-crafted firing and glazing samples.
Picture courtesy of Radicate.

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Robotically 3D-printed test samples of hand-crafted (top) and industrial clays (bottom).
Picture courtesy of Radicate.

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Final piece exhibited at Museo della Ceramca di Savona.

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3.1 _ Ianis Lallemand
Unspecified Clay

Designer, artist and researcher Ianis Lallemand joined


digifabTURINg for the physical development of Un-
specified Clay, an experimental robotic fabrication
process and part of his doctoral research in the SACRe
programme at École Nationale Supérieure des Arts
Décoratifs in Paris. Unspecified Clay is an experimen-
tal robotic fabrication system producing self-organized
clay structures through an iterative process of depo-
sition, scanning, and computation. Through a closed
feedback loop, successive clay additions build on top
of one another, yielding an emergent and open-ended
process in which material properties are not subordi-
nated to a predetermined geometry, but act as cata-
lysts for aesthetic and structural explorations.

Research & Code Ianis Lallemand


Robotic Fabrication digifabTURINg
Partner & Supporters Co-de-iT, EnsadLab, PSL Research
University, SACRe – PSL doctoral program

Robotic material deposition close-up.

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Unspecified Clay robotic setup (Comau NS12, Microsoft Kinect, Claystruder).

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Custom made software Graphic User Interface (top) and robotic material deposition (bottom).

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Unspecified Clay
material instantiations,
2016-2017.

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Unspecified Clay
fired and glazed material
instantiations, 2017.

All pictures courtesy of


Ianis Lallemand

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3.2 _ Maurizio Montalti
Bio Ex-Machina

Designer, researcher and creative explorer Maurizio


Montalti - founder of the Amsterdam-based practice
Officina Corpuscoli - joined digifabTURINg for the phys-
ical development of Bio Ex-Machina, a collaborative
research project exploring possibilities at the intersec-
tion of digital and biological computation through the
use of robotics and 3D printing technologies.
Combining the unique potential of computation, robot-
ics and biological building agents (e.g. fungi) tempo-
rary scaffolds capable of supporting cell growth will be
algorithmically designed and fabricated; those will be
colonised, progressively degraded and transformed by
living organisms. By implementing a 6-axis robotic arm
with a custom designed extruder, the project’s ambi-
tion is to develop a process for printing diverse typol-
ogies of scaffolding structures, while simultaneously
deploying the living organisms as main transformation
agent. The primary aim of BIO EX-MACHINA is in fact to
design hybrid artefacts as ecosystems combining algo-
rithmic design strategies, material behavior and living
organisms, while exploiting manufacturing processes
made possible by the use of robotics, therefore devel-
oping hybrid growth protocols (i.e. Bio-4D-printing).

Design, Research & Biology Officina Corpuscoli


Computational Design Co-de-iT
Robotic Fabrication digifabTURINg
Partners & Supporters Officine Innesto, FabLab Torino,
Casa Jasmina, Toolbox Coworking , NYXO, Utrecht Uni-
versiteit, ESA - European Space Agency

Mycelium-based material robotic deposition close-up.

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Deposition tests of various mycelium-based compound mixtures.

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Mycelium-based samples after 20 minutes.

Mycelium-based samples after 2 weeks.

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Picture courtesy of Comau

3.3 _ Comau Robotics


Hardware and software development for au-
tonomous robotic 3D printing applications for
exhibition purposes

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Picture courtesy of MgM

3.4 _ M.g.M. Robotics


Software and User Interface development
for robotic layer-based 3d printing and plasma
cutting applications

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Picture courtesy of The Fablab Milano

3.5 _ The Fablab


Hardware and software development for au-
tonomous robotic layer-based 3D printing ap-
plications for prototyping purposes

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Picture courtesy of Xister

w/ Officine Innesto
3.6 _ Xister Nastro Azzurro
for
Software support and robot trajectories generation
for Armarius - The Label of Tomorrow, a robotic cal-
ligraphy project for the beer brand Nastro Azzurro.

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05
outcomes
Overview of the exhibition layout.

Besides immaterial results achieved throughout lec-


tures, residencies and workshops, A.A.R.M. had to
showcase its physical and material outcomes via
the production of a final series of objects suited
for the domestic environment. The final produc-
tion - togheter with a rich selection of prototypes
and material samples - was organized and show-
cased for AARM: Robotics & Creativity Exhibition.

The exhibition was held at Fablab Torino and Toolbox


Coworking from October 11th to October 16th 2017.
The event has been framed inside Torino Design of the
City 2017, event organized for the World Design Orga-
nization general assembly.

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Fired and glazed ceramics final production (ReactionDiffusion and Gravity series).

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Fired and glazed ceramics final production (tiles).

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Polymers final production (truss prototype, dining table, suspension lamps).

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Lycra+Polymers final production (Equilibrium suspension lamps).

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Workshop results : inFORMed Flexible Matter (top), inFORMed Bio Matter (bottom).

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acknowledgements

digifabTURINg sincerely thanks


_ guest artists, researchers and designers
Alessio Erioli, Ianis Lallemand, Riccardo La Magna, Maurizio Montalti, Fran-
cesca Perona, Marco Tortarolo, Tiziana Casapietra

_ past and present collaborators


Marco Caprani, Silvia Galfo, Alessandro Squatrito, Alessandro Tassinari, Stav-
roula Tsafou, Riccardo Mameli

with a particular mention to


_ Francesca Gambetta and Compagnia di San Paolo for strongly believing in
project A.A.R.M. since day 1

_ Fablab Torino, Officine Innesto, Toolbox Coworking for constantly and


actively supporting the project

_ Panelists / colleagues Cesare Griffa, Mariano Marchetti, Maurizio Mon-


talti, Aldo Bottero and Chairman Alessio Erioli for setting up such an inter-
esting conversation and, mostly, for playing a really important role in the
project

_ Alessandro Squatrito, Silvia Galfo, Davide Gomba, Alessandro Tassinari


and all the precious helping hands and minds from the Fablab Torino Com-
munity who contributed to transform a big workshop into a real exhibition
space

_ Lapo Naldoni and Lorenzo Selva for their outstanding thesis outcomes

_ Our students from IED Torino and all participants of the inFORMed Matter
Workshops for providing a big amount of inspiration

_ Paolo Bistrot for the catering and the daily doses of great food in the last
2 years
license

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a project by

Project by
Project by

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supported by

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