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TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRODUCTION RATES OF RESOURCES IN CONSTRUCTION


PART I

I.

Building Constants
A. Carpentry
a. Partitioning
b. Exterior Trims
c. Roof and Ceiling Framing
d. Bracing
e. Wall Framing
f. Sub Wall Framing
g. Flooring
h. Water Proofing

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B. Interior Finishing
a. Doors & Frames Fixings
b. General finishes
c. Carcassing
d. Commercial Kitchen
e. Suspended Ceilings
f. Hardware, Fix Only
g. Fixings

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C. Joinery
a. Staircases
b. Cupboards, Shelving

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D. Roof Coverings and Frames


a. Flashings, Downpipes & Gutters
b. Timber Frames
c. Slate and Tiling
d. Sheeted Roofs
e. Rainwater Works
f. Metal Decking
g. Flat and Layered Roofs
h. Underlay and Netting

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E. Lifts and Escalators


a. Lift Installation
b. Escalator Installation

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F. Suspended Ceilings

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G. Tiling

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H. Floor Coverings
a. Steel Frames
b. Floor Finishes

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I. Glazing

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J. Painting
a. Wallpapering
b. Painting

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K. Plumbing
a. Sanitary Fixtures
b. Hot Water Units
c. Cocks, Taps & Traps
d. Soil, Waste and Vent Pipes
e. Water Pipes

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L. Masonry
a. Restoration Works
b. Brickwork
c. Blockwork
d. Plasterboard
e. Plastering Product Rates
f. Stonework

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M. Tower Cranes

II.

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Concrete Work
A. Formwork
a. Formwork Construction Man-hour Norms
a. Formwork Production Rates
b. Scaffolding

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B. Concrete
a. Concrete Placement (Man Hours)
b. Concrete Placement Production Rates

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c. Concrete Mixing
C. Surface Finishes
a. Concrete Finishing Estimating Man-hours
b. Concrete Finishing Production rate

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D. Joints
a. Expansion Joint

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E. Waterstops

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F. Reinforcing Steel
a. Reinforcement, placing and fixing Norms
b. Reinforcement Fixing Production Rates
c. Post Tensioning

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III.

Demolition

A. Structures
a. Demolition Estimating Man-hours
b. Demolition Production Rates

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B. Joinery

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C. Concrete
a. Cutting Switchboxes
b. Cutting Chases
c. Cutting Back for Pile Caps
d. Productivity of Concrete Demolition
e. Demolishing Reinforced & Unreinforced Concrete
f. Cutting Back Piles & Slabs

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IV.

Excavation

A. Backfilling and Compaction

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B. Small or Deep Excavation

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C. Spread and Level

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D. Trench Excavation

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E. Basement Excavation

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F. Bulk Excavation

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V. Foundation
A. Barrette Piles

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B. Bored Piling

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C. Pile Cutting Back

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D. Sheet Piling

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E. Surface Treatment

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F. Framing and Bracing

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VI. Structural Steel


A. Workshop Fabrication

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B. Stairs, Balustrades & Ladders

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C. Framing and Cladding

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VII. Electrical
A. Cable Laying

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B. Cable Conduits

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C. Conduit

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D. Power Supply

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VIII. Road and Rail


A. Drainage

a.
b.
c.
d.

Drainage Laying Man-hours and Norms


Manholes and Gulleys
Drainage Laying Production Rates
Manhole Cover Installation

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B. Fencing Works

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C. Kerbs and Footpaths


a. Prep for Kerbs and Slabs
b. Kerb and Concrete Slab Production Rate

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D. Landscaping

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E. Rail Trackwork

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F. Services

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G. Site Clearance

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H. Subsoil Drains

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VIX. Tunneling and Mining


A.

Tunneling NATM

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRODUCTION RATES OF RESOURCES IN CONSTRUCTION
Part II

I. FOUNDATIONS AND EXCAVATION


A. Basement Excavation
B. Bulk Excavation
C. Contiguous Piling
D. Dewatering
E. Excavate and Remove
F. Ground Compaction
G. Sheet Piling
H. Small or Deep Excavation
I. Spread and Level

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II. ARCHITECTURAL BUILDERS WORK AND FINISHES


A. Carpentry
a. Carcassing
b. Final Fixing
B. Ceiling Finishes
C. Door and Windows
D. Fire Protection
E. Floor Finishes
F. Metal Wall Panels
G. Metalwork
H. Painting
I. Partitioning
J. Plasterboard
K. Restoration Works
L. Stonework
M. Wall Finishes
N. Wallpapering

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III. CONCRETE WORKS


A. Concrete Finishing
B. Concrete Mixing
C. Concrete Placement
D. Formwork
E. Post Tensioning
F. Pre-cast Concrete
F. Reinforcement

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G. Reinforcement Ratios

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IV. CONSTRUCTION WET TRADES


A. Blockwork
B. Brickwork
C. Plastering
D. Rendering
E. Screeding

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V. PLUMBING

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De La Salle University Dasmarias


College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology
Architecture Department

Specialization 2 (ARCH517)
Construction Management

PROJECT MANAGEMENT FORMS


Project Statement and Management Plan

Submitted by:
ARC52 Group 1: DesignCon Builders
Bernadene Paolma
Jo-anne Rivera
Glenn Mervin Sarreal
Julie Anne Suck
Pamela Tanteco
Mariel Petals Trampe

Submitted to:
Ar. Juanito Y. Sy
Instructor

October 12, 2016

INTRODUCTION: Production Rate


Productivity in Construction
There are various terms used to describe productivity in construction. It could be
performance factor, production rate, unit person-hour (p-h) rate, and others. It is
traditionally defined as the ratio of input/output (ratio of the input of an associated
resources to real output). In construction, labor productivity is the physical progress
achieved per p-h.

Production Rate
According to Planning Engineer Est., Productivity rates are very important to
both Site Engineers, and Planning Engineers. It could be used to monitor the labor
performance, or to estimate the manpower required for a project for planning and
monitoring purposes or for cost estimations.
Production rate is the rate at which workers are expected to accomplish a certain
work scope, like in roads or buildings. It usually depends on the speed of the workers,
generally categorized as slow, average and fast.

Factors that Affect Productivity


Some construction work task are labor intensive and equipment intensive. The
productivity of labor intensive roles are determined by some factors like:

Motivation
Skill
Training of the workforce
Working Condition

For the productivity of equipment, the power and capability of the equipment are
the basis.
Labor intensive activities are those works that require manual or on-hands labor
like the piping and drywall installation. Equipment intensive activities usually include
earth-moving tasks which relies on the speed and size of the equipment.
There are several factors that affect the labor productivity. This was presented
through Figure 1 shown on the next page.

Figure 1: Factor affecting labor output

Important characteristics that affect the labor productivity focus on both on what
the construction site conditions are and the type of construction being performed
(Thomas and Sakaran, 1994). The factors include:

Work Space and Work Flow


Congestion on the construction site and improper sequencing of work tasks
would negatively impact the productivity

Weather
Poor and harsh weather halts most of the construction works especially those
done in the exterior, therefore affecting the productivity for elongating days of
work.

Project Management
Quality of project management could increase or decrease the productivity.

Tooling and Equipment

Use of equipment that embodies the latest technological innovation tends to


increase productivity.

Availability of Raw Materials


It is an important factor for construction crews should be provided with steady
stream of materials to ensure high productivity.

Clear Understanding of Specifications


Good understanding in the site will increase productivity. Workers must have a
clear understanding or what to be done and should be trained to achieve high
productivity.

In relation with the nature of work to be done, the following are considered as its
factor to productivity:

Uniqueness of the Project


An unusual building with many unusually shaped elements will naturally have
lower productivity than those with regular like rectangular shapes.

Variation in Scope
A megaproject has a more complex scope compared to the small ones.
Therefore, the productivity level will be also different.

Magnitude of the Project


For example, large structural elements may be more difficult to install compared
to the smaller ones, therefore lowering the productivity.

Quality
Specification dictate quality requirements. Projects that require high quality
specifications tends to be less productive than those projects with less stringent
quality requirements. High quality specifications requires the construction crews
to be more exact and detailed during installation process, and this will take more
time.

References:

Dozzi, S.P. and AbouRizk, S.M. (1993). Productivity in Construction. Retrieved


from < http://web.mit.edu/parmstr/Public/NRCan/nrcc37001.pdf>

Planning Engineer Est. (2014). Construction civil works productivity rates.


Retrieved from < http://www.planningengineer.net/construction-civil-worksproductivity-rates/>

Investopedia (2016). Production Rate. Retrieved from < http://www.investopedia.


com/terms/p/production-rate.asp>

Williams, T. (2009). Construction Management: Emerging Trends &


Technologies, 1st Edition. USA: Cengage Learning

NEW SCHEDULE OF FEES AND OTHER CHARGES


OF THE
REVISED IMPLEMENTING RULES AND REGULATIONS
(IRR)
OF THE
NATIONAL BUILDING CODE OF THE PHILIPPINES
(PD 1096)

Bases of Assessment:
a. Character of occupancy or use of building/structure
b. Cost of construction
c. Floor area
d. Height

SCHEDULE OF FEES
(PD1096)

FORMS FOR PROJ.


MANAGEMENT