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The State of the Art on Numerical Wave Tank

What is NWT?
NWT is a computer code which final goal is to reproduce
Physical wave tanks as closely as possible.
NWTs have to support
Time domain simulation,
Simulation in bounded domain,
Simulation of free surface waves dominated by gravity,
Fully nonlinear boundary condition applied on both
free surface and body surface,
Physical wave generation.
NWT is a numerical seakeeping test basin.
Potential flow

Contents

Theoretical background of NWT


Boundary Integral Equations
Boundary conditions
Discretization
Instantaneous free surface motions
Instantaneous floating body motions
Time integral
Stability analysis
Accuracy check
Numerical technique
Treatment of intersection
Curve and surface fitting by spline
Rearrangement of collocation points
Reduction of CPU time
Wave generation
Wave absorption
Hydrodynamic forces
Floating body motions

Theoretical background of NWT


Boundary Integral Equations (BIE)

Discretized BIE

Theoretical background of NWT


Body surface boundary conditions
z

v
x

G
r

Theoretical background of NWT


Free surface boundary conditions

P=0

Simulation of free surface motion


Mixed Eulerian and Lagrangian method (MEL)

Wave generation
Physical method
Piston wave maker
Flap wave maker
Plunger wave maker etc.
Artificial method
Wave making boundary
(Liner or nonlinear )
Spinning dipole

Physical wave generation by piston wave maker

Physical wave generation by plunger wave maker

Artificial wave generation by vertical control surface

Rienecker & Fentons solution of nonlinear wave

0.15
0.1
0.05
0
-0.05
-0.1
0

0.5

1.5

2.5

3.5

Wave absorption
Sommerfelt-Orlanski radiation condition
Physical method
Piston type
Flap type
Plunger type etc.
Artificial method
Damping zone

Wave absorption by damping zone


Damping zone

Radiation wave by a rolling Wigley hull

Diffraction of oblique wave by a Wigley hull

Simulation of floating body motion


Introduction of Acceleration field
Solution methods of acceleration field
Iterative method
Modal decomposition method
Indirect method
Implicit boundary condition method

Relation of variables in Velocity field and Acceleration field


Bernoullis equation
p/ = - t - 1/2 ||2 - g Z

Modal decomposition method

Indirect method

Implicit boundary condition method

Simulation of a floating body motions

Simulation of a floating body motions coupled with internal fluid

GZ curve of the weakly unstable


floating body

(deg)

Simulation of chaotic roll motions

GZ (m) 0.0005

(deg)

-0.0005

6
8
(deg)

(deg)

-2

30

40

50

20

30

40

50

40

60

80

100

14 Tw

10

Hw = 7.5 cm
-3
-3.5
-4
-4.5
-5
0
-2
-4
-6
-8

(deg)

-4

20

10
5
0
-5
-10

20

Hw = 7.5 cm (Burst)

50

100

150

200

250

300

Hw = 10 cm

(deg)

-6

10

Hw = 5 cm
-3.5

-3.75
-4
-4.25
-4.5

-8

Hw = 1 cm

-3.9
-3.95
-4
-4.05
-4.1

50

100

150

200

t / Tw

250

300

350

400

GZ curve of the weakly unstable


floating body

(deg)

Simulation of chaotic roll motions

GZ (m) 0.0005

(deg)

-0.0005

6
8
(deg)

(deg)

-2

30

40

50

20

30

40

50

40

60

80

100

14 Tw

10

Hw = 7.5 cm
-3
-3.5
-4
-4.5
-5
0
-2
-4
-6
-8

(deg)

-4

20

10
5
0
-5
-10

20

Hw = 7.5 cm (Burst)

50

100

150

200

250

300

Hw = 10 cm

(deg)

-6

10

Hw = 5 cm
-3.5

-3.75
-4
-4.25
-4.5

-8

Hw = 1 cm

-3.9
-3.95
-4
-4.05
-4.1

50

100

150

200

t / Tw

250

300

350

400

Floating Wigley hull in oblique sea


( = 150 deg)

Running Wigley hull in oblique sea


( = 150 deg, Fn = 0.1)

Dream comes true, soon or later !

Future

Now

Dream comes true, soon or later !

Future

Now