PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICE

August 25, 2017

Mr. Michael T. Reynolds
Acting Director
National Park Services
1849 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20240

Re: Removal of Albert Pike’s Monument

Dear Acting Director Reynolds,

The National Park Services maintains numerous properties across the
District of Columbia for “the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of
future generations.” With that in mind, we call upon the NPS to remove
the statue of Confederate Brigadier General Albert Pike and the use of
tax payers funds to permanently care for, protect and preserve the only
Ku Klux Klan Confederate general with a statute on federal property in
Washington, DC. There is nothing inspiring or enjoyable about the life
of Albert Pike.

This statue of political rebellion, hate, terror, slavery, racial discrimination,
murder, and segregation stands on a pedestal near the foot of Capitol Hill,
between the Department of Labor building and the Municipal Building,
between 3rd and 4th Streets, on D Street, NW. Washington, D.C.’s Judiciary
Square.

Inscribed on the base of the statue are the words, “poet” the terrorist
anthem of the KKK was his most famous literary work and “jurist” he was
called the KKK's chief judiciary officer, and reputedly wrote the organization
manual for the terrorist anti-black movement after the U.S. Civil War.
This statue is a tribute to the influence of Pike's organization, Scottish
Rite of Freemasonry Southern Jurisdiction, of which Pike was the chief
or Sovereign Grand Commander. It has power in the Executive Branch,
and the Congress, and it is decisive in the courts. It has great power in all
branches of law enforcement and the military.

After the Civil War, Pike was found guilty of treason and jailed, only to be
pardoned by fellow Scottish Rite Freemason President Andrew Johnson
on April 22, 1866, who met with him the next day at the White House.
On June 20, 1867, Scottish Rite officials conferred upon Johnson the 4th
to 32nd Freemasonry degrees, and he later went to Boston to dedicate a
Masonic Temple.

The immense bearded figure of the Confederate General Albert Pike
steeped in historical significance stretching from slavery to the civil rights
movement is looming over a public square in the nation’s capital. Why
has it never been removed in that predominantly African American city?

The NPS has refused to act in the past to remove the statue and monument
of Albert Pike honoring the most important founder of the Ku Klux Klan, and
the use of tax payers funds to permanently care for, protect and preserve
the only Confederate General with a statue of hate on federal property in
Washington, DC.

The American people are hoping the 101 years old National Park Services
will finally act to remove the statue, that addresses the National climate of
hate crimes, racial discrimination, segregation, terror, treason, and murder
as result of National and Domestic Terrorism and Security challenges, with
scores of innocent Americans subjected to white supremacists, acts, terror,
racially motivated assaults, assassinations, racial discrimination, political
rebellion, hate and violence in honor of the Confederacy, (its statues and
flags in America).

Since 1916, the National Park Service has been entrusted with the care
of our national parks. If the NPS refuses to act in our view to remove the
statute honoring Albert Pike only serves to perpetuate and incite hate,
violence, and oppression, it would constitute an utter dereliction of duty.
We are clearly opposed to the placement of the Albert Pike Monument,
Confederate memorials, Flags, and Confederate markings or monuments
on government property because the government must be neutral."

Therefore, we call upon the National Parks Services to immediately remove
this statute from the District of Columbia, in the interests of Public Safety.

Thanking you in advance,

Mr. Roy L. Perry-Bey
Director of Civil & Political Rights
UNITED FRONT FOR JUSTICE
P.O. Box 1772
Hampton, Virginia 23669
ufj2020@gmail.com
804.252.9109

cc:
Lena McDowell, Deputy Director, Management, and Administration
Bob Vogel, Acting Deputy Director, Operations
Jennifer Wyse, Acting Chief of Staff
April Slayton, Assistant Director, Communications
Stephanie Toothman, Associate Director, Cultural Resources, Partnerships,
and Science
Shane Compton, Associate Director, Information Resources
Julia Washburn, Associate Director, Interpretation, Education, and
Volunteers
Melissa Kuckro, Acting Assistant Director, Legislative and Congressional
Affairs
Ray Sauvajot, Associate Director, Natural Resource Stewardship, and Science
Shawn Benge, Associate Director, Park Planning, Facilities, and Lands
Jeffrey Reinbold, Assistant Director, Partnerships and Civic Engagement
Louis Rowe, Acting Associate Director, Visitor and Resource Protection
Jennifer Di Bella, Acting Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and
Inclusion Management
Honorable Terry McAuliffe, Governor of Virginia
Albert Pike Monument near the foot of Capitol Hill, between the
Department of Labor building and the Municipal Building, between
3rd and 4th Streets, on D Street, NW. Washington, D.C.’s
Judiciary Square.