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CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

Advertising is an important tool of promotion. Advertisement is a non-personal


presentation of an idea or a product (where as personal selling or salesmanship help in
personal promotional.) Advertisement supplements personal selling to a great extent.
Advertising has, acquired great importance in the modern India characterized by tough
competition in the market and fast changes in technology, and fashion and taste
customers..

Advertising is used for communicating business information to the present and


prospective customers. It usually provides information about the advertising firm, its
product qualities, place of availability of its products, etc. Advertisement is indispensable
for both the sellers and the buyers. However, it is more important for the sellers. In the
modern age of large scale production, producers cannot think of pushing sale of their
products without advertising them.

Television is the fast growing medium of advertisement because Of huge


expansion of electronic media and cable network. It makes its appeal through both the
eye and the ear. Products can be demonstrated as well as explained as in film
advertisement. Advertising may take the form of short commercials and sponsored
programmes.

T.V. advertising has all the merits of film advertising. It has greater effectiveness
as the message is conveyed at their homes to the people Selectivity of message can
also be achieved. Commercials may be given during that time period when the
prospective buyers are supposed to watch television programme

T.V advertising has got all the demerits of film advertising. Television is a very
costly medium of advertisement and can be made use of by -he well established
companies only. Another limitation of television advertisement is that once it is
presented, its back reference is not possible

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HISTORY OF ADVERTISEMENT

Archaeologists have found evidence of advertising dating back to the 3000s BC,
among the Babylonians. One of the first known methods of advertising was the outdoor
display, usually an eye-catching sign painted on the wall of a building. Archaeologists
have uncovered many such signs, notably in the ruins of ancient Rome and Pompeii. An
outdoor advertisement excavated in Rome offers property for rent, and one found
painted on a wall in Pompeii calls the attention of travelers to a tavern situated in
another town.

In medieval times word-of-mouth praise of products gave rise to a simple but


effective form of advertising, the use of so-called town criers. The criers were citizens
who read public notices aloud and were also employed by merchants to shout the
praises of their wares. Later they became familiar figures on the streets of colonial
American settlements. The town criers were forerunners of the modern announcer who
delivers radio and television commercials.

Although graphic forms of advertising appeared early in history, printed


advertising made little headway until the invention of the movable-type printing press by
German printer Johannes Gutenberg about 1450. This invention made the mass
distribution of posters and circulars possible. The first advertisement in English
appeared in 1472 in the form of a handbill announcing a prayer book for sale. Two
hundred years later, the first newspaper ad was published offering a reward for the
return of 12 stolen horses. In the American colonies, the Boston News-Letter, the first
regularly published newspaper in America, began carrying ads in 1704, and about 25
years later Benjamin Franklin made ads more readable by using large headlines.

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In the United States, the advertising profession began in Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, in 1841 when Volney B. Palmer set up shop as an advertising agent, the
forerunner of the advertising agency. Agents contracted with newspapers for large
amounts of advertising space at discount rates and then resold the space to advertisers
at a higher rate. The ads themselves were created by the advertisers. In 1869 Francis
Ayer bought out Palmer and founded N. W. Ayer & Son, an agency that still exists
today. Ayer transformed the standard agent practice by billing 4 advertisers exactly
what he paid to publishers plus an agreed upon commission. Soon Ayer was not only
selling space but was also conducting market research and writing the advertising copy.

Advertising agencies initially focused on print. But the introduction of radio


created a new opportunity and by the end of the 1920s, advertising had established
itself in radio to such an extent that advertisers were producing many of their own
programs. The early 1930s ushered in dozens of radio dramatic series that were known
as soap operas because they were sponsored by soap companies.

Television had been introduced in 1940, but because of the high cost of TV sets
and the lack of programming, it was not immediately embraced. As the American
economy soared in the 1950s, so did the sale of TV sets and the advertising that paid
for the popular new shows. Soon TV far surpassed radio as an advertising medium.

The introduction of the TV remote control and access to hundreds of cable


channels means that today advertising must interest and entertain consumers or else
they will simply use the remote to change the channel. New digital devices even
threaten to make it possible to edit out commercials. The development of interactive
television, combining the functions of a computer with access to high-speed
transmission over cable lines or optical fibers, will likely enable consumers to select
from a vast video library. Consumers will be able to determine not only when they watch
something, but also, to a greater extent than ever before, what they will watch. Some
industry observers believe that as consumers gain greater control over their viewing
activities, they will find it easier to avoid advertising.

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IMPACT OF ADVERTISEMENT

Advertising has an important effect on a country’s economy, society, culture, and


political system. This is especially true in the United States where the advertising
industry plays such a prominent role.

1. Economic Impact

Most economists believe that advertising has a positive impact on the economy
because it stimulates demand for products and services, strengthening the economy by
promoting the sale of goods and services. Manufacturers know that advertising can help
sell a new product quickly, enabling them to recoup the costs of developing new
products. By stimulating the development of new products, advertising helps increase
competition. Many economists believe that increased competition leads to lower prices,
thereby benefiting consumers and the economy as a whole. These economists also
argue that by interesting consumers in purchasing goods, advertising enables
manufacturers and others to sell their products in larger quantities. The increased
volume of sales enables companies to produce individual units at lower costs and
therefore, sell them at a lower price. Advertising thus benefits consumers by helping
lower prices. Other economists, however, believe that advertising is wasteful. They
argue that the cost of advertising adds to the cost of goods and that most advertising
simply encourages consumers to buy one brand rather than another. According to this
view, advertising simply moves sales from one company to another, rather than
increasing sales overall and thereby benefiting the economy as a whole.

2. Social Impact

Advertising can have wide-ranging repercussions on a society. Some critics


suggest that advertising promotes a materialistic way of life by leading people to believe
that happiness is achieved by purchasing products. They argue that advertising creates
a consumer culture in which buying exciting new products becomes the foundation of
the society's values, pleasures, and goals.

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Other critics express concern over the way advertising has affected women and racial
minority groups. Ads in the 1950s depicted women primarily as decoration or sex
objects. Although millions of women worked outside the home in the 1960s, ads
continued to focus on their role as homemakers. Whether owing to the feminist
movement or to women's increasing economic power, after the 1960s it became more
common to see women depicted in professional roles. However, many ads today still
emphasize a woman’s sexuality.

The way advertising has depicted racial minorities has also been harmful. Prior to 1960,
African Americans were usually shown in a subordinate position. Due to the influence of
the civil rights movement, however, advertisers by the 1980s had begun to depict
African Americans as students, professionals, or business people. However, many
African American organizations and community activists continue to object to the way
that alcohol and tobacco companies have seemingly targeted low-income minority
communities with a heavy preponderance of outdoor advertising for their products.

As ads have begun to more fully reflect the lives of women and African Americans in the
United States, increasing attention has been paid to the way in which advertising shows
other ethnic groups, including Hispanics, Asians, Native Americans, and Eastern
Europeans. There is still considerable debate over how advertising influences public
perception of gender and of particular ethnic groups.

Advertising has a major social impact by helping sustain mass communications media
and making them relatively inexpensive, if not free, to the public. Newspapers,
magazines, radio, and broadcast television all receive their primary income from
advertising. Without advertising, many of these forms of mass communication might not
exist to the extent that they do today, or they might be considerably more expensive,
offer less variety, or even be subject to government control through subsidies. In-depth
news programs, a diversity of magazines, and free entertainment might no longer be
widely available.

At the same time, however, some critics warn that because advertising plays such a
major economic role, it may exercise undue influence on the news media and thereby

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curtail the free flow of information in a free society. Reporters and editors, for example,
may be hesitant to develop a news story that criticizes a major advertiser.

As a result society might not be alerted to harmful or potentially harmful conduct by the
advertiser. Most members of the news media deny that pressure from an advertiser
prevents them from pursuing news stories involving that advertiser, but some members
of the media acknowledge that they might not be inclined to investigate an issue
aggressively if it threatened to offend a major advertiser.

Advertisers may affect media programming in other ways, too, critics charge. For
example, companies that sponsor TV programs prefer relatively wholesome,
noncontroversial programming to avoid offending a mass audience. This preference
causes TV networks to emphasize this type of programming. The result is that society
may be denied the benefits of being able to view challenging or highly original
entertainment programs or news programs on controversial issues. Because advertisers
are especially interested in attracting the 18 to 34 year olds who account for most
consumers spending, television shows are often developed with this audience in mind.
If the ratings show that a program is not attracting large audiences, particularly among
18 to 34 year olds, advertisers often withdraw support, which causes a program to be
canceled.

As a result, shows that are more likely to interest and to be of value to older audiences
are not produced. The impact of television on young children has received much
attention. Research suggests that children see television advertising as just another
form of programming and react uncritically to its messages, which makes them
especially vulnerable to advertising.

There is also concern about the way in which adolescent girls respond to advertising
that features beautiful, thin models. Research indicates that many adolescent girls are
unduly influenced by this standard of beauty, become dissatisfied with their own bodies,
and may develop eating disorders in pursuit of a thin figure. New research suggests that
adolescent boys are also being influenced by advertising images of bulked-up, buffed
bodies. As a result, many become dissatisfied with their own body image, devote large

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amounts of time to weightlifting, and may even take drugs that have harmful side effects
in order to develop more muscle. Those over the age of 60 are thought to be less
influenced by advertising, but some elderly people no longer process messages as
easily as younger people, making them more susceptible to questionable advertising
claims.

3. Political Impact

Advertising is now a major component of political campaigns and therefore has a


big influence on the democratic process itself. In 1998 more than $467 million was
spent on election campaigns in the United States. That amount of spending placed
political advertising in the ranks of the country’s 30 leading advertisers that year.
Political advertising is a relatively new development in U.S. history. Advertising
professionals did not become involved in electoral campaigns until the 1950s. But since
then, political advertising has grown in sophistication and complexity. Political
advertising enables candidates to convey their positions on important issues and to
acquaint voters with their accomplishments and personalities. Television advertising is
especially effective for candidates running for national or statewide office because it can
reach so many people at once. Candidates can also use advertising to respond
effectively to the charges of their opponents.

Various campaign finance reform proposals, however, have tried to address the impact
of television advertising on political campaigning. Because of the high cost of television
ads, the costs of political campaigns have skyrocketed, making it necessary for
candidates to raise money continually, even after they have been elected to office.
Critics say this factor jeopardizes the democratic process by making elected officials
beholden to wealthy contributors and by making it more likely that only the wealthy will
run for office. Some reform proposals have called for free airtime, but television and
radio networks have resisted this idea.

Critics of political advertising also charge that the 30-second television spot has become
more important to a political campaign than a thorough discussion of the issues. As a
result, voters are bombarded with image advertising rather than being acquainted with

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the candidate’s positions. They contend that this practice is harmful to good
government. Issues are simplified, and candidates are “packaged and sold” much like a
consumer product, thereby distorting the political process.

4. Cultural Impact

Advertising can affect cultural values. Some advertising messages, for example,
encourage aggressive individualism, which may clash with the traditional cultural values
of a country where the collective or group is emphasized over the individual or humility
or modesty is preferred to aggressiveness. With the globalization of the world economy,
multinational corporations often use the same advertising to sell to consumers around
the world. Some critics argue that advertising messages are thus helping to break down
distinct cultural differences and traditional values, causing the world to become
increasingly homogeneous.

Many advertising campaigns, however, have universal appeal, overriding cultural


differences, or they contribute to culture in a positive way. Humor in advertising has
made many ad campaigns widely popular, in some cases achieving the status of
folklore or taking on new life in another arena. For example, a popular ad campaign for
a fast food chain with the slogan “Where’s the beef?” became part of the 1980
Democratic presidential primary campaign between Gary Hart and Walter Mondale. The
ad ridiculed a competitor by depicting a small hamburger patty dwarfed by a huge bun.
During a primary debate one of the candidates used the ad slogan to suggest that his
opponent’s campaign lacked substance.

CHAPTER 2
REVIEW OF LITRATURE

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Ravi M Pandey (2002) “Business Ethics on Media”
In India, consolidations began in 2002, reducing the media buying industry to a
handful of major players who now dominate the media buying business. The top six -
though not necessarily in order of importance - are Madison Media, GroupM, Starcom,
Carat, Lodestar and Initiative Media. Besides the traditional media planning and buying,
now days the agencies offer a range of other solutions, including client servicing and
research.

Ashok Raja (2007) “Cost Relation on Media”


The biggest problems the media buying industry faces is a shortage of talent.
The attrition rate is a high 20-28 per cent. The reason is the decrease in payments.
Client expectations have risen, and costs related to research, people, and other
overheads have spiraled In the rat race for survival, media agencies have been building
volumes at the cost of margins. Some agencies resort to undercutting to get business -
and clients, who otherwise value stability and consistency, are tempted to move
accounts to agencies that offer their services at lower rates. Television has always been
a very powerful medium of communication and it stands till today in spite of challenges
from the internet.

Ram Varma Babu (2004) “Tele programming”


As we deduced in the way of analysis new innovative content that gives the
audience a feeling of involvement would definitely help increase trips and along with it
the advertisement effectiveness like we saw in case of the program "saas bahu ki
saazis" on star news. Integration of cellular service with television programming would
help to maintain touch with audience and help in personalized brand communication.

Bijoy Veeraj (2006) “Context on view of media”


The content of the webpage would already be there with star news it only needs
to be converted into html for the internet. So no additional spend required for the web

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page. Secondly if it can follow Google’s model of sponsored links then that would open
a completely new avenue for advertising revenue to flow in. Very topical and related ads
can be provided with the news search that one does on the page.

CHAPTER 3

“RESEARCH METHODOLOGY”

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3.1 TYPE OF RESEARCH

The research is DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH because it tries to identify


characteristics of observed phenomenon and explore possible correlations among
phenomenon. Here in this research the phenomenon would be audience behavior
patterns, brand recall and viewer preferences.

3.2 SOURCES OF DATA


Source of data for this project primary & secondary only. In reference to the
theoretical concept as well as for information are collected through secondary sources
from paper published material i.e. Newspaper, journal and magazine & from printed
electronic media i.e. Internet websites. The primary data was collected through
questionnaire filled from the respondents.

3.3 COLLECTION OF PRIMARY DATA


For the study primary data is obtained through preparing questionnaire

3.4 COLLECTION OF SECONDARY DATA


The secondary data that are required are got from the internet, books and other
sources.

3.5 SAMPLE SIZE


The method used for sample technique was random sampling method. This
method was used because it was not know previously as to whether a particular person
will be asked to fill the questionnaire.
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3.6 SAMPLE UNIT
The population of the sample would be 100 respondents.

3.7 STASTICAL TOOLS

 Simple Percentage Analysis=Number of Respondents/Total Number of


Respondents×100%

 CHI-SQUARE
Chi Square analysis has been used to judge the relationship or association
between two attributes and to find out how they are influencing the investment patterns.

Χ2=Σ(O-E)2/E

Degree of freedom= (R-1) (C-1)


Where O = Observed Frequency
E = Expected Frequency
R = Number of Rows
C = Number of Columns

3.8 LIMITATIONS

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 Television viewing patterns vary immensely across different cross sections of the
society. Therefore my sample population would probably not contain enough
variety of the audience.

 Time constrain to complete the project was also another limitation faced during
the research.

 There were some qualitative questions that needed explaining hence some
respondents needed assistance thus slowing down the process of data
collection.

 Limited access to data available in archives

CHAPTER 4

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

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Table – 1

Watching Television

S.No Factors No of Percentage


respondents

1. Yes 94 94

2. No 6 6

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 94 % of the Respondents watch T.V
and 6 % of them do not.

Majority

94 % of the respondents watch television

CHART 1

Watching Television

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table – 2

Importance to Advertisement

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. Yes 60 60

2. No 40 40

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 60 % of the Respondents prefer


advertisement while 40 % do not.

Majority

60 % of the respondents give importance to advertisement

CHART 2

Importance to Advertisement

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

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Table-3

Ads influencing customers

S.No Factors No of Percentage


respondents

1. Agree 31 31

2. Neutral 46 46

3. Disagree 23 23

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 31 % of Respondents agree with the
influences while 46 % on neutral basis & 23 % disagree.

Majority

46 % of the respondents are neutral with ads influence

CHART 3

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Ads influencing customers
NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table - 4

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Impact on Purchase

S.No Factors No of Percentage


respondents

1. Yes 85 85

2. No 15 15

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 85 % of the Respondents impact is


considered on purchase while 15 % do not.

Majority

85 % of the respondents consider that ad creates impact on purchase

CHART 4

Impact on Purchase

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table – 5

Other Preferable Sources

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S.No Factors No of Percentage
respondents

1. News Papers 40 40

2. Magazines 30 30

3. Internets 25 25

4. Boards 5 5

5. Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 40 % of respondents prefer News


paper, 30 % Magazines while 25 % on internets & 5 % on Boards

Majority

85 % of the respondents prefer News paper

CHART 5

Other Preferable Sources

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table – 6

Necessity for High Spending

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S.No Factors No of Percentage
respondents

1. Yes 73 73

2. No 27 27

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 73 % of respondents go for the


necessity for advertisement while 27 % do not.

Majority

73 % of respondents go for the necessity for advertisement

CHART 6

Necessity for High Spending

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table – 7

Upliftment for Advertisement

S.No Factors No of Percentage


respondents

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1. Cost/Price 33 33

2. Celebrity 25 25
Advertisements

3. Quality & Quantity 31 31

4. Other (Packing, Trial) 11 11

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 33 % of the respondents go for


Cost/Price, 25 % towards Celebrity while 31 % for Quality & Quantity & 11 % for
Other Factors.

Majority

33 % of the respondents go for Cost/Price towards uplifting for


advertisement

CHART 7

Upliftment for Advertisement

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table – 8

Change in Presence on Celebrity

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. Yes 76 76

2. No 22 22

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 76 % of respondents agree while 22 %


of them do not

Majority

76 % of respondents agree with Change in Presence on Celebrity

CHART 8

Change in Presence on Celebrity

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table-9

Endorsed by the Celebrity

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. Yes 64 64

2. No 36 36

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 64 % of respondents agree while 36 %


of them do not

Majority

76 % of respondents go by endorsement by the Celebrity

CHART 9

Endorsed by the Celebrity

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table-10

Increase in Sale of Product

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. Yes 82 82

2. No 18 18

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 82 % of the respondents agree with
the sale of product while 18 % do not.

Majority

82 % of the respondents agree with the sale of product

CHART 10

Increase in Sale of Product

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table-11

Celebrating Giving True Picture

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. Yes 42 42

2. No 58 58

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 42 % of the respondents agree with
the true picture by the celebrity while 58 % do not.

Majority

58 % of the respondents do not agree with the true picture by the celebrity

CHART 11

Celebrating Giving True Picture

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table – 12

Purchase Based on Celebrity

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. Mostly 31 33

2. Rarely 25 25

3. Often 32 31

4. Never 12 11

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 31 % of the respondents purchase


mostly , 25 % purchase rarely while 32 % purchase Often & 12 % Never Purchase.

Majority

32 % of the respondents make their purchase based on celebrity

CHART 12

Purchase Based on Celebrity

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table - 13

Motivation by Celebrity

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. Agree 51 51

2. Neutral 25 25

3. Disagree 24 24

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 51 % of the respondents are motivated
by the celebrity while 25 % are neutral & 24 % strongly disagree.

Majority

51 % of the respondents are motivated by the celebrity

CHART 13

Motivation by Celebrity

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table-14

Influence about the Product

S.No Factors No of Percentage


respondents

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1. Yes 62 62

2. No 28 28

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 62 % of the respondents agree with
the influence by the advertisement while 27 % do not.

Majority

62 % of the respondents agree with the influence by the advertisement

CHART 14

Influence about the Product

40
NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table-15

Social issue towards Advertisement

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. Yes 51 51

2. No 49 49

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 51 % of the respondents agree with
the social issue towards the advertisement while 49 % do not.

Majority

51 % of the respondents agree with the social issue towards the


advertisement

CHART 15

Social issue towards Advertisement

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

Table-16

Kinds of influencing advertisements

S.No Factors No of Percentage

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respondents

1. National Advertisement 81 81

2. Local Advertisement 19 19

Total 100 100.00

Interpretation

From the Above Table we predict that 81 % of the respondents go towards


the National Ad while 19 % go towards Local ads.

Majority

81 % of the respondents prefer National Ad

CHART 16

Kinds of influencing advertisements

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NO OF RESPONDENTS

CHAPTER 5

5.1 FINDINGS

 Advertisements with moving image are more effective than advertisement with
still image.

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 Information provided in the advertisement has more influence on consumer’s
perception about the product.

 Language used in the advertisement also plays important role in increasing


effectiveness of an advertisement.

 Intensity of advertisement affects the perception of consumers towards the


product and leads them for its purchase.

 Social issues included in advertisement affects the perception of high age group
people.

 National advertisement has more influence on consumer’s perception about the


product instead of local advertisement.

 Advertisement increases the sales of any product.

5.2 SUGGESTIONS

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 Advertisement should be made with keeping the determinants of effectiveness in
mind.

 Advertisement should be according to the product and its suitability with different
age groups.

 To make advertisement more effective all the determinants of effectiveness


should be taken care of.

 Investment in advertisement should be made with great care of media of


advertisement and type of advertisement.

 Advertisers should develop new and more effective ways of advertisement.

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5.3 CONCLUSION

Advertisement reveals that all the determinants are not internally equal they are
significantly different from one another. Similarly, all the parameters are not internally
equal they are significantly different from one another.

In order to measure the effectiveness of advertising, which approach


(communication effectiveness or sales effectiveness), is more suitable? Two factors are
to be considered in deciding the approach. They are

1. Relevance of advertising objectives on the overall performance objectives:

Generally advertising managers would like to know the role of advertisements on


the overall performance of the business firm i.e., return on investment and on
profitability. A sale is a determining factor of company performance.

2. Difficulty and cost of obtaining data needed to evaluate effectiveness:

Generally communication measures are easy to follow than sales effectiveness


measures. If the measures of advertising are more relevant they will be difficult and
costly. If it is less difficult and cheap the measures will not be more relevant. Therefore,
the advertising manager has to make a balance between these two approaches.

ANNEXURE
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5.4 QUESTIONNAIRE

1. Name

2. Gender

3. Age

4. Occupation

5. Do you watch television?


❏Yes ❏No

6. Do you give importance to Advertisements while watching T.V?


❏Yes ❏No

7. Do you think the advertisement in television influences customer?


❏Agree
❏Neutral
❏Disagree

8. Do you think advertisement in television creates and impact on purchase?


❏Yes ❏No

9. Other than Television which form of Advertisement do you prefer


❏Newspapers
❏Magazines
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❏Internet
❏ Boards

10. Is it necessary to invest more on advertisement through television?


❏Yes ❏No

11. Which factor makes the advertisement an up going one?


❏Cost / Price
❏Celebrity Advertisement
❏Quality & Quantity
❏Other (Packaging, Trial)

12. Does presence of any celebrity in the advertisement affects your opinion about
the
Product?
❏Yes ❏No

13. Do you purchase the product because of your favorite celebrity endorsing it?
❏Yes ❏No

14. Do you think advertisement helps in increasing sales of any product?


❏Yes ❏No

15. Do you think that Celebrity give a true picture of products through
Advertisement?
❏Yes ❏No

16. How often is your purchase decision based on Celebrity Advertisement recall?
❏Mostly ❏ rarely
❏Often ❏Never

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17. Do you believe that, Celebrity Endorsement on advertisement motivate you to
purchase?
❏Agree
❏Neutral
❏Disagree

18. Does an entertaining advertisement influence your opinion about the product?
❏Yes ❏No

19. Does presence of social issues in the advertisement affects your opinion about
the product?
❏Yes ❏No

20. Which type of advertisement influences you more?


❏National advertisement
❏Local advertisement

5.5 BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books
1. Advertising Management – concepts and cases Mahendra Mohan.

2. Marketing Management – Philip Kotler


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3. Branding – Geoffrey Randoll

4. Strategic Brand Management – Kapferer

5. Advertising and Sales Promotion Management – S.L.Gupta, V.V.Ratra

6. Advertising and Salesmanship – P.Saravanavel.

Internet
1. www.books.google.com

2. www.scribd.com

3. www.paulbeelen.com

4. www.decisionanalyst.com

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