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A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE ABSENTEEISM IN SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTON INDUSTRY AT KARUR

ABSTRACT

This project on Employee Absenteeism reveals that one of the major problems is absenteeism in our industry. Absenteeism is the practice or habit of being an absentee and an absentee is one who habitually stays away from work. Employees Absenteeism is a serious problem for management because it involves heavy additional expenses. Absenteeism hinders planning, production, efficiency and functioning of the organization. In fact high rates of absenteeism affect an organization state of health and also supervisory and managerial effectiveness.

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY

THEORETICAL CONCEPT INDRODUCTION

Absenteeism is one of the major threats to Indian industry. Absenteeism causing poor utilization of plant India is facing unemployment problem on one side and the other side abnormal absenteeism in industries if our absenteeism can be reduced. We can improve our gross national product without any investment. Absenteeism not only causes production loss but also causes reduction of gross national income, when the gross income of workmen reduces naturally his buying capacity also reduces if he could not manage the primary and secondary needs of timely and properly. He has to face problems like poor family harmony poor health more mental and physical tiredness which will again lead to absenting from work. Absenteeism as commonly understood refers to the failure of an operative to report to work when work is available to him as used in the study overall absenteeism is made up of three component.

CONCEPT OF ABSENTEEISM

It refers to workers absence from their regular task when he is normally schedule to

work. The according to Websites dictionary” Absenteeism is the practice or habit of being an absentee and an absentee is one who habitually stays away from work.”

According to Labor Bureau of Shimla: Absenteeism is defined as the total man shifts lost because of absence as percentage of total number of man shifts scheduled to work In other words, it signifies the absence of an employee from work when he is scheduled to be at work. Any employee may stay away from work if he has taken leave to which he is entitled or on ground of sickness or some accident or without any previous sanction of leave. Thus absence may be authorized or unauthorized, willful or caused by circumstances beyond ones control. Maybe even worse than absenteeism, it is obvious that people such as malingerers

and those unwilling to play their part in the workplace can also have a decidedly negative impact.

Such team member’s need individual attention from frontline supervisors and

management. Indeed, as prevention is better than cure, where such a problem occurs, it is always important to review recruitment procedures to identify how such individuals came to be employed in the first place. For any business owner or manager, to cure excessive absenteeism, it is essential to find and then eliminate the causes of discontent among team members. If they find their supervisor or job unpleasant - really unpleasant - they look for legitimate excuses to stay home and find them with things such as upset stomachs or splitting headaches. Any effective absentee control program has to locate the causes of discontent and modify those causes or eliminate them entirely. In other words, if we deal with the real reasons team members stay home it can become unnecessary for t hem to stay away. Any investigation into absenteeism needs to look at the real reasons for it. Sometimes team

members call in sick when they really do not want to go to work. They would not call you up

and say, “I’m not coming in today because my supervisor abuses me.”Or, “I’m not coming in today because my chair is uncomfortable.” Or, “I’m not coming in today because the bathrooms are so filthy; it makes me sick to walk into them.”

There are a few essential questions to consider at the outset if you want to make a measurable improvement to your absenteeism figures. Why is your present absenteeism policy ineffective? Where and when is excessive absenteeism occurring? In many cases, under- trained supervisors could be a contributing factor. What are the real causes for absences? It is commonly expected that low pay, poor benefits and high workloads will be the major causes. However, in numerous employee surveys absenteeism generally has been identified as a symptom of low job satisfaction, sub-standard working conditions and consistent negative and unfair treatment received by first-line supervisors

How much formal training have your supervisors received on absenteeism containment and reduction? If your answer is none or very little, may be you have found the solution. As with every other element within your organization, you cannot ask a person to do a job he or she has never been trained to do. Many human resources specialists have found that repetitive, boring jobs coupled with uncaring supervisors and/or physically unpleasant workplaces are likely to lead workers to make up excuses for not coming to work.

If your team members perceive that your company is indifferent to their needs, they are less likely to be motivated, or even to clock on at all. One way to determine the causes of absenteeism is to question your supervisors about excessive absenteeism, including what causes it and how to reduce it. Of course, if your supervisors have made no efforts to get to know the team members in their respective departments, they may not be able to provide reasons. However, just the act of questioning may get the ball rolling and signal to your supervisors that their involvement is important. Once a manager finds the real reasons for absenteeism there is another important step. Through open communication, you need to change the team member’s way of reacting and responding to discontent. Other problems will no doubt arise in the future. If the way of responding has not been reviewed, then the same cycle is likely to start all over again. So, often absenteeism problems can be sheeted back to the supervisor level and to unsatisfactory working conditions. Without improvement in these areas, you can expect your high rate of absenteeism to continue.

MEASUREMENT OF ABSENTEEISM

For calculating the rate of absenteeism we require the number of people scheduled to work and number of people actually present. Absenteeism can be find out of absence rate method.

For Example:

  • a) Average number of employees in work force: 100

  • b) Number of available workdays during period: 20

  • c) Total number of available workdays (a x b): 2,000

  • d) Total number of lost days due to absences during the period: 93

  • e) Absenteeism percent (d [divided by] c) x 100: 4.65%

Since absenteeism is a major barometer of employee morale, absenteeism above 5percent has to be considered as very serious (across most industries 3 percent is considered standard).

PECULIAR FEATURES OF ABSENTEEISM On the basis of studies undertaken certain observations may be made:

a) The rate of absenteeism is lowest on payday; it increases considerably on the days following the payment of wages and bonus. The level of absenteeism is comparatively high immediately after payday. When worker either feel like having a good time or in some other cases return home to their villages family and after a holiday, has also been found to be higher than that on normal days.

b) Absenteeism is generally high workers below 25 years of age and those above 40. “The younger employees are not regular and punctual”. Presumably because of the employment of a large no.of new comers among the younger age groups, while the older people are not able to withstand the strenuous nature of the work.

c) The percentage of absenteeism is higher in the night shift than in the day shift. This is so because workers in the night shift experience great discomfort and uneasiness in the course of their work than they do during day time.

Absenteeism in India is seasonal in character. It is the highest during March-April- May, when land has to be prepared for monsoon, sowing and also in harvest season (Sept- Oct) when the rate goes as high as 40%.

CAUSES OF ABSENTEEISM

The Royal Commission Labor observed that high absenteeism among Indian labour is due to rural orientation and their frequent urge for rural exodus. According to Acharaya “In modern industrial establishment the incidence of industrial fatigue, mal nutrition and bad working conditions aggravate that feeling for change among industrial worker and some time impel them to visit their village home frequently for rest and relaxation.”

MALAD JUSTMENT WITH FACTORY

In factory the worker finds caught within factory walls, he is bewildered by heavy traffic, by strangers speaking different and subjected to strict discipline and is ordered by complete strangers to do things which he cannot understand. As a result he is under constant strain, which cause him serious distress and impairs his efficiency. All these factors tend to persuade him to maintain his contacts with village.

SOCIAL AND RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES

Social and religious ceremonies divert workers from workers to social activities. In large number of cases incidence of absenteeism due to religious ceremonies is more than due to any other reason.

HOUSING CONDITIONS

Workers also experience housing difficulties. Around 95% of housing occupied by industrial workers in India is unsatisfactory for healthful habitations. This leads to loss the interest in work.

INDUSTRIAL FATIGUE

Low wages compel a worker to seek some part time job to earn some side income. This often result inconstant fatigue, which compels to remain absent for next day.

UNHEALTY WORKING CONDITION

Irritating and intolerable working conditions exist in a factory. Heat, moisture, noise, vibration, bad lighting, dust fumes and overcrowding all these affect the workers health causing him to remain absent from work a long time.

ABSENCE OF ADEQUATE WELFARE ACTIVITIES

High rate absenteeism is also due to lack of adequate welfare facilities Welfare activities include clean drinking water, canteen, room shelter, rest rooms, washing and bathing facilities, first aid appliances etc.

ALCOHOLISM

Some of the habitual drunkards spend whole of the it salary during first week of each month for drinking purpose. Therefore 2 or 3 weeks after getting their salary absent themselves from their work.

INDEBTNESS

All those workers who undergo financial hardships usually borrow money lender sat interest rate which is very high, which often cumulates to more than 1112 times their actual

salary To avoid the moneylenders they usually absent themselves from work because they are unable to return the money in stipulated time.

IMPROPER & UNREALISTIC PERSONNEL POLICIES

Due to favouritism and nepotism which are in the industry the workers generally become frustrated. This also results in low efficiency, low productivity, unfavorable relationship between employee and supervisor, which in turn leads to long period of absenteeism.

INADEQUATE LEAVE FACILITIES

Negligence on part of the employee to provide leave facility compel the worker to fall back on ESI leave. They are entitled to 50 days leave on half on pay. Instead of going without pay the worker avail them of ESI facility.

EFFECTS OF ABSENTEEISM ONINDUSTRIAL PROGRESS

It is quite evident that absenteeism is a common feature of industrial labour in India. It hinders industrial growth and its effect in two fold.

1) LOSS TO WORKER

Firstly due to the habit of being absenting frequently worker’s income is reduced to a large extent. It is because there is a general principle of “no work no pay”.

Thus the time lost in terms of absenteeism is a loss of income to workers

2)

LOSS TO EMPLOYERS

On other hand, the employer has to suffer a greater loss due to absentees. It disturbs the efficiency and discipline of industries consequently, industrial production is reduced. In order to meet the emergency and strikes, an additional labour force is also maintain by the industries. During strikes they are adjusted in place of absent workers. Their adjustment brings serious complications because such workers do not generally prove themselves up to work. Higher absenteeism is an evil both for workers and the employers and ultimately it adversely affects the production of industries.

ANALYSIS OF CAUSES FAMILY ORIENTED & RESPONSIBILITES

It was observed that about 40% case absenteeism responsibilities of workers. It increases in harvesting season.

is

family oriented and more

SOCIAL CEREMONIES

In 20 % cases it was found that social and religious functions divert worker from

work.

HOUSING FACILITY

In about 30% cases, the workers remain absent because there is no housing facilities and the workers stay alone and great distance from factory.

SICKNESS AND ACCIDENT

In 20% case the workers remain absent due to ill health and disease and in 15%cases workers remain absent due to accident.

TRANSPORTATION

Most of the workers have to travel long distance to reach the work place . Most of the workers are not satisfied with transport facilities.

WELFARE FACILITES

In 13% cases, the workers are not satisfied with welfare facilities.

WORKING CONDITIONS

In 21% cases, the workers feel that there is not good working condition, because they work in standing position which causes to remain absence for relaxation.

MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Near about 34% people are dissatisfied with management system because they feel that their work is not being recognized and promotions are biased.

CORRECTIVE ACTION FOR CULPABLE ABSENTEEISM

As already indicated, culpable absenteeism consists of absences where it can be demonstrated that the employee is not actually ill and is able to improve his/her attendance. Presuming you have communicated attendance expectations generally, have identified the

employee as a problem, have met with him/her as part of your attendance program, made your concerns on his specific absenteeism known and have offered counseling as appropriate, with no improvement despite your positive efforts, disciplinary procedures may be appropriate. The procedures for corrective/progressive discipline for culpable absenteeism are generally the same as for other progressive discipline problems. The discipline should not be prejudicial in any way. The general procedure is as follows:

1.

Initial Warning(s)

2.

Written Warning(s)

3.

Suspension(s)

4.

Discharge

1.

Verbal Warning

Formally meet with the employee and explain that income protection is to be used only when an employee is legitimately ill. Advice the employee that his/her attendance record must improve and be maintained at an improved level or further disciplinary action will result. Offer any counseling or guidance as is appropriate. Give further verbal warnings as required. Review the employee's income protection records at regular intervals. Where a marked improvement has been shown, commend the employee. Where there is no improvement a written warning should be issued.

3.

Written Warning

Interview the employee again. Show him/her the statistics and point out that there has been no noticeable (or sufficient) improvement. Listen to the employee to see if there is a valid reason and offer any assistance you can. If no satisfactory explanation is given, advise the employee that he/she will be given a written warning. Be specific in your discussion with him/her and in the counseling memorandum as to the type of action to be taken and when it will be taken if the record does not improve. As soon as possible after this meeting provide the employee personally with the written warning and place a copy of his /her file. Warning as an alternative to proceeding to a higher level of discipline (i.e. suspension) will depend on

a number of factors. Such factors are the severity of the problem, the credibility of the employee's explanations, the employee's general work performance and length of service.

  • 2. Suspension

If the problem of culpable absenteeism persists, following the next interview period and immediately following an absence, the employee should be interviewed and advised that he/she

is to be suspended. The length of the suspension will depend again on the severity of the

problem, the credibility of the employee’s explanation, the employee's general work

performance and length of service. Subsequent suspensions are optional depending on the above condition

  • 3. Dismissal

Dismissals should only be considered when all of the above conditions and procedures have been met. The employee, upon displaying no satisfactory improvement, would be dismissed on the grounds of his/her unwillingness to correct his/her absence

record.

CHAPTER-II REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Muchinsky, (1997) conducted study in the same field on the basis of literature review on employee absenteeism and concluded employees’ withdrawal behavior apart from turnover. Studies examining the psychometric properties of absence measures are reviewed, along with the relationship between absenteeism and personal, attitudinal and organizational variables chronic absentees into four categories such as; entrepreneurs, status seekers, family oriented and sick and old.

Martocchio&Jimeno (2003) stated that” We propose a model of the personality types that have a higher likelihood of using absenteeism to their benefit (i.e.to recharge and change negative affect) and therefore have the absence be functional (i.e., positive affect and higher productivity upon returning to the job) rather than dysfunctional (i.e., negative affect and person is still unproductive or has less productivity than before the absence event). We conclude by emphasizing the theoretical contributions that this model makes and by

suggesting ways in which the model could be tested.”

RuchiSinha(2010) in her study reveals that there only 4% employees remain away from their work and that too due to personal reasons. There is very high level of job satisfaction among the employees.

Nisam (2010) stated that stress among employees, health problems, loneliness at workplace, non-cooperation of colleagues causes absenteeism at workplace. K.A.Hari Kumar (2012) stated that the rate of absenteeism in Madura Coats is very high.

Jacobson (1989) has investigated a direct relationship between monetary incentives and work floor attendance. Wolter H.J. Hassink& Pierre Koning (2009) find statistically significant differences in absence patterns across groups of workers with different eligibility statuses depending on their attendance records and whether they had previously won. One finding is that absenteeism rose among workers who, having won already, were ineligible for further participation. Nevertheless, and although the reduction in firm-wide absence associated with the lottery drifted from 2.4 percentage points to 1.1 percentage points after seven months, the authors conclude that the lottery was of net benefit to the firm

Mckee (1992) reported that it cost a company an average of $411 per employee per year for unscheduled absences. This amount did not include any of the indirect costs that were incurred. In 1995 HR Focus used information from CCH’s 1994 survey that stated companies were now paying an average of $505 14 per employee. Data shows that the number of unscheduled absences in 1997 declined by 24 percent from 1991 (Anonymous, 1997) according to the CCH survey. They also reported that although the number due to personal illness as a cause has declined, the absences due to personal needs and stress have increased.

Kweller (1998) suggest that you create a current absence profile that examines causes, employee demographics, annual cost impact, indirect cost, and explore how absences are dealt with. Florist (1998) created a model that educates all employees regarding the company’s absenteeism policy, monitors the absences, counsels those who have had unscheduled absences, follows up with these employees, and administers corrective action to those employees who do not comply with the policy. Companies need to make sure that all employees understand the current policies that exist within their companies regarding absenteeism (Perry, 1996). If departments within an organization have separate policies or standard operating procedures, these also need to be communicated. Current policies are now moving towards what is called “no-fault systems” (Markowich, 1993). Employers set a limit

as to how many unscheduled absences you are allowed. It does not matter why you are absent. If you exceed this amount then disciplinary actions occur. Other companies are using rewards instead of discipline, and exploring preventive approaches to absenteeism. Employers realize that some of the involuntary absences are preventable.

Perry (1996) points out the policies that have not been communicated to everyone can also cause employee absenteeism. Arkin (1996) provided an extensive list as to possible causes of employee absenteeism. These causes are as follows: · Inept supervision (inadequate or poor) · Wage problems · Under-utilization of skills · Adverse working conditions · Inadequate selection · Inadequate information about job requirements · Unsatisfactory working conditions · Lack of opportunity for advancement · Lack of a well-organized training program · Ineffective grievance procedure · Lack of proper facilities and services · Excessive fatigue · Boredom Much of the research reviewed focused on the causes related to the employee; however, this article focused more on how the supervisor or environment could be contributing to employee absenteeism. Often times in an attempt to control absenteeism, an employer will establish what employees need to be doing to assure reasonable attendance. However, employers have a responsibility to their employees as well. Employers need to create environments that encourage attendance at work (Kelly, 1992). Poor morale caused from negative work environments can cause stress, which in turn can cause employee absenteeism (Fishman, 1996).

Harrison and Martocchio’s (1998) research showed that there were five classes of variables hypothesized to be origins/cause of absences: personality, demographic characteristics, job-related attitudes, social context, and decision-making mechanisms. As the literature suggests there are many reasons as to why an employee may be missing work and that all of these need to be identified (Fowler, 1998). Employers should realize that many of the legitimate illnesses have causes, and maybe addressing these causes could help prevent further illnesses or injuries. Impact If most companies were to calculate the impact that absenteeism was having on their companies, most of them would be appalled. Many of the authors took statistics from the Commerce Clearing House (CCH) surveys that are conducted each year to try and figure out how much absenteeism is costing companies.

Mckee (1992) reported that it cost a company an average of $411 per employee per

year for unscheduled absences. This amount did not include any of the indirect costs that

were incurred. In 1995 HR Focus used information from CCH’s 1994 survey that stated

companies were now paying an average of $505 14 per employee. Data shows that the number of unscheduled absences in 1997 declined by 24 percent from 1991 (Anonymous, 1997) according to the CCH survey. They also reported that although the number due to personal illness as a cause has declined, the absences due to personal needs and stress have increased.

COMPANY PROFILE& INDUSTRY PROFILE

INDUSTRY HISTORY AND PROFILE:

We established the creative boutique in 2005 and combined fashion, textile and graphic

design backgrounds to produce comprehensive design outcomes, rich with edgy originality, beauty and distinction. We a are a Sydney based design trio of print and fabric surface treatment specialists, whose primary focus is to deliver original, exclusive and bespoke designs for a broad range of visual applications, particularly textiles. We are

committed to uncovering and servicing clients’ needs while promoting environmental

sustainability and Australian based production in an inspiring and creative way. We also have a design library, seasonally updated with a range of original artwork that is available for purchase on an exclusive basis for use in fashion, interiors and lifestyle product design.

We provide our clients with the textile concept as artwork [99% illustrator files] and leave

the production up to our clients’ discretion. We provide technical services also in making the

files’ production ready if suppliers need this. We forecast trends, color and pursue original concepts with stylistic diversity to produce hand-worked and computer generated Croquis. These include for fabric and other surfaces. We also do a lot of custom design development as well as our seasonal collection.

Contact Information:

Company Name:

 

SREE

LAKSHMI

ORGANIC

COTTONTEXTILES

Address

:

 

No:135,kovai bypass road,

 
 

Karur- 639 001.

Tamil Nadu

India

Contact Number :

919095341966

Line of Business:

Parent Line of Business and Top Line of Business has been extracted from National Industrial Classification code Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarments. If company has registered business with incorrect code or has changed the line of business without informing ROC, provided information will be incorrect. We take no warranties about accuracy of these classifications. Sree Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextiles Pvt Ltd. is the principle supplier to Sree Garments, fulfilling their total yarn requirements. Established in 2005, SSMT sources cotton domestically and from reputable African growers, Using State-of-the- art machinery, the raw material is woven into the finest quality cotton yarn. Efficient inventory management systems are in place to ensure a continuous.

The cotton is purchased in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton& Africa and processed step by step through these highly sophisticated machineries to ensure the best quality yarn. Efficient management of inventory ensures uninterrupted production process for the company. ShriSree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextiles Pvt Ltd is the least carbon emitting spinning mill in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonas declared by ETI. It is also certified by FLO Fair Trade, CMIA, Organic Cotton and Oeko-Tex Certifications. The knitting plant is equipped with hi-tech machines capable of producing a wide variety of knit finishes and structures. Jacquard, Flat and Circular machines provide a diverse range of garments in Jersey, Rib and Fleece. A continuous programmed of research and development ensures that the knitting unit has the capability required to meet the latest fashion trends.

Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton Spinners Private Limited Profile:

Corporate Identification Number :

U17111TZ2005PTC012112

 

Company Name:

SHRI

SREE

LAKSHMI

ORGANIC

COTTONTEXTILES

 

Company Status:

Active

ROC:

ROC-Coimbatore

 

Registration Number:

12112

Company Category:

Company limited by Shares

 

Company Sub Category:

Non-govt company

 

Class of Company:

Private

Date of Incorporation:

01 September 2005

Age of Company:

10 years, 8 month

Activity:

Spinning, weaving and finishing

Company Founder

T.Manivannan

Managing Director

A.Meenatchi

Total Employees

450

   

About Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextile:

Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextile Company LTD though a relatively new venture, has made remarkable progress in spinning quality yarn. SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTON has an huge production capability, productivity and a committed team of skilled workers and efficient staff numbering approximately 1000. Under the guidance of its promoter, Shri Ramesh Kumar Tibrewal, who personify the true spirit of enterprise, SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTONhas established a distinct identity in the textile market within a decade of its existence. SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTONhas a unique inspirational work culture. SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTONrests on strong ethical and moral foundations, relying on the deeds of wisdom propagated by Swami Vivekananda, Mahatma Gandhi, and Rabindranath Tagore and our Former President, His Excellency Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam.

With strong business acumen, successfully demonstrated by its Promoter, the company has progressed steadily from dealing in cotton waste to the position of eminence it holds in manufacture of Superior Quality yarn. The location has been chosen to promote employment generation in the interior and rural areas of Coimbatore district. SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTON commitments are not purely business centric. It

encompasses a wider societal obligation. The promoter have chosen, Karuvalur, Karumathampatti, near Coimbatore, as the plant location. The small underdeveloped village

has been chosen to promote a social cause of, “Enabling Progress through Enterprise”.

Further, the plant location meets the business requirements. The plant is close to major consumption centres like Tirupur, Somanur, Palladam, Karur, Madurai, and Erode, thereby promising enormous scope for expansion of the company. At SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTONGARMENTS, learning and sharing of knowledge becomes an integral part of its work culture. This unique work culture has been able to spin the work force together. Swami Vivekananda words of wisdom form the back bone of the entire workforce at SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTONGARMENTS, spinning its success story without any major hiccups.

INDUSTRY PROFILE

INTRODUCTION ABOUT TEXTILES INDUSTRIES

Definition for Textile:

“Pertaining of weaving or to wove fabrics; as textile arts; woven, capable of being woven; formed by weaving; as textile fabric”

Descriptive of textiles as defined of the raw materials, process, machinery, building, craft, technology, personnel used in, and the organizations and activities connected with their manufacture. A Latin word originated from texere, it means to weave. Any cloth or fabric made by weaving or knitting.

Introduction:

The textile industry occupies a unique place in our country. One of the earliest to come into existence in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton Garments. It accounts for 14% of the total Industrial production, contributes to nearly 30% of the total exports and is the second largest employment generator after agriculture.The Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton Garmentsn textile industry is one of the largest in the world with a massive raw material and textiles manufacturing base. Our economy is largely dependent on the textile manufacturing and

trade in addition to other major industries. About 27% of the foreign exchange earnings are on account of export of textiles and clothing alone. The textiles and clothing sector contributes about 14% to the industrial production and 3% to the gross domestic product of the country. Around 8% of the total excise revenue collection is contributed by the textile industry. So much so, the textile industry accounts for as large as 21% of the total employment generated in the economy. Around 35 million people are directly employed in the textile manufacturing activities. Indirect employment including the manpower engaged in agricultural based raw-material production like cotton and related trade and handling could be stated to be around another 60 million.

Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn Textile Industry:

Textile is one of the Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarments’s largest industries after agriculture. It provides direct employment to about 350 lacks people.Besides this, there are a large number of ancillary industries, which are dependent upon this sector such as manufacturing various machines, accessories, stores, ancillary item and chemicals. Known globally for its skilland craftsmanship, the Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile industry from soaring to the height it iscapable, but this is expected to change post January 2005, as the quota are striation have been removed.

Textiles covers the following sub-segment: -

1)

Synthetic fiber/filamentprocessing vise, drawing, texturizing, twisting etc.

2)

Yarn: spinning cotton &blends on rotors and ring frames.

3)

Weaving/Knitting, Processing and Distribution.

The Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile industry is large and divers, unique for its coverage of the entire gamut of activities ranging from production of raw material to providing the consumers high value added products, such as fabrics and garments. The key segment of Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textiles are divided into Fiber, Yarn, Fabrics and made-ups. The multi- fiber base of Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile comprise natural fibers from polyester, viscose, acrylic, polypropylene and nylon. Though primarily cotton based textile industry has a growing polyester sector and is active in processing linen wool and silk.

Overview Textiles Industry:

The Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile industry is one the largest and oldest sectors in the country and among the most important in the economy in terms of output, investment and employment. The sector employs nearly 35 million people and after agriculture, is the second-highest employer in the country. Its importance is underlined by the fact that it accounts for around 4% of Gross Domestic Product, 14% of industrial production, 9% of excise collections, 18% of employment in the industrial sector, and 16% of the country’s total exports earnings. With direct linkages to the rural economy and the agriculture sector, it has been estimated that one of every six households in the country depends on this sector, either directly or indirectly, for its livelihood.

A strong raw material production base, a vast pool of skilled and unskilled personnel, cheap labour, good export potential and low import content are some of the salient features of the Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile industry. This is a traditional, robust, well-established industry, enjoying considerable demand in the domestic as well as global markets.

Global Textiles:

The glssobal textile and clothing industry is estimated to be worth about US$ 4,395 bn and currently global trade in textiles and clothing stands at around US$ 360 bn. The US market is the largest, estimated to be growing at 5% per year, and in combination with the EU nations, accounts for 64% of clothing consumption.

The Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile industry is valued at US$ 36 bn with exports totalling US$ 17 bn in 2005-2006. At the global level, Sree Lakshmi Organic

CottonGarments’s textile exports account for just 4.72% of global textile and clothing

exports. The export basket includes a wide range of items including cotton yarn and fabrics,

man-made yarn and fabrics, wool and silk fabrics, made-ups and a variety of garments. Quota constraints and shortcomings in producing value-added fabrics and garments and the absence of contemporary design facilities are some of the challenges that have impacted textile exports from Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarments.

Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarments’s presence in the international market is significant

in the areas of fabrics and yarn.

  • Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonis the largest exporter of yarn in the international market and has a share of 25% in world cotton yarn exports.

  • Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonaccounts for 12% of the world’s production of textile fibers and yarn

  • In terms of spindle age, the Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton Garmentsn textile industry is ranked second, after China, and accounts for 23% of the world’s spindle capacity

  • Around 6% of global rotor capacity is in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton Garments

  • The country has the highest loom capacity, including handlooms, with a share of 61% in world loom age.

Textile Industry Structure:

Cotton textiles continue to form the predominant base of the Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile industry, though other types of fabric have gained share in recent years. In 1995-96, the share of cotton and manmade fabric was 60% and 27% respectively. More recently, cotton fabrics accounted for 46% of the total fabric produced in 2005-06, while man-made fibers held a share of 41%. This represents a clear shift in consumer preferences towards man-made fabric

The Textile and Apparel supply chain

Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarments’s presence in the international market is significant in the areas of fabrics
The fiber and yarn-specific configuration of the textile industry includes almost all types of textile fibers,

The fiber and yarn-specific configuration of the textile industry includes almost all types of textile fibers, encompassing natural fibers such as cotton, jute, silk and wool; synthetic / man-made fibers such as polyester, viscose, nylon, acrylic and polypropylene (PP) as well as multiple blends of such fibers and filament yarns such as partially oriented yarn (POY). The type of yarn used is dictated by the end product being manufactured.The Man-made textile industry comprises fiber and filament yarn manufacturing units of cellulosic and non- cellulosic origin. The cellulosic fiber/yarn industry is under the administrative control of the Ministry of Textiles, while the non-cellulosic industry is under the administrative control of the Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers.

As in January 2006, there were 1779 cotton/man-made fiber textile mills in the organized sector, with an installed capacity of 34.1 million spindles and 395,000 rotors. Of these, 218 were composite mills which accounted for just 3% of total fabric production, with 97% of fabric production happening in the unorganized segment. Cloth production in the mill sector has fallen from 1,714 million sq mtrs in 1999-2000 to a projected 1,493 million sq mtrs in 2005-06, declining at a rate of 2% per annum. As a result, the number of sick units in the organized segment has also been growing rapidly.

The competitiveness of composite mills has declined in comparison to the power looms in the decentralized segment. Policy restrictions relating to labour laws and the fiscal advantages enjoyed by the handloom and power loom sectors have been identified as two of the major constraints responsible for the declining scenario of the mill sector.Nonetheless, overall cloth production in the country has been growing at 3.5% per annum since 2000, with growth driven largely by the power loom sector. Being the largest manufacturer of fabric in the country, the power loom sector produces a wide variety of cloth, both grey as well as processed.

SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTONGARMENTSN TEXTILE HISTORY:

Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonhas a diverse and rich textile tradition. The origin of Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textiles can be traced to the Indus valley civilization. The people of this civilization used homespun cotton for weaving their garments. Excavations at Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro, have unearthed household items like needles made of bone and spindles made of wood, amply suggesting that homespun cotton was used to make garments. Fragments of woven cotton have also been found from these sites. The history of textile is almost as old as that of human civilization and as time moves on the history of textile has further enriched itself. In the 6th and 7th century BC, the oldest recorded indication of using fiber comes with the invention of flax and wool fabric at the excavation of Swiss lake inhabitants.

In Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonthe culture of silk was introduced in 400AD, while spinning of cotton traces back to 2 3000BC. In China, the discovery and consequent development of sericulture and spin silk methods got initiated at 2640 BC while in Egypt the art of spinning linen and weaving developed in 3400 BC. The discovery of machines and their widespread application in processing natural fibers was a direct outcome of the industrial revolution of

the 18th and 19th centuries. The discoveries of various synthetic fibers like nylon created a wider market for textile products and gradually led to the invention of new and improved sources of natural fiber. The development of transportation and communication facilities facilitated the path of transaction of localized skills and textile art among various countries.

the 18th and 19th centuries. The discoveries of various synthetic fibers like nylon created a wider

The first literary information about textiles in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottoncan be found in the Rig Veda, which refers to weaving. The ancient Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn epics the Ramayana and the Mahabharata also speak of a variety of fabrics of those times. The Ramayana on the one hand refers to the rich styles worn by the aristocracy and on the other the simple clothes worn by the commoners and ascetics.Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonhad numerous trade links with the outside world and the Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textiles were popular in the ancient world. The Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn silk was popular in Rome in the early centuries of the Christian era. Hoards of fragments of cotton material originating from Gujarat have been found in the Egyptian tombs at Fostat, belonging to 5th century A.D. Cotton textiles were also exported to China during the heydays of the silk route.

THE COTTON TEXTILE INDUSTRY:

The cotton textile industry is one of the oldest and most firmly established major industries. There is reason to believe that cotton was first grown and put to use in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonbefore where else in the world. Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonhas been a manufacturing

nation and an exporter of cotton fabrics to all nations. Thus, the cotton textile industry acquired the characteristics of trusty Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn and later to travel to other parts of the world. The dignity of man is raised to an appreciable level due to the evolution of textiles industry. It consists of Handloom, Power loom and Composite mills (Spinning and Weaving) sectors. The industry has been exporting its products for more than 3,000 years and is now strengthened with the collaboration of other allied industries.

The industry is spread across all the states of Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonbut two thirds of the textile mills are concentrated in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Tamilnadu with 1,460 organized units, 32 million spindles, 1.7 million power looms, 4 million handlooms and a large number of small, medium and large processing houses. The cotton textile industry is mainly a private sector industry, Gujarat and Maharashtra account for 50 per cent of the total spindles installed and 70 per cent of the tota1 100ms in the cotton textile industry.

ALL ABOUT TEXTILE INDUSTRY:

The major categories of textiles are linens and domestic products towels. Shower curtains, bathroom ensemble, table linen / damask and bed spread are categorized under linens, product such as sheets cases mattress pads, blankets and blanket covers comforters and quilts, embroidery and lace are coming under domestic products. However based on exports are HS code, Home textiles can broadly be classified in the following categories.

  • 1. Bed lines

  • 2. Bath liner

  • 3. Table linen & Kitchen linen

  • 4. Curtains, drapes and furnishing fabr5. Blankets

  • 6. Carpets & Floor covering

  • 7. Made Ups

Textiles industry

1)Cottage stage:

TEXTILE MANUFACTURING BY PRE-INDUSTRIAL METHODS

There are some indications that weaving was already known in the Paleolithic. An indistinct textile impression has been found at Pavlov, Moravia. Neolithic textiles were found in pile dwellings excavations in Switzerland and at El Fayum, Egypt at a site which dates to about 5000 BC.

The key British industry at the beginning of the 18th century was the production of textiles made with wool from the large sheep-farming areas in the Midlands and across the country. This was a labor-intensive activity providing employment throughout Britain, with major centers being the West Country; Norwich and environs; and the West Riding of Yorkshire.

The export trade in woolen goods accounted for more than a quarter of British exports during most of the 18th century, doubling between 1701 and 1770. Exports of the cotton industry centered in Lancashire had grown tenfold during this time, but still accounted for only a tenth of the value of the woolen trade. Before the 17th century, the manufacture of goods was performed on a limited scale by individual workers. This was usually on their own premises and goods were transported around the country. clothiers visited the village with their trains of pack-horses. Some of the cloth was made into clothes for people living in the same area, and a large amount of cloth was exported. Rivers navigations were constructed, and some contour-following canals. In the early 18th century, artisans were inventing ways to become more productive.

In Roman times, wool, linen and leather clothed the European population, and silk, imported along the Silk Road from China, was an extravagant luxury. The use of flax fiber in the manufacturing of cloth in Northern Europe dates back to Neolithic times. During the late medieval period, cotton began to be imported into northern Europe. Without any knowledge of what it came from, other than that it was a plant, noting its similarities to wool, people in the region could only imagine that cotton must be produced by plant-borne sheep. John Mandeville, writing in 1350, stated as fact the now-preposterous belief:

"There grew in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottona wonderful tree which bore tiny lambs on the endes of its branches. These branches were so pliable that they bent down to allow the lambs to feed when they are hungry."

Spindles or parts of them have been found in archaeological sites and may represent one of the first pieces of technology available. They were invented in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonbetween 500 and 1000 AD.

2) Industrial Revolution:

Textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution

The woven fabric portion of the textile industry grew out of the industrial revolution in the 18th Century as mass production of yarn and cloth became a mainstream industry. In 1734 in Bury, Lancashire, John Kay invented the flying shuttle one of the first of a series of inventions associated with the cotton woven fabric industry. The flying shuttle increased the width of cotton cloth and speed of production of a single weaver at a loom. Resistance by workers to the perceived threat to jobs delayed the widespread introduction of this technology, even though the higher rate of production generated an increased demand for spun cotton.

19th century developments:

With the Cartwright Loom, the Spinning Mule and the Boulton and Watt steam engine, the pieces were in place to build a mechanized woven fabric textile industry. From this point there were no new inventions, but a continuous improvement in technology as the mill-owner strove to reduce cost and improve quality. Developments in the transport infrastructure; that is the canals and after 1831 the railways facilitated the import of raw materials and export of finished cloth.

Thirdly, also in 1830, Richard Roberts patented the first self-acting mule. Stalybridge mule spinners strike was

Thirdly, also in 1830, Richard Roberts patented the first self-acting mule. Stalybridge mule spinners strike was in 1824,this stimulated research into the problem of applying power to the winding stroke of the mule. The draw while spinning had been assisted by power, but the push of the wind had been done manually by the spinner, the mule could be operated by semiskilled labor. Before 1830, the spinner would operate a partially powered mule with a maximum of 400 spindles after, self-acting mules with up to 1300 spindles could be built.

20th Century:

Major changes came to the textile industry during the 20th century, with continuing technological innovations in machinery, synthetic fiber, logistics, and globalization of the business. The business model that had dominated the industry for centuries was to change radically. Cotton and wool producers were not the only source for fibers, as chemical companies created new synthetic fibers that had superior qualities for many uses, such as rayon, invented in 1910, and DuPont's nylon, invented in 1935 as in inexpensive silk substitute, and used for products ranging from women's stockings to tooth brushes and military parachutes.

Industry integration and global manufacturing led to many small firms closing for good during the 1970s

Industry integration and global manufacturing led to many small firms closing for good during the 1970s and 1980s in the United States, during those decades, 95 percent of the looms in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia shut down, and Alabama and Virginia also saw many factories close.

21st century:

Industry integration and global manufacturing led to many small firms closing for good during the 1970s

In 2002, textiles and apparel manufacturing accounted for $400 billion in global exports, representing 6% of world trade and 8% of world trade in manufactured goods. In the early years of the 21st century, the largest importing and exporting countries were developed countries, including the European Union, the United States, Canada and Japan.The countries with the largest share of their exports being textiles and apparel were as follows (2002):

OVERVIEW OF SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTONGARMENTSN TEXTILE INDUSTRY Background: Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextile Industry is one

OVERVIEW OF SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTONGARMENTSN TEXTILE INDUSTRY

Background:

Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextile Industry is one of the leading textile industries in the world. Though was predominantly unorganized industry even a few years back, but the scenario started changing after the economic liberalization of Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn economy in 1991. The opening up of economy gave the much-needed thrust to the Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile industry, which has now successfully become one of the largest in the world. Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottontextile industry largely depends upon the textile manufacturing and export. It also plays a major role in the economy of the country. Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonearns about 27% of its total foreign exchange through textile exports. Further, the textile industry of Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonalso contributes nearly 14% of the total industrial production of the country. It also contributes around 3% to the GDP of the country. Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottontextile industry is also the largest in the country in terms of employment generation. It not only generates jobs in its own industry, but also opens up scopes for the other ancillary sectors. Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottontextile industry currently generates employment to more than 35 million

people. Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn textile industry can be divided into several segments, some of which can be listed as below:

Cotton Textiles

Silk Textiles

Woolen Textiles

Readymade Garments

Hand-crafted Textiles

Jute and Coir

Government initiatives and regulatory framework

Government Initiatives

The Government of Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonhas promoted a number of export promotion policies for the Textile sector in the Union Budget 2011-12 and the Foreign Trade Policy 2009-14. This also includes the various incentives under Focus Market Scheme and Focus Product Scheme; broad basing the coverage of Market Linked Focus Product Scheme for textile products and extension of Market Linked Focus Product Scheme etc. to increase the Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn shares in the global trade of textiles and clothing. The various schemes and promotions by the Government of Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonare as follows - It has allowed 100 per cent Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in textiles under the automatic route.

Welfare Schemes:

The Government has offered health insurance coverage and life insurance coverage to 161.10

million weavers and ancillary workers under the Handloom Weavers' Comprehensive Welfare Scheme, while 733,000 artisans were provided health coverage under the Rajiv Gandhi Shilpi Swasthya Bima Yojna.

E-Marketing:

The Central Cottage Industries Corporation of Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton(CCIC), and the Handicrafts and Handlooms Export Corporation of Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton(HHEC) have developed a number of e-marketing platforms to simplify marketing issues. Also, a

number of marketing initiatives have been taken up to promote niche handloom and handicraft products with the help of 600 events all over the country.

Skill Development:

As per the 12th Five Year Plan, the Integrated Skill Development Scheme aims to train over

2,675,000 people within the next 5 years (this would cover over 270,000 people during the first two years and the rest during the remaining three years). This scheme would cover all sub sectors of the textile sector such as Textiles and Apparel; Handicrafts; Handlooms; Jute; and Sericulture.

Credit Linkages:

As per the Credit Guarantee program, over 25,000 Artisan Credit Cards have been supplied to

artisans, and 16.50 million additional applications for issuing up credit cards have been forwarded to banks for further consideration with regards to the Credit Linkage scheme.

Skill Development: As per the 12th Five Year Plan, the Integrated Skill Development Scheme aims to

Financial package for waiver of overdues:

The Government of Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonhas announced a package of US$ 604.56 million to waive of overdue loans in the handloom sector. This also includes the waiver of overdue loans and interest till 31st March,2010, for loans disbursed to handloom sector. This

is

expected to benefit at least 300,000 handloom weavers of the industry and 15,000

cooperative societies.

Textiles Parks:

The Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarmentsn Government has given approval to 40 new Textiles Parks to be set up and this would be executed over a period of 36 months. The new

Textiles Parks would leverage employment to 400,000 textiles workers.The product mix in these parks would include apparels and garments parks, hosiery parks, silk parks, processing parks, technical textiles including medical textiles, carpet and power loom parks.

COMPANY PROFILE:

We established the creative boutique in 2005 and combined fashion, textile and graphic

design backgrounds to produce comprehensive design outcomes, rich with edgy originality, beauty and distinction. We a are a Sydney based design trio of print and fabric surface treatment specialists, whose primary focus is to deliver original, exclusive and

bespoke designs for a broad range of visual applications, particularly textiles. We are committed to uncovering and servicing clients’ needs while promoting environmental sustainability and Australian based production in an inspiring and creative way. We also have a design library, seasonally updated with a range of original artwork that is available for purchase on an exclusive basis for use in fashion, interiors and lifestyle product design.

We provide our clients with the textile concept as artwork [99% illustrator files] and leave

the production up to our clients’ discretion. We provide technical services also in making the files’ production ready if suppliers need this. We forecast trends, color and pursue original

concepts with stylistic diversity to produce hand-worked and computer generated Croquis. These include for fabric and other surfaces. We also do a lot of custom design development as well as our seasonal collection.

Contact Information:

Company Name:

SREE

LAKSHMI

ORGANIC

COTTONTEXTILES

Address : No:135,kovai bypass road, Karur- 639 001. Tamil Nadu India Mobile: + 919095341966 Website: +
Address
:
No:135,kovai bypass road,
Karur- 639 001.
Tamil Nadu
India
Mobile: + 919095341966
Website: + www.organiccottonindus.in

Line of Business:

Parent Line of Business and Top Line of Business has been extracted from National Industrial Classification code Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarments. If company has registered business with incorrect code or has changed the line of business without informing ROC, provided information will be incorrect. We take no warranties about accuracy of these classifications. Sree Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextiles Pvt Ltd. is the principle supplier to Sree Garments, fulfilling their total yarn requirements. Established in

2005,SSMT sources cotton domestically and from reputable African growers, Using State-of- the-art machinery, the raw material is woven into the finest quality cotton yarn. Efficient inventory management systems are in place to ensure a continuous.

The cotton is purchased in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cotton& Africa and processed step by step through these highly sophisticated machineries to ensure the best quality yarn. Efficient management of inventory ensures uninterrupted production process for the company. ShriSree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextiles Pvt Ltd is the least carbon emitting spinning mill in Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonas declared by ETI. It is also certified by FLO Fair Trade, CMIA, Organic Cotton and Oeko-Tex Certifications.The knitting plant is equipped with hi-tech machines capable of producing a wide variety of knit finishes and structures. Jacquard, Flat and Circular machines provide a diverse range of garments in Jersey, Rib and Fleece. A continuous programmed of research and development ensures that the knitting unit has the capability required to meet the latest fashion trends.

Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonSpinners Private Limited Profile:

Corporate Identification Number :

U17111TZ2005PTC012112

 

Company Name:

SHRI

SREE

LAKSHMI

ORGANIC

COTTONTEXTILES

 

Company Status:

Active

ROC:

ROC-Coimbatore

 

Registration Number:

12112

Company Category:

Company limited by Shares

 

Company Sub Category:

Non-govt company

 

Class of Company:

Private

Date of Incorporation:

01 September 2005

 

Age of Company:

10 years, 8 month

 

Activity:

Spinning, weaving and finishing

 

Company Founder

T.Manivannan

 

Managing Director

A.Meenatchi

 

Total Employees

450

   

VISION AND MISSION

Vision of Textiles Industry:

  • The Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottontextile industry has strength across the entire value chain from natural to man-made fiber to apparel to home furnishings. Its share in the nation’s GDP is 6% and in exports is 13%. The sector is the second largest employer after agriculture. After the phasing out of export quotas in 2005 Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarments’s export performance has been below expectations. Its share of global exports is around 5% whereas it was expected to rise quickly towards China’s level. The Chinese share in global exports is 39%. Vietnam and Bangladesh have shown remarkable success. Vietnam could achieve a peak export growth rate of 30% while Bangladesh could achieve a growth rate of 18%.

  • Taking innovative measures in partnership with the industry and learning from experience, Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottoncould aspire to achieve 20% growth in exports over the next decade. In any case the achievement of 15% growth rate in exports should be feasible. In the domestic market, sustaining an annual growth rate of 12% should also not be difficult.

  • This implies that with a 12% CAGR in domestic sales the industry should reach a production level of US$ 350 billion by 2024-25 from the current level of about US$ 100 billion for the domestic market. With a 20% CAGR in exports Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonwould be exporting about US$ 300 billion of textile and apparel by 2024-25 while with the lower15% CAGR in exports, Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonwould be exporting about US$ 185 billion of textile and apparel by 2024- 25.Considering the targeted growth in exports, Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonshould by then have a market share of 15% to 20% of the global textile and apparel trade from the present level of 5%.

  • During this period Sree Lakshmi Organic Cottonshould also attempt a structural transformation whereby it becomes a net exporter of finished products. This would imply that growth rates in exports of fibers and yarn should start declining and growth rates of apparel, homes furnishing, technical textiles and other finished products should grow very rapidly. This would maximise employment generation and value creation within the country and the fulfilment of the Prime Minister’s Vision of “Make of Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonGarments”.

Mission of the Industry:

We believe in an inspiration that us to stretch ourselves, to challenge the limits and overcome them. We also believe that, as time changes, one must evolve in thinking.Each accomplishment marks a new beginning and inspires us to focus on tomorrow in terms of new possibilities.Cutting edge technologies that will cater to the. Interests of the customers and investors. Be innovative not only to invent new technology but also to fulfill the ever- changing needs of society and environment.

Sree Lakshmi Organic CottonTextile And Industries Limited. Is amongst the most efficient textile companies in textile industry, As a company we strive to:-

  • To excel in our core areas of competence i.e., manufacture of Yarn And Home Textiles.

  • To uphold and nature the core values of transparency, empowerment, accountability, independent monitoring and environmental consciousness.

  • To give highest priority to customer satisfaction.

  • To develop new varieties of yarn.

  • To upgrade production facilities and technology continuously.

  • To grow globally through cost competitiveness and excellence in quality.

  • To fulfill the aspiration of customers, employees, financers and of the society in general.

  • To recruit and retain skilled manpower, reward superior performance.

  • To maximize shareholder`s wealth through good corporate Governance.

CHAPTER -III

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

  • 3.1 RESEARCH PROBLEM

  • 3.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

To measure the Employees Absenteeism level.

To identify steps required to decrease the Absenteeism.

To identify factors that motivates the Employees, which minimize Absenteeism SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTON INDUSTRY, KARUR. To study about the factors that influence absenteeism. By improving machine utilization by reduction of absenteeism the quality of Product and productivity To study about the working conditions prevailing in the market.

  • 3.3 SCOPE OF THE STUDY: The development of any organization depends on the regularity of employees. The study is conducted to know the various levels and reasons for absence of employees in an organization. By looking it, one can adopt corrective measures to decrease irregularities in the organization, leads to organizational growth.

3.4 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

  • Time is a important constraint and There may be a chance for sample error

  • The observation and conclusion which are presented in the report is based on data collected only the sample employees of 150private SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTON industries and cannot be generalized to other areas.

  • The respondents may tend to disclose information unwillingly.

  • 3.4.1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.4.2POPULATION:

The employees of SREE LAKSHMI ORGANIC COTTON industries in KARUR

3.4.3SAMPLE SIZE:

The size of the sample selected for the study is 150respondents.

  • 3.4.4 RESEARCH DESIGN:

A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose. It is a blue print of the study. Descriptive research design was used in this study for analysis.

3.4.5SAMPLE DESIGN

Convenient sampling was used in this study, which does not afford any basis for estimating. It is a non-probabilistic sampling method

  • 3.4.6 METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION

In the study the primary data was collected through structured questionnaire, the questionnaire was prepared in such a way that it covers the entire objectives of the study and Secondary data are those which are collected from the magazines, booklets, etc.

The data is analyzed with Simple analysis technique”. The data tool is percentage method. Percentage method is used in making comparison between two or more criteria. This method is used to describe relationship.

Percentage of Respondents = No. of Respondents/ Total no of Respondents X 100

3.4.8STATISTICAL TOOL

Chi-square test is used for the study. Chi-square test is one of the important tests developed to test hypothesis. It is a non parametric test. It is frequently used for testing hypothesis concerning the difference between a set of observed frequencies of a sample and corresponding set of expected or theoretical frequencies. X2= ∑(O– E)^2/ E Where O = observed frequencies,

E = expected frequencies,

Degree of freedom (v) = n-k

n = number of frequency classes

k = number of independent constraints.

For a contingency table with ‘r’ number of rows and ‘c’ number of columns the degree

of freedom is V= (r-1) (c-1)

The following steps are required to determine the value of the chi-square test.

  • 1. Calculate the expected frequencies

  • 2. Take the difference between observed and expected frequencies.

  • 3. Obtain the square of the difference.

  • 4. Divide (O- E)^2 with the expected frequency.

  • 5. Obtain (OE)^2/ E

The calculated value of x^2

Is compared with the table value of x^2 for a given degree of freedom at a certain

specified level of significance.

If

the

calculated value is more than table value, null

hypothesis is rejected and accept the alternative hypothesis. If the calculated value is less than table value, null hypothesis is accepted and alternative hypothesis is rejected.

The important applications of chi-square test are given below.

  • To test the variance of a normal population.

  • To test the goodness of fit.

  • To test the independence of attributes.

CHAPTER -IV

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

TABLE 4.1 AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS

Age

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative Percent

 

21-30

49

  • 32.7 32.7

 

32.7

31-40

43

  • 28.7 28.7

 

61.3

Valid

41-50

35

  • 23.3 23.3

 

84.7

50 above

23

  • 15.3 15.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

CHART INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred that 32.7 % of the respondents are

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred that 32.7 % of the respondents are in the age group of 21- 30, and 28.7% of the respondents are in the age group of 31-40 years, 23.3% respondents are in the age group of 41-50years, 15.3% of the respondents are in the age group Above 50.

TABLE 4.2

GENDER WISE CLASSIFICATIONS OF RESPONDENTS

Gender

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Male

106

  • 70.7 70.7

 

70.7

Valid

Female

44

  • 29.3 29.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred that 70.7% of the respondents are Male and

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred that 70.7% of the respondents are Male and 29.3%

of the respondents are female.

TABLE 4.3

EDUCATIONAL WISE CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS

Department

 

Frequenc

Percent

Valid

Cumulative

y

Percent

Percent

 

Marketing

  • 42 28.0

28.0

 

28.0

Supervisor

  • 47 31.3

31.3

 

59.3

HR

  • 35 23.3

23.3

 

82.7

Valid

Manager

Finance

  • 26 17.3

17.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative y Percent Percent Marketing 42 28.0 28.0 28.0 Supervisor 47 31.3 31.3

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred that Department in 28.0% of the respondents are Marketing 31.3% of the respondents are Supervisor,23.3% of the respondent in the department of HR Manager,17.3% of the respondent in the department of Finance.

TABLE 4.4

EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

up to 12

34

22.7

22.7

22.7

ITI

38

25.3

25.3

48.0

Valid

undergraduate

71

47.3

47.3

95.3

postgraduate

7

4.7

4.7

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

CHART INTERPERTATION: From the above table it is inferred that 22.7% of the respondents has completed

INTERPERTATION:

From the above table it is inferred that 22.7% of the respondents has completed up to 12, 25.3% of the respondent in the ITI, 47.3% of the respondent in the employee under graduates, and 4.7% of the have respondents have completed their up to Post Graduate.

TABLE 4.5 YEAR OF EXPERIENCE

Experience

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Below 1 yrs

68

45.3

45.3

45.3

1-5yrs

50

33.3

33.3

78.7

Valid

5-10yrs

25

16.7

16.7

95.3

10yrs & above

7

4.7

4.7

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

CHART INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred that 45,3% of the respondents have Below

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred that 45,3% of the respondents have Below 5 years of experience, and 33.3% of the respondents have 1-5 years and16.7% of the respondent 5-10 years, 4.7% of the respondent are 10 years and above.

TABLE 4.6

TYPE OF FAMILY

Family

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Joint

97

64.7

64.7

64.7

Valid

Nuclear

4

2.7

2.7

67.3

Single

49

32.7

32.7

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

CHART INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred family of the employee that 64,7% of

INTERPERTATION

From the above

table it

is

inferred family of

the employee that 64,7% of the

respondents have Joint Family, and 2.7% of the respondents have Nuclear and 32.7% of the

respondent Single of the family.

TABLE 4.7 HOW OFTEN YOU VISIT YOUR HOME TOWN

visit

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Weekly once

30

20.0

20.0

20.0

Two week once

61

40.7

40.7

60.7

Valid

Monthly once

49

32.7

32.7

93.3

Six month once

10

6.7

6.7

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Visit of the company that 20,0% of the

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Visit of the company that 20,0% of the respondents have weekly once, 40.7% of the respondents in two weeks once and 32.7% of the respondent Monthly once,6.7% of the respondent in six months once

TABLE 4.8 LOW MORALE LEADS TO ABSENTEEISM

Moral

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

43

28.7

28.7

28.7

Agree

64

42.7

42.7

71.3

Valid

Neutral

18

12.0

12.0

83.3

Disagree

15

10.0

10.0

93.3

Strongly disagree

10

6.7

6.7

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Moral Leads of Absenteeism that 28,7% of the

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Moral Leads of Absenteeism that 28,7% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 42.7% of the respondents in Agree and 12.0% of the respondent Neutral,10.0% of the respondent in Disagree,6.7% of the respondent in Strongly Agree.

TABLE 4.9 POLITICAL OR SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT FORCE ABSENT THEM FROM WORK

Political

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

  • 43 28.7

28.7

 

28.7

Agree

  • 46 30.7

30.7

 

59.3

Valid

Neutral

  • 48 32.0

32.0

 

91.3

Disagree

8

5.3

5.3

96.7

Strongly disagree

5

3.3

3.3

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Political that 28,7% of the respondents Strongly Agree,

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred

Political

that 28,7% of the respondents Strongly

Agree, 30.7% of the respondents in Agree and 32.0% of the respondent Neutral,5.3% of the

respondent in Disagree,3.3% of the respondent in Strongly Agree.

TABLE 4.10 ABSENT FROM WORK DUE TO HABIT OF ALCOHOLISM

Alcoholism

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

28

18.7

18.7

18.7

Agree

64

42.7

42.7

61.3

Valid

Neutral

34

22.7

22.7

84.0

Disagree

17

11.3

11.3

95.3

Strongly disagree

7

4.7

4.7

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Absent from work that 18.7% of the respondents

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Absent from work that 18.7% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 42.7% of the respondents in Agree and 22.7% of the respondent Neutral,11.3% of the respondent in Disagree,4.7% of the respondent in Strongly Agree.

TABLE 4.11 CLIMATE CONDITION IS CAUSE FOR ABSENTEEISM

Climate

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Yes

76

  • 50.7 50.7

 

50.7

Valid

No

74

  • 49.3 49.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

Yes 76 50.7 50.7 50.7 Valid No 74 49.3 49.3 100.0 Total 150 100.0 100.0 CHART

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Climate that 50.7% of the respondents are say Yes and 49.3% of the respondents are No.

TABLE 4.12 DO YOU THINK THAT THE ABSENTEEISM LEADS TO DELAY IN WORK

Delay

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Always

62

  • 41.3 41.3

 

41.3

Valid

Sometimes

71

  • 47.3 47.3

 

88.7

Never

17

  • 11.3 11.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

CHART INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred in delay that 47.3% of the respondents

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred in delay that 47.3% of the respondents they are Sometimes delay in work due to absenteeism,11.3% of the respondents that have no delay of work due to absenteeism and 41.3% of the respondents that always they are delay in work due to absenteeism.

TABLE 4.13 DOES THE WORK LOAD INCREASE DUE TO YOUR ABSENTEEISM

Loadincreasing

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative Percent

 

Always

46

  • 30.7 30.7

 

30.7

Valid

Sometimes

69

  • 46.0 46.0

 

76.7

Never

35

  • 23.3 23.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred in Load increasing that 46.0% of the respondents

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred in Load increasing that 46.0% of the respondents they are Sometimes delay in work due to absenteeism,23.3% of the respondents that have no delay of work due to absenteeism and 30.7% of the respondents that always they are delay in work due to absenteeism.

TABLE 4.14 DISTANCE OF WORK SPOT FROM HOME IN(KM)

Workspot

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Below 5 km

19

  • 12.7 12.7

 

12.7

5-15km

48

  • 32.0 32.0

 

44.7

Valid

15-25

42

  • 28.0 28.0

 

72.7

25km & above

41

  • 27.3 27.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is inferred that 28.0% of the respondents says that they

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that 28.0% of the respondents says that they travel 15-25 km from home to work spot, 32.0% of the respondents that they travel more than 5-15 km, 12.7% of the respondents that they travel less than 5 km, 27.3% of the respondent are 25 km and above.

TABLE 4.15 MODES OF TRANSPORT TO REACH WORK SPOT

Transport

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid

Bus

24

16.0

16.0

16.0

 

Train

50

  • 33.3 33.3

 

49.3

Two Wheelers

41

  • 27.3 27.3

 

76.7

any other

35

  • 23.3 23.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

Train 50 33.3 33.3 49.3 Two Wheelers 41 27.3 27.3 76.7 any other 35 23.3 23.3

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred that 16.0% of the respondents that they travel in Bus from home to work spot, and 33.3% of the respondents that they travel in Train,27.3%the respondent that they travel in two wheeler,23.3% of the respondents in Any other modes of transport.

TABLE 4.16 WELFARE MEASURE

WelfareMeasures

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Highly satisfied

23

15.3

15.3

15.3

Satisfied

27

18.0

18.0

33.3

Valid

Neutral

29

19.3

19.3

52.7

Dissatisfied

36

24.0

24.0

76.7

Highly dissatisfied

35

23.3

23.3

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

CHART INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred welfare measures that 15.3% of the respondents

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred welfare measures that 15.3% of the respondents highly satisfied, 18.0% of the respondents in satisfied and 19.3% of the respondent Neutral, 24.0% of the respondent in Dissatisfied, 23.3% of the respondent in Highly Dissatisfied.

TABLE 4.17 RELATED FACTORS

Relatedfactors

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Highly satisfied

22

14.7

14.7

14.7

Satisfied

28

18.7

18.7

33.3

Valid

Neutral

39

26.0

26.0

59.3

Dissatisfied

34

22.7

22.7

82.0

Highly dissatisfied

27

18.0

18.0

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Related factors that 14.7% of the respondents highly

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Related factors that 14.7% of the respondents highly satisfied, 18.7% of the respondents in satisfied and 26.0% of the respondent Neutral, 22.7% of the respondent in Dissatisfied, 18.0% of the respondent in Highly Dissatisfied.

TABLE 4.18 ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH YOUR MONTHLY INCOME

Income

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Highly satisfied

  • 24 16.0

16.0

 

16.0

Satisfied

  • 29 19.3

19.3

 

35.3

Valid

Neutral

  • 39 26.0

26.0

 

61.3

Dissatisfied

  • 33 22.0

22.0

 

83.3

Highly dissatisfied

  • 25 16.7

16.7

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Monthly income that 16.0% of the respondents Highly

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Monthly income that 16.0% of the respondents

Highly satisfied, 19.3% of the respondents in satisfied and 26.0% of the respondent Neutral,22.0% of the respondent in Dissatisfied,16.7% of the respondent in Highly Dissatisfied.

TABLE 4.19 DOES YOUR ABSENTEEISM AFFECT YOUR EARNINGS

Earnings

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

  • 24 16.0

16.0

 

16.0

Agree

  • 38 25.3

25.3

 

41.3

Valid

Neutral

  • 37 24.7

24.7

 

66.0

Disagree

  • 25 16.7

16.7

 

82.7

Strongly disagree

  • 26 17.3

17.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Earnings that 16.0% of the respondents Strongly Agree,

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Earnings that 16.0% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 25.3% of the respondents in Agree and 24.7% of the respondent Neutral,16.7% of the respondent in Disagree,17.3% of the respondent in Strongly Disagree.

TABLE 4.20 LESS PROPORTIONATE PAY ON BONUS AND INCENTIVES DUE TO ABSENTEEISM

Incentives

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

  • 28 18.7

18.7

 

18.7

Agree

  • 35 23.3

23.3

 

42.0

Valid

Neutral

  • 28 18.7

18.7

 

60.7

Disagree

  • 30 20.0

20.0

 

80.7

Strongly disagree

  • 29 19.3

19.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Incentives that 18.7% of the respondents Strongly agree,

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Incentives that 18.7% of the respondents Strongly agree, 23.3% of the respondents in Agree and 18.7% of the respondent Neutral, 20.0% of the respondent in Disagree, 19.3% of the respondent in Strongly disagree.

TABLE

4.21

INTERPERSONAL

RELATIONSHIP

WITH

SUPERIORS

AND

COLLEAGUES

 

Superiors

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Highly satisfied

27

18.0

18.0

18.0

Satisfied

35

23.3

23.3

41.3

Valid

Neutral

37

24.7

24.7

66.0

Dissatisfied

29

19.3

19.3

85.3

Highly dissatisfied

22

14.7

14.7

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Superiors that 18.0% of the respondents Highly satisfied,

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Superiors that 18.0% of the respondents Highly

satisfied, 23.3% of the respondents in satisfied and 24.7% of the respondent Neutral,19.3% of the respondent in Dissatisfied,14.7% of the respondent in Highly Dissatisfied.

TABLE 4.22 HOW MANY DAYS OF LEAVE YOU TAKE IN A MONTH? Leave

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid

One day

26

17.3

17.3

17.3

 

Two days

34

  • 22.7 22.7

 

40.0

Three days

43

  • 28.7 28.7

 

68.7

More than four days

28

  • 18.7 18.7

 

87.3

Nil

19

  • 12.7 12.7

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Leave that 17.3% of the respondents One day,

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Leave that 17.3% of the respondents One day, 22.7% of the respondents in Two days and 28.7% of the respondent Three Days, 18.7% of the

respondent in more than 4 days, 12.7% of the respondent in Nil.

TABLE 23. HOW DO YOU RATE YOUR JOB?

Ratejob

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Very interesting

  • 21 14.0

14.0

 

14.0

Challenging

  • 31 20.7

20.7

 

34.7

Valid

Monotonous

  • 40 26.7

26.7

 

61.3

Boring

  • 33 22.0

22.0

 

83.3

Very difficult

  • 25 16.7

16.7

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Rate Job that 14.0% of the respondents Very

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it

is inferred Rate Job that 14.0% of the respondents Very

interesting, 20.7% of the respondents in Challenging and 26.7% of the respondent Monotonous, 16.7% of the respondent in Very Difficult, 22.0% of the respondent in Boring.

TABLE 4.23 STRESS IS A PART OF YOUR LIFE

Stresswork

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

  • 26 17.3

17.3

 

17.3

Agree

  • 35 23.3

23.3

 

40.7

Valid

Neutral

  • 37 24.7

24.7

 

65.3

Disagree

  • 27 18.0

18.0

 

83.3

Strongly disagree

  • 25 16.7

16.7

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Stress work that 17.3% of the respondents Strongly

INTERPERTATION

From

the

above table it

is inferred

Stress work

that 17.3% of the respondents

Strongly Agree, 23.3% of the respondents in Agree and 24.7% of the respondent Neutral,18.0% of the respondent in Disagree,16.7% of the respondent in Strongly Disagree.

TABLE 4.24 REDUCE ABSENTEEISM

Reduceabsenteeism

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid

Strongly agree

27

18.0

18.0

18.0

 

Agree

32

  • 21.3 21.3

 

39.3

Neutral

41

  • 27.3 27.3

 

66.7

Disagree

28

  • 18.7 18.7

 

85.3

Strongly disagree

22

  • 14.7 14.7

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Reduce absenteeism that 18.0% of the respondents Strongly

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Reduce absenteeism that 18.0% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 21.3% of the respondents in Agree and 27.3% of the respondent

Neutral,18.7% of the respondent in Disagree,14.7% of the respondent in Strongly Agree.

TABLE 4.25 Recognition of work

Recognition of work

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

  • 21 14.0

14.0

 

14.0

Agree

  • 38 25.3

25.3

 

39.3

Valid

Neutral

  • 38 25.3

25.3

 

64.7

Disagree

  • 33 22.0

22.0

 

86.7

Strongly disagree

  • 20 13.3

13.3

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Recognition of work that 14.0% of the respondents

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Recognition of work that 14.0% of the

respondents Strongly Agree, 25.3% of the respondents in Agree and 25.3% of the respondent Neutral,22.0% of the respondent in Disagree,13.3% of the respondent in Strongly Disagree.

TABLE 4.26

EmployeeMorale

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

  • 20 13.3

13.3

 

13.3

Agree

  • 41 27.3

27.3

 

40.7

Valid

Neutral

  • 41 27.3

27.3

 

68.0

Disagree

  • 32 21.3

21.3

 

89.3

Strongly disagree

  • 16 10.7

10.7

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

Strongly agree 20 13.3 13.3 13.3 Agree 41 27.3 27.3 40.7 Valid Neutral 41 27.3 27.3

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Employee morale that 13.3% of the respondents

Strongly Agree, 27.3% of the respondents in Agree and 27.3% of the respondent Neutral,21.3% of the respondent in Disagree,10.7% of the respondent in Strongly Disagree.

Table 4.27

ChangeManagementStyle

 

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

 

Strongly agree

17

  • 11.3 11.3

 

11.3

Agree

43

  • 28.7 28.7

 

40.0

Valid

Neutral

41

  • 27.3 27.3

 

67.3

Disagree

30

  • 20.0 20.0

 

87.3

Strongly disagree

19

  • 12.7 12.7

 

100.0

Total

150

100.0

100.0

 

CHART

CHART INTERPERTATION From the above table it is inferred Change Management style that 11.3% of the

INTERPERTATION

From the above table it is inferred Change Management style that 11.3% of the

respondents Strongly Agree, 28.7% of the respondents in Agree and 27.3% of the respondent Neutral,20.0% of the respondent in Disagree,12.7% of the respondent in Strongly Disagree.

T-TEST:

TEST

One-Sample Statistics

 
 

N

Mean

Std. Deviation

Std. Error Mean

 

Age

150

 

1.06555

  • 2.2133 .08700

 

150

  • 1.6800 .07645

.93636

Family

One-Sample Test

 
 

Test Value = 0

 

t

df

Sig. (2-tailed)

Mean

95% Confidence Interval of the

Difference

Difference

Lower

Upper

Age

25.440

  • 149 .000

 

2.21333

  • 2.0414 2.3852

 

21.974

  • 149 .000

1.68000

  • 1.5289 1.8311

Family

Statistical Tools: T-test

There is no significant difference between Family of the respondents and their Related Factors. There is a significant difference between Family Size of the respondents and their absenteeism affect our job.

There is no significant difference between Family of the respondents and their Recognition of work.

ONE-WAY ANOVA:

ANOVA

Gender

 

Sum of Squares

Df

Mean Square

F

Sig.

 

1.108

3

.369

1.798

.150

Between Groups

  • 29.985 .205

146

Within Groups

Total

  • 31.093 149

There is no significant difference between Gender of the respondents and their

Employee Abseentism. There is no significant difference between Between groups of the respondents and

their recognition of work. There is no significant difference within groups of the respondents and their

Employee Abseetism. There is no significant difference between experience of the respondents and their

stress is a part of work life. There is no significant difference between gender of the respondents and their

Recognition of work. There is no significant difference between gender of the respondents and their employee measures.

There is no significant difference between gender of the respondents and their is monthly income a part of work life. There is no significant difference between department of the respondents and their recognition of work.

CORREALTION:

Correlations

 

Department

Moral

 

Pearson Correlation

1

-.127

Department

Sig. (2-tailed)

 

.120

N

150

150

 

-.127

1

 

Pearson Correlation

Moral

Sig. (2-tailed)

.120

 

N

150

150

There is no significant relationship between department of the respondents and their

moral is a part of work life. There is no significant relationship between department of the respondents and their

moral of work. There is no significant relationship between How many days visit in the organisation

of the respondents and their employee morale. There is no significant relationship between department of the respondents and their employee change Management Style.

CHI-SQUARE TEST:

EducationalQualification

 

Observed N

Expected N

Residual

up to 12

34

37.5

-3.5

 

ITI

38

37.5

.5

71

37.5

33.5

undergraduate

7

37.5

-30.5

 

postgraduate

 

Total

150

Political

 

Observed N

Expected N

 

Residual

 

43

30.0

 

13.0

Strongly agree

 

Agree

46

30.0

 

16.0

Neutral

48

30.0

18.0

Disagree

8

30.0

-22.0

5

30.0

-25.0

Strongly disagree

 

Total

150

Test Statistics

 

EducationalQualification

Political

 

55.067

a

61.933

b

Chi-Square

   

Df

3

4

Asymp. Sig.

.000

.000

  • a. 0 cells (0.0%) have expected frequencies less than 5. The minimum expected cell frequency is

37.5.

  • b. 0 cells (0.0%) have expected frequencies less than 5. The minimum expected cell frequency is

30.0.

There is no significant association between Education Qualification of the

respondents and their think that the absenteeism leads to delay in work. There is no significant association between Education Qualification of the respondents and their how many day Political of job.

CHAPTER -V

FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSION

5.1 FINDINGS

It is inferred that 67.9% of the respondents are Male and 28.2% of the respondents are female. It can be referred by Department in 26.9% of the respondents are Marketing 29.5% of the respondents are Supervisor,23.1% of the respondent in the department of HR Manager,16.7% of the respondent in the department of Finance.

It is inferred that 21.8% of the respondents has completed up to 12,24.4% of the respondent in the ITI,45.5% of the respondent in the employee under graduates, and 4.5% of the have respondents have completed their up to Po It is inferred that 43,6% of the respondents have 1-5 years of experience, and 31.4% of the respondents have 5-10 years and16.0% of the respondent Above 10 years. Family of the employee that 62,2% of the respondents have Joint Family, and 2.6% of the respondents have Nuclear and 31.4% of the respondent Single of the family. Visit of the company that 19,2% of the respondents have weekly once, 39.1%of the respondents in two weeks once and 31.4% of the respondent Monthly once,6.4% of the respondent in six months once. Moral Leads of Absenteeism that 27,6% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 41.0% of the respondents in Agree and 11.5% of the respondent Neutral,9.6% of the respondent in Disagree,6.4% of the respondent in Strongly Agree. Political that 27,6% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 29.5% of the respondents in Agree and 30.8% of the respondent Neutral,5.1% of the respondent in Disagree,3.2% of the respondent in Strongly Agree. It is inferred Absent from work that 17.9% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 41.0% of the respondents in Agree and 21.8% of the respondent Neutral,10.9% of the respondent in Disagree,4.5% of the respondent in Strongly Agree. Climate that 48.1% of the respondents are say Yes and 47.4% of the respondents are No. It is inferred in delay that 45.5% of the respondents they are Sometimes delay in work due to absenteeism,10.9% of the respondents that have no delay of work due to absenteeism and 45.5% of the respondents that always they are delay in work due to absenteeism. It is inferred that 22.4% of the respondents says that they travel 15-25 km from home to work spot,44.2% of the respondents that they travel more than 5-15 km,29.5% of the respondents that they travel less than 5 km It is inferred that 12.2% of the respondents that they travel in Bus from home to work spot, and 30.8% of the respondents that they travel in Train,26.9% of the respondent that they travel in two wheeler,26.3% of the respondents in other modes of transport.

It is inferred work related factors that 14.1% of the respondents highly satisfied, 17.9% of the respondents in satisfied and 25.0% of the respondent Neutral,21.8% of the respondent in Dissatisfied,17.3% of the respondent in Highly Dissatisfied. It is inferred welfare measures that 14.7% of the respondents highly satisfied, 17.3% of the respondents in satisfied and 18.6% of the respondent Neutral,23.1% of the respondent in Dissatisfied,22.4% of the respondent in Highly Dissatisfied. It is inferred welfare measures that 14.7% of the respondents highly satisfied, 17.3% of the respondents in satisfied and 18.6% of the respondent Neutral,23.1% of the respondent in Dissatisfied,22.4% of the respondent in Highly Dissatisfied. Absent from work that 15.4% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 24.4% of the respondents in Agree and 23.7% of the respondent Neutral,16.0% of the respondent in Disagree,16.7% of the respondent in Strongly Agree. Incentives from work that 17.9% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 22.4% of the respondents in Agree and 17.9% of the respondent Neutral,19.2% of the respondent in Disagree,18.6% of the respondent in Strongly Agree. It is inferred superiors that 15.4% of the respondents highly satisfied, 18.6% of the respondents in satisfied and 25.0% of the respondent Neutral, 21.2% of the respondent in Dissatisfied, 16.0% of the respondent in Highly Dissatisfied. It is inferred Leave that 16.7% of the respondents One day, 21.8% of the respondents in Two days and 27.6% of the respondent Three Days, 17.9% of the respondent in more than 4 days, 12.2% of the respondent in Nil. It is inferred Related Job that 13.5% of the respondents Very interesting, 19.9% of therespondents in Challenging and 25.6% of the respondent Monotonous, 16.0% of the respondent in Very Difficult, 21.2% of the respondent in Boring. It is inferred Stress work that 16.7% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 22.4% of therespondents in Agree and 23.7% of the respondent Neutral,17.3% of the respondent in Disagree,16.0% of the respondent in Strongly Agree. It is inferred your Opinion that 17.3% of the respondents Strongly Agree, 20.5% of the respondents in Agree and 26.3% of the respondent Neutral,17.9% of the respondent in Disagree,14.1% of the respondent in Strongly Agree

5.2 SUGGESTIONS

It is suggested that the organization should solicit well educated persons, so that the job awareness can be created in them. It is suggested that the organization must focus on recruiting experienced employee to ensure their value of presence. It is suggested that the performance of employee must be measured. It is suggested that the organization must focus on social gathering to know the employees problem. The company to conduct personal counseling for the employees in order to increase self esteems and build confidence in them and their attitude towards work. Better working conditions and welfare facility providing the employee and induce interest in them to come regularly for work. Implement reward schemes for those employees who are regular. It is suggested that to bring down the level of challenging, job rotation can be practiced. This can make the employees get interested in their job. Create a favorable and peaceful work environment where relationship between workers and supervisors are professional to avoid conflict. The rate of absenteeism must be controlled to overcome the work load and if possible there should be increased in the salary. It is suggested that the work related factors must be controlled by providing various training programs to the employee.

CONCLUSION

Absenteeism is unavoidable. It must be controlled by effective management relations. Organization should make innovative strategic planning to reduce the absenteeism. The

requirements here is the committed management force with single task to carry forward

strategic function with reliability and accuracy.

It

is

envisaged that a culture of open

communication and collaboration can reduce the level of absenteeism through strategic interventions.

BOOKS REFERRED

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • V.S.P RAO – “Human resource management”: Text and Cases(Excel books, New Delhi, 2000)

  • EDWIN.S.FLIPPO Personal management international Student Edition.

  • C.B MEMORIA - Personal management and Industrial Relation Himalaya Publishing House; 22th edition.

  • C.R. Kothari – “Research Methodology” : Methods and Techniques(Wily Eastern, New Delhi, 1985)

WEBSITIES

QUESTIONNAIRE

1.

Name

:

2.

Age

:

a)

21-30

b) 31-40

c) 41-50

d) 50&above

3.

Gender

a)

Male

b) Female

 

4.

Department

:

5.

Educational Qualification

 

a)

Up to 12

b) ITI

c) Undergraduate

d) Postgraduate

6.

Year of Experience

a)

Below 1yrs

b) 1-5yrs

c) 5-10yrs

d) 10 yrs & above

7.

Type of Family

a)

Joint

b) Nuclear

c) Single

8.

How often you visit your home town?

a)

Weekly once

b) Two week once

c) Monthly once

d) Six month once

9.

Low morale leads to absenteeism

 

a)

Strongly agree

b) Agree

c) Neutral

d) Disagree

e) Strongly disagree

10.

Political or social engagement force absent them from work

a)

Strongly agree

b) Agree

c) Neutral

d) Disagree

e) Strongly disagree

11.

Absent from work due to habit of alcoholism

 

a)

Strongly agree

b) Agree

c) Neutral

d) Disagree

e) Strongly disagree

12.

Do the climate condition is a cause for absenteeism?

a) Yes

b) No

  • 13. Do you think that the absenteeism leads to delay in work?

  • a) Always

b) Sometimes

c) Never

  • 14. Does the work load increase due to your absenteeism

  • a) Always

b) Sometimes

c) Never

  • 15. Distance of work spot from home in (Km)

  • a) Below 5 Km

b) 5-15 Km

c) 15-25 Km

d) 25 Km & above

  • 16. Modes of transport to reach work spot

 
  • a) Bus

b) Train

c) Two wheeler

d) Any other

  • 17. Work related factors:

Sl.No

Opinion

Highly

Satisfied

Neutral

Dissatisfied

Highly

Satisfied

dissatisfied

 
  • 1 Working

         

condition

 
  • 2 Welfare

         

measure

  • 18. Are you satisfied with your monthly income?

    • a) Highly satisfied

b) Satisfied

c) Neutral

d) Dissatisfied e) Highly dissatisfied

  • 19. Does your absenteeism affect your earnings?

    • a) Strongly agree

b) Agree

c) Neutral

d) Disagree

e) Strongly disagree

  • 20. Less proportionate pay on Bonus and incentives due to absenteeism

    • a) Strongly agree

b) Agree

c) Neutral

d) Disagree

e) Strongly disagree

21.

Interpersonal relationship with superiors and colleagues

  • a) Highly satisfied

b) Satisfied

c) Neutral

d) Dissatisfied e) Highly dissatisfied

  • 22. How many days of leave you take in a month?

a) One day

b) Two days

c) Three days

  • 23. How do you rate your job?

d) More than Four days

e) Nil

  • a) b) Challenging

Very interesting

c) Monotonous

d) Boring

e) Very difficult

24. Stress is a part of your work life

  • a) Strongly agree

b) Agree

c) Neutral

d) Disagree

e) Strongly disagree

  • 25. Comment your opinion to control absenteeism in your organization.

 

Sl.No

Ways to reduce absenteeism

SA

A

N

DA

SDA

 
  • 1 Recognition of

         

work

 
  • 2 Employee

         

morale

 
  • 3 Change

         

management

style