You are on page 1of 4

Research Proposal 

Erik Mechtel 
Independent Research 
2017­18 
 
Assessment of Assumption Use in Macroinvertebrate Studies: Error Analysis 
 
1. Overview of Research 
 
This study aims at pursuing errors in ecological modeling. Less broadly, the field of pollution 
modeling and mapping using biological indicators such as macroinvertebrates contains several 
assumptions which have gone untested, or loosely tested in association with other studies. Doing 
analysis on the assumptions using scientific data may yield oversights that negatively affect the 
point­source accuracy of data on pollutants. This would cause some studies to lose accuracy and the 
use of the conclusions as derived from these studies might suffer deviation from the current ecological 
state. 
 
2. Background 
 
Macroinvertebrate analysis for the use of pollution sensing has taken many forms, from 
laboratory experiments to field data to citizen science efforts, to gather data on macroinvertebrate 
populations in streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Even high school biology classes have 
helped gather data for official organizations such as the USGS and the Chesapeake Monitoring 
Cooperative. Under these organizations, a common system for collecting and analyzing data has 
emerged. However, this is only the setting for further research.  
The most obvious, and most difficult, direction that thus appears is the analysis of assumptions 
used in said data collection. However, since they are assumptions, there is no substantial data from 
which to begin to derive accurate, new conclusions, or more precisely, conclusions that do not commit 
the same potential errors in the analysis already conducted. Therefore, much of the data­­if not all of 
it­­must be free from potentially fallacious analysis. 
 
3. Problem Statement 
 
The problem, therefore, is identifying possible assumptions and testing the assumptions’ 
validity in the application of pollution modeling and mapping through macroinvertebrate data. 
Therefore, results could perform two roles: (1) validating the data and analysis done thus far in 
pollution modeling or (2) finding that data thus far contains slight inaccuracies on a point­source 
pollution scale. Both are important reasons for doing this type of error analysis.  
 
4. Methodology 
 
a. Question and Hypothesis 
­ Are the quantity and taxonomic diversity of macroinvertebrates in a given stream location 
determined solely on a point­source pollution scale, i.e.: operating only meters beyond the 
source? Or, are there, when analyzing non­point pollution sources, other factors that may not 
have been considered when testing for uncontrolled variables. 
­ There will be a clear, if slight, increase between settings where point pollution is not the only 
influence on the size of macroinvertebrate communities and when it is the only source. 
Noticeable taxonomic differences will also ensue.  
b. Basis for Hypothesis 
Pollution, be that large­particle type or chemical pollution, can often be transported by 
fast­moving water, and given macroinvertebrates live in often fast­moving water to filter feed, there is 
a non­zero chance that they would absorb pollution from beyond point pollution sources. Further, 
given the natures of studies thus far, there could be problems when generalizing from data that was 
original influenced by point pollution sources. 
c. Research Design 
There are two possible ways of pursuing this topic: (1) original data or (2) correlating data. The 
first is the most expedient for defining the results of this study: it would show that pollution flowing 
downstream clearly does or does not influence macroinvertebrate communities. The latter is less direct, 
and may be susceptible to more error: it would require compiling data from other studies and finding a 
possible correlation within scenarios including point and nonpoint pollution sources. It would be 
prudent, therefore, to begin work on the former with consideration to falling back on the latter.  
 
5. Operational Definitions 
 
­ Point pollution: Pollution that has been shown or is assumed to have a fall off just beyond its 
source.  
­ Physiogeographic: Of or relating to the physical, geographical, or combined physical and 
geographic characteristics of a location.  
­ Benthic: Existing or living at the bottom of a body of water. 
­ Water column: The theoretical term referring to the middle to upper section of a body of water 
containing life. 
­ Biological Indicator (species): Organisms which respond to their environment and can therefore 
be used to assess its health. 
 
6. Final Product Overview 
 
Given the scientific applications for this study, it would seem reasonable that a journal paper 
would follow from any data collected (given that would be the optimal means of studying 
macroinvertebrate error analysis). And also given the scientific basis of the research, that paper and 
following information would be presented to fellow scientists, through the article or (at a high level) at 
conferences on the subject. 
 
7. Working Product Overview: 
As a necessary facet for a scientific journal, original data must be collected, in the form of an 
experiment. Therefore: 
 
Resources: 
­ Lab setting OR Stream setting 
­ House, Howard County Conservancy respectively 
­ This will require administration and outreach to current professional organizations to 
obtain permission to conduct tests. 
­ The stream would be the most accurate, the lab would be easier, of only for the 
administrative necessities. 
­ Chemical indicators 
­ A non­harmful chemical indicator needs to be located, which meets all health and 
ethical requirements.  
­ And one that is readily available.  
­ Observation tools 
­ Careful notations of existent and added macroinvertebrate species would need to be 
conducted. 
­ Then, the effects need to ascertained over a short period of time. 
­ Finally, conditions which are both statistically chaotic and which are controlled need to 
be tested for each variable. 
 
Calendar: (January/February Calendar through hopeful administrative approval) 
 
Sun.  Mon.  Tues.  Wed.  Thurs.  Fri.  Sat. 

7  8  9  10  11  12  13 


      [Begin]     

14  15  16  17  18  19  20 


             

21  22  23  24  25  26  27 


Request  Research    Research      Send in 
Info on  Chemical   Request  Research 
Ethics  Solutions  forms  Request 
(Administra
tive) 

28  29  30  31  1  2  3 


            Hopeful 
Permission 
Date; Begin 
process 
analysis  
8. Logistical Consideration 
 
Problems may arise in gathering material for such an experiment and finding a space in which 
to test. Those appear to be the only problems in the laboratory. If field tests are necessary, 
transportation and permission from local organizations may be necessary. Overall, money and time are 
the largest constraints.