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Keene State College

Music Department

Teacher Candidate Assessment of Performance (TCAP)
MU 475/MU 476 Music Student Teaching

STRAND 2: Planning and Preparing

OVERVIEW

Practicum students will design a learning segment consisting of 3-5 lessons that promote
students’ development of a music skill with the pre-approval of the cooperating teacher.
During weeks 2-3 of the placement, student teachers will present their created lessons
and assessment(s) to the cooperating teacher for review and discussion. The cooperat-
ing teacher will offer suggestions, edits or adjustments to the lesson plans and assess-
ment(s). Following this discussion, revise the lesson plans incorporating this feedback.
This lesson will be taught during weeks 4-5 (timeline may vary by placement). Submit the
final draft of the lesson plans, instructional materials, and assessment(s) along with
completing the ‘Planning and Preparing’ commentary.

Purpose

The Planning and Preparing Strand provides evidence of your ability to develop plans
that:

• Support student learning of artistic perceptions, creative expressions, historical &


cultural contexts, aesthetic valuing, and/or connections, relations, and applications

• Make the curriculum accessible to all students

• Provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of the stan-


dards/objectives

Insert Lesson Plans and Assessment(s) HERE:


Name: Holly Webster

Date: 1/15/18

MU 457: Lesson 1

Grade Level: gr. 1

Objective(s):

1. Students will demonstrate understanding of high low and middle pitch through move-
ment and singing
2. Students will sign Do, Mi, Sol with their class.
3. Students will sing Do, Mi, Sol with accurate pitch with their class.
4. Students will sing new melody The Balloon Song with accurate pitch as a class
5. Students will demonstrate the Curwen Hand Signs for The Balloon Song as a class
6. Students will move expressively in time with The Balloon Song

Materials:

* One balloon (or ball)/student

* Chalk board

* Curwen solfege syllable posters in correct order by interval

Procedures:

1. Arrange students in a circle. Students listen while teacher sings and does the movements to the
Balloon Song with balloon/ball

Teacher Sings and moves:

Balloons float up high,

Up to the sky!

Now bring them down,

Down to the ground,

Now let them fly

2. Teacher sings and moves to the Balloon Song with students response

Teacher with movement :

Balloons float up high,

Up to the sky! (Students Repeat)

Teacher with movement :

Now bring them down,


Down to the ground,

Now let them fly (Students Repeat)

3. Teacher and students sing and move to the Balloon Song together with balloons/balls . Ask stu-
dents to think about what happens to the pitch when the balloons float up high, and when they
go toward the ground.

Teacher and Students sing and move:

Balloons float up high,

Up to the sky!

Now bring them down,

Down to the ground,

Now let them fly

(Wait for student response to question! If they are struggling, offer choices to help them.)

4. Without the help of teacher, students will sing and move to the Balloon Song (group assess-
ment)

Students sing and move:

Balloons float up high,

Up to the sky!

Now bring them down,

Down to the ground,

Now let them fly

Students repeat with feedback from teacher.

5. Teacher sings Sol Mi, students respond Sol Mi Do. Direct students attention to chalk board with
solfeggi syllables with Curwen hand signs.

6. Explain to students that Solfege : is the language of music. (Students repeat the definition)

7. Explain that Hand Signs : are the sign language of music (Students repeat the definition)

8. Teacher sings Balloon Song in solfeggi with hand signs, while students watch and listen

Teacher with hand signs:

Sol Sol Sol - Do

Sol Sol Sol - Do

Sol Sol Sol Mi

Mi Mi Mi Do

Do Do Do - Do
9. Teacher and students sing Balloon Song in solfeggi with hand signs. Tell students you will be
watching for proper placement of the hand sign - individual assessment)

Teacher and Students with hand signs:

Sol Sol Sol - Do

Sol Sol Sol - Do

Sol Sol Sol Mi

Mi Mi Mi Do

Do Do Do - Do

10. Repeat step 9 but ask students to think about what happens to the pitch when our hands move
up, and when our hands move down.

Teacher and Students with hand signs:

Sol Sol Sol - Do

Sol Sol Sol - Do

Sol Sol Sol Mi

Mi Mi Mi Do

Do Do Do - Do

(Wait for student response to question! If they are struggling, offer choices to help them. individ-
ual assessment)

11. Without teachers help, students sing Balloon Song in solfeggi with hand signs

Students with hand signs:

Sol Sol Sol - Do

Sol Sol Sol - Do

Sol Sol Sol Mi

Mi Mi Mi Do

Do Do Do - Do

(Provide Feedback!)

12. Conclusion;

Ask students what solfeggi means. (wait for response)

Ask students what hand signs are. (wait for response)

Assessment:

• Teacher will evaluate students understanding of high low and middle through movement
and singing, and hand signs (group assessment)
• Teacher will evaluate students on ability to sign Do, Mi, Sol (group assessment)
• Teacher will listen for accurate pitch while singing Do, Mi, Sol (group assessment)
• Teacher will listen for correct lyrics when singing The Balloon Song (group assessment)
• Teacher will watch for correct demonstration of Hand Signs during The Balloon Song
(group assessment)
• Teacher will watch students move expressively in time with the music (group assessment)

Evaluation:
Yes / No Self Assessment Rubric

Circle YES if you agree or NO if you disagree.

I can hear the difference between high, low and middle pitch YES NO

I can sing and sign Do Mi and Sol YES NO

I can sing and move to the Balloon Song YES NO

National Core Arts Standards addressed:

MU:Pr4.3.1

Demonstrate and describe music’s expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo).

MU:Pr6.1.1

With limited guidance, perform music for a specific purpose with expression.

Adaptions:

Behavioral - if students throw the balls they need to go back in the bin and do the movements
with an imaginary ball instead

ELL - write Balloon song on the board for them to read. They can still participate in the move-
ments and hand signing
Holly Webster

1/22/18

MU 457: Lesson 2

Grade Level: gr. 1

Objectives:

Students will sing the Balloon Song with accurate pitch as a class.

With accurate motions, students will move in time with the Balloon Song

From brainstorming ideas as a class and demonstrations by the teacher, students will recognize the
difference between songs sung with and without expressive qualities.

Regarding the Balloon Song, students will together as a group demonstrate and describe their own
musical ideas, such as regarding musical expression

Students will recognize the solfeggi syllables by singing, signing, and playing them on the xylo-
phones in a group.

Students will use iconic notation in rhythmic patterns to analyze, read and perform music

Materials:
* For every 2 students, one labeled xylophone with specific chimes

* For every 2 students, one mallet

* Color cards

* White Board/Chalk Board (in this case I used both)

* Balloons/Balls in 3 varieties of colors

* Hand Sign posters

* Piano

Procedures:

1. Give each student a colored card on their way into class. After attendance, students will locate
the person with the same colored card, then sit with their partner. Collect colored cards.

2. Review Balloon Song. Teacher demonstrates Balloon Song on neutral syllable “du” with
movements while students imitate the movements. Give starting pitch on piano.

Teacher: Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du
Du Du Du Du

3. Teacher and students sing Balloon Song on neutral syllable “du” with movements. Give starting
pitch & cue.

Teacher & Students: Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

4. Students sing Balloon Song on neutral syllable “du” with movements. Give starting pitch &
cue.

Students: Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Du Du Du Du

Teacher listens for pitch accuracy. Provide feedback on pitch and movements.

5. Tell students you will now sing Balloon Song with the correct pitch and movements, but ask
them to be listening & looking for what might be off. Give starting pitch.

Teacher with lack of word articulation and enthusiasm:

Balloons float up high

Up to the sky

Now bring them down

Down to the ground

Now let them fly

(Wait for students response)

6. Tell students you will sing the Balloon Song again and ask them to think about the differences
between the first time and this time. Give starting pitch.

Teacher with accurate articulation and enthusiasm:

Balloons float up high

Up to the sky

Now bring them down

Down to the ground


Now let them fly

7. Repeat the question, wait for students response. Record responses on paper or board.

Possible student responses: happy, light, clear, clean, not muddy, louder

8. Tell students they are going to sing the Balloon Song with movements and as if they were (use
their ideas - big, red, weightless happy) balloons floating through the sky. Give starting pitch &
cue.

Teacher & Students:

Balloons float up high

Up to the sky

Now bring them down

Down to the ground

Now let them fly

(Provide feedback on articulation, enthusiasm, and expression)

9. Review solfeggi & hand signs. First ask for the definition, then wait for students response.

Teacher: Who remembers the definition of solfeggi? (Student Responds)

Teacher: Repeat after me, solfege is the language of music. (Students Repeat)

Teacher: Who remembers the definition of hand signs? (Student Responds)

Teacher: Repeat after me, hand signs are the sign language of music (Students Repeat)

10. Assign student pairs to xylophones. The mallets should have been already distributed. Ask the
partner standing on the right to come in the middle to practice hand signs, while the left partner
stays at the mallets. During transitioning, let xylophone partner experiment for 10 seconds.

11. Ask xylophones to locate low Do. Tell the students you’re going to count them in, and they
will play for 4 beats.

12. Ask hand signers to show you what do looks like. Tell the students you’re going to count them
in, and they will play for 4 beats.

13. Repeat step 11 & 12 for Mi, Sol, and high Do.

14.Teacher will sing, sign the hand signs and point so students can follow along with the notation
written on the board.

Teacher sings solfeggi while playing:

Sol Sol Sol -Do

Sol Sol Sol -Do

Sol Sol Sol Mi

Mi Mi Mi Do
Do Do Do -Do

15. Teacher sings, signs, and points along while xylophone students play the Balloon Song. The
hand signers will sing and sign along.

Teacher & students sing solfeggi while playing or moving:

Sol Sol Sol -Do

Sol Sol Sol -Do

Sol Sol Sol Mi

Mi Mi Mi Do

Do Do Do -Do

16. Teacher will only point along on the board while students play or sing the Balloon Song again.
This time tell the students you want them to play or sing with expression or as if they were (use
their ideas - big, red, weightless happy) balloons floating through the sky.

Students sing solfeggi while playing:

Sol Sol Sol -Do

Sol Sol Sol -Do

Sol Sol Sol Mi

Mi Mi Mi Do

Do Do Do -Do

Provide feedback on pitch, expression, enthusiasm, articulation, ect.

17. Switch partners and repeat steps 10-16.

Assessment:

Teacher will …

listen for accurate pitch

watch for accurate motions, moving in time with the music

observe students differentiate between expressive and non expressive qualities

record students own musical ideas, such as musical expression

see that student recognize the solfeggi syllables by singing, signing, and playing them on the xy-
lophones

observe students using iconic notation in rhythmic patterns to analyze, read and perform music
Evaluation:

Yes / No Self Assessment Rubric

Circle YES if you agree or NO if you disagree.

I can sing and move with expression YES NO

I can sing Do, Mi, Sol, and high Do YES NO

I can sign the Hand Signs for Do, Mi, Sol and high Do YES NO

I can play the Balloon Song on the xylophone YES NO


National Core Art Standards:

MU:Cr1.1.1a
With limited guidance, create musical ideas (such as answering a musical question) for a specific
purpose

MU:Pr4.2.1b
When analyzing selected music, read and perform rhythmic patterns using iconic or standard no-
tation.

MU:Pr4.3.1a Demonstrate and describe music’s expressive qualities (such as articulation, dynam-
ics and tempo).

Adaptions:

ELL- sing on a neutral syllable, follow along to the iconic notation on the board

Holly Webster
1/25/18
MU 457: Lesson 3

Grade Level: Gr. 1


Objectives:
Students will sing solfeggi with accurate pitch in a group
Students will sign solfeggi with accurate hand signs as a group
Students will independently write their own solfeggi pattern using iconic notation with at
least 2 syllables
Students will play their solfeggi melody on a xylophone while maintaining a steady beat
Materials:
* For every 2 students, one labeled xylophone with specific chimes

* For every 2 students, one mallet

* Note cards

* Piano

Procedure:
• Start with Sol mi, students response back Sol mi do
• Play Simon Says using solfeggi syllables and hand signs. start with students standing up and
the ones who are out sit back down.
• Ask students what solfeggi is
Teacher : what is the language of music?
• Ask students what hand signs are
Teacher : what is the sign language of music?
• Write an example of solfeggi melody on the board. Play your example on the xylophone while
singing.
do mi sol mi sol mi do
• Tell students they will compose their own solfeggi melody on a notecard. Write the require-
ments on the board
- Melody must have a steady beat (review steady beat)
- Melody must use at least 2 solfeggi syllables that they’ve been working on (do, mi,
sol, do)
- Melody must be playable. If you write it and it’s too hard to play, then change it.
• Set the xylophones up at the front of each row while they are writing.
• Listen to each student sing and play their composition. Have the rest of the class sign and sing
it back. Rotate row after the last person in the row has played their composition.
• If time, have students play the Balloon Song on the xylophones. The students in the other two
rows should sing and sign the Balloon Song.
Assessment:
Teacher will…
Listen for accurate pitch.
Observe students sign solfeggi with accurate hand signs
Evaluate student’s solfeggi melody using iconic notation with at least 2 syllables
Listen for a steady beat when students play their solfeggi melody

Evaluation:
Yes / No Self Assessment Rubric
Circle YES if you agree or NO if you disagree.
I can sing Do Mi Sol and high Do YES NO
I can sign the Hand Signs for Do Mi Sol and High Do YES NO
I can make a solfeggi pattern with at least 2 solfeggi syllables YES NO
I can play my solfeggi pattern on the xylophone YES NO

National Core Art Standards:

MU:Cr2.1.1b With limited guidance, use iconic or standard notation and/or recording technology
to document and organize personal musical ideas.

MU:Pr6.1.1b Perform appropriately for the audience and purpose.

Adaptions

ELL - read the requirements to them individually and make sure they understand the directions

Planning and Preparing Commentary
Write a commentary that addresses the following prompts. You can address each prompt
separately, through a holistic essay, or a combination of both, as long as all prompts are
addressed. Each bolded overarching question corresponds to a rubric that will be
used to assess the depth and quality of your responses.

TOPIC A:

How do the plans support student learning of artistic perceptions, creative ex-
pressions, historical & cultural contexts, aesthetic valuing, and/or connections,
relations, and applications?

1. Identify the central focus of the learning segment and National Core Arts Stan-
dards that will be addressed in the lesson. Explain why the content of the learning
segment is important for your particular students to learn.

The central focus of the learning segment is learning the solfeggi for Do, Mi, Sol, Do
through singing, playing, signing, analyzing and moving to music. The National Core Arts
Standards addressed throughout the lessons include the following:

MU:Cr1.1.1a
With limited guidance, create musical ideas (such as answering a musical question) for a
specific purpose

MU:Cr2.1.1b With limited guidance, use iconic or standard notation and/or recording
technology to document and organize personal musical ideas.

MU:Pr6.1.1
With limited guidance, perform music for a specific purpose with expression.

MU:Pr4.2.1b
When analyzing selected music, read and perform rhythmic patterns using iconic or
standard notation.

MU:Pr4.3.1a Demonstrate and describe music’s expressive qualities (such as articula-


tion, dynamics and tempo).

MU:Pr6.1.1b Perform appropriately for the audience and purpose.

The content of the learning segment is important for the students to learn because this
method will eventually help students learn how to sight read quickly and well. The long
term goal would be that students could pick up a piece of music and be able to internal-
ize the melody in their heads, and not have to hear it played out loud. Solmization
strengthens sight singing skills by recognizing patterns in music.

2. Describe how the central focus addresses multiple dimensions of learning through
any of these aspects: clear connections among creative expression; artistic per-
ception; aesthetic valuing; understanding music in historical and cultural context;
and/or connections/relations/applications.
Learning solfege addresses the multiple dimensions of learning through connections, re-
lationships, and applications. If the students make the connection and associate sylla-
bles with notes, they will eventually be able to mentally hear pitches and sing them the
first time they see a score. In view of the fact that students with solfeggi training have
sung these notes and note relations previously, they are able to sing what they see. Ar-
ranging a curriculum that incorporates singing and movement can help and speed the
process of memorization.

3. Refer to your lesson plans to describe the progression of instructional strategies,


learning tasks (work to be done), and assessments (quality of ability) and how
they build understanding of the central focus of the learning segment. Reference
the instructional materials you have included, as needed.

The progression of the instructional strategies, learning tasks, and assessments all com-
bine to build understanding of the central focus (learning solfeggi) of the learning seg-
ment. In my first lesson, my instructional strategies start with recognizing high, low, and
medium sounds, then singing and moving to the solfeggi syllables Do, Mi, Sol, and Do,
to singing and signing the previous syllables in song. I assessed the students in lesson
one based on their pitch accuracy, their understanding of high low and middle pitch
based on how they moved to the music, the expression in their movements, and their
correct demonstration of the Curwen Hand Signs.
In the second lesson, my instructional strategies are still very similar to lesson one,
which starts with a review of last weeks new material, but we take it a step further to dis-
cuss singing and moving with and without expression, brainstorm their own musical ideas and
demonstrate what it means to sing with expression and the composers intent, and play the solfeggi
on the xylophones using iconic notation. In lesson two, they were again assessed on pitch
accuracy, moving in time with the music, differentiate between expressive and non expressive
qualities, their own musical ideas, ability to recognize the solfeggi syllables by singing, sign-
ing, and playing them on the xylophones and lastly watching students follow along to
iconic notation in rhythmic patterns to analyze, read and perform music.
The final lesson still focuses on Do, Mi, Sol, and high Do. Like the last lesson, we begin
with a review, then the students will write their own musical composition using iconic no-
tation with conditions listed above. They will be assessed on pitch accuracy, demonstra-
tion of correct hand signs, ability to play while keeping a steady beat, and incorporating
at least two solfeggi syllables we covered in their original composition.
The ultimate learning task throughout all the lessons were to get the students to recog-
nize the relationships between high, low and middle sounds and the solfeggi and learn
the syllables that were introduced.

4. Justify the pedagogical choices (i.e. methodology and sequence of steps) that you
are making in the planning and preparation of this learning segment by making
specific connections to scholarly and/or professional literature. Why are you im-
plementing this pedagogical approach for the learning segment?

In the Kodaly Child developmental approach, students are first introduced to musical
concepts through experiences such as listening, singing, or movement. Once the child
becomes familiar with a that musical idea, then they learn how to notate it. Everything is
constantly reviewed and supported through games, movement, and songs. I’m imple-
menting this pedagogical approach to the learning segment because I feel that ear train-
ing is an important skill for students to develop at a young age. This is a proven method
with proven results.
TOPIC B:

How do the plans make the curriculum accessible to the students in the class?

5. Make connections to the description of your students provided in the Contextualiz-


ing Strand (* this should be discussed with cooperating teacher during lesson plan
review):

a. Explaining how your plans draw on students’ prior learning as well as experiential
backgrounds or interests to help students reach the learning segment’s standards/
objectives

For many first grade students, it is their first introduction to a music class. The students
have prior knowledge of steady beat and how to recreate it, rhythm, recognizing melody,
and experienced learning about different instruments and how they’re properly played.
The class I’ll be focusing on can play instruments such as the xylophone, although they
may need a reminder on how to hold the mallet and how to hit the tone bars so that it
creates a ring, not muted sound. They can move to music. Moving and creating music is
of high interests to the students. They do have prior knowledge of high versus low, so
part of the focus of the learning segments will be review. The students have learned
about expressive qualities in music such as loud and soft, fast and slow- through doing-
not as a fact only lesson - Mrs. Schwalbe has used the terminology with them but they
might not use it always yet.

b. Clearly articulating how scaffolding or other structured forms of support in the


plans provide access to grade-level standards/objectives

One form of structured support from the plans will be demonstrating the movements and
the pitch, it might mean doing the movements and singing with them so that they can
meet those grade level expectations more quickly. It may also mean pointing on the
board to a visual so the students can follow along to the iconic notation. It could also
mean coaching them along when asking them questions regarding musical expression. It
could also be separating half the class so each person gets a turn at playing the xylo-
phone. Scaffolding could even be turning something into a game, the students won’t
even realize they’re being assessed.

TOPIC C:

What opportunities do students have to demonstrate their understanding of the


standards/objectives?

6. Review the collection of formative and summative assessment tasks throughout


your learning segment and explain how:

a. These assessments allow your students’ to demonstrate depth of understanding


relative to specific student standards/objectives

The students have multiple opportunities to demonstrate depth of understanding relative


to specific student standards. Throughout the learning segment, my lessons give stu-
dents multiple ways to demonstrate the standards, whether it be through singing, mov-
ing, playing, explaining/speaking, signing and writing.
b. These assessments access both productive (speaking/writing) and receptive (lis-
tening/reading) modalities to monitor student understanding

The assessments throughout my learning segments incorporate both productive and re-
ceptive modalities to monitor student understanding. Examples of productive assess-
ments include singing with pitch accuracy or singing and playing their melodic composi-
tion, speaking the correct solfeggi syllables, moving with the music, writing melodic com-
positions using solfeggi syllables, demonstrating the hand signs, repeating a definition.
Examples of receptive assessments include reading and following the notation written on
the board, listening to solfeggi patterns that are sung to sing them back, reading a defini-
tion.

c. These assessments provide access to all students (including those with diverse
learning needs) to demonstrate learning relative to specific student standards/ob-
jectives

The assessments provide access to all students (including those with diverse learning
needs) to demonstrate learning relative to specific student standards. Diverse learning
needs means that the teacher will need to approach the same thing in multiple ways. By
writing on the board, removing the unnecessary tone bars on the xylophones, doing
demonstrations while the students are watching and listening, and having a discussion
on what hand signs or anything else are all adaptions that will make the lessons more
accessible to everyone. I was not given a lot of information on specific learning needs for
each student. Some of the students are having their IEPs in progress right now so it’s a
difficult age group to provide the right access to the people who need it most, so it’s best
to cover everything and make those adaptions with the mind set that someone in the
room needs that adaption.

d. You will provide feedback to students on their learning

Most of my feedback to students on their learning will come from me speaking directly to
them on what was good and what could be improved. I will also give feedback through
demonstration, such as demonstrating the way I would like it sung or move the way I
want them to. I’ll also sing or play back what I heard. I may even be able to take their
compositions and write a comment on what I liked about their performance.

TOPIC D: Academic Language

How does the candidate identify the language demands of learning tasks and as-
sessments relative to the students’ current levels of academic language proficien-
cy? How do the candidate’s planning, instruction, and assessment support acad-
emic language development?

7. Consider the language demands of the oral and written tasks in which you plan to
have students engage as well as the various levels of English language proficien-
cy related to classroom tasks as described in the Contextualizing Strand.

a. Identify words and phrases (if appropriate) that you will emphasize in this learning
segment including music terminology, symbolic notation, and other music tech-
niques. Why are these important for students to understand and use in completing
classroom tasks in the learning segment? Which students?

Some words and phrases that I will emphasize in this learning segment will include
solfege, hand signs, Do, Mi, Sol, high Do, pitch, high and low pitch, count you in, expres-
sion, compose, mimic me, and present/perform. These terms and phrases are important
for students to understand and use in completing the classroom tasks because they build
off one another. If you don't know the definition of solfeggi, then you won’t understand
the definition of hand signs. If you were asked to sing a solfeggi syllable, you would need
to pick from Do, Mi, Sol or high Do. Students need to distinguish the difference between
high and low Do in order to sing it or play it on the xylophone, even before that they need
to be able to tell the difference between a high and low sound. They need to know what
the phrase “I’ll count you in” means so they can be cued to play at the same time. They
need to know what expression means in order to sing with expression. They need to
know what compose means in order to write their own solfeggi melody. It’s important for
all students to understand these words and phrases.

b. How do key learning tasks in your plans build on each other to support students’
academic language development?

The key tasks in my plans build on each other to support students’ academic language.
The ultimate learning task throughout the learning segment was to get the students to
recognize the relationships between high, low and middle sounds and the solfeggi and
learn the syllables that were introduced. We first start with a song that demonstrates
high, middle, and low sounds which we identified. Then I introduced solfeggi and the syl-
lables. We sang the song using the syllables first, then we added the hand signs. In the
next lesson, we reviewed the balloon song, solfeggi and the hand signs. After the review
we talked about expression. Next they were to transfer the information onto an instru-
ment and play the melody on the xylophone. Next they will create their own solfeggi
melody using the previous information.

c. How will you assess students’ academic language development?

For the first two lessons, I have wrote the definition of solfeggi and hand signs on the
chalk board and I made them verbally repeat the definitions (sometimes even twice in
one lesson). For the third lesson, I would like to erase the definition and I will ask the
class who remembers the definition of solfeggi… hand signs. That will inform me on if
the information is sticking or not.
Another way I monitor the students language development is sometimes when I ask a
question like “what way did the pitch go?” some students respond back saying “the pitch
went up” so I think if they use the word in their answer, that is a really good sign.
They can also physically show me with their movements if they understand. When I say
show me Sol, they’ll show me the hand sign for Sol. That is another way which can in-
form me if the language I’m using is sticking in their heads.

*** Please self-assess your Strand 2 submission using the


rubrics below. Highlight the level that best represents your
work in the areas below:

Planning and Preparing Rubrics


NH TCAP: Music

PLANNING AND PREPARING: ESTABLISHING A BALANCED INSTRUCTIONAL FOCUS


1. How do the plans support student learning of artistic perceptions, creative expressions,
historical & cultural contexts, aesthetic valuing, and/or connections, relations, and ap-
plications?
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
• The standards, • The standards, • Learning tasks or the • Both learning tasks
learning objectives, learning objectives, set of assessment and the set of as-
learning tasks, and learning tasks, and tasks focus on multi- sessment tasks fo-
assessments either assessments have ple dimensions of cus on multiple di-
have no central an overall focus learning through mensions of learning
focus or a one- that is primarily clear connections through clear con-
dimensional fo- one-dimensional, among creative ex- nections among cre-
cus, i.e., represent i.e., represent cre- pression, artistic per- ative expression,
creative expres- ative expression, ception, aesthetic artistic perception,
sion, artistic per- artistic perception, valuing, understand- aesthetic valuing,
ception, aesthetic aesthetic valuing, ing music in historical understanding music
valuing, under- understanding mu- and cultural context, in historical and cul-
standing music in sic in historical and and/or connections/ tural context, and/or
historical and cul- cultural context, relations/ap- connections/rela-
tural context, and and connections/ plications. tions/applications.
connections/rela- relations/ap- • A progression of • A progression of
tions/applications plications as most- learning tasks and learning tasks and
as separate tasks. ly separate tasks, assessments is assessments guides
but with vague planned to build un- students to build
connections be- derstanding of the deep understand-
tween them. central focus of the ings of the central
learning segment. focus of the learning
segment.

PLANNING AND PREPARING: MAKING CONTENT ACCESSIBLE


2. How do the plans make the curriculum accessible to the students in the class?

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4


• Plans refer to stu- • Plans draw on stu- • Plans draw on students’ All components of
dents’ experiential dents’ experiential prior learning as well Level 3 plus:
backgrounds, inter- backgrounds, inter- as experiential back- • Plans include
ests, or prior learning ests, or prior learning grounds or interests to well-integrated
that have little or no to help students help students reach the instructional
relationship to the reach the learning learning segment’s strategies that
learning segment’s segment’s standards/ standards/objectives. are tailored to
standards/objectives. objectives. • Plans for implementa- address a vari-
OR • Plans for the imple- tion of learning tasks ety of specific
• There are significant mentation of learning include scaffolding or student learn-
content inaccuracies tasks include sup- other structured ing needs.
in plans that will lead port to help stu- forms of support to • Plans include
to student misunder- dents who often provide access to multiple
standings. struggle with the con- grade-level standards/ sources to en-
tent. objectives. hance curricu-
lum accessibil-
ity such as
modeling,
recordings,
videos, etc.
PLANNING AND PREPARING: DESIGNING ASSESSMENTS
3. What opportunities do students have to demonstrate their understanding of the standards/
objectives?

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4

• There are limited • Opportunities • Opportunities are provided for All components of
opportunities pro- are provided students to learn what is as- Level 3 plus:
vided for students for students to sessed. • Assessments are
to learn what is learn what is • The assessments allow stu- modified, adapt-
measured by as- assessed. dents to show some depth of ed, and/or de-
sessments. • It is not clear understanding or skill with signed to allow
OR that the as- respect to the standards/ob- students with spe-
• There is a signifi- sessment of jectives. cial needs opportu-
cant mismatch one or more • The assessments access nities to demon-
between one or standards/ ob- both productive (perform- strate understand-
more assessment jectives go be- ing/speaking/writing) and ings and skills rela-
instruments or yond surface- receptive (listening/reading) tive to the stan-
methods and the level under- modalities to monitor student dards/objectives.
standards/objec- standings. understanding.
tives being as-
sessed.