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landowners.

[11][12] Some of the Maratha clans claiming Rajput descent


include Bhonsales (from Sisodias),[13] Chavans (from Chauhans),[14] and Pawar (from Parmar).[15] "Mar
atha-Agri" within Agri caste, "Maratha-Koli" within Koli caste and so on.[5] In the Pune District, the
words Kunbi and Maratha had become synonymous, giving rise to the Maratha-Kunbi caste
complex.[16] The Pune District Gazetteer of 1882 divided the Kunbis into two classes: Marathas and
other Kunbis.[5] The 1901 census listed three groups within the Maratha-Kunbi caste complex:
"Marathas proper", "Maratha Kunbis" and "Konkani Marathas".[17] The Kunbi class comprised
agricultural workers and soldiers.
Chhatrapati Shivaji stayed in Miraj for two months during his South India Campaign. Because of its
location, Miraj has been held as a strategic bastion: it was the capital of Miraj Senior and an
important junction on the central railway network. The Pathwardhan family were the hereditary rulers
of Miraj until independence. Miraj City is part of the Sangli-Miraj-Kupwad Municipal Corporation
formed in 1999. The city is recognised for performance of Hindustani classical music, for its medical
services and as a place of religious harmony. The annual Ganesh Visarjan procession is an
attraction which lasts for an average of twenty hours. Miraj is mainly recognised for medical
treatment and Indian string instruments.
In 1216, Miraj, along with other territories of Silaharas, was conquered by the Yadavas. In 1318,
the Bahamanis gained control. Historian, Tazkirat-ul-Mulk, reported that Hasan, the founder of the
Bahamani dynasty, was in the employ of the Saikh Muhammad Junaidi at Gangi near Miraj. Hasan
found a treasure with which he raised an army, marched on Miraj. He defeated and imprisoned Rani
Durgavati, the subhedar of Miraj and captured the town's fort. At the behest of Saikh Muhammad,
the name of the town was changed to Mubarakabad in 1347 (748 Hijri).
various Deccan sultanates.[6] By the mid-1660s, Shivaji had established an independent Maratha
kingdom.[7] After his death, the kingdom expanded into a vast empire under the Peshwas, stretching
from central India [8] in the south, to Peshawar[9] (in modern-day Pakistan) on the Afghanistan border
in the north, and with expeditions to Bengal in the east. By the 19th century, the Empire had become
a Confederacy of individual states controlled by Maratha chiefs such as Gaekwads of Baroda,
the Holkars of Indore, the Scindias of Gwalior, the Puars of Dhar & Dewas,
and Bhonsles of Nagpur. The Confederacy remained the pre-eminent power in India until their
defeat by the British East India Company in the Third Anglo-Maratha War (18171818).
By 19th century, the term "Maratha" had several interpretations in the British administrative records.
In the Thane District Gazetteer of 1882, the term was used to denote elite layers within various
castes: for example, The upper-class "Marathas proper" (comprising 96 clans)
claimed Rajput descent with Kshatriya status, and included princes, officers and landowners.[11]
[12]
Some of the Maratha clans claiming Rajput descent include Bhonsales (from Sisodias),
[13]
Chavans (from Chauhans),[14] and Pawar (from Parmar).[15] "Maratha-Agri" within Agri caste,
"Maratha-Koli" within Koli caste and so on.[5] In the Pune District, the words Kunbi and Maratha had
become synonymous, giving rise to the Maratha-Kunbi caste complex. [16] The Pune District Gazetteer
of 1882 divided the Kunbis into two classes: Marathas and other Kunbis.[5] The 1901 census listed
three groups within the Maratha-Kunbi caste complex: "Marathas proper", "Maratha Kunbis" and
"Konkani Marathas".[17] The Kunbi class comprised agricultural workers and soldiers.

The builder of the Miraj fort is unknown. It probably predates the Bahamani sultans even though they
might have repaired it and increased its fortifications. They used the fort as a base for military
expeditions against South Konkan and Goa. Firishta mentions the fort in an account of the rebellion
of Bahadur Gilani in 1494, which was quelled by Sultan Muhammad II (14521515). Muhammad II
took the fort from its governor, Buna Naik, who acquiesced to the new ruler. Gilani's troops were
offered the options of joining Muhammad's army and being treated with leniency or leaving. About
2000 soldiers left the fort to join Gilani's rebel forces. The main entrance of the fortress was a huge
gate about 30 ft (9.1 m) high but it has been demolished in recent times.

Yadavas and Bahamanis. (1216 to 1347)[edit]


In 1216, Miraj, along with other territories of Silaharas, was conquered by the Yadavas. In 1318,
the Bahamanis gained control. Historian, Tazkirat-ul-Mulk, reported that Hasan, the founder of the
Bahamani dynasty, was in the employ of the Saikh Muhammad Junaidi at Gangi near Miraj. Hasan
found a treasure with which he raised an army, marched on Miraj. He defeated and imprisoned Rani
Durgavati, the subhedar of Miraj and captured the town's fort. At the behest of Saikh Muhammad,
the name of the town was changed to Mubarakabad in 1347 (748 Hijri).

Fortress[edit]
LOVELY MIRAJ
The term "Maratha" originally referred to the speakers of Marathi language. In the 17th century, it
emerged as a designation for soldiers serving in the armies of Deccan sultanates (and later Shivaji).
[5]
A number of Maratha warriors, including Shivaji's father, Shahaji, originally served the various
Deccan sultanates.[6] By the mid-1660s, Shivaji had established an independent Maratha kingdom.
[7]
After his death, the kingdom expanded into a vast empire under the Peshwas, stretching from
central India [8] in the south, to Peshawar[9] (in modern-day Pakistan) on the Afghanistan border in the
north, and with expeditions to Bengal in the east. By the 19th century, the Empire had become a
Confederacy of individual states controlled by Maratha chiefs such as Gaekwads of Baroda,
the Holkars of Indore, the Scindias of Gwalior, the Puars of Dhar & Dewas,
and Bhonsles of Nagpur. The Confederacy remained the pre-eminent power in India until their
defeat by the British East India Company in the Third Anglo-Maratha War (18171818).
By 19th century, the term "Maratha" had several interpretations in the British administrative records.
In the Thane District Gazetteer of 1882, the term was used to denote elite layers within various
castes: for example, The upper-class "Marathas proper" (comprising 96 clans)
claimed Rajput descent with Kshatriya status, and included princes, officers and landowners.[11]
[12]
Some of the Maratha clans claiming Rajput descent include Bhonsales (from Sisodias),
[13]
Chavans (from Chauhans),[14] and Pawar (from Parmar).[15] "Maratha-Agri" within Agri caste,
"Maratha-Koli" within Koli caste and so on.[5] In the Pune District, the words Kunbi and Maratha had
become synonymous, giving rise to the Maratha-Kunbi caste complex. [16] The Pune District Gazetteer
of 1882 divided the Kunbis into two classes: Marathas and other Kunbis.[5] The 1901 census listed
three groups within the Maratha-Kunbi caste complex: "Marathas proper", "Maratha Kunbis" and
"Konkani Marathas".[17] The Kunbi class comprised agricultural workers and soldiers.

Gradually, the term "Maratha" came to denote an endogamous caste. [5] 1900 onwards,
the Satyashodhak Samaj movement defined the Marathas as a broader social category of nonBrahmin groups.[18] These non-Brahmins gained prominence in Indian National Congress during
the Indian independence movement. In independent India, these Marathas became the dominant
political force in the newly formed state of Maharashtra
ABOUT MY MIRAJ
city in southern Maharashtra, India, that was founded in the early 10th century. It was an
important Jagir of the Adil Shahi Court of Bijapur. Chhatrapati Shivaji stayed in Miraj for two months
during his South India Campaign. Because of its location, Miraj has been held as a strategic bastion:
it was the capital of Miraj Senior and an important junction on the central railway network. The
Pathwardhan family were the hereditary rulers of Miraj until independence. Miraj City is part of
the Sangli-Miraj-Kupwad Municipal Corporation formed in 1999. The city is recognised for
performance of Hindustani classical music, for its medical services and as a place of religious
harmony. The annual Ganesh Visarjan procession is an attraction which lasts for an average of
twenty hours. Miraj is mainly recognised for medical treatment and Indian string instruments.
MARATHA
The term "Maratha" originally referred to the speakers of Marathi language. In the 17th century, it
emerged as a designation for soldiers serving in the armies of Deccan sultanates (and later Shivaji).
[5]
A number of Maratha warriors, including Shivaji's father, Shahaji, originally served the various
Deccan sultanates.[6] By the mid-1660s, Shivaji had established an independent Maratha kingdom.
[7]
After his death, the kingdom expanded into a vast empire under the Peshwas, stretching from
central India [8] in the south, to Peshawar[9] (in modern-day Pakistan) on the Afghanistan border in the
north, and with expeditions to Bengal in the east. By the 19th century, the Empire had become a
Confederacy of individual states controlled by Maratha chiefs such as Gaekwads of Baroda,
the Holkars of Indore, the Scindias of Gwalior, the Puars of Dhar & Dewas,
and Bhonsles of Nagpur. The Confederacy remained the pre-eminent power in India until their
defeat by the British East India Company in the Third Anglo-Maratha War (18171818).
By 19th century, the term "Maratha" had several interpretations in the British administrative records.
In the Thane District Gazetteer of 1882, the term was used to denote elite layers within various
castes: for example, The upper-class "Marathas proper" (comprising 96 clans)
claimed Rajput descent with Kshatriya status, and included princes, officers and landowners.[11]
[12]
Some of the Maratha clans claiming Rajput descent include Bhonsales (from Sisodias),
[13]
Chavans (from Chauhans),[14] and Pawar (from Parmar).[15] "Maratha-Agri" within Agri caste,
"Maratha-Koli" within Koli caste and so on.[5] In the Pune District, the words Kunbi and Maratha had
become synonymous, giving rise to the Maratha-Kunbi caste complex. [16] The Pune District Gazetteer
of 1882 divided the Kunbis into two classes: Marathas and other Kunbis.[5] The 1901 census listed
three groups within the Maratha-Kunbi caste complex: "Marathas proper", "Maratha Kunbis" and
"Konkani Marathas".[17] The Kunbi class comprised agricultural workers and soldiers.
Gradually, the term "Maratha" came to denote an endogamous caste. [5] 1900 onwards,
the Satyashodhak Samaj movement defined the Marathas as a broader social category of non-

Brahmin groups.[18] These non-Brahmins gained prominence in Indian National Congress during
the Indian independence movement. In independent India, these Marathas became the dominant
political force in the newly formed state of Maharashtra

Early History[edit]
In 1024 AD, Miraj was ruled by Narsimha of the Silahar dynasty. From 1216 to 1316, the Yadavas of
Devgiri ruled the town. In 1395, the Bahamanis conquered Miraj. Between 1391 and 1403, Miraj was
affected by the Durgadevi famine. From 1423, Malik Imad Ul Mulk ruled Miraj. 1494 was the year of
Bahadur Khan Gilani's rebellion. For two months of 1660, Shivaji Maharaj and Adilshah battled for
control of Miraj. In 1680, Santaji Ghorpade became Deshmukhi of Miraj and six years later, the town
was captured by Aurangzeb. In 1730, Chatrapati Shahu of Satara instructed Pant Pratinidhi to attack
the town. Shahu gains power in Miraj on 3 October 1739 and brings Maratha rule. In 1761, Harbhat
Patwardhan's son, Gopalrao, took the Miraj Jagir from Peshwa Madhavrao. In 1801, the Miraj was
divided into two parts, Miraj and Chintamanrao with Sangli. In 1819, British rule is established and in
1948, the Princedom of Miraj becomes part of the Republic of India.
MIRAJ
Miraj ( pronunciation (helpinfo)) is a city in southern Maharashtra, India, that was founded in the
early 10th century. It was an important Jagir of the Adil Shahi Court of Bijapur.
Chhatrapati Shivaji stayed in Miraj for two months during his South India Campaign. Because of its
location, Miraj has been held as a strategic bastion: it was the capital of Miraj Senior and an
important junction on the central railway network. The Pathwardhan family were the hereditary rulers
of Miraj until independence. Miraj City is part of the Sangli-Miraj-Kupwad Municipal Corporation
formed in 1999. The city is recognised for performance of Hindustani classical music, for its medical
services and as a place of religious harmony. The annual Ganesh Visarjan procession is an
attraction which lasts for an average of twenty hours. Miraj is mainly recognised for medical
treatment and Indian string instruments.