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A SEMINAR REPORT ON

GREAT INDIAN SPORT KABADDI


Submitted to partial fulfillment of the requirements to
SWARNANDHRA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND
TECHNOLOGY (AUTONOMOUS)
SEETHARAMPURAM
Submitted by
K. SARATH SAI RAM
(Regd. No: 14A21A0463)

2016-2017
DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONICS &COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING
SWARNANDHRA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY
(AUTONOMOUS)
Accredited by National Board of Accreditation, AICTE, New Delhi
(Approved by A.I.C.TE & Affiliated to JNTUK Kakinada)An ISO 9001:2000 Certified
Institution
Seetharampuram, Narsapur-534 280, West Godavari (Dt.), A.P

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONICS & COMMUNICATION


ENGINEERING
SWARNANDHRA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND
TECHNOLOGY (AUTONOMOUS)
Accredited by National Board of Accreditation, AICTE, New Delhi
(Approved by A.I.C.TE & Affiliated to JNTUK Kakinada)
An ISO 9001:2000 Certified Institution
Seetharampuram, Narsapur-534 280, West Godavari (Dst.), A.P.

CERTIFICATE
2016-2017
This is to certify that this dissertation work entitled GREAT INDIAN SPORT
KABADDI Being submitted by K.SARATH (Regd. No: 14A21A0463)

SEMINAR CO-ORDINATORS

1.___________________
2.___________________
3.___________________

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The satisfaction that accompanies the successful completion of every task
during my dissertation would be complete without the mention without the
mention of the people who made it possible. I consider it my privilege to my
gratitude and respect to all who guided , insipired and helped me in completion of
my seminar.
I extend my heartfelt gratitude to the Almighty for giving me strength in
proceeding with this seminar report on GREAT INDIAN SPORT KABADDI
I owe my special thanks to the Dr.S.Ramesh Babu, M.Tech (P.E.M).,
Secretary and Correspondent, Swarnandhra college of engineering &
Technology , Seetharampuram for providing necessary arrangements to carry out
this seminar.
I express my heartful thanks to Dr. M. Srinivas Kumar, M. Tech., Ph.D.
(U.K) MISTE,MIEEE. Principal, Swarnandhra College Of Engineering &
Technology, Seetharampuram for giving me this opportunity for the successful
completion of my seminar.
I would like to express my sincere thanks to Dr.B.Subramaneswara Rao,
M.Tech , Ph.D. Professor & Head of the Department of ECE for his valuable
suggestions at the time of need.
I would like to express my profound sense of gratitude to all the Seminar
coordinatorsMr.S.Srilali,M.Tech, Assoc.Prof., Ms.N.Nimishi, M.Tech,Asst.Prof.,
Ms.D.Hindhuja,M.Tech,Asst.Prof.
K.SARATH SAI RAM
14A21A0463

CONTENTS
1. INTRODUCTION
2. HISTORY AND ORIGINATION
3. WHAT IS KABADDI?
4. VARIOUS VERSIONS
5. REQUIREMENTS
6. HOW TO PLAY?
7. KABADDI WORLDWIDE
8. INDIA IN KABADDI
9. PRO KABADDI LEAGUE
10. CONCLUSION

ABSTRACT:
Kabaddi is a contact sport that originated in ancient India. Kabaddi is an umbrella
term which encompasses various forms of the game including International rules
Kabaddi .Kabaddi also encompasses similar sports known by their regional names,
such as hadudu in Bangladesh, bhavatik' in Maldives, chedugudu in Andhra
Pradesh, sadugudu in Tamil Nadu and hututu in Maharashtra. Kabaddi is the
national game of Bangladesh and also the state game of the Indian states of Tamil
Nadu, Maharashtra, Bihar, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Punjab.
The earliest form of the game may have originated in Ancient India, including
speculations from the Indian epic Mahabharata. For many years, kabaddi was
practiced in Indian Vedic schools with earliest references found in writings by
Tukaram pointing that Lord Krishna played kabbadi as a boy. In the International
team version of kabaddi, two teams of seven members each occupy opposite halves
of a field of 10 by 13 metres (33 ft 43 ft) in case of men and 8 by 12 metres (26 ft
39 ft) in case of women.Each has three supplementary players held in reserve.
The game is played with 20-minute halves and a five-minute halftime break during
which the teams exchange sides.

INTRODUCTION :

Kabaddi in Hindi means holding of Breath. Modern Kabaddi is a synthesis of the


game played in various forms under different names throughout South Asia.
Buddhiya Kabaddi is one such ancient sport which has its origin in Magadh region
and is still a popular sport among the rural youth. It was probably invented to ward
off the group attacks. History reveals that princes played to display their strength
and win their brides. The game has many popular local versions. Salle-Maan-Chi is
a popular chant for the raiders in the game and the game therefore is also locally
popular by name CHI. Skill required Running, Quickness, Observation. Kabaddi
is a popular sport in South Asia. The Kabaddi Federation of India (KFI) was
founded in 1950, and it compiled a standard set of rules. The governing body for
kabaddi in Pakistan is Pakistan Kabaddi Federation. Kabaddi is one of the national
sports of Nepal. Kabaddi is played and taught at a very early age in most primary
schools beginning in the third grade or so in most Nepali schools. Kabaddi was
also played by the British Army for fun, to keep fit and as an enticement to recruit
soldiers from the British Asian community. Kabaddi was brought to the United
Kingdom by Indian immigrants and Pakistani immigrants.

HISTORY AND ORIGINATION:

The origin of Kabaddi can be traced to pre-historic times when man learned how to
defend in groups against animals or attack weaker animals individually or in
groups for survival and food. Though Kabaddi is primarily an South Asian game, it
is originated from Punjab (Indian Province). There is, however, concrete evidence
that the game is 4,000 years old.[citation needed] Another theory states that the
sport is actually inspired by the way Abhimanyu tried to break the Kaurava
formation (Chakravyuha) but failed. There is a popular belief that Kabaddi
originated in the South Indian State of Tamil Nadu. A folk history of the game tells
that it developed from a game of tag between two young boys - the rule of holding
one's breath being added later.
Various forms of kabaddi are played. Hence, many states in India lay claim to the
game. Some forms of kabaddi originated in the southern Indian state of Tamil
Nadu, where it is derived from group hunting and village defence. Other forms of
kabaddi originated in northern parts of India. Although the game is a traditional
sport in various parts of South Asia, the modern standardised version identifies
kabaddi with Maharashtra where the process of standardising the rules of kabaddi
took place from 1915 through to the 1920s Though variations emerged and rules
were framed, the games principal objective remained unchanged.Modern kabaddi
is therefore a synthesis of the game played in various forms under different
names. Kabaddi received international exposure during the 1936 Berlin Olympics,
demonstrated by India. The game was introduced in the Indian National Games
at Calcutta in 1938. In 1950 the All India Kabaddi Federation (AIKF) came into
existence and framed the rules. The AIKF was reconstituted as The Amateur
Kabaddi Federation of India (AKFI) in 1972 and the first national tournament for
men was held in Chennai.[
Kabaddi was introduced to and popularised in Japan in 1979 by Sundar Ram of
India, who toured Japan on behalf of Asian Amateur Kabaddi Federation for two
months to introduce the game.

WHAT IS KABADDI?
The game consists of two teams the Raider and the Defender with 9 players each in
the field. There are two circular posts called castle and outpost at the opposite
ends inside the bigger oval field. Dimensions of the ground are fixed on mutual
agreement. Raiders are occupants of the caste and the outpost while the Defenders
occupy the outfield. The raiders have 8 players in the castle and one Buddhiya
trapped in the outpost. The defender/raider that is OUT shall be sent off the field.
Raiders objective is to facilitate escape of the Buddhiya trapped at the outpost;
they do this by raiding the defenders and OUT them. A player can also get
OUT by going over a boundary line or part of the body touches the ground
outside the boundary.Defenders are spread in the field preventing escape of the
Buddhiya. The raiders win if the Buddhiya successfully joins them at castle.
Without being touched by the defenders. Defenders win if they prevent the escape
of the Buddhiya in the stipulated time or they touch the Buddhiya while she is on
her escape run towards the castle. The match has two half of 20 minutes and the
raider in 1st half becomes defender in the 2nd half. The match revolves around the
Buddhiya the Buddhiya has to escape from the outpost for castle in the stipulated
time. In the respective half if the Buddhiya is successful or unsuccessful in her
escape from outpost to the castle the half is complete. The team winning the toss
shall choose to either raid or defend in the first half.
Kabaddi (sometimes written Kabbadi or Kabadi) is a team sport that originated in
South Asia. Two teams occupy opposite halves of a field and take turns sending a
"raider" into the other half, in order to win points by tagging or wrestling members
of the opposing team; the raider then tries to return to his own half, holding his
breath during the whole raid.

VARIOUS VERSIONS:
Kabaddi is known as Chedugudu or Hu Tu Tu in Southern India. In the
Eastern India, it is known as Chu-Kit-Kit (Ladies Version) and Hadudu
(Gents version). In the northern parts of India, it is known as Kabaddi.
In other Asian countries it has other names! In Malaysia it is called
Chedigudu. In Thailand it is known as Teechub. In Indias neighboring
countries like Pakistan it is called Kabaddi, in Sri Lanka it is known as
Gudu and in Nepal it is called Dodo. All these are essentially the same old
Kabaddi but with very minor changes according to the local whims.
Kabaddi is also played on a fixed time basis. There are many variants of which
the following are important:
Surjeevani
Gaminee
Amar
Surjeevani Kabaddi:
This version is recognized by the Kabaddi Federation of India and the game is
largely dictated by its rules and regulations. Suppose a player M from Team A
during his raid touches player P from Team B, player P is out and he has to go
out of the court and sit out. During the return raid, Team Bs player L touches
player N of Team A, player N is out and he will go out of the court and sit out.
However, this has revived player P of Team A, who will take the court!
Reviving an out player is the gist of Surjeevani type of Kabaddi.

Gaminee Kabaddi:
Unlike Surjeevani in this version of Kabaddi, there is no revival. When all the
7 players of a team are out, the game comes to an end. No time frame. All the
players of a team should be out.
Amar Kabaddi:
Player 7, a raider from Team A raids the court of Team B and in the bargain
touches the back of player 2 of Team B. Team A gets a point, but player 2 of
Team B remains in court. One point for each touch is awarded and the team,
which gets maximum points by the end of the stipulated time, is considered the
winner.

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