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Burn Body

Introduction

When testing a well in a remote location, a principal


concern is how to dispose of the oil produced at the
surface. Onshore, the oil is usually burned in a burning
pit. Offshore, prior the availability of burners, the only
alternative was to store the oil in tanks or tankers, which
was costly and limited the duration of tests to a few
hundred barrels.

This significantly restricted the information that could be obtained through well
testing.

In the late 1960s, Flopetrol (now Schlumberger Testing) introduced the first flaring
system to safely and efficiently burn oil, making offshore testing economical.

Today, different types of burners are available to dispose of oil, foams, and oil-base
muds. They are usually comprised of one or more burning heads that are mounted on
a boom to keep them at a safe distance from the rig.

The "Surface Test Equipment" figure shows where the oil burner and the gas flare are
located in relationship to the other surface testing equipment. The gas flare is
connected to the separator by the separator gas line. The oil burner is connected to the
separator, the tank, and the pump by an oil manifold.

Objectives

Upon completion of this package, you should be able to:

Explain the purpose of an oil burner.


Describe the operating principles of an oil burner.
With the help of the Field Operating Handbook (FOH) for Surface Well
Testing, write the rig-up procedures for a burner boom.

Upon completion of the practical exercises for the burners, you should be able to:
Identify the function of all the items on the burner assembly.
Remove and disassemble one oil atomizer from the burner. Check the
condition of the seals and reassemble the oil atomizer.
Disassemble one water nozzle. Check it for debris, then clean and reassemble
the water nozzle.
Disassemble the swivel joint for maintenance and reassemble it.
Disassemble the air line check valve for maintenance and reassemble it.
Review FIT and TRIM procedures for burners and booms.
Function test the ignition system following exactly the steps outlined in the
FIT and TRIM procedures.

Principles of Operation

To efficiently combust well effluent without producing unburned particles and smoke,
the well effluent must be reduced to very fine droplets. This process, called
atomization, is achieved by:

Using the energy resulting from the pressure of the well effluent
Supplying additional energy (air pressure) to enhance the process.

This mechanical and pneumatic process takes place in the atomizer.

Atomizer

The atomizer is the heart of the burner system. It consists of a chamber where the oil
and air are combined before the mixture is ignited by a pilot light. The oil enters the
atomizer chamber, hits the cone of the swirl assembly and passes through the slanted
slots. The slanted slots of the swirl assembly induce a swirling motion in the oil flow
before it passes through the oil nozzle where it is sheared into finely atomized
droplets.

As the oil passes through the oil nozzle, compressed air provides the energy required
for further atomization. Compressed air leaves the air nozzle in a rotary motion at a
velocity close to the speed of sound. Air striking the oil jet breaks the fluid into even
smaller droplets.

When the mixture of oil and air is ignited, the flame produced is rich and under-
oxygenated. Water sprayed into the flame brings more oxygen and avoids the
formation of carbon black. The flame burns clear and yellow (no unburned oil falls
out). The water injected into the flame also reduces heat radiation.
Efficient burning is a critical process and varying air, water, and oil pressures and
flow rates are usually necessary so the flame does not produce excessive black smoke
(too rich in oil) or excessive white smoke (too rich in water). The size of the air and
oil nozzles also plays a major role in the burning process. Detailed information is
available in the Field Operating Handbook (FOH) for Surface Well Testing.

The following paragraphs detail the main components of an oil burner and give a
description of a mud burner and a boom.

Oil Burner

The different parts of an oil burner are shown in the "Typical Three-Head Burner"
diagram and are described below.
Hearth
The hearth is a cylindrical tube located in front of the atomizer. It guides the
air drawn at the back of the burner into the vortex created at the atomizer
outlet and stabilizes the flame. The hearth is most efficient when the burner is
properly oriented in the wind.
Water ring with nozzles
The water ring consists of a circular tube mounted around the hearth. It is
fitted with nozzles to spray water in the flame as shown in the "Water Nozzle"
diagram. A fine spray is mandatory because big water droplets cause improper
combustion and therefore pollution. The amount of water and the water
pressure are also important factors to consider in order to achieve proper
combustion. A maximum water-to-oil ratio of 50% and a pressure between 150
and 240 psi are recommended. Different sizes of of water nozzles (3 mm and
4.5 mm) are available to match the required water flow rate and pressure.
Gas pilot light
Located below the atomizer, the gas pilot system consists of a small propane
burner and a spark plug as illustrated in "Gas Pilot Light" diagram. The burner
is lit by sending high voltage to the spark plug from a remote control box.

Swivel joint
The swivel joint, as shown in the "Swivel Joint" figure, acts as a pivot support
for the whole burner. It allows the burner to be positioned up to 75 degrees on
either side of the horizontal axis Oil, water, and air enter in the swivel joint
before going to the burner heads.
Oil and air check valves
A check valve is mounted on the oil line upstream of the atomizers to prevent
air passing from the atomizer into the oil line. A typical situation in which this
might occur is during the start up procedure for the burners because air is sent
to the atomizers before the oil is sent.
Similarly, a check valve is mounted on the air line upstream from the
atomizers to prevent the oil flow from entering into the air line. It is possible
that this might happen if the air compressor that supplies the burners fails
during burning operations.

Valves
On the typical three-head burner, two heads out of three are equipped with ball
valves mounted on the air and oil lines. These ball valves make it possible to
select the number of heads that will optimize burning for a given oil flow rate.
The other head cannot be isolated or closed for two reasons. First, it prevents
the air and oil lines from overpressurizing in case the other heads are closed;
and second, the minimum number of heads required for burning is one.
Supporting frame
This device supports the atomizer, cylindrical hearth, piping, swivel joint, and
the pilot light system.
Rotation system
The supporting frame is mounted on a rotation system, actuated by a cable and
a hand winch located at the foot of the boom. This system allows the position
of the burner heads to be varied as necessary, depending on the wind direction.
An optional pneumatic rotation system is also available; it allows the position
of the heads to be controlled from a remote station.

Mud Burner

The mud burner was developed as a economical solution to dispose of oil-base mud
during drilling operations. The mud burner is derived from the oil burner and also
uses atomizers. It allows oil-base mud to be burned without polluting the
environment. The mud burner can also be used to burn high viscosity oils.

The mud burner is comprised of three combustion heads fitted on a supporting frame.
The upper head burns a mixture of mud (or high viscosity oil) and diesel. The fine
droplets of diesel mixed with the mud (or high viscosity oil) promote efficient
combustion. The two lower heads burn diesel and create a flame curtain in which any
possible fallout from the upper head is burned off. The lower heads can be modified
to burn gas instead of diesel, if necessary. To ensure continuous ignition, the upper
head is fit with two pilot lights. The water injection rings around the heads spray
water droplets into the flame, improving combustion by adding more oxygen. A drip
pan is installed under the heads to collect the hydrocarbon liquids that may have
condensed.

The "Mud Burner" drawing shows a typical mud burner with air, water, oil (or mud),
and diesel lines. The 1 in. diesel line is used to supply diesel fuel that is mixed with
the mud or the high viscosity oil. The 2 in. diesel line supplies the lower heads of the
mud burner. The oil, air, and water lines are similar to the ones in a standard burner.

As is true for the standard burner, pressure and flow rate of the different fluids as well
as the size of the different nozzles play a major role in achieving efficient combustion.
Detailed information about pressures, flow rates, and nozzle sizes for mud burners is
available in the "Burners-Booms" chapter of the Field Operating Handbook II (FOH
II), and in the mud burner maintenance manual.

Boom

To reduce heat radiation and the risk of fire, the burner is mounted on a boom to keep
it away from the rig. The boom is usually made up of two lightweight sections, which
give it a length of 60 ft. The length of the boom can be extended to 85 ft by adding an
intermediate section. The structural design of the boom permits access to the burner.

The boom contains the necessary piping to supply the burner with air, water, oil, and
propane; it also includes the gas flare pipe. The water line is fit with a filter,
preventing debris from plugging the water nozzles. The boom is mounted on the rig
with a rotating base plate and guy lines. Horizontal guy lines allow the boom to be
oriented and vertical guy lines fixed to the structure of the rig (king post) support the
boom. The rotating base plate allows horizontal and vertical movements to facilitate
the orientation of the boom. The boom axis should be placed slightly above the
horizontal axis so oil left in the boom piping after flaring operations does not fall into
the sea. This is also important when booms are installed on floating rigs. In order to
burn safely with changing winds, two booms are usually installed on opposite sides of
a drilling rig.
An optional water screen placed on the boom, between the burner and the rig, can be
used to reduce heat radiation.

Equipment

Burners can be classified in two main categories: oil burners and mud burners. Oil
burners are usually described by their number of combustion heads which determines
the maximum oil flow rate they can burn. The oil burners have one, three, or four
heads. Mud burners are equipped with three heads. All burners, except the one head
model, exist in two versions: standard and H2S service.

These drawings show examples of several types of burners and their characteristics. If
you would like a printed version of these tool specifications, please use the PDF
version provided in the original graphics.

Spitfire Burner Three-Headed Mud Evergreen Burner, H2S


(BRN-ADA) Burner (BRHE-A)
(BRN-AEA/HEA)
Three-Headed Green Dragon Four-Headed Green Four-Headed Green Dragon
Burner Dragon Burner Burner, H2S
(BRN-ABD) (BRN-ACB) (BRN-HCB)

Three-Headed Green Dragon


Burner, H2S
(BRN-HBD)

Burner Selection Guidelines

The principal criteria for selecting a burner are:

The type of effluent to burn.


The maximum expected flow rate to determine the required number of heads.
The service type required (standard service or H2S service).

Additional considerations for selecting a burner are:

Air compressors required to supply compressed air to the atomizers.


The burners need propane for pilot lights.
The burners need electricity for the ignition of the pilot lights.
The burners need water for proper burning. Water is also needed for the water
screen to reduce heat radiation.

Boom Selection Guidelines

The boom is available in two different lengths, 60 and 85 ft, and in two different
temperature ratings, -4F (-4 to 200F) and 32F (32 to 200F). It is designed for use
on fixed installations, semisubmersibles, and drillships in winds of up to 160 km/h
[100 mph].
These drawings show examples of different booms and their characteristics. If you
would like a printed version of these tool specifications, please use the PDF version
provided in the original graphics.

Upgraded Burner Boom Upgraded Burner Boom Light Boom 45


85 ft 60 ft ft,
(UBB-A) (UBB-B) (UBML-A)

U-Boom 60 ft, U-Boom 85 ft,


(UBM-F) (UBM-G)

The principal criteria for selecting a boom are:

The heat radiation concern. Heat radiation from a burner mounted on an 85 ft


boom is approximately half the heat radiation from a burner mounted on a 60
ft boom.
The working temperature.

Additional considerations for selecting a boom are:

Suitable supports (king posts) required to attach the boom. Usually they are
fitted to the rig but Schlumberger can provide king posts.
Vertical and horizontal guy lines needed.
Base plate welded to the deck of the rig.

Safety

The following is a list of key safety considerations for burners and booms:

Obtain a rig work permit before performing maintenance or starting burning


operations on the rig.
Advise the customer before you start burning to ensure that no other activity
on the rig will conflict with burning operations.
Do not light the burner if a helicopter is approaching the platform.
The burners are very sensitive to the direction of the wind. Check for wind
direction, steadiness, and strength.
A crew of firemen must be ready at all times during the burning operation.
When working on the burner boom, always wear a life vest.
When somebody goes out on the burner boom, the stand-by boat, the barge
master, and one testing crew member must be informed.
Securing yourself with a safety line to the boom structure is a personal
decision. If the boom falls, being attached to it may be a safety disadvantage.
Do not go out on the boom while burning is in progress.
Protect propane bottles and diesel drums from heat radiation by shielding them
behind a rig structure or covering them with wet rags.
To help control excessive heat radiation, ensure the sprinkler system for the rig
or around the booms is working.
The recommended procedures for installing booms must be strictly observed.
They are detailed in the Field Operating Handbook (FOH) for Surface Well
Testing and in the two animations, "Burner Boom Preparation" and "Burner
Boom Installation."

Burner Boom Preparation Multimedia

Objective: To understand the preparation and installation of 60 and 85 ft burner


booms

Comment: This animation is the first part of the Burner Boom animation. Burner
boom installation requires good coordination and communication between the supply
boat crew, rig crew (crane operator), our crew, and the stand-by boat crew.

All safety rules are covered. Installation of the king post is explained, but the location
selection is not covered in this animation.

Burner Boom Installation Multimedia

Objective: To understand the installation of 60 and 85 ft burner booms

Comment: After the king post is installed, the burner boom is ready to be lifted from
the supply boat and installed on the rig. Once again all common safety, lifting, and
handling practices are emphasized.

Maintenance

For information about boom installation, burner preparation, and functional checks,
see the recommended steps in the Field Operating Handbook (FOH) for Surface Well
Testing. For information about equipment maintenance, see the Field Operating
Handbook II (FOH II) and the maintenance manuals.

For this type of equipment, it is quite common to implement some modifications


which originate from the engineering center. The changes to be made are listed on
modification recaps (MR) and can be mandatory.

Summary

In this training page, we have discussed:

The atomizer and its operating principles.


The separate functions of the main components of the oil burner.
The mud burner.
The boom.
The key safety points that you should be aware of when working around
burners and booms.
The preparation and installation of burners and booms.

Self Test
1. How did the oil burner make offshore well testing practical?
2. What is the role of compressed air in the atomization process?
3. What is the purpose of the hearth that's mounted around the atomizer?
4. What is the purpose of the slanted slots in the swirl assembly?
5. Why is diesel mixed with the oil-base mud in the upper head of a mud burner?
6. How is the boom attached to a rig?
Burn body

Introduction

Burners are designed to efficiently dispose of the oil produced at the surface during an
offshore well test, avoiding oil storage and pollution problems. To limit the heat
radiation on rigs, the burners are attached to booms to keep them at a safe distance
from the rig.

Features and Benefits

Burners have the following features and benefits:

Different types of burners for burning oil, oil-base mud, or foam


The oil burner is available with one or several combustion heads to
accommodate the expected flow rate
Atomizers to reduce the effluent into very fine droplets for efficient burning
Remotely controlled pilot lights
Heads which can be manually or pneumatically oriented, depending on the
prevailing wind
Water rings on every combustion head to spray water into the flame,
improving the combustion and reducing the heat radiation.

Booms have these principal features:

They are made of modular sections and are available in two different lengths
They permit access to the burners
They can be oriented horizontally and vertically
They contain all the necessary piping for the burners.

Burners made a major contribution to the development of extensive offshore well


testing. Before burners were introduced, most offshore tests required costly storage
facilities to hold the oil. For technical and safety reasons, only small quantities of oil
could be produced, which limited the area of investigation and the information about
the well that could be obtained from a test. The introduction of burners allowed oil to
be disposed of in a manner that is both safe and environmentally responsible. These
benefits are an important reason why burners are used more frequently for onshore
tests as well.

Applications

Worldwide, burners are used for the following applications:

Onshore and offshore well testing


Well cleanup
Waste disposal
Disposal of oil-base mud
Disposal of foam during stimulation jobs
Safety on drilling rigs in case of kick.
Burners also have unusual applications such as burning the high viscosity oil from a
sunken tanker or burning the emulsion oil collected on beaches after severe pollution.

Spitfire burner
Description

The Spitfire light burner is designed for clean disposal of oil produced during well
testing or clean-up. The equipment comes complete with rotation device, swivel joint
distributor, gas pilot light and electric ignition.

Specifications

Service General
Capacity 4000 B/D at 300 psi
Power supply 110/220 VAC

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Water inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Air inlet 2 in. Fig. 206
Pilot light hose 1/2 in. LP
Crossovers for connection to the Schlumberger boom piping are
included in the tool set.

Certifications
Quality file and load
Documentation
test

References
BRN-ADA M-808872
Weight and dimensions
Width 0.95 m
Length 1.05 m
Height 1.90 m
Weight 300 kg

Optional accessories
Pneumatic rotation kit assembly for Spitfire
M-801513
burner
Maximum air flow nozzle 22mm P-778514
Panel for rotation only M-801371
Three headed mud burner

Description

The 3-headed mud burner is designed for disposal of oil


based mud by use of auxiliary diesel heads and mud
conditioning. The equipment comes complete with rotation
device, swivel joint distributor and electric ignition. It is
delivered with gas pilot light assembly M-872545.
Specifications

Service General, H2S


Capacity 5000 B/D of mud/diesel
oil mixture
Power supply 110/220 VAC

Connections
Mud or oil inlet 3 in. LP Fig. 206
Water inlet 3 in. LP Fig. 206
Air inlet 2 in. LP Fig. 206
1 in. LP Fig. 206 (upper
Diesel oil inlet
head)
2 in. LP Fig. 206 (lower
Diesel oil inlet
heads)
Includes crossovers for connection to the Schlumberger boom piping.

Certifications (third party)


Design Type approval for DVR
Manufacturing Certificate of conformity
Documentation Quality file and load test

Reference
BRN-AEA/HEA M-808206 / M872176

Weight and dimensions


Width 1.36 m
Length 1.63 m
Height 2.81 m
Weight 850 kg

Optional accessories
Diesel oil pump unit 1600 BPD (PMP-
M-809932
EDB)
Lateral gas flare kit
(enabling use of gas instead of diesel into M-813238
the 2 lower heads)
Pneumatic rotation kit assembly M-801513
Rotation panel M-801371
Three-headed green dragon burner:

Description

The 3-headed green dragon high efficiency burner is designed


for clean disposal of oil produced during well testing. The
equipment comes complete with rotation device, swivel joint
distributor, gas pilot light and electric ignition. It includes
pneumatic actuators on the oil and air valves and a pneumatic
control panel for high efficiency burning and rotation control.

Specifications

Service General
Capacity 7000 B/D at 300 psi
Power supply 110/220 VAC

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Water inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Air inlet 2 in. Fig. 206
Pilot light hose 1/2 in. LP
Crossovers for connection to the Schlumberger boom piping are
included in the tool set.

Certifications
Quality file and load
Documentation
test

References
BRN-ABD P-581372
Weight and dimensions
Width 1.325 m
Length 1.65 m
Height 2.53 m
Weight 950 kg

Optional accessories
Pneumatic rotation kit assembly for Green
M-801513
Dragon burner
Maximum air flow nozzle 22mm P-778514

Four headed green dragon burner:

Description

The 4-headed green dragon high efficiency burner is designed for


clean disposal of oil produced at high rates during well testing. The
equipment comes complete with rotation device, swivel joint
distributor, gas pilot light and electric ignition. It includes
pneumatic actuators on the oil and air valves and a pneumatic
control panel for high efficiency burning and rotation.

Specifications

Service General
Capacity 9000 B/D at 300 psi
Power supply 110/220 VAC

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Water inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Air inlet 2 in. Fig. 206
Pilot light hose 1/2 in. LP
Crossovers for connection to the Schlumberger boom piping are
included in the tool set.

Certifications
Quality file and load
Documentation
test

References
BRN-ACB P-581374
Weight and dimensions
Width 1.325 m
Length 1.65 m
Height 2.53 m
Weight 1150 kg

Optional accessories
Pneumatic rotation kit assembly for Green
M-801513
Dragon burner
Maximum air flow nozzle 22mm P-778514

Four headed green dragon burner, H2S

Description

The 4-headed green dragon high efficiency burner is designed


for clean disposal of oil produced at high rates during well
testing. The equipment comes complete with rotation device,
swivel joint distributor, gas pilot light and electric ignition. It
includes pneumatic actuators on the oil and air valves and a
pneumatic control panel for high efficiency burning and
rotation control

Specifications

Service H2S, -4oF


Capacity 9000 B/D at 300 psi
Power supply 110/220 VAC

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Water inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Air inlet 2 in. Fig. 206
Pilot light hose 1/2 in. LP
Crossovers for connection to the Schlumberger boom piping are
included in the tool set.
Certifications (third party)
Quality file and load
Documentation
test
Type approval or
Design
DVR
Certificate of
Manufacturing
conformity

References
BRN-HCB P-581375
Dimensions
Width 1.325 m
Length 1.65 m
Height 2.53 m
Weight 1150 kg

Optional accessories
Pneumatic rotation kit assembly for Green
M-801513
Dragon burner
Maximum air flow nozzle 22mm P-778514
Three headed green dragon burner, H2S:
Description

The 3-headed green dragon high efficiency burner is designed for


clean disposal of oil produced during well testing. The
equipment comes complete with rotation device, swivel joint
distributor, gas pilot light and electric ignition. It includes
pneumatic actuators on the oil and air valves and a pneumatic
control panel for high efficiency burning and rotation control.

Specifications

Service H2S, -4oF


Capacity 7000 B/D at 300 psi
Power supply 110/220 VAC

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Water inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Air inlet 2 in. Fig. 206
Pilot light hose 1/2 in. LP
Crossovers for connection to the Schlumberger boom piping are
included in the tool set.

Certifications (third party)


Quality file and load
Documentation
test
Type approval or
Design
DVR
Certificate of
Manufacturing
conformity

References
BRN-HBD P-581373
Weight and dimensions
Width 1.325 m
Length 1.65 m
Height 2.53 m
Weight 950 kg

Optional accessories
Pneumatic rotation kit assembly for Green
M-801513
Dragon burner
Maximum air flow nozzle 22mm P-778514

Light boom 45 FT:

Description

Light weight U-boom with integrated mono head burner comprised of:

1. A main structure made with air, water and gas flare lines.
2. Piping for oil line and pilot gas line.
3. A double rotation support base.
4. A filter and two check valves.
5. A flame front generator.

Specifications

Service General
Working temperature 32oF (0oC)
60 km/h wind, one head burner only,
Operation
static operation

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Union Figure 602
Water inlet 3 in. Union Figure 602
Air inlet 2 in. Union Figure 602
Gas inlet 3 in. Union Figure 602

Certifications (third
party)
Documentation Quality file
Type approval or design verification
Design
report
Manufacturing Certificate of conformity

References
UBML-A P-779745
Weight and dimensions
Width 1.00 m
Length 13.50 m (45 ft)
Weight 3000 kg

Optional accessories
Horizontal guy line
P-780100
(equipped)
Vertical guy line
P-780101
(equipped)
Safety harness M-809336
Water screen kit P-780102
Evergreen burner, H2S

Description

The Evergreen burner is the result of a development supported by EEU. Thermie


funding with the participation of I.F.P. It is a single head, twelve nozzles system,
making extensive use of pneumatic atomization and enhanced air induction. No water
injection into the flame is required. Key advantages are smoke free and fall out free
operation. It includes two gas pilots, flame front igniting system and water screens. It
is mounted on a 180 degree rotating device to enable access to the nozzles for
maintenance. The Evergreen burner is very efficient with all types of oil, including
heavy oil.

Specifications

Maximum oil flow rate 9000 B/D at 4000 psi


Minimum oil flow rate 2500 B/D
Maximum pressure 1440 psi
Maximum oil viscosity 50 cp at flowing temperature
Water screen rate 15,000 BWPD at 150 psi
Flame diameter 13 m at maximum oil rate
5 x 1200 CFM at maximum flow rate
Air requirements
under 120 psi
Service H2S
Noise 90 dBA at 30 m
Heat radiation 650 Btu/hr/ft2 at 30 m with water screen

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Fig. 206
Water inlet 4 in. Fig. 206
Air inlet 4 in. Fig. 206
Pilot light hose 1/2 in. LP

Certifications (third
party)
Documentation Quality file
Design Type approval or design verification report
Manufacturing Certificate of conformity

References
BRHE-A P-785000
Weight and dimensions
Width 1.60 m
Length 4.50 m
Height 2.50 m
Weight 900 kg
Upgraded burner boom, 85 FT, H2S

Description

Heavy duty triangular boom for a six-headed burner. It consists of:

1. Three structure sections (a foot section UBBF-A, an intermediate section


UBBI-A, a head section UBBH-A).
2. Piping for oil line, water line with filter, air line with check valve, pilot gas
line and gas flare.
3. A double rotation support base.

Specifications

Service H2S, six-headed burner


Working temperature -4oF
Drill ship dynamic conditions, 160 km/h
Operation
lateral wind velocity with 5 cm of ice

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Union Figure 602
Water inlet 3 in. Union Figure. 602
Air inlet 2 in. Union Figure 602
Gas inlet 3 in. Union Figure 602

Certifications (third
party)
Documentation Quality file
Design Type approval or design verification report
Manufacturing Certificate of conformity

References
UBB-A including:
Foot section (UBBF-A) P-776801
Intermediate section P-776782
(UBBI-A) P-776802
Head section (UBBH- P-776783
A)
Weight and dimensions
Width 1.10 m
Length 26 m (85 ft)
Weight (with lines) 7700 kg

Optional accessories
Horizontal guy line
P-776795
(equipped)
Vertical guy line
P-776796
(equipped)
Safety harness M-809336
Low pressure 4 in. gas
P-782725
flare
Gas pilot kit for gas
P-782826
flare
Peacock tail water
P-776781
screen
Pulley P-776904
Water screen piping P-782927
U- Boom 60 FT, H2S:

Description

Burner boom for Schlumberger burners composed of:

1. Two structure sections (one foot section and one head section).
2. Piping for oil line, water line with filter included, air line with check valve
included, pilot gas line and one gas flare.
3. A double rotation support base.

Specifications

Service H2S
Working temperature 32oF
160 km/h semi-sub dynamic
Operation
conditions

Connections
Oil inlet 3 in. Union Figure 602
Water inlet 3 in. Union Figure 602
Air inlet 2 in. Union Figure 602
Gas inlet 3 in. Union Figure 602

Certifications (third party)


Documentation Quality file
Type approval or design
Design
verification report
Manufacturing Certificate of conformity

References
UBM-F including: P-586658
U-boom foot section UBMF-C P-586525
U-boom head section UBMH-C P-586526
Weight and dimensions
Width 0.89 m
Length 18 m (60 ft)
Weight 4900 kg

Optional accessories
Equipment for guy lines 5/8" M-810146
Equipment for guy lines 1" M-810147
Safety harness M-809336
Hand winch and cable for burner
M-807851
roation
Low pressure 4" gas flare M-830233
Gas pilot kit for gas flare M-809647
Water wall kit M-831869