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MUSIC 670

Elementary Teaching Unit

Eighth Note and Sixteenth Note Rhythms


4th Grade

Matt Shea
May 3, 2017

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Unit Introduction .. 3-5


-10
Unit Outline 6

Prepare ..6-7

Present ...7-8

Practice .8-10

Lesson Plans ...11-52

Prepare Lesson 1 ...12-15

Prepare Lesson 2 ...16-20

Prepare Lesson 3 ...21-24

Present Lesson 1 ...25-29

Practice Lesson 1 ..30-33

Practice Lesson 2 ..34-37

Practice Lesson 3 ..38-41

Practice Lesson 4 ..42-45

Practice Lesson 5 ..46-48

Practice Lesson 6 ..49-52

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Unit Introduction

The focus of this unit plan is the combined rhythm of the sixteenth and eighth
note combined rhythm (eighth and two sixteenth notes or two sixteenths and an eighth
note), in the fourth grade classroom. Students will have already learned about sixteenth
notes this year and this concept will build on their previous knowledge of quarter notes,
eighth notes, whole notes, half notes, quarter rests, half rests, whole rests, and
syncopated eighth quarter eighth. After they have mastered the concept in this unit, they
will be working on dotted quarter-eighth rhythms for the remainder of the year. Each
student will have sung each of these rhythms and performed them through body
percussion and on classroom instruments such as xylophones, rhythm sticks, etc.
Besides learning/experiencing the eighth-2 sixteenths as well as 2
sixteenth-eighth note rhythms, students will learn other musical concepts as well. For
example, while learning the songs we will be focusing on performing songs with our
best musicality. This will require the students to sing with correct tone and intonation,
which can lead to development in individual and ensemble timbre. We will also have
opportunities to learn different melodies as well as forms of the pieces we will learn in
this unit. The students will also learn proper techniques in singing and playing both
pitched and unpitched percussion instruments.
This unit addresses cross-curricular topics such as alliteration in literature, social
studies through historical background information of certain songs, biology and
conservation, health and wellness through movement and dancing, as well as honoring
cultural traditions. Students will not only learn more about the cultures from which the
selected music came, but also about people who contributed their own ideas and
transformed the music. As musicians we also get to talk about math and how the beats
can be broken down into different divisions. For example, we can discuss the structure
(meter) of a measure of music (translates: denominator of a fraction) and how many
notes, or fractions of the beat, it takes to fill up a measure completely. Other
opportunities for cross-curricular connections include journaling as a means of
assessment, and researching or reading up on our different composers for
supplemental knowledge.

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Pre-Assessment:
Before learning the new rhythm concept, it is important that students understand
sixteenth notes and eighth notes as well as the differences between the two. One
activity that Im planning for the students is to have rhythmic cards that the students will
read and clap. There will be a backing track provided so that the students will have
context and I will have a checklist and mark if students can clap sixteenth separately
and eighth notes separately. If the students cant clap both of these rhythms then I will
plan lessons to review these concepts that are required to master this unit. The songs
chosen to review these rhythms will be songs that the students already know.

Checklist Example:
Eighth Notes/ Yes No N/A
Sixteenth Notes

(Name)

(Name)

(Name)

Post-Assessment (Summative):
At the end of the unit I plan on using a few different assessment tools to assess student
learning. First, students will be given rhythm cards that reviews the sixteenth notes and
eighth notes that we have already learned as well as the eighth-2 sixteenth
combinations that we have covered in this unit. This will assess students ability to
differentiate between all three rhythms. Again, I will be using a checklist to see if
students are able to perform the activity. Another tool I plan to use is a arranging
assignment where students will create an original arrangement of the Israeli song,
Dundai, using the rhythms learned in this unit and previously learned rhythms. (You can
find this lesson on page 42). Here, the students will have to externalize the rhythm (via
body percussion) as well as possibly sing/count through them. Finally, I will incorporate
student self-reflection to gauge the students confidence in concepts previously taught
as well as the new unit concept. If there are more than a few students who are
struggling with eighth notes, sixteenths and a combination of the two, then it is up to me
to reflect where we got off track, and re-teach/reinforce as necessary.

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(Example of Self Assessment)
How are you feeling about these activities?
Clapping the rhythm below:

I can do it! I can do it with I am stuck and


some help. need a lot of help.

Singing/Chanting the rhythm below:

I can do it! I can do it with I am stuck and


some help. need a lot of help.

Hearing any combination of the


rhythms below and notating them with
standard notation:

I can do it! I can do it with I am stuck and


some help. need a lot of help.

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Unit Outline
Prepare
The prepare stage is the first time that students will have an experience with the new
concept. Students arent shown notation of the new rhythmic concept or told that there
is a new concept. In this stage, students will experience the new rhythms through
learning folk songs, dances, and various related activities.

1. Little Red Truck


a. Historical Context: Not much can be found about this chant online. The
composer is Diane Lange, author of Together In Harmony: Combining Orff
Schulwerk and Music Learning Theory. She has taught elementary music
for ten years in Michigan and Nevada. She is currently the Asst. Professor
and Area Coordinator of Music Education at the University of Texas -
Arlington where she oversees the music education area and teaches
undergraduate and graduate courses in Early Childhood and Elementary
Music Education.
b. The reason I chose this song is that it not only contains the concept being
covered in the unit, but the chant addresses the fundamental skill of
keeping a steady beat. From there, we can delve further into feeling the
macrobeat vs. the microbeat. I also picked this song because it has many
descriptive words that make imaginary concepts for the child more
concrete. From there and as a class, we can branch out from the original
chant and come up with other creative idea/rhythmic ostinati that reinforce
the unit concept.

2. How Much Wood Could a Woodchuck Chuck


a. Historical Context: American English-language tongue-twister. The
woodchuck from the Algonquian word "wejack" is a kind of marmot
regionally called a groundhog.The complete beginning of the
tongue-twister usually goes: "How much wood would a woodchuck chuck
if a woodchuck could chuck wood?"[The tongue-twister relies primarily on
alliteration to achieve its effects, with five "w" sounds interspersed among
five "ch" sounds. The origin of the phrase is from a 1902 song "The
Woodchuck Song", written by Robert Hobart Davis for Fay Templeton in
the musical The Runaways. The lyrics became better known in a 1904
version of the song written by Theodore Morse, with a chorus of "How
much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck
wood?",which was recorded by Ragtime Roberts, in 1904.

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b. This fun tongue twister allows students a deeper look into how intertwined
language is with rhythm and that the short words in this saying directly
correlate with the shorter notes in the rhythm. Then, we can look at what
the woodchuck looks like and pretend to be one. As a class, we are going
to practice feeling the different pulses and experience where the
emphases are in the chant and how our bodily actions can align with the
strong beats of the chant.

3. Shagidi Shagidi Shapopo


a. Historical Context: Nonsense Saying. I found several versions of different
groups of people performing a canonic routine with this chant. However, I
could not seem find any sort of background for this fun chant. You could
really make up any sort of nonsense syllable and achieve the same result.
b. This song is the base for a canon or a round. It is one measure long and is
usually done with body movement. Typically, there is a line leader that will
demonstrate the first movement and it will waterfall to the next person
when the measure starts over and so on. The actions can be very broad
or very stylized. The possibilities of what this chant/composition could turn
into are endless. Because this is a chant and is only 4 beats long,
students will be able to grasp the concept quickly and transform it.

Present
The present stage is when the students will label the concept that they have been
exploring in the present stage. During this stage students will see the 2 sixteenth, eighth
and eighth 2 sixteenth rhythms for the first time and be able to name it.

4. Old Betty Larkin


a. Historical Context: The dulcimer is the Kentucky state instrument. In
addition to playing it and being a songwriter and folk singer, Jean Ritchie
(the Mother of Folk) is credited with bringing the sound of the dulcimer to
the world-wide audience. As a young child, she would sneak into her
fathers room to play his dulcimer when he was out working in the fields.
After attending college, she moved straight to New York and took the odd
instrument with her. When people saw her carrying the dulcimer on the
subway, they would beg her to play it because they had never seen an
instrument like that before. She began playing in clubs and has been a
pioneer of publicizing folk singing and the bringing recognition to the
dulcimer.

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b. This song is an excellent example of the eighth-2 sixteenth rhythm and
vice versa right after one another. Students will be introduced to the
notation of this song and we will get to explore the idea that two sixteenth
notes can replace and attach onto an eighth note to get the unit concept
we are studying. Students will use recorders and speech patterns to
articulate the rhythmic pattern instead of clapping or using body
percussion because the larger muscle movements are not as precise as
the fine motor movement of the tongue. Students will also engage in a
dance that goes with the song.

Practice
The practice stage is where students will get to do the concept. In this stage students
will read, write, improvise, and compose using this new concept. The students will also
perform the concept more and the students will be able to take ownership of the
concept.

5. William Tell Overture


a. Historical Context: The William Tell Overture was written by Gioachino
Rossini to open his opera William Tell. The opera is about a legendary
Swiss bowman who once shot an apple from his sons head. His overture
is one of the most recognizable songs today. The overture is featured in
some popular movies including The Lone Ranger.
b. This piece is filled with the rhythmic concept of eighth 2 sixteenth rhythms.
The purpose of William Tell is to get students to aurally identify the
rhythmic concept as well as be able to describe it. I believe that this piece
also gets the students excited since it is a fast paced song with an
interesting story. Students will engage in percussion stations (crash cans)
to practice the unit concept. Additionally, this piece involves an
easy-to-conceptualize form as well as a strong tonic-dominant chordal
structure. We will be able to talk about pick-up notes as they are
repeatedly stated in this piece.

6. The Deer Chase


a. Historical Context: "Cumberland Mountain Deer Chase" -- also known as
"Cumberland Mountain Deer Race" and/or "Cumberland Mountain Bear
Chase" -- is a lively up-tempo tune that sounds like it might be an old, old
fiddle tune. But it isn't. It's a novelty song that Uncle Dave Macon, one of
the first stars of the Grand Ole Opry, made popular in the 1930s and 40s.
Uncle Dave Macon sang the parts about the hounds really fast, then

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slowed down for a verse about the deer -- who's panting and getting
winded by this time -- and picked up again as he returned to the hounds
and horses.
b. The Deer Chase will engage students immediately because its
programmatic, it obviously contains our unit concepts, and we are able to
talk about the background and its significance, tempo, and tension and
release.

7. Cross Patch
a. Historical Context. Being a cross patch meant that you were and
ill-tempered and disagreeable people in the context of the song. Patches
were defined by the patched clothing they wore and drawing the latch
would mean closing the door behind you when you come into someones
home. To pass the time, many women spun thread to make clothes and
that helped pass the time. Inviting neighbors in for a cup of tea would be to
cordial thing to do if ever a guest was to arrive at ones house. It is likely
cross patches didnt get a lot of company.
b. Not only does this song offer some interesting background history behind
the lyrics, but it also sets up a tonic-dominant bordun for students to
explore and accustom themselves to so that they may improvise to tonic
and dominant harmonies later in the lesson.

8. Dundai, Hebrew Folk Song:


a. Historical Context: This song comes from Israel and is a part of the
Hebrew tradition. Translation of song: Israel without the Torah is like a
body without a soul.
b. This song comes from another part of the world where the class will get to
talk about another culture! It is suggested that after each 4 beat phrase,
students add 4 more beats of clapping. There are three 4-beat patterns
that students can rearrange to make his/her own composition. With this
piece, we can talk about tonality and cadences so that the arrangements
can resolve on a consonant note. Students will also musically experience
this song on recorder.

9. Michael Finnegan
a. Historical Context: This song is an example of a repetitive song. In this
type of song, the structure has a large portion of the words remaining
constant each time the main stanza is repeated with small changes each
time. Another example of this type of song is If Youre Happy and You

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Know It.. Michael Finnegan appears in the second volume of The
Oxford Song Book collected and arranged by Thomas Wood in 1927.
There is some evidence to suggest that this piece came about after an
Irish soldier in the First World War who had a large beard and the other
members of his brigade sang the song about him.
b. The song Michael Finnegan is a fun camp song that students might have
heard of before! With this in mind we will learn the song and then play the
clapping game that is associated with it. This piece could also be used to
introduce eighth notes as well as the sol to do relationship. Once the
students are comfortable with both the song and the clapping game, we
can speed it up slowly.
10. Cedar Swamp
a. Historical Context: A cedar swamp can include evergreen trees such as
white cedar. This song is an American Folk Song from the Appalachian
region, specifically from Kentucky. Jean Ritchie and her friends would get
together and play together as children. To pass the time, her and her
friends would play singing games so that they could get a boy to notice
them.
b. This song has all three elements that students should be familiar with
(eighth notes, sixteenth notes, and the combination) and by reviewing with
a musical game of bingo, they should be well versed in the differences
between the three. Not only should they be able to sing the rhythms, but
they should also be able to write the rhythms down correctly and perform
the rhythms correctly on instruments. There is also a dance that goes with
the song that is fun and can reinforce the concepts being covered.

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Lesson Plans

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Prepare: Lesson 1 Little Red Truck

Objective: Students will be able to perform maintain a steady beat through body
percussion and unpitched percussion instruments with musical context from the teacher
for the entirety of Little Red Truck with fewer than two deviations from the given
tempo.

Students will identify whether the meter of the piece is duple or triple and can
externalize the macro or micro-beat through movement, rhythmic syllables, words, or
unpitched percussion with 3 or fewer technical errors.

Students will compose and perform rhythmic/syllabic ostinati that emphasize either the
micro or macro beat and fits with the 8-bar chant with 3 or fewer technical errors.

Standards Being Addressed:


MU:Cr1.1.4b Generate musical ideas (such as rhythms, melodies, and simple
accompaniment patterns) within related tonalities (such as major and minor) and
meters.
MU:Cr2.1.4a Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation,
arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and
context.
MU:Cr3.1.4a Evaluate, refine, and document revisions to personal music, applying
teacher provided and collaboratively developed criteria and feedback to show
improvement over time.

Materials:

Hand drum
White board and markers

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Sequence:
Pattern Work: Students will sing this call and response song back to the teacher. This
intro song incorporates the eighth-two sixteenth note pattern that students will be
learning more about in this unit. The teacher will initiate this song with his students and
when they have learned it and are comfortable with the words, may improvise
responses back to him.

1. T greets students at the door: Good morning, quickly and quietly find your spots
and be ready with everything you need to do your best today!
2. T: Starts patting legs. Repeat after me. Hey hey Mr. Shea (Ss echo)
3. T: What are we gonna do today? (Ss echo)
4. T: We could play or we could sing (Ss echo)
5. T: I dont want that bell to ring. (Ss echo)
6. T: Well as a matter of fact I think we are going to play and sing today!

Activity 1 - Learn the chant (T/Ss patting quarter notes on legs whole time)
1. T: Begins patting legs. Will you all join me? Im going to sing a really cool song,
see if you can tell me what its about. Listen.
2. T sings through song.
3. T: What was my song about? (Ss answer.)
4. T: Did you remember what color it was? (Ss answer.)
5. T: What sounds did it make? Ss waver. T: Give it another listen.
6. T sings song again. T: What sounds did it make? Ss answer. Youre right.
7. T: Repeat after me. Little red truck goes splish splish splash. (Ss echo)
8. T: Little red truck goes weeee! (Ss echo)
9. T: Little red truck goes splish splish splash. (Ss echo)
10. T: When its raining on me! (Ss echo)
11. T will assess comprehension of the students and diction. (Fill in the blank if
necessary)
12. T: Lets do two lines at a time. T sings the first two lines. Ss echo.
13. T sings the last two lines. Ss echo.

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14. T: Lets try it all together. T sings whole song with Ss. T corrects any words as
needed.
15. T: Try without me this time. Ss sing.
16. T assesses, Thumbs up if youve got it no problem. Thumbs to the side if youre
still working on it.

Activity 2 - Macro to Micro


1. T: Who can tell me if this song is in a 3 feeling or in a 2 feeling? (Ss answer)
Why do you say that?
2. T: Thats right, its a 2 feeling. It means theres a little more heaviness on count
1.
3. T: Is there something we can do that will help us remember to be heavier on
count 1? Ss suggestions. (Maybe we could stomp)
4. T: When you stomp in a puddle, does it splash? Ss: yes.
5. T: Lets practice stomping for the song so we can splash around. (Stomps to the
half note/macrobeat)
6. T: What about tip-toeing around the puddles? Can we tiptoe around the puddles
so our shoes dont get wet? (Tiptoes to the quarter note)
7. T assesses if feet are moving in time.
8. T: Okay, Im going to make it harder. Half the class will be stomping and half will
be tiptoeing. When you hear me pound three times on the drum, you have to
switch to either stomping or tiptoeing, whatever you werent not doing
previously.
9. T goes through a couple of switches. Changes tempo, etc.

Activity 3 - Speech Ostinato


1. T: Now, we are going to assign words to go along with our tip toes or our
stomps. What are some words that sound like what we are doing with our feet?
Ss answer.
2. T writes answers up on the board. Lets pick our favorite for the tip toe and for
the stomp.
3. T: Now we are going to make an ostinato. (Describes ostinato). Fills in a table
on the board. Directs Ss through each one of the patterns in the boxes.
Drip drop Boom Boom Boom

Boom drip drop Drip drop drip drop


4. T guides them to picking a four bar pattern that repeats.
5. T splits the class so half of them say the pattern and half sing Little Red Truck.
Switch.
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6. Half of Ss play ostinato pattern on unpitched percussion instrument (triangles,
woodblock, hand drum, gong, rhythm sticks, etc.) while half sing the song.
Switch.

Assessment:
The ranges on the assessment table below are as follows:
Mastery - Student demonstrates skill successfully 90% of the time or more
Developing - Student demonstrates skill successfully around 70% of the time
Beginning - Student demonstrates skill successfully around 50% of the time

Students Ability to Keep Steady Micro/Macro Beat


Name Beginning Beginning Developing Developing Mastery Mastery
(B) Micro (B) Macro (D) Micro (D) Macro (M) Micro (M) Macro

Student
1

Student
2

Student
3

Song Analysis: Little Red Truck


Tone Set N/A

Range N/A

Rhythm Set Ti-ti, tika-ti, ta (rest)

Form Call and Response (ABAB)

Pedagogy:
Melody N/A

Rhythm Focus on the eighth-two sixteenth rhythms

Other Improvising their own Answers to the Question


Focus on the macrobeat and microbeats
Source: Lange, Diane M. Together in Harmony: Combining Orff Schulwerk and Music Learning
Theory. Chicago: GIA Publications, 2005. Print.

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Prepare: Lesson 2 How Much Wood Could a Woodchuck Chuck?

Objective:
Students will recite the tongue twister in various tempos (80bpm, 100bpm, 120bpm)
with correct rhythms and wording.

Students will learn more background information about woodchuck and its habitat.

Students will learn about alliteration and rhyming in How Much Wood.

Standards Being Addressed:


MU:Cr1.1.4a Improvise rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic ideas, and explain connection
to specific purpose and context (such as social and cultural).
MU:Pr6.1.4a Perform music, alone or with others, with expression and technical
accuracy, and appropriate interpretation.
MU:Pr5.1.4b Rehearse to refine technical accuracy and expressive qualities, and
address performance challenges.
4.L.4.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and
nuances in word meanings.
Materials:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-3DpgckiLA - The Woodchuck Song
Google Slides Woodchuck Presentation

Backing track
Hand drum (for T accompaniment)

Sequence:
Pattern Work: Students will sing this call and response song back to the teacher. This
intro song incorporates the eighth-two sixteenth note pattern that students will be
learning more about in this unit. The teacher will initiate this song with his students and
when they have learned it and are comfortable with the words, will learn to greet with

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the question and teacher will improvise an answer.

1. T has students sing the first two lines of the song.


a. T responds We are learning a new chant, please go sit down in your
spot.

Activity 1 - Background info on the Woodchuck


1. T: Today we are going to be learning about a cool animal. Have you ever hear of
something called the woodchuck? Does anyone know what that is? Can you
describe it? Has anyone ever seen a real woodchuck? Ss respond.
2. T passes out the student worksheet that students can take notes on.
3. T pulls up Woodchuck Presentation and presents about name, habitat, diet, etc.
4. Students will write three things they learned during the presentation.

Transition: Students will put their worksheets under their seats.

Activity 2 - Learn the Chant


1. T: Have you ever asked someone a question and they didnt say anything back
to you? Have you ever asked a question and you got an answer that didnt make
any sense? (Ex: Hey, how are you doing today? Pickles.) Ss respond.
2. T: That happens in music, too. Sometimes there are questions asked in music
that need answers. Sometimes the answer can be just like the question (TR
Teddy Bears) and sometimes the answer can be different than the question
(Shave and a haircut), but it makes sense.
3. T: I have a question for you guys today, are you ready to hear it? Ss respond.
Speaks fast: How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could
chuck wood? (students faces should be blank) Need to hear it again?
4. T has students begin patting their legs while speaks it slower.
5. T: Repeat after me. How much wood could a Ss echo.
6. T: Woodchuck chuck if a Ss echo.
7. T: Woodchuck could chuck wood? Ss echo.

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8. T: How many syllables are in each line? Lets feel it out. Put a fist underneath
your chin and we are going to mouth the first line. The number of times your chin
moves is how many syllables there are. How many? Ss respond.
9. T has students clap on each syllable said.
10. T: Now you are going to fill in some words for me. Say woodchuck every time I
leave it blank.
a. Then wood
b. Then chuck
11. T has students recite the whole question on their own.
12. Repeat steps 5-10 when teaching the answer. (As much wood as a
woodchuck could if a woodchuck could chuck wood.)
13. T has students speak it at varying tempi until proficient.
14. Present on Historical Context (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-3DpgckiLA)

Activity 3 - Improvising
1. T: How much wood is as much wood? We dont really know What if I said: T
models: A woodchuck could chuck (seven big trees) if a woodchuck could chuck
wood. Did that make sense to the question we were asked?
2. Ss will partner up and come up with their own responses to the question and be
asked to share.
3. T wil put on some sort of backing track for musical context and rhythmic clarity.
4. Students will then be asked if they want to volunteer their own responses and will
perform them in front of the class (the rest of the students will be reminded what
it means to be good listeners).

Transition: Students will retrieve their worksheets. A student will come identify the faster
words on the slide. Then we will move into talking about alliteration.

Activity 4 - Learning about Alliteration


1. T: That was something you call a tongue twister. Its tricky to say because of all
the similar letters and sounds used so close together. Lets take a closer look at
it.
2. T goes to the Alliteration Slide and asks a student if he can come up and identify
how many W sounds there are. (Ss will also identify the Ch sounds as well as the
rhyming words like would/wood and could. Students will follow along on their
worksheets provided.

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Assessment:
Teacher will be listening for correct rhythms and text when learning the chant and
correcting as needed. Students will follow along in class with the worksheet provided so
that they may remain actively engaged.

ListthreethingsyoulearnedabouttheWoodchucktoday:

1. 2. 3.

Circlethefasterwords. 1. HowmanyW
soundsareinthe
poem?


Howmuchwoodcoulda

Woodchuckchuckifa
2. HowmanyCH
soundsareinthe
Woodchuckcouldchuckwood? poem?



Asmuchwoodasa

3. Whattwowords
Woodchuckcouldifa rhyme?


Woodchuckcouldchuckwood.

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Song Analysis: Woodchuck
Tone Set N/A

Range N/A

Rhythm Ti-ti, ti-tika, ta


Set

Form As

Pedagogical:
Melody N/A

Rhythm Focus on the eighth two sixteenth rhythms

Other Information on the Woodchuck (Google Slides)


Alliteration English cross-curricular

Sources:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-3DpgckiLA - The Woodchuck Song
https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/woodchuck-groundhog -
Information on the Woodchuck
Wikipedia - Woodchuck

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Prepare: Lesson 3 Shagidi Shagidi Shapopo

Objective: Students will accurately chant, use body percussion/movement, and perform
the two sixteenths-eighth note rhythms in Shagidi on unpitched percussion
independently and within a group of students.

Students will identify how a round (canon) is structured and will perform the song in a
round with choreographed movement added with less than 3 speaking/rhythmic errors.

National Standards Being Addressed:


MU:Cr2.1.4a Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation,
arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and
context.
MU:Cr3.2.4a Present the final version of personal created music to others, and explain
connection to expressive intent.
MU:Pr4.1.4a Demonstrate and explain how the selection of music to perform is
influenced by personal interest, knowledge, context, and technical skill.
MU:Pr6.1.4a Perform music, alone or with others, with expression and technical
accuracy, and appropriate interpretation

Materials:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDXvLt2YDDs - Movement Game

Unpitched Percussion Instruments

Sequence:
Pattern Work: Students will sing this call and response song back to the teacher. This
intro song incorporates the eighth-two sixteenth note pattern that students will be
learning more about in this unit. The teacher will initiate this song with his students and
when they have learned it and are comfortable with the words, will learn to greet with

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the question and teacher will improvise an answer.

2. T has students sing the first two lines of the song.


a. T responds We are playing a new game, it is going to be insane!
3. T: Do you remember how we talked about fast words in our last lesson. Did you
notice if we had any fast words in our Starting Song?
4. T has Ss mouth the syllables (with fists under chin), then clap the syllables
isolating the big beats and working down to the small beats isolating What are
we gonna do today?

Transition: Ss will arrange themselves standing in a circle to learn the next game. T
begins echoing different 4-beat speech patterns and clapping/BP patterns for the
students to echo back as they are moving.

Activity 1 - 4 After Me
1. T: Now we are going to play Four After. You have to pay very close attention or
you will mess up! I will go for 4 beats and then you will do what I did right
afterward. No stopping! Lets try it! (Pats legs, claps, wing flaps, toe touch
forward, raises hands up and down, squat down and up, march in place,
toe touch behind, etc.)
a. T begins with simple patterns and gradually increases difficulty as
observed.
b. T asks if any of the students wants to lead the group. (This is really hard
and they may not be able to think as quickly.)

Activity 2 - Learn the Chant


1. T: Okay, now I want to add words to it. Do you want to hear the words to it? Ss
respond excitedly!
2. T begins patting and non-verbally invites them to join in.
3. T models the song. Ss are amazed.
4. T has them speak the words emphasizing articulation and diction.
5. Ss pat and chant the phrase.

22
6. Combine the 4 After Me Game with the words.
7. Group Ss in 4-5 and they can play the game on their own while teacher
observes. Students will come up with a small routine and perform for the class if
they would like. (Class will be reminded what it means to be a good listener and
supportive musician.)
8. Ss will circle back up and we can try the entire class playing the game.
a. This can be performed at a school program or just for fun at home.

Activity 3 - Sound to Symbol


1. Teacher will put blank table up on the board.

Sha-gi-di Sha-gi-di Sha-po Po

2. Ss will get back into their groups and will be given their own cards that are cut to
different lengths and will be asked to make the pattern they hear in the song.
3. Students will color in board according to how many fast or slow sounds there are
for each beat.

Assessment: Students will perform one measure independently with movement.


Teacher will assess via a checklist if the student can keep time, perform the rhythm
accurately and (in group setting) perform the sequential movement passed from the
leader. When students are making their sound to symbol card patterns together, teacher
will perform each groups work so they can compare if their pattern matches the original
pattern.

23
Checklist: Assessing with (B) Beginning, (D) Developing, or (M) Mastery
Students Name Student can Student can Student can perform the
speak/perform the rhythm speak/perform the rhythm sequential movement
independently with steady accurately in a group passed from the previous
beat. setting with steady beat. student accurately with
steady beat.

Song Analysis:
Tone Set N/A

Range N/A

Rhythm Set

(Repeat)

Form AA (Canon)

Pedagogical:
Melody N/A

Rhythm Eighth two sixteenth rhythms (duple meter)

Other Canon Form (Round)

Source:
http://kodalycat.weebly.com/uploads/2/9/4/1/2941805/sagidi_sapopo.pdf
.

24
Present: Lesson 1 Old Betty Larkin

Objective:
Students can identify and notate the eighth/two sixteenth combination rhythm with iconic
notation and standard notation.

Students will be able to chant rhythms Old Betty Larkin, sing on solfege and text, play
melody on recorder as well as perform traditional folk dance to song with fewer than 4
mistakes in each category.

National Standards Addressed:


MU:Cr2.1.4b Use standard and/or iconic notation and/or recording technology to
document personal rhythmic, melodic, and simple harmonic musical ideas.
MU:Cr3.2.4a Present the final version of personal created music to others, and explain
connection to expressive intent.
MU:Pr4.2.4b When analyzing selected music, read and perform using iconic and/or
standard notation.
MU:Pr6.1.4a Perform music, alone or with others, with expression and technical
accuracy, and appropriate interpretation.

Materials:
Recorders

25
Verse 2: Needle in a haystack, Old Betty Larkin, (3 times)
Also, my dear darling.
Verse 3: Steal, steal, Old Betty Larkin, (3 times)
Also, my dear darling.
Verse 4: You take mine and Ill take another, (3 times)
Also, my dear darling.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSjI70FkBzk - Dulcimer Playing

Sequence:
T will prepare the students for Re pentatonic with vocables (re-mi, sol-la, do-re) using
bum bum.

Activity 1 - Learn the Song


1. T: I have a song that I think youll like and it has those faster note patterns that
we worked on in the Woodchuck song and in the Shagidi Song. Do you know
what those faster notes are called? (Youve talked about them before. Shorter
than eighth notes.)
2. Ss pat quarter notes while teacher models the song.
3. T: Did you notice those faster notes in there like the other songs we learned?
Did I sing four fast notes in a row? Take another listen. Ss respond. Which
words were the faster ones?
4. T: Youre right I sang only two fast notes and sang an eighth note on
Round.
5. T puts up table notation grid.

(pat) (pat)

Hop a- round Skip a- round

(pat) (pat)

Old Bet- ty Lar- kin

26
6. Puts up musical notation without words. Draws two eighth notes, draws four
16th notes, erases part and draws the new combination. Minds blown. Students
will draw along on white boards to learn the proper notation.
7. Asks Ss to uses ti and ti-ka to voice the different combinations, then tells Ss to
pat it on legs. Is this pattern sound familiar to anything that we have done?
8. Verse 1: T echo sings the melody of Old Betty Larkin on ti/tika measure by
measure. Ss echo. T corrects as needed.
9. T echo sings the melody on solfege. Ss echo.
10. T echo sings on words. Ss echo. T corrects as needed.
11. Repeat steps 8-10 for Verses 2-4
12. T presents Historical Context: The dulcimer is the Kentucky state instrument. In
addition to playing it and being a songwriter and folk singer, Jean Ritchie (the
Mother of Folk) is credited with bringing the sound of the dulcimer to the
world-wide audience. As a young child, she would sneak into her fathers room to
play his dulcimer when he was out working in the fields. After attending college,
she moved straight to New York and took the odd instrument with her. When
people saw her carrying the dulcimer on the subway, they would beg her to play
it because they had never seen an instrument like that before. She began playing
in clubs and has been a pioneer of publicizing folk singing and the bringing
recognition to the dulcimer. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSjI70FkBzk)

Activity 2 - Learn the Dance


Formation: Single circle of partners, facing in. (If enough) Girl at her partners
right. An extra player (or more in a large circle) is standing alone
inside the circle.
1. Verse 1: All sing verse one, while inside player skips around
the inside of the circle clockwise, the partners join hands in skating
position and circle counterclockwise.
2. Verse 2: Partners drop hands and form a single circle facing in
toward the center. Betty or Billy skips weaving in and out of the circle.
3. Verse 3: Betty/Billy breaks a couple up and starts skipping with
them around the circle until they get back to the broken couple. The
person without a partner will become the new Betty/Billy.
4. Verse 4: New Betty or Billy will skip around clockwise while the
rest of the partners skip counterclockwise.

Activity 3 - Play on Recorder


1. Breathing warm up. Emphasizing soft air against hand.
2. T/Ss echo playing whole notes aiming for good tone and no cracking.

27
3. T will play rhythmic patterns on one note emphasizing good tone. Ss echo.
4. T will review fingerings for the notes being covered. Assessing for characteristic
sound.
5. T will model note grouping by note grouping, measure by measure and then line
by line. Ss echo.
6. Once students feel confident, teaching will sing the words while they play. Then,
T will split class in half and half will play and half will sing. Switch.

Assessment: The presented song and lesson above will certainly take more than one
class session to learn everything. T can keep a running checklist to mark down students
once they have mastered the skill presented.

Can student demonstrate skill?


X- Yes O- No
Skill Name 1 Name 2 Name 3
Student can identify
and notate
eighth/sixteenth rhythm
iconically.

Student can identify


and notate
eighth/sixteenth rhythm
in standard notation.

Student can chant


rhythm to OBL w/ >4
mistakes.

Student can sing OBL


on solfege w/ correct
rhythms (>4 mistakes).

Student can sing text to


OBL with correct
intervallic relationships.

Student can play OBL


on recorder with steady
beat and correct
pitches/rhythms. (80%
accuracy)

28
Song Analysis: 72. Old Betty Larkin
Tone Set r m s l d r (re pentatonic)

Range P8

Rhythm Set ta, ti-ti, ti-tika, tika-ti

Form Strophic with refrain

Pedagogical Use:
Melody Re pentatonic (D Dorian)

Rhythm This rhythm is the most complex because it involves


two quick sixteenth notes followed by an eighth note,
then repeated.

Other American Folk Song Tradition


Dance

Source: Locke, Eleanor G., and Robin Goodfellow. Sail away: 155 American folk songs
to sing, read, and play. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1989. Print.

29
Practice: Lesson 1 William Tell Overture

Objective: Students can aurally identify different elements of form in the William Tell
Overture (Introduction, ABCD Sections, Coda, Interlude).

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to accurately play the two
sixteenth/eighth rhythms on rhythm board/crash can using drum sticks or hands.

While listening to the piece, students will be able to differentiate and externalize the
macro/micro-beat through body percussion or instruments with 85% accuracy.

National Standards Addressed:


MU:Pr4.1.4a Demonstrate and explain how the selection of music to perform is
influenced by personal interest, knowledge, context, and technical skill.
MU:Pr6.1.4b Demonstrate performance decorum and audience etiquette appropriate for
the context, venue, and genre.
MU:Re7.2.4a Demonstrate and explain how responses to music are informed by the
structure, the use of the elements of music, and context (such as social and cultural).
MU:Cn10.0.4a Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal
choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music.

Materials:
Unpitched percussion (Crash cans: scrapers, can, rhythm board, drum sticks, maracas,
tambourine/jingles, hand drum)
Hula Hoops for different groups
Projector
Form Sheet
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wF5Bs2yh2T0 - Rhythm Sticks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIbYCOiETx0 - William Tell Song

30
Sequence:
Activity 1 - Historical Context:
1. T: The William Tell Overture was written by Gioachino Rossini to open his opera
William Tell.
a. Composer History
i. Gioachino Rossini, the most popular opera composer of his day,
was born in Pesaro, Italy. Like many composers, Rossini learned
about music from his parents. Gioachino's father played the horn
and the trumpet, and his mother was an opera singer. When
Gioachino was a little boy, he learned to play the piano and to sing.
ii. In Rossini's day, the opening of a new opera was as exciting as the
opening of a new movie is for us. Rossini wrote his first opera when
he was 18 years old. His most famous opera is The Barber of
Seville. And after composing the opera William Tell in 1829, when
he was 37, Rossini stopped writing operas.
iii. After that, Rossini didn't compose again for years. When he was
much older, he wrote some music for the church, and he wrote a lot
of small pieces to entertain his friends.
b. What is an opera?
i. T: Does anyone know what an opera is? Ss respond (a singing
play, very little talking)
31
c. What is an overture?
i. An overture is is a piece of music that is played at the beginning of
a big opera.
d. Plot
i. The opera is about a legendary Swiss bowman (hunter with a bow
and arrow) who once shot an apple from his sons head. If he is
Swiss, do you know what country he is from? Ss answer
(Switzerland)

Transition: T will play the William Tell Overture Finale (slower tempo)
Listen for the ti-ka ti pattern! T will ask students to use spider hands to keep a steady
beat throughout the piece.

Activity 2 - Rhythm Stick Activity (Finding the Rhythmic Concept)


1. Introduction - Prepare the sticks
2. A Section
a. On the sixteenth rhythms play as notated. For the accented three eighth
notes - three stick clicks.
3. B Section
a. Tap both sticks twice on the ground and then pass them to the person on
the right.
4. Interlude
a. Pass once to the right every 8 beats
5. C Section
a. Move the sticks up and out, together, down and out, together
6. D Section
a. Silence
7. Coda
a. Rolling the sticks and resting

Activity 3 - Crash Cans


1. T will assign certain groups of students certain instruments from the crash cans
and they will then perform the choreographed routine practiced from the previous
activity on the designated percussion instrument
2. Students will then switch instruments.
Assessment:
Students will be given their own Form Charts and will be following along with the song
and physically pointing to what part of the music we are in. After assigning different

32
percussion groups to different sections of the song, students will be aurally assessed by
raising their hand when their section of the song is playing.

Multiple Choice:
The most famous part of the William Tell A. Cows mooing
Overture describes what? B. Horses galloping
C. A thunderstorm
D. A bow and arrow

Rossini was born in which country? A. Spain


B. Switzerland
C. Italy
D. Germany

What country did the opera William Tell A. England


take place? B. Switzerland
C. Italy
D. Poland

Song Analysis Table: Finale from William Tell Overture


Tone Set sltdrmfs

Range P8

Rhythm Set Ti-ti, ti-tika, tika, ta-a-ka-ti-ka

Form Intro, A B Interlude, ACDC B Interlude A Coda

Pedagogical:
Melody Sol-Do relationship, chord structure, authentic major (G
major)

Rhythm Focus on eighth-two sixteenth rhythms and steady


beats

Other Opera overture, historical context

Source: http://www.artiealmeida.com/
http://www.classicsforkids.com/pastshows.asp?id=40

33
Practice: Lesson 2 The Deer Chase

Objective:
In groups, students will collaborate and create a story of The Deer Chase using
Plastique Animee and perform it in front of the class.

Students can identify expressive elements (tempo, dynamics, phrasing, movement,


acting) that were incorporated into their Plastique Animee and can explain why those
elements were contextually appropriate for the music.

Students will analyze and sing the refrain of TDC on rhythmic duration syllables (ti - tika,
etc.), solfege syllables, and with correct text and pitches with less than 3 technical
errors.

National Standards Being Addressed:


MU:Re7.2.4a Demonstrate and explain how responses to music are informed by the
structure, the use of the elements of music, and context (such as social and cultural).
MU:Re7.1.4a Demonstrate and explain how selected music connects to and is
influenced by specific interests, experiences, purposes, or contexts.
MU:Pr6.1.4b Demonstrate performance decorum and audience etiquette appropriate for
the context, venue, and genre.

Materials:

34
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OR5jZT8TO0c - Deer Chase story (Erik Darling)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfH6uYD4sJ0 - Uncle Dave Macon song
Ukulele (For harmonic context) or real banjo player if available.
Percussion instruments, scarves, ribbons, props

Sequence:
Warm-up: D Major Scale. Outlining Tonic and Dominant Chords.
Ear training exercises - Interval training on nonsense syllables.
Two pitches and then three pitches. Preparing the ear for the song to come.
Incorporating the eighth-two sixteenth note concept.
Sing through D Major Scale (1. ti-tika 2. Solfege) on this pattern with Curwen hand
signs.

T: Okay, now Im going to tell you a little bit more about where the song we are about to
learn came from.
Activity 1 - Historical Context
1. "Cumberland Mountain Deer Chase" -- also known as "Cumberland Mountain
Deer Race" and/or "Cumberland Mountain Bear Chase"
2. A lively up-tempo tune that sounds like it might be an old, old fiddle tune. But it
isn't. Uncle Dave Macon plays the accompaniment on a very unique instrument.
Its like a guitar. T shows picture of a banjo. Can anyone tell me what this
instrument is? Ss respond banjo.
3. The banjo was brought to the region in the the early 1800s by enslaved African
Americans and became popularized through the minstrels who played them.
a. It can have 4, 5, or 6 strings.
b. Circular frame, plastic or skin head stretched over the frame
4. It's a novelty song that Uncle Dave Macon, one of the first stars of the Grand Ole
Opry, made popular in the 1930s and 40s. Uncle Dave Macon sang the parts
about the hounds really fast, then slowed down for a verse about the deer --
who's panting and getting winded by this time -- and picked up again as he
returned to the hounds and horses.
5. T shows map of Appalachia and the Cumberland Mountain Range.

Activity 2 - Learn the song (refrain)


1. Teach the song part by part
a. Solfege each phrase. T gives advice/corrects as needed.

35
b. T: Away and away.. Ss echo
c. Were bound for the mountain (x3) Ss echo.
d. Over the mountains, the hills and the fountains Ss echo.
e. Away to the chase away, away. Ss echo.
2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfH6uYD4sJ0 - Have students sing the refrain
every time they hear it.
3. T: Did you notice anything about how he sang the song? Did the notes change?
(No) Were there any instrument sounds that were taken away or added? (No)
Give it another listen and see if you can pick out what he does to make the story
more exciting with the lyrics.. (Students should be listening for how the artist
speeds up the lyrics and slows down to enhance the story.)
4. T: Since we are talking about it, doesnt it take a lot of work to climb over
mountains and hills. Lets pretend like we are climbing a hill and singing this
song. (T models a strained and legato way of singing the refrain) Ss follow.
5. T: Now, what about it someone was chasing after us we need to sing fast
right? Ss sing refrain fast.

Transition: I noticed how some of you were moving to the music and really trying to
pretend like you were at the Deer Chase. That is good practice for what we are going to
do next.

Activity 3 - Plastique Animee


1. T: I want you all to close your eyes. Imagine you are out in the woods with your
hunting dog by your side and and you are going to track down the biggest
deer/bear youve ever seen in your life. Keep your eyes closed and listen to this
story.
2. T: Whoa, there were a lot of characters in that story, huh? This time you are
going to get in a group of 4-5 people and you all are going to come up with your
own way to show the song through your own movements. Different people can
be different characters if you want. Before you start, think about what is going to
be appropriate. T lists examples of bad things to do and good things to do.
3. T gives the groups time to explore, collaborate and develop routine. Ss may use
props/instruments if needed.
4. Half of the groups will perform. The other half will observe (being attentive and
good audience members) and then they will switch.

Closure: Students will fill out reflections over what expressive elements their groups
included in their performances and why those choices were relevant to the music/story.

36
Assessment:
EXITTicketforClass
Whatinstrumentwasplayedalongwithoursong,TheDeerChase,today?

Howdoyouthinkthatinstrumentssoundaddedtothestory?Writeaboutthe
soundsyouheard.

Whatthingsdidyoudoduringyourperformancehelpedthestorymakesenseto
you?

Whatwassomethingthatanothergroupdidthatyoulikedandhowdiditaddto
thestory?

Song Analysis Table: 120. The Deer Chase


Tone Set t, d r m f s l d (authentic major)

Range m9

Rhythm Set Eighth notes/rests, eighth and two sixteenth combinations

Form Verse/Refrain - Strophic

Pedagogical:
Melody Authentic Major (D Major)

Rhythm Focus on eighth two sixteenth rhythms

Other Historical Context, D.C. al Fine

Source: Locke, Eleanor G., and Robin Goodfellow. Sail away: 155 American folk songs
to sing, read, and play. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1989. Print.

37
Practice: Lesson 3 Cross Patch

Objective: Students will improvise an 8 bar phrase in 2/4 time incorporating the two
sixteenth/eighth concept and eighth/two sixteenth combination.

Students will arrange and perform class composition on Orff instruments of Cross Patch
that incorporates rhythmic concept being studied in class.

Students will demonstrate what it means to be a good listener and supportive audience
member by remaining quiet, focusing on the performer, and applauding after the
performance is over.

National Standards Being Addressed:


MU:Cr2.1.4a Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation,
arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and
context.
MU:Cr3.2.4a Present the final version of personal created music to others, and explain
connection to expressive intent.
MU:Pr4.2.4b When analyzing selected music, read and perform using iconic and/or
standard notation.
MU:Pr6.1.4b Demonstrate performance decorum and audience etiquette appropriate for
the context, venue, and genre.

Materials:

38
ttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zfclv_2Q-Po - Poem breakdown
h
Class Set - Orff Instruments (Xylophones)
Bass Xylophone (for Teacher Demonstrations)

Sequence:
Warm-Up: D Major scale. Tonic and dominant intervals, singing solfege and nonsense
syllables incorporating Curwen hand signs.

Activity 1 - Learn the Song


1. Students pat quarter notes while T models the song.
2. T non-verbally gestures to himself and models first two measures on loo. Ss
echo.
3. with measures 3-4. Ss echo.
4. with measures 5-6. Ss echo.
5. with measures 7-8. Ss echo.
6. Repeat measures 2-5 on solfege with Curwen hand signs.
7. Fill in the blank. T will leave out the last word of each line and Ss will fill in the
correct word with the correct pitch. T will correct as needed.
8. Once teacher is confident in the student's ability, T will ask students to sing
along in their heads to check to see if any part needs to be retaught/ reinforced.
9. Class will sing through the song without the Ts help.

Activity 2 - Historical Context (show the video)


1. Being a cross patch meant that you were and ill-tempered and disagreeable
people in the context of the song.
2. Patches were defined by the patched clothing they wore and drawing the latch
would mean closing the door behind you when you come into someones home.
3. To pass the time, many women spun thread to make clothes and that helped
pass the time.
4. Inviting neighbors in for a cup of tea would be a cordial thing to do if ever a guest
was to arrive at ones house.
5. It is likely cross patches didnt get a lot of company.
6. It sounds like the cross patch needs to be nicer to his friends and neighbors. Its
not very fun to not have any friends around, is it? Its pretty lonely when you dont
have any friends.

Activity 3 - Learn the Bordun


1. Students will use spider hands to pat quarter note pulse while singing the song.

39
2. Students will alternate spider hands - pat their left hand on leg on beat one and
right hand on leg on beat two.
3. Ss will select their instruments. T: Remember we are not hitting the instruments,
we are going to tap the bar and pull away quickly with our mallet so we can let
the sound ring. T models proper technique for playing bordun.
4. Students play do-sol broken bordun. (If they can not independently play the
alternating notes, students can just play both notes at the same time, or one note
if they are comfortable with that.)
5. Students will sing the song and play the bordun.

Activity - Improvise
1. T will select advanced student(s) to play the bordun while T models improvising.
T will incorporate rhythmic concept as well and dominant and tonic cadences.
2. T: Did you see how I kept with the beat of the other students? Did you hear me
play ti-tika and tika-ti?
3. T will give students a couple minutes to explore their improvisation while he plays
the bordun.
4. Students perform improvisation for a partner and the partner will assess if they
have used the two rhythmic concepts studied correctly. If not, the performer will
revise his/her work until he/she has completed the objective.
5. Students will be largely grouped to improvise during the group run through. If
some students are brave enough and would like to solo improvise on their own,
they are encouraged to do so.
6. Ss will be reminded that this is a time to be supportive and not critical. This is a
time where we can say what is going on in our head through our instruments.
7. Class will piece together song-refrain (improvise) - song arrangement to be
performed at the end of class.

Closure: T: Isnt it so cool when everyone is involved in making this performance


happen?! Its so much more fun to be nice and have friends to play music with instead
of being mean like a cross patch who doesnt have many friends.

Assessment:

Peer Assessment:
Did your partner perform Did you partner perform
the eighth-two sixteenth the two sixteenth-eighth
rhythm (ti - tika) correctly in rhythm (tika - ti) correctly in
his/her improvisation? his/her improvisation?

40
Yes

No

Song Analysis: Cross Patch


Tone Set t d r m f s l

Range m7

Rhythm Set Ta, ti-ti, ti-tika

Form Call and Response

Pedagogical:
Melody Teaching a do-sol bass line, Improvising in the
tonic-dominant tonalities (D Major)

Rhythm Focusing on the eighth-sixteenth rhythms

Other N/A

Source: Source: Lange, Diane M. Together in Harmony: Combining Orff Schulwerk and
Music Learning Theory. Chicago: GIA Publications, 2005. Print.

41
Practice: Lesson 4 Dundai Hebrew Folk Song

Objective: Students will be able to aurally identify 4-beat rhythmic patterns (quarter
notes/rests, eighth notes/rests, 4 sixteenth notes/quarter rest, dotted quarter - eighth
notes and reverse, and a combination of 8th-2 16ths and 2 16ths-8th with quarter rest)
and notate in standard Western notation with 90% accuracy by the end of the
10-Lesson Unit.

Students will aurally identify different melodic phrases as heard in Dundai and create a
listening map of the recording provided.

Students will arrange Dundai phrases 1-4 into their own original arrangement.
Taking it a step further: Students will compose additional 2-bar phrases in D
Major and 2/4 time utilizing both of the newly learned rhythmic concepts correctly (in
addition to other concepts previously learned) to create an original composition.

National Standards Being Addressed:


MU:Pr4.1.4a Demonstrate and explain how the selection of music to perform is
influenced by personal interest, knowledge, context, and technical skill.
MU:Cr3.2.4a Present the final version of personal created music to others, and explain
connection to expressive intent.
MU:Cr3.1.4a Evaluate, refine, and document revisions to personal music, applying
teacher provided and collaboratively developed criteria and feedback to show
improvement over time.

Materials:

1 2

3 4
Garage Band backing track
Recorders
Projector
Whiteboard/Markers
Audio Equipment

42
Sequence:
Rhythmic dictation warm-up: T will clap and vocalize 4 beat rhythmic patterns that
incorporate: quarter notes/rests, eighth notes/rests, 4 sixteenth notes/quarter rest,
dotted quarter - eighth notes and reverse, and a combination of 8th-2 16ths and 2
16ths-8th with quarter rest. T will provide musical context through backing track. Ss will
notate their answers on whiteboards and will be checked/corrected by peers and
teacher.

Historical Context: Translation of song: Israel without the Torah is like a body without a
soul. This song could be taught at a Jewish camp for children to make the serious
religion atmosphere a little more light-hearted.

Activity 1 - Attentive Listening (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6oST3qQ-EuI)


1. With the song notation projected on the board, students will follow a phrase map
that shows the order of the phrases in this specific interpretation. When the song
layers two phrases harmonically, T will stop the recording after the first phrase
and asked which phrases were just played. Ss respond. T plays again to check
for correctness. Moves on to the next. T writes down the combination on the
phrase map. What sorts of instruments do we hear? Who is singing - is there
one person or many? Is the song fast or slow?

Activity 2 - Engaged Listening


1. Students will be asked to internalize the macrobeat and physically move a part of
their body to show comprehension.
2. Students will be invited to walk around to the beat (externalize) in a style that is
appropriate for the song. Ss should experience different levels of the music, and
different size steps.

Transition: T models singing phrases 1-4 while Ss return to seats. Ss show whether two
phrases are the same (two closed fists) or different (one hand open palm and one
closed fist).

Activity 3 - Enactive Listening (prepare the tonal center of G Major - singing


tonic-dominant chords, DMSMDTD)
1. T models Dundai phrase 3 on loo. Ss echo. T corrects as needed.
2. phrase 2 & 4 (since they are the same)
3. phrase 1. Ss echo.
4. Repeat steps 1-3 on Solfege
5. Repeat steps 1-3 on text.

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Activity 4 - Creating - Extending the phrase
1. Given a phrase chart and with guidance, the class will arrange and extend each
Dundai phrase 4 additional beats.
2. Each student will compose a 4-beat phrase that includes one of the variations of
8th- 2 16ths (in G Major in 2/4 time) in addition to other patterns learned.
3. Once each student has peer-edited and revised his/her work, the class will vote
on the top 8 phrases to be included in the class Dundai composition.

Integrating - The class could invite a guest in to talk about Hebrew and Israeli cultures
and how music is interwoven in them. If the composition is culturally and technically
acceptable, the class could perform it for a large Jewish congregation or someone could
come and collaborate on a new interpretation of the same song for a program/concert.

Assessment:
Using the white boards for rhythmic dictation practices allow the teacher to assess
individual aural skills as well as cognitive skills . Making the exercise into a
game/competition could motivate some students who are struggling to put forth more
effort and a better attitude in the classroom, too. Students are asked to show the
macro-beat in some part of the body so teacher can assess
internalization/externalization of the pulse. When the students walk around, teacher can
see how Ss are experiencing the music. T may ask students to explain decisions behind
movements, etc. The composition project not only is fun but allows the class to
collaborate toward a great shared experience. It teaches social skills, critical thinking
skills, refining skills, attention to detail and cultural sensitivity.

When each student submits his/her own mini-phrase, it will be scored with this checklist:
Y/N
Names Did student Did student Did student Did student
compose incorporate incorporate participate in
4-beat phrase rhythmic previously the class
in 2/4 time in G concept of 8th- learned selection
Major? 2 16ths? rhythmic process?
patterns?

S-1

S-2

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Song Analysis: Dundai (Israeli - Hebrew Folk Song)
Tone Set d r m f s l t d (authentic major - G Major)

Range P8

Rhythm Set Ti-tika, ti-ti, ta, tika-tika, tika-ti

Form Canon

Pedagogical:
Melody Authentic Minor (E minor)

Rhythm Focus on the eighth-two sixteenth and two


sixteenth-eighth rhythms

Other Israeli Culture


Translation of song: Israel without the Torah is like a
body without a soul.

Source: Source: Frazee, Jane, and Kent Kreuter. Discovering Orff: A Curriculum for
Music Teachers. Mainz: Schott, 1997. Print.

Averill, Patricia. Camp Songs, Folk Songs. United States: Xlibris, 2014. Print.

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Practice: Lesson 5 Michael Finnegan

Objective: Students will sing Michael Finnegan and simultaneously perform body
percussion
National Standards Being Addressed:
MU:Cr2.1.4a Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation,
arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and
context.
MU:Pr5.1.4b Rehearse to refine technical accuracy and expressive qualities, and
address performance challenges.

Materials:

Sequence:
Activity 1 - Historical Context: This song is an example of a repetitive song. In this type
of song, the structure has a large portion of the words remaining constant each time the
main stanza is repeated with small changes each time. Another example of this type of
song is If Youre Happy and You Know It.. Michael Finnegan appears in the second
volume of The Oxford Song Book collected and arranged by Thomas Wood in 1927.
There is some evidence to suggest that this piece came about after an Irish soldier in
the First World War who had a large beard and the other members of his brigade sang
the song about him.

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Transition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5e7c30eNNy4 (Cheaper by the Dozen
Campfire)

Activity 2 - Learn the Song


1. T will speak/chant the words. Ss echo.
2. T models phrase by phrase on text and pitch. Ss echo.
3. Fill in the blank - last words of the phrase.
4. Audiate the song in Ss heads with cueing signals.
5. Go back and reteach as needed.

Activity 3 - Body Percussion Game


1. The body percussion for the piece is [Stomp, Clap, Stomp, Clap, Stomp, Clap,
Clap, Clap] (eighth notes) and it repeats over and over again.
2. T will break down the BP:
a. T will teach stomps first. They are on the beat. Non-verbally gestures for
Ss to join in.
b. Once Ss are comfortable with the stomps, T will add the three claps on (&
4 &). Ss follow.
c. Once Ss get the hang of the three claps, T will add it the & of 1 and 2
claps.
d. If students are struggling, it might help to vocalize the body percussion
movement. (Stomp, Clap, Stomp, Clap, Stomp, Clap, Clap, Clap)
3. Ss put together BP and song slowly. Speed kills.
4. Once they are comfortable with both, encourage them to move around the room
to feel the beat.
5. If there is time at the end of the lesson, slowly, speed up the tempo to see how
fast it can go!

Assessment:
For this lesson, I will be assessing informally that the students are singing the right
words on pitch with the correct rhythms while in sync with the body percussion.

Song Analysis Table: Michael Finnegan


Tone Set sl drm s

Range P8

Rhythm Set Ti-ti, ti-tika, tika-ti, tika-tika

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Form Strophic

Pedagogical:
Melody Sol based pentatonic (F Major)

Rhythm Focus on the eighth-two sixteenth rhythms

Other Repeated Song


Historical Context
Pick-up notes
I-V

Source:
Prisha Gustinas: Steps to Music Literacy
Abigail Baetens 4th Grade Elementary Unit

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Practice: Lesson 6 Cedar Swamp

Objective: Students can aurally identify rhythmic patterns that include - quarter
notes/rests, eighth notes/rests, 4 sixteenth notes/quarter rest, and combination of 8th-2
16ths and 2 16ths-8th with quarter rest, and dotted quarter note - eighth note/eighth
note - dotted quarter note - and the standard notation that corresponds with it.

Students can aurally identify 20/25 (combination of the rhythms listed above) and can
conceptualize and write in standard notation.

National Standards Being Addressed:


MU:Cr2.1.4b Use standard and/or iconic notation and/or recording technology to
document personal rhythmic, melodic, and simple harmonic musical ideas.
MU:Cr1.1.4b Generate musical ideas (such as rhythms, melodies, and simple
accompaniment patterns) within related tonalities (such as major and minor) and
meters.
MU:Pr4.1.4a Demonstrate and explain how the selection of music to perform is
influenced by personal interest, knowledge, context, and technical skill.
MU:Pr5.1.4b Rehearse to refine technical accuracy and expressive qualities, and
address performance challenges.

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Materials: Recorder, hand drum

Older she gets the prettier she gets,


Tell you she's a honey,
Makes me work all through the week
And get stove-wood on Sundays. (Refrain)

Built my love a big fine house,


Built it in the garden,
I put her in and she jumped out
Fare you well, my darlin'. (Refrain)

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Sequence:
Warm-Up; Rhythm BINGO - Students will be given a BINGO sheet that covers all of the
rhythmic skills they (should) know. T will clap and vocalize the rhythms with rhythmic
context (backing track) so students can fill out their sheets. When a student gets a
BINGO, they must clap back the rhythms they have marked down. If student performs
rhythms correctly, they will be entered into the drawing for a classroom prize of the
teachers creation.

Transition: T: Today we are going to be learning another song that was made famous
by Jean Ritchie. Do you remember the last song we sang that she made famous? (Old
Betty Larkin) What was that instrument that she played called? Remember, she would
always sneak into her fathers office to play it while he was working on the farm.
(Dulcimer) Do you remember what state Ms. Ritchie was from? (Kentucky)

Activity 1 - Historical Context:


1. This song is called Cedar Swamp. What is a Cedar? (tree) What is a swamp?
(watery, muddy, habitat) Where is the swampland in the U.S.? (Louisiana) What
sort of animals live there? (Alligators)
2. A cedar swamp can include evergreen trees such as white cedar.
3. This song is an American Folk Song from the Appalachian region, specifically
from Kentucky.
4. Jean Ritchie and her friends would get together and play together as children. To
pass the time, her and her friends would play singing games so that they could
get a boy to notice them.

Activity 2 - Learn the song


1. Have the students walk around with the beat in their feet while T plays the
melody on recorder.
2. Have the students step to the macro beat and clap the microbeat. Do you feel
this in 2 or 3? Give another student a hand drum and when he/she chooses,
switch so that the microbeat is in the feet and macro is clapping.
3. T teaches the refrain to the song. Since there are many verses it would be best
just to teach the first phrase and the refrain.
a. T will teach the refrain with the text first, and if there are intervallic
discrepancies, then Ss can revert to solfege. If there are rhythmic
discrepancies, then Ss can chant the rhythmic syllables.
b. T then moves on to the first verse. I chose to omit the second verse
because I felt it was inappropriate for younger children.

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Activity 3 - Learn the dance
1. Game Directions: Formation: Double line, partners facing each other.
a. Beats 1-8: Head couple sashay to foot of line.
b. Beats 9-12: Head couple, right arm swing.
c. Beats 13-16: Head couple, left arm swing.
d. Beats 17-20: All couples, right arm swing.
e. Beats 21-24: All couples, left arm swing.

Assessment:
The bingo game will be my assessment of not only the new rhythmic concept of this
unit, but also assessing if the students are retaining what they have learned from units
and years past. Ideally, enough of the rhythms should overlap that many people end up
getting a bingo and I can assess with a checklist of all the options listed. The game
requires the student to listen to the pattern, conceptualize it into standard notation, and
then perform the rhythm back to the teacher.

Song Analysis: Cedar Swamp


Tone Set l drm sl d (do pentatonic)

Range m10

Rhythm Set Tika-tika, ti-ti, ta, ti-tika, tika-ti

Form Strophic with Refrain

Pedagogical:
Melody Do based pentatonic (D Major)

Rhythm Focus on eighth two sixteenths

Other American Folk Song Tradition

Source: Ritchie, Jean. Folk songs of the Southern Appalachians. Lexington: U Press of
Kentucky, 1997. Print.

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