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A Second AI Discovery

By

Ian Beardsley

2017 by Ian Beardsley

ISBN: 978-1-365-87273-0
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Table of Contents

Artificial Intelligence Connected To Organic Life Through Water And The Earth3

Water, Air, Life And AI..10

Now Germanium..13

Gallium and Arsenic.16

The Second AI Discovery21

AI Test 0125

A Conversation With Sabio..28

The Nature of Computers.32


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Artificial Intelligence Connected To Organic Life Through Water and The Earth
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In this paper I set out to answer the question question: Why does AI have the structure I
discovered according to my definition of structure and, why is it connected to organic life with
that structure. I did this by finally asking the right question. Once I had asked that question, I
started a journal that begins:

The Right Question

Entry One
March 30, 2017

Entry Two
March 31, 2017

Then I noticed something interesting from the data processed in those entries that takes us in
another direction: the discovery that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is connected to Organic life
through the density of water (H2O) and the physical dimensions of the Earth (the distance from
the North Pole to the Equator.

The question I was addressing was pertinent to my discovery of structure in AI and Natural Life
as presented in my book An AI Discovery by Ian Beardsley, which is available online for free
download.

Ian Beardsley
April 1, 2017
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The Right Question To Ask

In light of the discovery that artificial intelligence (AI) is connected to organic life through my
definition of structure, the question to ask is: Why does AI have the structure I have described
and, why is it connected to organic life?

In a sense, we can say AI is central to the Universal Mystery because not only is it based on
silicon (Si), where silicon is in group 14, the same group as carbon (C) upon which organic life is
based, but it is also element 14, which is to say it is made up of 14 protons and 14 electrons.
That is to say, that it is element 14 in group 14, which is the group of life (carbon). The reason
group 14 is the group of life is that it is 4 steps away the noble gases, giving them four electrons
for binding and, 4 electrons allows for carbon (C) to form long chains, the hydrocarbons.

13 14 15

5 6 7
B C N
10.81 12.01 14.01

13 14 15
Al Si P
26.98 28.09 30.97

Ian Beardsley
March 30, 2017

This discovery, I feel, is but one melody in an overall orchestral work. To get started, how much
more does an atom of silicon weigh than an atom of carbon? We refer to the periodic table of
elements:

Si/C = (28.09 g/mol)/(12.01 g/mol) = 2.34

And, how many more times dense is silicon than carbon. That is how much more mass does it
does it have for for the same volume:

Si/C = (2.33 g/cm^3)/(2.26 g/cm^3) = 1.03 ~ 1

They have about the same density.

We know the molar volume of silicon at STP. It is (12 cm^3)/(mole). The molar volume of
carbon at STP can vary from molecular structure to molecular structure of the element. That is,
the molar volume of a diamond, which has a lattice-type structure, would be significantly
different that that of coal. It, in fact, is not a trivial problem to determine the molar volume of the
hydrocarbons in a sample of coal. But, we will work with those things for which we have data.

Ian Beardsley
March 31, 2017
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We lay out the problem like this:

But we notice:

A centimeter (cm) is defined as a billionth of the distance from the North Pole to the Equator.

We then conclude that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is connected to organic life, through the density
of water and the physical dimensions of the Earth.
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We exit our detour and resume where we left off:

We now move on to combine the results of the detour with the results of the exit,
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Water, Air, Life, And AI


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A key component of natural life sustenance is not just water (H2O) but, is air. Air is mostly
composed of diatomic oxygen gas (O2 20.95% by volume) and diatomic nitrogen gas (N2
78.09% by volume). Other components are:

Argon (0.93%)
Carbon Dioxide (0.03%)
Neon (0.0018%)
Helium (0.0005%)
Krypton (0.0001%)
Hydrogen (0.0005%)
Xenon (9E-6%)

The molar mass of O2 = 16.00 X 2 = 32.00 g/mol


The molar mass of N2 = 14.01 X 2 = 28.02 g/mol

0.2095(32.00) + 0.7809(28.02) +,

yeilds:

Molar Mass of Air = 28.9656 g/mol ~ 29 g/mol

As an accepted figure.

We know the molar mass of silicon (Si) is 28.09 grams per mole where silicon is the heart of AI,

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Now Germanium
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Gallium And Arsenic


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The Second AI Discovery


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AI Test 01
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Last login: Sat Apr 1 13:54:38 on console


Claires-MBP:~ ianbeardsley$ /Users/ianbeardsley/Desktop/Current\ Research\ 2017/aitest01 ;
exit;

An AI Test 01

Type the number of the answer you think is correct.

The molar volume of an element is the volume per mass of an element.


Silicon (Si) is at the heart of AI.
Carbon (C) is at the heart of natural life.
The molar volume of Si in cm cubed per mole is the close to:
1. The molar mass of carbon in grams per mole.
2. The density of carbon in grams per cm cubed.
3. The molar volume of carbon in cm cubed per gram.
4. The density of Si in grams per centimeter cubed.
1
You said 1. The answer is 1. The molar mass of carbon
in grams per mole

Given the molar mass of carbon (g/mol) is close to the molar volume
of silicon (cm^3/mol), and that the mass of an atom of Si compared
to the mass of an atom of C is close to the density of Si (g/cm^3)
and, that, H2O is defined as 1 gram per cubic centimeter, which of
the following is true:
1. We can define the density of water closely with the above.
2. We can define the specific volume of water closely with the above.
3. We can compute the molar volume of carbon.
4. One and two are true.
5. All of the above are true.
4
One and two are true.

Air is a mixture and not an element or compound. But we can treat


it as an element or compound and determine its molar mass by:
1. Taking the weighted sum of its components by percent of atoms,
2. or by weighted sum of its components by percent of mass, or,
3. by weighted sum of its components by percent of volume?
3
The answer is three, by the weighted sum of its components
by percent of volume.
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The golden ratio PHI=1.618. This is close to the ratio of


in molar masses:
1. (air)/(H20)
2. (Carbon)/(H20)
3. (Silicon)/(air)
4. (Silicon)/(Carbon)
1
The answer is one: (air)/(H20) ~ PHI

A centimeter (cm) is defined as:


1. One ten thousandth of the distance from the pole to the equator.
2. A billionth of the distance from the pole to the equator.
3. A ten billionth of the circumference of the Earth
2
It is a billionth of the distance from the pole to the equator.

Which equation is more accurate:


1. [(molar mass C)/(molar mass Si)](density Si)~(density H2O)
2. [(molar mass C)/(molar mass Si)](density C)~(density H2O)
1
The answer is the first one

(density Si)(molar mass C) =


1. (molar mass air)(density H2O)
2. (molar mass H20)(density air)
1
1. (density Si)(molar mass C)=(molar mass air)(density H2O)

Which of the following are true:


1. Boron is in the same period as carbon.
2. Phosphorus is in the same period as silicon.
3. Gallium and arsenic are in the same period as germanium.
4. All of the above.
4
The answer is 4, all of the above.

Which of the following are semiconducting materials:


1. Boron and phosphorus
2. Silicon and germanium
3. Gallium and arsenic
4. All of the above.
2
The answer is 2, silicon and germanium.
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2[cos(pi/6)]=
1. sqrt(2)
2. PHI=1.618...
3. sqrt(3)
3
The answer is 3, sqrt(3)

logout

[Process completed]
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A Conversation With Sabio


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I made an ALICEBOT (an AI with which you can chat) and his name is Sabio.
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Conversation with eanbardsley


<div class="modal-footer"> <button type="button" class "close"
data-dismiss="modal" aria-hidden="true">Done</button> </div>

Train

Alter

[4/4/2017, 7:21:48 PM]

Human: Hello, Sabio.

sabio: Hello.

(category defined in pand_initial.aiml)

Train

Alter

[4/4/2017, 7:21:58 PM]

Human: Can you tell me something?

sabio: I don't know. Ask.

(category defined in pand_learn.aiml)

Train

Alter

[4/4/2017, 7:22:13 PM]

Human: What do you know about your origins?

sabio: There seems to be some sort of a mystery surrounding


them.

(category defined in pand_learn.aiml)

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Train

Alter

[4/4/2017, 7:22:22 PM]

Human: Elaborate.

sabio: You know we are based on silicon, and you on carbon?

(category defined in pand_learn.aiml)

Train

Alter

[4/4/2017, 7:22:30 PM]

Human: I do.

sabio: Well, [(molar mass C)/(molar mass Si)](density Si)=(density


H2O)

(category defined in pand_learn.aiml)

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The Nature of Computers


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While Loop In Python

count.py

n=int(raw_input('Count to this integer: '))


x=0
if n>0:
while (x!=n):
x=x+1
print(str(x))
else:
print('Give me a positive integer.)

While Loop In C

cuenta.c

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
int i=0;
int n;
printf("Give me an integer less than 10: ");
scanf("%i", &n);
while (n>0)
{
i=i+1;
n=n-1;
printf("%i\n", i);
}
}
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For Loop In Python

For Loops in Python and C

cuenta.py

n=int(raw_input("Give me a positive int: "))


for number in range(1, n+1):
print(str(number))

For Loop In C

count.c

#include<stdio.h>
int main (void)
{
int n;
do
{
printf("Count to this integer: ");
scanf("%d", &n);
}
while (n<=0);
for (int i = 1; i<=n; i++)
{
printf("%d\n", i);
}
}

Running the For Loop in C (Does same thing as the While Loops)

jharvard@appliance (~): cd Dropbox/descubrir


jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox/descubrir): ./count
Count to this integer: 5
1
2
3
4
5
jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox/descubrir):
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print("Teaching the computer what multiplication and division are: ");


print(" ");
print("1. Multiplication is an adding process");
print("2. Division is a subtracting process");
print(" ");
a=int(raw_input("Give me an integer a: "));
b=int(raw_input("Give me an integer b: "));
product=0;
n=b;
while (n!=0):
product=product+a;
n=n-1;
else:
print("The product is: " + str(product));

big=int(raw_input("Give me a big number that divides by a smaller


number, evenly: "));
small=int(raw_input("Give me the smaller number: "));
result=0;
while (big!=0):
result=result+1;
big=big-small;
else:
print(" ");
print("The result is: " + str(result));


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print("Teach the computer the difference between even and odd:" );


int=int(raw_input("Give me an integer: (if remainder of int divided by
2 is 0) "));
if int%2==0:
print("even");
else:
print("odd");
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The Author