You are on page 1of 34

Santa Rosa National High School

Soledad Santa Rosa Nueva Ecija


S.Y. 2015-2016
EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS EMOTIONAL
BEHAVIOR

By:
Allisa Andhrey Sevilla
Patricia Bongbonga
Marichelle Reyes
Luz Fatima Evelarion
Rondelle Rosales
John Paulo Esmundo
Vincent Gonzales
Mike Vincent Gonzales
John Carlo Iral

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


CHAPTER I
THE PROBLEM AND RELATED LITERATURE

Introduction
Reading and watching stories can be an escape from real life, a
window into another world -- but have you ever considered how
new fictional experiences might change your perspective on real,
everyday life? From children fairytales to Harry Potter, learn
how popular fiction can spark public dialogue and shape culture.
The

power

in

the

psychology

of

fiction

is

important

to

acknowledge.
Is fiction good for us? We spend huge chunks of our lives
immersed in novels, films, TV shows, and other forms of fiction.
Some see this as a positive thing, arguing that made-up stories
cultivate our mental and moral development. But others have
argued that fiction is mentally and ethically corrosive.
Reading fiction improves understanding of others, and this
has a very basic importance in society, not just in the general
way

of

making

interpersonal

the

world

understanding,

a
but

better
in

place

specific

by
areas

improving
such

as

politics, business, and education. In an era when high-school


and university subjects are evaluated economically, our results
do have economic implications. People read fiction to travel to
fictional worlds, where one's responsibilities are few and one's
3

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


experiences are many. But fiction also enables us to change our
personality.
This research consistently shows that fiction does mold
us. The more deeply we are cast under a storys spell, the more
potent

its

influence.

In

fact,

fiction

seems

to

be

more

effective at changing beliefs than nonfiction, which is designed


to persuade through argument and evidence. Studies show that
when we read nonfiction, we read with our shields up. We are
critical and skeptical. But when we are absorbed in a story, we
drop our intellectual guard. We are moved emotionally, and this
seems to make us rubbery and easy to shape.
But

perhaps

the

most

impressive

finding

is

just

how

fiction shapes us: mainly for the better, not for the worse.
Fiction enhances our ability to understand other people; it
promotes

deep

morality

that

cuts

across

religious

and

political creeds. More peculiarly, fictions happy endings seem


to warp our sense of reality. They make us believe in a lie:
that the world is more just than it actually is. But believing
that lie has important effects for societyand it may even help
explain why humans tell stories in the first place.

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


Background of the Study
Neuroscientists have discovered that reading a novel or
watching can improve brain function on a variety of levels. The
researchers found that becoming engrossed in a novel enhances
connectivity

in

the

brain

and

improves

brain

function.

Interestingly, reading fiction was found to improve the reader's


ability to put themselves in another persons shoes and flex the
imagination in a way that is similar to the visualization of a
muscle memory in sports.
Psychologists have made big advances by means of methods
such as experiments, interviews, questionnaires, and controlled
observations. So it may seem that fiction has no more place in
psychology than ideas of a flat earth have in the physical
sciences. Perhaps a quote from fiction may be all right for an
illustration

when

photo

won't

do,

but

surely

nothing

in

fiction is comparable to an article in a referred psychological


journal.

Even

the

word

"fiction"

gives

it

away.

It

means

something made, something made up. This view was widely held.
Perhaps it still is. But it's wrong.
Narrative fiction isn't a set of observations that are flawed by
lack of reliability and validity. It's a simulation. Narrative
was the very first kind of simulation, one that runs not on
computers but on minds. It's a kind of simulation that enables
us to enter social contexts that otherwise we would never know.

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


The

imagination

enables

us

to

understand

others

and

ourselves, to draw on our past in order to consider possible


futures. It's a means by which we can transcend the immediate.
Psychological

research

on

imagination

has

been

sparse

in

comparison with such areas as perception and memory. At last


such research is coming into prominence, in a meeting between
the psychology of fiction and questions of how we deal with the
what-ifs of human life.

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


Statement of the Problem
The study is designed to determine how fictional stories
affect viewers emotional behavior.
Specifically

this

research

and

study

aims

to

answer

the

following questions:
1. How may the respondents be described in terms of :
a. Age;
b. Gender
2. What are the possible effects on viewers emotional
behavior in terms of:
a. Age; and
b. Gender
3. What are the possible reasons of the viewers on their
engagement in watching fictional stories?
4. Implications of the study on Santa Rosa

National

High

School.

Hypothesis

Through analyzing the conducted surveys and through


some readings, the researchers have inferred the following.

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Scope and Delimitation


This

study

focuses

on

the

effects

of

reading

or

watching

fictional stories on viewers behavioral pattern.


8

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


High School students enrolled in Santa Rosa National High School
at the Year of 2015-2016, were randomly selected and used as the
respondents of this study.
The

descriptive

method

of

research

will

be

used

with

questionnaires and interviews as a source of data.

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Significance of the Study


The

findings

of

this

study

will

redound

to

the

benefit of the society, considering that fictional stories


play an important role in viewers emotional behavior.
To the viewers, who long for explanation as to why
fictional stories affect our emotional behavior in ways we
couldnt understand in the first place.
The researchers, be a part of the growing world of
fictions. Explaining how fictional stories mold our minds
and

our

hearts

through

the

process

of

watching

and/or

reading.
For the parents to be aware of the

10

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


Definition of terms
The following terms are defined as used in the study.
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY- is interested directly and primarily in human
behavior in a social situation. It may concern itself with the
inner mechanisms of responses to social stimuli, or it may focus
its attention upon collective response to similar or identical
or to mutual or supplementary stimuli. In the one case it leans
towards psychology and in the other it rests upon sociology.
Both interests are legitimate to the field of social psychology
and in both cases its theme is human behavior.
THE UNITS OF BEHAVIOR in either case it is concerned with the
individual or neural patterns of response, and in the latter
case it must consider the collective patterns of response. In
this

chapter

individual

or

we

shall

neural

review

(primarily

the

fundamental

neuro-muscular)

and

general

patterns

of

response. In later chapters we will consider the more specific


and derivative (primarily neuro-psychic) individual patterns of
adjustment.

ACQUIRED BEHAVIOR PATTERNS the conclusion which apparently we


are compelled to draw from these facts is that the significance
of instinctive behavior for man has been vastly overestimated.
Instincts,

like

reflexes,

undoubtedly

have

served

useful

function in the adjustment processes of lower animal types,

11

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


especially in the case of the simpler responses under relatively
constant

environmental

conditions.

But

as

environment

became

more complex and fluid or flexible for higher types of animals,


and as the complexity of both organism and environment grew up
and changed together, instincts no longer served adequately the
higher functions of adjustment. They hindered rather than aided
the

coordinated

and

concomitant

changes

in

environment

and

organism. It became necessary to discard them, or to reduce them


to their constituent reflexes, or to inhibit their development
and functioning, as was the case with the delayed instincts. The
reflexes could, in large measure, still remain, because their
greater simplicity made it possible for them to be organized
into

new

and

acquired

composite

patterns

by

environmental

pressures or selection. Thus habits have largely supplanted the


instincts and the independent or isolated reflexes as human
behavior patterns. Modern culture and civilization are built
primarily, if not wholly, out of acquired behavior patterns.
Civilization itself has sometimes rightly been termed a complex
of acquired characteristics.
LITERARY

FICTION-

certain fictional
words,

they

is

works that

are

works

term

principally

used

hold literary

merit.

that

deliberate social

offer

In

for
other

commentary, political criticism, or focus on the individual to


explore some part of the human condition. Literary fiction is
deliberately written in dialogue with existing works created

12

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


with the above aims in mind. Literary fiction is focused more on
themes than on plot.
Literary

fiction

fiction (e.g.,
contrast

is

usually

popular,

between

contrasted

commercial,

these

two

with paraliterary

or genre

subsets

of

fiction).

fiction

This

is highly

controversial amongst critics and scholars who study literature.


INTERPERSONAL SKILLS- are sometimes also referred to as people
skills or communication

skills. Interpersonal

skills

are

the

skills a person uses to communicate and interact with others.


They

include persuasion, active

listening, delegation,

and leadership.
The

term

contexts
operate

"interpersonal
to

refer

within

communication

and

to

skills"

the

is

measure

business

of

used

often

person's

organizations

interactions.

Interpersonal

in

business

ability

through
skills

to

social
are

how

people relate to one another.


Social psychology is an academic discipline that does research
related to social skills or interpersonal skills. The discipline
studies how skills are learned by an individual through changes
in attitude, thinking, and behavior.
Introspection, (from Latin introspicere, to look within), the
process of observing the operations of ones own mind with a
view

to

discovering

the

laws

that

govern

the

mind.

In

dualistic philosophy, which divides the natural world (matter,


13

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


including the human body) from the contents of consciousness,
introspection is the chief method of psychology.
Perspective-talking is the process by which an individual views
a situation from another's point-of-view. Perspective-taking can
occur visually in that one changes their physical location to
see things as someone else does. Perspective-taking can also
occur cognitively in that one mentally simulates the point-ofview

of

anothers

cognitive

state.

For

instance,

one

can

visualize the viewpoint of a taller individual (physical state)


or reflect upon another's point-of-view on a particular concept
(cognitive state). In other words, perspective-taking is the
process of temporarily suspending ones own point-of-view in an
attempt to view a situation as someone else might. This process
does

not

necessitate

any

form

of

affinity,

compassion,

or

emotional identification with the other. Therefore, as anotheroriented activity, perspective-taking can be used to gain an
understanding of a given physical state and/or situation after
which a determination of appropriate action can be selected
(e.g.,

empathy). Perspective

taking

ability

appears

to

be

greater in adults than children, because adults are more able to


correct and adopt the perspective of another person.
EMPATHY-

is

used

to

describe

wide

range

of

experiences.

Emotion researchers generally define empathy as the ability to


sense

other

peoples

emotions,

coupled

with

the

ability

to

imagine what someone else might be thinking or feeling.

14

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


Fictional character- is a person in a work of art such as a
novel, play, opera or movie. If it is a made-up person or
imaginary person (not someone who really or actually lived) it
is a "fictional character".
Theory of mind (ToM)- is the intuitive understanding of one's
own

and

other

people's

minds

or

mental

states

including

thoughts, beliefs, perceptions, knowledge, intentions, desires,


and emotionsand of how those mental states influence behavior.

15

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

Related Literature
Fiction, literature

created

from

the

imagination,

not

presented as fact, though it may be based on a true story or


situation.

Types

the novel, short

of

literature

story,

in

the

and novella.

The

fiction genre include


word

is

from

the

Latin ficti, the act of making, fashioning, or molding.


Some says, neither. It is art."We all know that Art is not
truth. Art is a lie that makes us realize truth, at least the
truth that is given us to understand. The artist must know the
manner whereby to convince others of the truthfulness of his
lies. If he only shows in his work that he has searched, and researched,

for

the

way

to

put

over

lies,

he

would

never

accomplish anything." - Pablo Picasso. Let's put it this way:


- Fiction is not fact real because its narrative or descriptive
content comes from imagination. Is it real? It can be real
enough, depending on how the fiction references real life. Is it
fake?

Fiction

doesn't

pretend

to

be

anything

more

than

imagination, so strictly speaking it isn't fake. But more down


to earth, fiction essentially means made-up (fake).

16

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.


Related Studies

Science
fiction
studies is
the
common
name
for
the academic discipline that studies and researches the
history, culture, and works of science fiction and, more
broadly, speculative fiction.
The modern field of science fiction studies is closely
related to popular culture studies, a sub discipline
of cultural
studies,
and film and literature studies.
Because of the ties with futurism and utopian works, there
is often overlap with these fields as well. The field also
has
spawned
subfields,
such
as feminist
science
fiction studies.
However, the field's roots go back much further, to the
earliest commentators who studied representations of the
sciences in the arts and literature, and explorations of
utopian and social reform impulses in fantastic and
visionary works of art and literature.
Modern
science
fiction
criticism
may
have
started
with Dorothy Scarborough, who in 1917 included a chapter
on "Supernatural Science" in her doctoral dissertation,
published as The Supernatural in Modern English Fiction.
As the pulp era progressed, shifting science fiction ever
further into popular culture, groups of writers, editors,
publishers, and fans (often scientists, academics, and
scholars
of
other
fields)
systematically
organized
publishing enterprises, conferences, and other insignia of
an academic discipline. Much discussion about science
fiction took place in the letter columns of early SF
magazines and fanzines, and the first book of commentary
on science fiction in the US was Clyde F. Beck's Hammer
and Tongs, a chapbook of essays originally published in a
fanzine.
The 1940s saw the appearance of three full-scale scholarly
works that treated science fiction and its literary
ancestors: Philip Babcock Gove's The Imaginary Voyage in
Prose Fiction (1941), J. O. Bailey's Pilgrims through
17

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Space
and
Time (1948),
and
Nicholson's Voyages to the Moon (1949).

Marjorie

Hope

Peter Nicholls credits Sam Moskowitz with teaching "what


was almost certainly the first Of course in the USA to be
given through a college": a non-credit course in "Science
Fiction Writing" at City College of New York in 1953. The
first regular, for-credit courses were taught by Mark
Hillegas (at Colgate) and H. Bruce Franklin (at Stanford)
in 1961.
During the 1960s, more science fiction scholars began to
move into the academy, founding academic journals devoted
to the exploration of the literature and works of science
fiction.
The
explosion
of film
studies and cultural
studies more
broadly
granted
the
nascent
discipline
additional credibility, and throughout the 1970s and
1980s, mainstream scholars such as Susan Sontag turned
their critical attention to science fiction.
In 1982, James Gunn (now Emeritus Professor) established
the Center for the Study of Science Fiction as a Kansas
Board of Regents Center as a focus for the SF programs he
offered at the University of Kansas, beginning in 1969.
This was the first such SF organization at a major
university.
The 1990s saw the first academic programs and degreegranting programs established, [9] and the field shows
continued
steady
growth,
not
surprisingly
also
at
technology-oriented institutions.

18

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

CHAPTER III
METHODOLOGY
This chapter presents the methods used in the study. It
discusses

the

research

design,

instrument,

respondents,

methods of data collection and analysis.


Research Design
Table 1
EFFECTS

OF

FICTIONAL

STORIES

ON

VIEWERS

BEHAVIORAL

PATTERN

Year
Level

Gender
Male

Female

Total No. of
participants

Percentage

BSCE
II
BSCE
III
BSCE
IV

57

43

23.33%

11

69

31

16

53.33%

57

43

23.33%

Total

19

183%

11

127%

30

100%

Table 2
19

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

ITE
MS
1
2
3
4
5

2
AGRE
E

YEAR
DISAG
REE

71.
43%
71.
43%
57.
14%

28.57
%
28.57
%
42.86
%

100%

0%

28.5
7%

71.42%

ND

YEAR LEVEL
3RD YEAR
AGR
DISAG
EE
REE
86.6
7%
53.3
3%
86.6
7%
93.7
5%
56.2
5%

4TH YEAR
AGRE
DISAG
E
REE
71.
43%
100
%
100
%

18.57
%

6.25%

100%

0%

43.75%

85.7
1%

14.29
%

13.33%
46.77%
13.33%

0%
0%

AGR
EE

DISAG
REE

80%
66.67
%
83.33
%
96.6
7%
56.6
7%

20
23.33
16.67
3.23
43.23

TOT
AL

Table 3
MALE
AGREE
74%
53%
74%
89%
58%

1
2
3
4
5
TOTAL

DISAGREE
26%
47%
26%
11%
42%

AGREE
90%
80%
90%
100%
50%

FEMALE
DISAGREE
10%
20%
10%
0%
50%

Table 4
ITEMS
1
2
3
4
5

AGREE
25
22
27
25
28

PERCENTAGE
83.33%
73.33%
90%
83.33%
93.33%

DISAGREE
5
7
3
5
2

PERCENTAGE
16.67%
23.33%
10%
16.67%
6.67%

RANK
4
5
2
3
1

20

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

CHAPTER IV
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
CONCLUSION
Fiction enables people to imagine their selfhood into
circumstances other than the usual. Thereby they extend
their sense of themselves. This is not persuasion. It does
not occur in a particular direction dictated by the writer
of the story. As readers loosen up their own personality,
perhaps to become more like a character in a story, or as
they manually enter situations other than those they are
normally in, they change to become more themselves.

21

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

22

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

http://www.google.com.ph/search?
site=&oq=Effects+of+Fictional+Stories&aqs=mobile-gwslite..&q=Effects+of+Fictional+Stories
http://m.fastcompany.com/1842370/how-fiction-impacts-factsocial-impact-books
http://www.google.com.ph/search?
site=&oq=Effects+of+Fictional+Stories&aqs=mobile-gwslite..&q=Effects+of+Fictional+Stories
https://themisfitscloset.wordpress.com/2014/04/17/lets-befictional-7-side-effects-of-reading-too-much/
https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2012/04/28/why-fictiongood-for-you-how-fiction-changes-yourworld/nubDy1P3viDj2PuwGwb3KO/story.html
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletesway/201401/reading-fiction-improves-brain-connectivity-andfunction
http://www.psmag.com/books-and-culture/reading-fictionimpacts-aggressive-behavior-35839
http://www.utne.com/mind-and-body/effects-of-readingzm0z12mazsie.aspx
http://www.jstor.org/stable/2779364
http://reviewcanada.ca/magazine/2011/07/why-fiction-is-goodfor-you/
http://www.healthline.com/health-news/reading-fictionincreases-empathy-013013
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120507131948.ht
m
http://blog.theliteracysite.com/fiction-readers/
http://www.storyinliteraryfiction.com/essays-on-writing/howhumor-works-in-literary-fiction/
http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/o
bserver/2014/september-14/literary-character.html
23

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

http://esciencecommons.blogspot.com/2013/12/a-novel-look-athow-stories-may-change.html?m=1
http://fmwriters.com/Visionback/Vision37/howtopoison.htm
https://www.astrosociety.org/education/astronomy-resourceguides/science-fiction-stories-with-good-astronomy-physicsa-topical-index/
OxFord Dictionary
Merriam Webster's Dictionary mobile AppAddison, Joseph, and
Richard Steele. The Spectator. Ed. Donald Bond. 5 vols.
Oxford: Clarendon, 1965.
Bhabha, Homi. Articulating the Archaic: Notes on Colonial
Nonsense. Literary
Theory Today. Ed. Peter Collier and Helga Geyer-Ryan.
Ithaca: Cornell UP,
1990. 203-18.
The World and the Home. Social Text 31-32 (1992): 14153.
Cixous, Hlne. Fiction and Its Phantoms: A Reading of
Freuds Das
Unheimliche. New Literary History 7 (1976): 525-48.
Frye, Northrop. Anatomy of Criticism: Four Essays.
Princeton: Princeton UP, 1957.
Levine, Joseph. The Battle of the Books: History and
Literature in the Augustan Age.
Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1991.
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs Dalloway. 1925. Ed. Stella McNichol.
London: Penguin,
1992

24

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

25

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

CURRICULUM VITAE

26

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Personal Data
Name

: Mina Joyce R. Bayan

Contact no.

: 09363068422

Email Address

: redshana24@gmail.com

Address

: San Pablo, Jaen, Nueva Ecija

Place of Birth

:Camiling, Tarlac

Date of Birth

: February 24, 1996

Civil Status

: Single

Religion

: Roman Catholic

Educational Background
Tertiary

: Nueva Ecija University of Science and


Technology (2013-present)

Secondary

: San Agustin Diocesan Academy

Elementary

: San Pablo Elementary School

27

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Personal Data
Name

: David Jonathan J. Moises

Contact no.

: 09051199712

Email Address

: dmoises88@gmail.com

Address

: Tramo, Sta Rosa, Nueva Ecija

Place of Birth

Date of Birth

: September 2, 1996

Civil Status

: Single

Religion

: Born Again Christian

Educational Background
Tertiary

Nueva

Ecija

University

of

Science

and Technology
Secondary

: Holy Cross College

Elementary

: Sta. Rosa Elementary School

28

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Personal Data
Name

: Mikaela Andrea B. Rosete

Contact no.

: 09061038080

Email Address

: Rosetemikaela@rocketmail.com

Address

AGL

heights

II

Subdivision,

Cabanatuan City, Nueva Ecija


Place of Birth

: Pasay City, Manila

Date of Birth

: August 1, 1997

Civil Status

: Single

Religion

: Roman Catholic

Educational Background
Tertiary

Nueva

Ecija

University

of

Science

and Technology
Secondary

: Araullo University

Elementary

: Cabanatuan East Central School

29

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Personal Data
Name

:Marlyn F. de Guzman

Contact no.

:09272948126

Email Address

:marlyn_20@ymail.com

Address

:Tabon, San Isidro NE

Place of Birth

:San Isidro NE

Date of Birth

:February 20, 1997

Civil Status

:Single

Religion

:Catholic

Educational Background
Tertiary

:NEUST

Secondary

:T.A Dionisio Nat'l HS

Elementary

:TabonElemSchool

30

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Personal Data
Name

:John Paul Ramos

Contact no.

:09272948126

Email Address

:johnpaulramos_26@yahoo.com

Address

:Pambuan,Gapan City

Place of Birth

:Gapan City Hospital

Date of Birth

:September 26 1997

Civil Status

:Single

Religion

:Catholic

Educational Background
Tertiary

:NEUST

Secondary

:Pambuan HS

Elementary

31

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Personal Data
Name

Contact no.

Email Address

Address

Place of Birth

Date of Birth

Civil Status

Religion

Educational Background
Tertiary

Secondary

Elementary

32

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Personal Data
Name

Contact no.

Email Address

Address

Place of Birth

Date of Birth

Civil Status

Religion

Educational Background
Tertiary

Secondary

Elementary

33

EFFECTS OF FICTIONAL STORIES ON VIEWERS BEHAVIORAL PATTERN.

Personal Data
Name

: Mariel S. Sevilla

Contact no.

: +639368854238

Email Address

: jungchinah@gmail.com

Address

: La Fuente Sta. Rosa, Nueva Ecija

Place of Birth

: San Joseph Sta. Rosa, Nueva Ecija

Date of Birth

: January 06, 1997

Civil Status

: Single

Religion

: Mistica

Educational Background
Tertiary

Bachelor

of

Science

in

Civil

Engineering

at Nueva Ecija University of Science

and Technology
Secondary

: Holy Cross College

Elementary

: La Fuente Elementary School

34