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Table of contents

Section 1: Original Lesson Plan...2

Section 2: Lesson Plan Analysis: APST and QTM.....4

Section 3: Modified Lesson Plan.8

Section 4: Academic Justification..14

Section 5: References.17

Section 6: Learning Portfolio Web Link21

Section 7: Appendix...22

Section 1

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Original Lesson Plan

LESSON: CLASS: Yr. 9HIS TOPIC: Prime Minister, Robert Menzies


announces Australias involvement in WW II UNIT OF WORK: WW2
SUBJECT: History

LESSON AIM: The aim of this lesson is for students to gain an understanding of
Australias involvement in WW2. An analysis of PM Menzies announcement and
declaration of War. Students will describe their own feelings and attitudes towards the War.

Student Outcomes Syllabus Outcomes

explain why Australians enlisted to fight identifies and evaluates the usefulness
in both wars of sources in the historical inquiry
process HT5-5

selects and uses appropriate oral,


written, visual and digital forms to
communicate effectively about the past
for different audiences HT5-10

Student previous knowledge / skills / Resources


attitudes
Prime Minister, Robert Menzies announces
Australias involvement in WW II.
http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/

Retroactive p.141,142

TIM LESSON CONTENT TEACHING / LEARNING ASSESSMEN


E STAGE STRATEGIES T / HWK

1:55 Roll call

2:00 Instruct Global map Students are to complete the


students of table outlining the Allies and
lesson Axis information Retroactive
outcome. p.141

2:10
Introduce Source extract

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next 7.2.2 p.142


activity
Using the link
http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/
students listen to the
announcement of PM Menzies.
(approx: 4mins duration)
2:20
Students are required to write (2)
paragraphs explaining to their
family why they are enlisting in
the Australian army.(10 mins)
Using Retroactive p. 141 as a
reference (excerpt of Menzies
announcement)
2:35
Close/revis
e Class discussion: Teacher to
nominate 2 or 3 students to read
out their explanations.

Teacher guided lesson. Providing


background information.
Emphasis on the Rats of
Tobruk.

EVALUATION FOLLOW UP CONTENT FOLLOW UP


- STUDENTS
What worked well . The Australian 6th Division. The
Mediterranean, The Middle East
and North Africa.

What needs improving . Teacher guided lesson. Providing


background information.
Emphasis on the Rats of
Tobruk.

Australian Curriculum Lessons (2015). Robert Menzies Announces Australias involvement in


WW2. Retrieved April 19,2017, from Australian Curriculum Lessons:
http://www.australiancurriculumlessons.com.au/2015/08/01/yr-9-history-lesson-robert-
menzies-announces-australias-involvement-in-ww2/

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Section 2

Lesson Plan Analysis

Section 2.1: Australian Professional Standards for Teachers

Evaluate the lesson plan according to the following Australian Professional Standards for
Teachers. Only standards directly addressed in Designing Teaching & Learning that are
relevant to this assignment have been included. However, this does not mean the other
standards are irrelevant to lesson planning and evaluation more generally.

Evaluation score 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent)

Comments incl. evidence for evaluation score (2 sentences)

1 Know students and how they learn


1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds
1 2 3 4 Comments: The plan does not mention strategies for teacher to provide assistance to
5 diverse students.
1.4 Strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
1 2 3 4 Comments: No Indigenous teaching strategies or perspectives are included in the plan.
5
1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities
1 2 3 4 Comments: students are only given the opportunity to write their explanations but there
5 is scope for other activities.
1.6 Strategies to support full participation of students with disability
1 2 3 4 Comments: There are no strategies to support students with disability.
5
2 Know the content and how to teach it
2.2 Content selection and Organisation
1 2 3 4 Comments: Aim of the lesson is clearly mentioned but there is no reference to prior
5 learning or relevance of the lesson for the students.
2.3 Curriculum, assessment and reporting
1 2 3 4 Comments: There is informal diagnostic assessment (filling table) and informal formative
5 assessment (paragraph writing and class discussion). There is no formal assessment or
homework.
2.6 Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
1 2 3 4 Comments: The lesson heavily relies on written work. ICT is only used to play Menzies
5 speech.

3 Plan for and implement effective teaching and learning


3.1 Establish challenging learning goals
1 2 3 4 Comments: The student and syllabus outcomes are clearly mentioned.
5
3.2 Plan, structure and sequence learning programs
1 2 3 4 Comments: There seems to be a flow in the lesson. The lesson is well planned and
5 organised. However the plan fails to mention prior knowledge.
3.3 Use teaching strategies
1 2 3 4 Comments: Limited teaching strategies are applied. The lesson is led by the teacher but
5 there is scope for group work.
3.4 Select and use resources

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1 2 3 4 Comments: Limited use of ICT. The lesson heavily relies on pen and paper. There is high
5 scope for using numerous ICT resources.
4 Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environments
4.1 Support student participation
1 2 3 4 Comments: The entire lesson focuses on individual learning. There is no group or paired
5 work. Class discussion is the only opportunity for class participation.
4.2 Manage classroom activities
1 2 3 4 Comments: The lesson provides clear directions and clearly organises classroom activities.
5
4.3 Manage challenging behaviour
1 2 3 4 Comments: No guidelines are provided to manage challenging behaviour. No expectation
5 of student behaviour is provided.
4.4 Maintain student safety
1 2 3 4 Comments: Student safety issues inside the classroom are not discussed.
5
4.5 Use ICT safely, responsibly and ethically
1 2 3 4 Comments: ICT is used to listen to Menzies speech. ICT is operated by the teacher so it is
5 possibly implied that it is used safely, responsibly and ethically.
5 Assess, provide feedback and report on student learning
5.1 Assess student learning
1 2 3 4 Comments: informal diagnostic And formative assessments are used. There is no formal
5 assessment.
5.2 Provide feedback to students on their learning
1 2 3 4 Comments: Limited feedback is potentially provided after classroom discussion. Individual
5 feedback is not provided.

Section 2.2: NSW Quality Teaching Model

Evaluate the lesson plan according to the following NSW Quality Teaching model elements.

Evaluation score refer to NSW QTM Classroom Practice Guide for each element

Comments incl. evidence for evaluation score (2 sentences)

1 Intellectual quality
1.1 Deep knowledge
1 2 3 4 Comments: There is no reference to prior knowledge but learning criteria explicitly stated.
5
1.2 Deep understanding
1 2 3 4 Comments: The lesson is led by the teacher. Limited classroom participation in discussion.
5 There is scope for group or paired work.
1.3 Problematic knowledge
1 2 3 4 Comments: The discussion might include multiple perspectives on the wars but the lesson
5 is scaffolded to provide one perspective
1.4 Higher-order thinking
1 2 3 4 Comments: The writing activity and class discussion can possibly generate higher-order
5 thinking.

1.5 Metalanguage
1 2 3 4 Comments: Limited metalanguage like outline and explain is used.

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5
1.6 Substantive communication
1 2 3 4 Comments: There is limited communication. The only communication is in the form of end
5 of class discussion.
Quality learning environment
2.1 Explicit quality criteria
1 2 3 4 Comments: The plan explicitly states learning outcomes and aims of the lesson.
5
2.2 Engagement
1 2 3 4 Comments: Majority of the lesson is individual based and teacher led. Engagement can be
5 enhanced by group work.
2.3 High expectations
1 2 3 4 Comments: Student expectations are not mentioned.
5
2.4 Social support
1 2 3 4 Comments: Students expected behaviour is not provided. However, class discussion is part
5 of the lesson. It is possible that instructions on giving respect to individual students are
discussed.
2.5 Students self-regulation
1 2 3 4 Comments: There is high scope for students self-regulation as students are required to
5 work individually.
2.6 Student direction
1 2 3 4 Comments: The lesson requires teacher to provide heavy direction. There is limited scope
5 for students to direct their own learning.
3 Significance
3.1 Background knowledge
1 2 3 4 Comments: Syllabus outcomes are mentioned but there is no reference to prior knowledge.
5
3.2 Cultural knowledge
1 2 3 4 Comments: No reference made to other cultures. Although there is scope to include
5 Indigenous perspective.
3.3 Knowledge integration
1 2 3 4 Comments: There is no reference to cross-curriculum possibilities.
5
3.4 Inclusivity
1 2 3 4 Comments: The lesson plan does not include inclusivity.
5
3.5 Connectedness
1 2 3 4 Comments: Writing about personal explanations connects the lesson to the students and
5 their outside world.
3.6 Narrative
1 2 3 4 Comments: Narrative is used in the form of Menzies speech and students personal
5 expectations. The plan has scope to include soldiers perspectives and stories.

Section 2.3: Identifying Areas for Improvement

Identify the two APST standards and two NSW QT model elements you are targeting for
improvement.

APST

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1) 1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the specific 2) 2.6 Information and Communication
learning needs of students across the full range of Technology.
abilities
QT model
1) 1.3 Problematic knowledge. 2) 3.1 Background knowledge.

Section 3

Modified Lesson Plan

Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:


Modern History Stage 5 HT5-3, HT5-5, HT5-7, HT5-10

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Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number: 1


12/05/2017 History Classroom
Time: 40 minutes Total Number of students Printing/preparation
24 Prime Minister, Robert Menzies announces
Australias involvement in
WW II. Link 1
http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/

Retroactive p.141,142

Prepare a word document with solders


images and recruitment posters from
WWI and WWII. The following websites
Can be used:
1. Australian War Memorial:
https://www.awm.gov.au/
2. WW2 Australia:
http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/

Print the 5 from sources from


http://anzaccentenaryschoollink.info/
estudies/estudies-2014-1-article-2.pdf

YouTube clip Romance of War


Link 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v
=KdyenJs3xrg

Gather A3 paper and coloured pens and


pencils.

Print outs of instructions of homework


activity.
Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to

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Syllabus outcomes Lesson assessment Students explain Analyse both primary


HT5-3 explains and why Australians and secondary
analyses the motives Informal diagnostic enlisted to fight sources.
and actions of past assessment by group in both wars Understand enlistment
individuals and groups discussion at the from various
in the historical start. perspectives.
contexts that shaped Formative assessment
the modern world and by group activity.
Australia Discussion throughout
HT5-5- identifies and the lesson to ensure
evaluates the student engagement
usefulness of sources and to map their
in the historical learning progress.
inquiry process Informal formative
assessment by end
HT5-7 explains different
of class discussion.
contexts, perspectives
Homework; Formal
and interpretations of
the modern world and Summative
Australia Assessment:
Students are
HT5-10 selects and uses required to write a
appropriate oral, letter, a short story, a
written, visual and poem, or a song (2
digital forms to
paragraphs)
communicate
effectively about the explaining to their
past for different family why they are
audiences enlisting in the
Australian army
using Retroactive p.
141 as a reference
(excerpt of Menzies
announcement) and
sources discussed in
the class.

Cross Curriculum themes & General Explicit subject specific concepts and skills
capabilities
The aim of this lesson is for students to gain an
- Indigenous history included understanding of Australias involvement in
WW2. An analysis of PM Menzies
- ICT capabilities- Online images and YouTube announcement and declaration of War.
clip.
Students will also engage with several sources
- Creative thinking- Use of sketches and letter which have positive and negative perspective
(homework ) to explain reasons for enlistment. towards war and enlistment. After an

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- Literacy- Using sources to evaluate reasons for examination of all sources, students will describe
enlistment. their own feelings and attitudes towards the War.

Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred

T/S

1:55-2:00 Roll Call and Discussion (Class Teacher: Teacher marks the roll and starts Student
activity) a discussion about world wars. Teacher
5 minutes allows students to engage with each other.
A general discussion about WW1 After marking the roll, teacher briefly
and WW2. introduces the days lesson.
A general recap of wars timeline Student: Students settle down and prepare
for the lesson. Students participate in the
Introduction of the days lesson
discussion and demonstrate their prior
knowledge.

Resources: Any notes used by the students


or teacher.

2:00-2:10 Speech analysis (Class activity) Teacher: sets up the browser to play the Student
speech
10 minutes Using link 1 students listen to the
announcement of PM Menzies. Link1: http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/
(approx.: 4mins duration). After the
speech is over, there is a discussion Discusses the speech after it is finished.
about the speech where teacher After the speech is finished, teacher sets
explains any difficult words or up the word document to show images of
phrases. While there is a discussion soldiers and recruitment posters.
of the speech; teacher shows images
of recruitment posters and soldiers Student: Listen to the speech and follow it
during the war (Indigenous and non- along in their textbook.
Indigenous; see appendix 1).
Student view images of soldiers and
participate in the discussion.

Resources: Internet browser to play the


speech, Microsoft word document and
textbook.

2:10-2:15 Video Clip Teacher: sets up the browser to play the Student
video clip.
5 minutes Students view the YouTube clip
Romance of War and make notes
of reasons given for enlistment.
Student: Watch the video clip and make
notes.

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Resources: YouTube video clip Romance


of War.

Link 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=KdyenJs3xrg

2:15:2:30 Group Activity Teacher: Divides the class into groups and Student
handouts source.
15 minutes After watching the video students
undertake a group activity. Handouts A3 sheets of paper, coloured
pens and pencils.
Step 1: Divide the class in 5 groups
of 5. Give each group a different Teacher supervises discussions to ensure
source document (see appendix 3). students are not distracted and stay on
Teacher can divide the group as task.
follows:
After initial planning of sketches, teacher
Group 1: A Catholic bishops ensures each group gets a chance to
response. respectfully perform their sketch.

Group 2: Labour Calls response. Student: Work in groups to read and


discuss sources, makes mind maps and
Group 3: AC Youdales response. works on their sketches.
Group 4: RW Bettss response. Students present their sketches in the class
and watch other groups sketches
Group 5: Evelyn Daviss response.
respectfully.
Step 2: 5-7 minutes: Students read
and discuss the sources.

Step 3: Based on individual sources, Resources: 5 individual sources, A3 sheets


each group is required to make a of paper, coloured pens and pencils.
mind-map of reasons for and against
enlistment on an A3 sheet of paper.

Step 4: After mapping the reasons,


students prepare a small sketch
explaining why or why not will they
enlist in the war.

Step 5: 5minutes: Each group


presents their sketch in the class.

2:30-2:35 Conclusion/Revision/Close Teacher: Encourages student participation Teacher


in discussion, gives out handouts of
5 minutes Brief discussion on the days lesson homework and provides additional
and homework. information about it.
Homework Activity (Individual
Activity):
Student: shares feeling/thoughts about the

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Students are required to write a lesson.


letter, a poem, short story or a
song (2 paragraphs) explaining to
their family why they are Resources: Handouts of homework.
enlisting in the Australian army
using Retroactive p. 141 as a
reference (excerpt of Menzies
announcement) and sources
discussed in the class. Students
must be ready to present it in
class next lesson.

Reflection

What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

In this lesson plan, I incorporated differentiation and the use of ICT. ICT can allow students

to visualise concepts they are learning about while differentiation can provides opportunities

to meet students individual needs.

I have incorporated a group activity. Along with this, I used a range of videos and images.

This adapted the plan to cater to a range of learning needs. For this assessment, I went online

and had a look at Menzies speech (see appendix 2) and I thought it was also very important

for teacher to explain some of the words in Menzies speech as he used some complex words.

This aids students with limited English language background who might be unfamiliar with

difficult words.

This lesson plan can easily be easily modified in terms of the use of technology. For example,

in a school where individual student has access to Ipads or laptops, students can view sources

and images on individual devices. If teacher is the only one with access to technology,

teacher can print out sources (like in this lesson plan). Finally, in a school with no access to

technology, teacher can find any other sources from history textbooks.

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Finally, perhaps the most challenging aspect was the time. I had another activity I wanted to

incorporate (which explicitly included indigenous perspectives) but the lesson was only 40

minutes. Overall, I enjoyed modifying the lesson plan and this assessment taught me about

time management in a classroom setting.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

HT5-7 Informal assessment during discussion of sources.

HT5-8 Formal assessment (homework activity) asks students


to use sources to write about their own reasons for
enlistment.

WHS

What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this
lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline the
key WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?

Physical risks: Standard rules of classroom apply to this lesson. Students must sit on their
seats or walk around carefully.
Psychological risks: This lesson requires teacher to show images of indigenous people who
might be deceased. The teacher must warn students about this before opening the website. If
any student feels upset about the images, they can consult the teacher after the lesson.

Section 4

Academic Justification

At a first glance, this lesson plan seemed comprehensive however after a critical

analysis; there is scope for some improvements. The modifications are done based on APST

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standards 1.5 and 2.6 (AISTL, 2011) and NSW QT model elements 1.3 and 3.1 (Department

of Education and Training, 2003).

Standard 1.5 is addressed by two activities- collaborative learning through group

activity and different summative assessment. Each student has their own ability to absorb and

understand a concept. Since students have a unique learning profile, it is important for teacher

to provide differentiated learning experiences to cater to the needs of different students

(Tomlinson, 2001). Differentiated classroom provides various opportunities to acquire

content, to process information, and to develop individual understanding of a concept

(Tomlinson, 2001). Class rooms can be differentiated through processes and student readiness

(Ministry of Education, 2008). Differentiation by process includes how students understand

knowledge, understanding and skills and can be achieved through collaborative learning

(Ministry of Education, 2008). Group activity is an example of cooperative learning as it

requires students to work in teams where each student is responsible for their part in the final

sketch. It enables students to further improve their understanding of a concept because they

try to explain their views to others or argue their point of view Department for Education and

Skills, 2004). By being a part of a group, students also develop their social and team working

skills (Department for Education and Skills, 2004). Furthermore, differentiation through

student readiness is achieved through the homework. As Levi (2008) says that homework

does not need to be same for every student as each student has their own ability, interest, and

way they want to show their learning. The homework for this lesson plan requires students to

use different mediums (e.g. songs, letters, poems, etc) to convey their ideas. This makes

learning more engaging and results in higher student achievement.

The lesson plan is modified to increase the use of ICT (2.6 and 4.5). The modified

lesson plan requires the teacher to open a video from YouTube (Smith, 2009) and show

students images of recruitment posters and soldiers. These online resources will be a valuable

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catalyst for learning. Callow and Orlando (2015) suggest that there is a direct correlation

between learning and technology and that technology can enhance learning. Students who

have access to technology show an increase in achievement and their attitude towards

learning becomes positive (Sivin-Kachala, 1996). By incorporating technology, teachers also

have a larger scope to promote collaborative work between students (Schacter, 1999).

However, using technology can also have some difficulties. Sometimes, while using

technology, education can be neglected (Schacter, 1999). Therefore, it is the task of the

teacher to ensure that technology is used ethically (4.5). In this modified lesson plan, teacher

has the control of ICT and it is expected from teachers to use it safely and ethically. But if

any ICT is used by the students, students should be monitored closely to ensure ICT is used

responsibly and that students remain on task during the lesson.

The first NSW Quality model element addressed is 1.3. The original lesson plan is

focused primarily on a positive perspective which comes from the government. Problematic

knowledge is added in the form of societys various perspectives on the wars (e.g. Church,

labour, ordinary men and woman) (Ryebuck Media, 2013). These perspectives are conflicting

and it requires students to critically evaluate sources to make their own judgements. Students

will learn about diversity of experiences and perspectives. Multiple Perspective-Taking is

beneficial in numerous ways. It requires students to explain and understand concepts that are

different from each other (Barton and Levstik, 2004). Students also reflect on the sources to

differentiate between their own perspective and the perspective of the historical source which

aids in their cognitive development (Barton and Levstik, 2004). Furthermore, by analysing

multiple perspectives, students can develop feelings of empathy towards the historical

characters and events (Field, 2001). By exploring different perspectives, students can

understand and appreciate others experiences and reasons for enlisting or not enlisting.

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The second NSW Quality model element addressed is 3.1. In the original lesson plan,

there was no mention of students background knowledge (3.1). This was modified by

including a discussion about the wars and a general recap of wars timeline. By holding this

discussion, teacher can get a general idea of students prior knowledge about the topic which

is important since prior knowledge can either promote or obstruct students learning

(Ambrose, Bridges, DiPietro, Lovett & Norman, 2010). There has been significant research

which validates the relationship between prior knowledge and students success (Marzano,

Gaddy & Dean, 2000; Smith, Lee, & Newmann, 2001). Furthermore, if preconceived

knowledge is oversighted, students may incorrectly grasp new concepts or become

discouraged from learning (Campbell & Campbell, 2009). If students are able to connect

what they are learning with prior knowledge, they integrate the content efficiently, form new

understandings, and critique and modify their previous understandings.

Section 5

References

Aboriginal soldiers from their special all volunteer platoon at No 9 camp, Wangaratta

[Image]. (1940, December). Retrieved May 3, 2017, from

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P02140.005

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Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M.C., Norman. M.K. (2010). How

Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching. San

Francisco, United States of America: Jossey-Bass.

Australian Curriculum Lessons (2015). Robert Menzies Announces Australias involvement in

WW2. Retrieved April 19,2017, from Australian Curriculum Lessons:

http://www.australiancurriculumlessons.com.au/2015/08/01/yr-9-history-lesson-

robert-menzies-announces-australias-involvement-in-ww2/

Australian War Memorial (n.d.). Prime Minister Robert G. Menzies: wartime broadcast.

Retrieved from https://www.awm.gov.au/encyclopedia/prime_ministers/menzies/

Barton, K. & Levstik, L. (2004). Teaching History for the Common Good. New Jersey,

United States of America: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Bomer Command [Image]. (1942, May 8). Retrieved May 3, 2017, from

http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/raaf/g_bomber.html

Callow, J. & Orlando, J. (2015) Enabling exemplary teaching: a framework of student

engagement for students from low socio-economic backgrounds with implications for

technology and literacy practices. Pedagogies: An International Journal, 10(4), 349-

371. doi: 10.1080/1554480X.2015.1066678

Campbell, L. & Campbell, B. (2009). Mindful Learning: 101 Proven Strategies for Student

and Teacher Success. California, united States of America: Corwin Press.

Department for Education and Skills. (2004). Pedagogy in Practice: Teaching and Learning

in Secondary Schools. Retrieved from

http://learning.gov.wales/docs/learningwales/publications/130423-pedagogy-and-

practice-teaching-and-learning-in-secondary-schools-en.pdf

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Department of Education and Training. (2003). Quality Teaching in NSW Public Schools.

Retrieved from

http://www.darcymoore.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/qt_EPSColor.pdf

Field, S. L. (2001). Perspectives and Elementary Social Studies: Practice and Promise. In O.

L. Davis Jr., E. A. Yeager & S. J. Foster (Eds.), Historical Empathy and Perspective

Taking in Social Studies, (pp. 115138). Maryland, United States of America:

Rowman & Littlefield.

God Bless Daddy: 45,000 Australian fathers are fighting. Will you help? [Image]. (1914-

1915). Retrieved May 3, 2017, from

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/ARTV00075/

Keep them Flying! [Image]. (1942). Retrieved May 3, 2017, from

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/ARTV08046/

Levi, H.M. (2008). Meeting the Needs of All Students through Differentiated Instruction:

Helping Every Child Reach and Exceed Standards. Retrieved from

http://www.wou.edu/~tbolsta/web/texbook/24_Meeting_the_Needs.pdf

Marzano, R.J., Gaddy, B.B., Dean, C. (2000). What works in Classroom Instruction.

Retrieved from http://www.at-udl.com/library_bkup/DATA/Misc

%20PDF's/whatworks.pdf

Ministry of Education. (2008). Reach Every Student through Differentiated Instruction.

Retrieved from

http://www.edugains.ca/resourcesDI/Brochures/DIBrochureOct08.pdf

New South Wales Education Authority [NESA] (n.d.). Outcomes. Retrieved from

http://syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/outcomes-k10/

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Ryebuck Media: Educational Interactive Media. (2013). How did Australians respond to war

in 1914? Retrieved from http://anzaccentenaryschoollink.info/estudies/estudies-2014-

1-article-2.pdf

Schacter, J. (1999). The Impact of Education Technology on Student Achievement: What most

current research has to say. Retrieved from

http://www.mediachalk.com/ImpactofET.pdf

Sivin-Kachala, J. (1996). The Effectiveness of Technology in Schools: A Summary of Recent

Research. School library media quarterly : journal of the American Association of

School Librarians, 10(1), 1-14. Retrieved from

http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/aaslpubsandjournals/slr/edchoic

e/SLMQ_EffectivenessofTechnologyinSchools_InfoPower.pdf

Smith, J., Lee, V., & Newmann, F. (2001). Instruction and achievement in Chicago

elementary schools. Chicago: Consortium on Chicago School Research.

Smith, M. (2009). Romance of war,1st Anzac Day WW1 Australia ANZAC New Zealand.

[Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdyenJs3xrg

The Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership [AISTL]. (2011). Australian

Professional Standards for Teachers. Retrieved from

http://www.aitsl.edu.au/docs/default-source/apst-resources/Australian_professional_

standard_for _teachers_final.pdf

Tomlinson, C.A. (2001). How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms. (2nd

ed). Virginia, United States of America: Association for Supervision and Curriculum

Development.

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Section 6

Learning Portfolio Web Link

http://rkaur1.weebly.com/

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Section 7

Appendix

Appendix 1:

Australian Soldiers

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Flight Sergeant Jack


Venning RAAF (left) and Sergeant CW Harris RAF of 460 Squadron RAAF, World War II.
Retrieved from http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/raaf/g_bomber.html

Aboriginal soldiers from their special all volunteer platoon at No 9 camp, Wangaratta,
Victoria, World War II. Retrieved from https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P02140.005

Recruitment Posters:

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God bless Daddy: 45,000 Australian fathers are fighting. Will you help?, WWI. Retrieved
from https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/ARTV00075/

Recruiting poster for WAAF. Retrieved from


https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/ARTV08046/

Appendix 2:

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Prime Minister Robert G. Menzies: wartime broadcast. Retrieved from


https://www.awm.gov.au/encyclopedia/prime_ministers/menzies/. Highlighted words and
concepts can be discussed in class.

Appendix 3: Group and source allocation. Retrieved from


http://anzaccentenaryschoollink.info/estudies/estudies-2014-1-article-2.pdf

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