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Personalities of the 1869-70 Resistance: Ladroutes Mmoires.

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Jean Baptiste Ladroute was born on October 1, 1837 at St. Vital, the Metis son of
Jean Baptiste Ladroute and Josphte Larocque. Jean Baptiste was the grandson of Jean
Philbert Ladroute (b. 1778) and Marguerite Pontbriand dit Sansregret. He married
Marguerite St. Arnaud2 (1845-1921) on February 4, 1862, at St. Norbert, Manitoba. She
was born on April 6, 1845 on the Mackenzie River. She was the daughter of Bonaventure
St. Arnaud and Genevive Contr. The couple raised their twelve children in St.
Boniface.
In 1863, Laderoute began freighting between the Red River Settlement and la
rivire aux Boeuf, now Moorhead, Minnesota as well as St. Paul, Minnesota. He also
worked as a carpenter and cooper, and was involved in the construction of the first
Catholic church in Winnipeg on the site of St. Marys Cathedral, as well as Notre-Dame
de Bon Secours chapel in St. Norbert. Jean-Baptiste participated in the events of 1869-70
which led to the creation of the province of Manitoba. In 1913, Ladroute wrote a
memoir entitled Mmoires des troubles du Manitoba 1869-70 1es articles detailing the
events of the Red River Resistance as he remembered them. The family moved to Olga,
North Dakota in 1885 and became a permanently resident there. Jean Baptiste died in
1915.
Jean Baptiste Laderoute reports that he, Le Grand Louison Lariviere and Ambroise
Lepine stopped Joseph Alfred Norbert Provencher and Captain D.R. Cameron from
William McDougalls party from proceeding past the barricade at La Rivire Sale. Andre
Nault reports: Around the middle of the day Captain Cameron arrived and wanted them
to remove the barrier, but Andr Neault and Benjamin Neault took the horse by the bridle
and Cameron had enough, fearful and shaking like a leaf he was taken to Thophile Jett 3
and kept in view. Joseph Delorme4 was the jail keeper.
Alex McArthur has given a description of the Metis warriors who gathered at La
Barrire on the Rivire Sale near the Pembina road, in St. Norbert parish, where they lay
in wait for Lieutenant Governor McDougall, in order to block him from entering the Red
River Settlement on October 21, 1869.
They all dressed well and usually in cloth of dark or blue shades; of good quality.
Their clothes were made in England, and the styles well became them. Vests,
however they cared little for; a heavy woolen shirt, loosely buttoned at the chest,
supplied the place of that garment.

Archives de la Socit historique de Saint-Boniface, Fonds Jean-Baptiste Ladroute, 0176, pp. 25-30.
The folk tales collected by Marguerite and her husbands journal of events at Red River during the
Resistance were passed down to Celina Ladroute Perron (1873-1963), Marie Anne Josephine Perron
(1915-2001) and finally to Marie-Louise Perron who had the memoires published; and reprinted one of the
folk tales, Lorigine des canards gris in Metis Legacy Vol. II: Michif Culture, Heritage, and Folkways (L.
Barkwell, L. Dorion and A. Hourie (Eds.) Saskatoon: Gabriel Dumont Institute and Pemmican
Publications, 2006: 46-54).
3
Thophile Jett was a French Canadian married to Delphine Dnomm (Metis). They lived in St. Norbert..
Captain Cameron was held captive in their home.
4
Joseph Delorme served on the Court Martial that sentenced Thomas Scott to death.
2

It was the fashion to wear leggings ornamented slightly, and these being wide,
took somewhat from the wearers height, particularly if only worn from the knee
downward, as it cut the leg in two. As cold weather was coming on many of those
on the River Salle [sic] wore their winter caps; those were quite martial in their
appearance being made of the whole fur of the red fox. The skin was merely
turned round the wearers head and the fox tail was then jauntily thrown back
over the top.5
Jean Baptiste Laderoute says that he went with Benjamin Lagimodiere and others
from St. Norbert, St. Francois Xavier, and Ste. Anne des Chenes, went to occupy Upper
Fort Garry. He says that when they arrived the doors were all open. They then closed the
big south door and the north door where the cannon fortifications were. They left the east
door facing St. Boniface open. Laderoute says that Baptiste Berard was looking after
them, sharing his sugar and tea.
Joseph Delorme. 6(b. 1849) Joseph Delorme was the guard for Captain D.R. Cameron
from William McDougalls party who was stopped at the barricade at La Rivire Sale on
October 21, 1869. Later, Delorme served on the Court Martial that sentenced Thomas
Scott to death.
Joseph was born on February 1, 1849, the son of Urbaine Delorme Sr. and Madeleine
Vivier; and was the younger brother of Norbert Delorme. Joseph married Lizette McLeod
(b. 1854) on February 9, 1875 at St. Franois-Xavier. They had five children. He served
on the Court Martial that condemned Thomas Scott to death. He moved to the Touronds
Coulee area on the South Saskatchewan in 1882. Delorme was involved in the 1885
Resistance at Duck Lake with Gabriel Dumont. Dumont reported that throughout the
Duck Lake fight Delorme was at his side fighting like a lion.
In the 1885 Resistance Delorme was an inspirational leader during the fighting at
Touronds Coulee. Isidore Dumas reports:
Joseph Delorme encouraged the people all the time; he cried out Courage!
Courage! We must defend ourselves. The battle lasted until 6 oclock p.m. or a bit
before 6 oclock. He visited the men to count them. He found 44 living.7
Joseph fought as a member of Captain Daniel Garipys company, one of the 19
dizaines led by Gabriel Dumont during the 1885 Metis Resistance. He was wounded and
captured at Batoche. In his memoir, Dumont recalls:
Joseph Delorme, now at Dauphin, lost both testicles at the battle of Batoche. The
bullet also went through his thigh. He was found and looked after by the English.
There were huge flaps of skin on both sides of the wound. To close it, the women put

Alex McArthur, The causes of the Rising in the Red River Settlement, 1869-70 Manitoba Historical
and Scientific Society, Publication No. 1, 1882: p. 7.

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him on a table and wanted to put him to sleep. He refused, and laughed while they
operated to show he had no fear.8
In his testimony of August 13, 1885 at the Regina trial Father Alexis Andre says:
Joseph Delorme I knew in Manitoba and during the three years that he has been in
the Saskatchewan. He was always a very respectable, hard working man, honest and
well thought of. He, for a long time, refused to have anything to do with Riel, and
induced his neighbors to refuse to do the same. It was only by force and threats that
he was compelled to take part in the rebel party. He has been severely wounded, is a
cripple for life, and his home and family utterly ruined. If he has offended he has
been very heavily punished, and the hand of justice might with mercy, deal lightly
with him. He has a wife and four children and has lost everything. (CSP, 1886, Vol.
13, pp. 385-386)
Delorme was arrested on July 20, 1885, tried at Regina on August 14, 1885 on the
charge of treason-felony, convicted and then released on his own recognizance with a
conditional discharge. The family later moved to Calgary.
Chrysostome Laderoute was born on January 16, 1848 in St. Boniface the Metis son of
Jean Baptiste Ladroute and Josphte Larocque. He married Christine Larocque
[Roguebrune] (b. 1848), the daughter of Charles Larocque and Cecile Laberge on April
26, 1870 in St. Boniface. Cecile was the sister of Cyrile Larocque, who was also a
Resistance participant. J.B. Laderoute says that after Riel had sent men to stop
McDougall at Pembina they sent Chrysostome Laderoute, Louis Blondeau, Cyrile
Laroque and others to the La Salle River to build a barricade.
Jean Laderoute reports that after Schultzs store was captured by the Metis a number
of men were sent to guard it; these were Chrysostome Laderoute, Bidaux Delorme and
Baptiste Arcand. As it was cold they started a fire. The stoves were not working and had
to be shaken. The pipes fell; they turned out to be filled with guns and ammunition. If the
stoves had worked they would have all been dead and the house destroyed. There was
enough powder found for that to happen.
Philbert (Philibert) Laderoute was born on March 2, 1824 in St. Boniface, the son of
Jean Philbert Laderoute and Marguerite Pontbriand dit Sansregret. He married Julie
Lepine, the daughter of Jean Baptiste Lepine and Julie Henry. He was the uncle of Jean
Baptiste and Chrysostome Laderoute. His wife, Julie Lepine, was the sister of Jean
Baptiste, Maxime and Ambroise Dydime Lepine.
Laderoute then reports that Ambroise Lepine, Andre Nault and Philbert Laderoute
went to Pembina to stop William McDougall.

A signator of Gabriel Dumonts petition (dated St. Antoine de Padoue, 4 th September, 1882) to the Prime Minister for a survey and
land grants.
7
Cloutier, op cit Vol. 2, p. 10.
8
Michael Barnholden (Translator), Gabriel Dumont Speaks, Vancouver: Talon Books, 1993: 25.

Louis Blondeau III was born circa 1843 at Red River, the son of Louis Blondeau II and
Josephte Desfonds. He lived on Lot #8, St. Boniface Parish. He married Philomene
Martel, the daughter of Joseph Martel and Marie Ritchot. He was the nephew of Simon
Blondeau. Simon Blondeau was born on the Pembina River, the son of Louis Blondeau I
and Marie Louise Laframboise dit Franche. Louis Blondeau worked as an interpreter for
the North West Company at Fort des Prairies in 1804 and at Cumberland House in 181516. Simon Blondeau was present during the aftermath of the Battle of Seven Oaks. Simon
Blondeau was also present at the Battle of the Grand Coteau in 1851.
J.B. Laderoute says that after Riel had sent men to stop McDougall at Pembina they
sent Chrysostome Laderoute, Louis Blondeau, Cyrile Laroque and others to the La Salle
River to build a barricade [October 20, 1869].
Simon Blondeau married Francoise Desjarlais, the daughter of Antoine Desjarlais
and Marie Catherine Allery, in 1850 at St. Boniface. Their son John was married to the
Augustin Brabants daughter Caroline. Simon worked for his father-in-law Antoine
Desjarlais at Fort Desjarlais in the Souris River Valley in the 1850s.
Louis Blondeau Jr. was one of the men who manned the barricades on the La Salle
River to prevent the entry of Canadian government officials in October of 1869.
Johnny Desmarais. John was born in July of 1841 at St. Franois Xavier, the son of
Joseph Desmarais (b. 1812) and Adelaide Clermont. He married Rose Gervais in 1864
and married Helene Gosselin in 1869. Helene and John lived first at St. Francois Xavier
then at the Battlefords, Fort Walsh, Wood Mountain and Batoche. Laderoute says that
after Norbert Parisien had shot John Sutherland:
A party of men on horses, their names were Mr. ODonaho (William
ODonoghue), Ambroise Lepine, Johnny Desmarais and others, I dont remember
their names, they brought back the people of Fort de Pierre (Boulton and the
Portage Gang) to Fort Garry. It was decided that many would be condemned.
Mr. ODonnel Smith (Donald Smith) asked the government if he could go
amongst the people and ask them if they would approve of the Government
Provisoire if it would spare the lives of Captain Boulton and Powers. The people
approving, all were freed excepting Scott, Wallace Gaudy (William Gaddy) and
Sabyne (Herbert L. Sabine).
Desmarais lived on lot 65 in Batoche. He had thirteen acres under cultivation but was
primarily a hunter and freighter. John was a member of Captain Daniel Garipys
company, one of the 19 dizaines led by Gabriel Dumont during the 1885 Metis
Resistance. The Provisional Council minutes of April 17 show an order for Desmarais to
be provided with a cow.9 Desmarais fled to North Dakota after 1885 and lived in the
Belcourt/Dunsieth area of North Dakota.

Canada Sessional Papers, Minutes of the Provisional Government, April 1885. 1886, Vol. 13, (No. 43),
pp. 41-49.

Jean Baptiste Arcand. Jean Baptiste was born at St. Franois Xavier December 20,
1840, the son of Joseph Arcand and Marie Vestro dit Gesson. He was employed with the
HBC as a Middleman from 1864 to 1866, and as Freeman employee at Red River from
1866 to 1868.10 He resided in Baie St. Paul Parish on Lot 245.He married Anne Nancy
McKay and later settled at St. Laurent on the South Saskatchewan.
Jean Laderoute reports that after Schultzs store was captured by the Metis a number
of men were sent to guard it [on December 7, 1869]; these were Chrysostome Laderoute,
Bidaux Delorme and Baptiste Arcand. As it was cold they started a fire. The stoves were
not working and had to be shaken. The pipes fell; they turned out to be filled with guns
and ammunition. If the stoves had worked they would have all been dead and the house
destroyed. There was enough powder found for that to happen.
Baptiste was involved in the 1885 Resistance at Duck Lake with Dumont. His name
appears as # 253 on Philippe Garnots list of Resistance participants.
Cyrile Larocque born 1846 at St. Vital, the son of Charles Larocque (b. 1815 at RR) and
Cecile Laberge. Cyrile married Isabelle Larence, the daughter of Basile Larence and
Agathe (Iroquois) on October 19, 1869 at St. Boniface. J.B. Laderoute says that after Riel
had sent men to stop McDougall at Pembina they sent Chrysostome Laderoute, Louis
Blondeau, Cyrile Laroque and others to the La Salle River to build a barricade.
Laventure (Bonaventure) Parisien. Bonaventure was born circa 1808, the son of
Claude Bonaventure Parisien and Isabelle Lizette (Saulteaux). Laventure married
Marguerite (Saulteaux) who was born 1810 at Red Lake. He lived at St. Norbert and died
there in 1873. Laderoute reports that Laventure was in William Deases party that went to
meet with Riel at the barricade. He says: La Venture Parisien was one of them wild and
untamed, worse than an Indian with different colored feathers in his hairreal savage
ways as signs of warfare.
Francois Parisien. Francois was born on September 13, 1828, the oldest son of
Laventure Pariesien and Marguerite (Saulteaux). He was first married to Genevieve
Lavallee dit Plante then married Annie Sahys, the daughter of Francois Sayis (Sahys) and
Marguerite (Saulteaux) on January 10, 1860 at St. Norbert. He was enumerated as a
hunter, Family # 15 during the 1850 Pembina census.
Jean Baptiste Laderoute says that Francois Parisien arrived and offered his services
to Riel when they had been warned that the people of Portage la Prairie were on their way
to seize Upper Fort Garry in February of 1870.
Le Grand Louison Lariviere was born on March 6, 1815 and died December 12, 1910
at Olga, N.D. Married Marie Lambert the daughter of Antoine Lambert and Marie
(Saulteaux). Sold the land where Riel House sits to the Riels.

10

HBCA, B.239/g/104/105/107-108.

Jean Baptiste Laderoute reports that he, Le Grand Louison Lariviere and Ambroise
Lepine stopped Joseph Alfred Norbert Provencher and Captain D.R. Cameron from
William McDougalls party from proceeding past the barricade at La Salle...
A party of them returned with people of Pembina, such as the Jeromes, Elzear
Goulet came to offer their services to defend their right of their likes or fellowmen.
After a while ODonald Smith armed was captured and guarded in a room in the big
house and guarded by Big Louison Lariviere, detained there for quite a few days. He
noticed that there was card playing in the basement of the house. Many of our men
did not feel like keeping up with the enterprise they had started. The number of Card
players were as follows Joseph Genthon, J.B. Morin 11, Big Louison Morin12, J.B.
Perrault,13 J. B. Gouriotte14 and others I dont remember their names after many
days I was named to replace the guard of ODonald Smith.
Jean Baptiste Comtois dit Morin. According to Laderoutes account, Morin was one of
the guards placed on or near the Governors House, Upper Fort Fort Garry, for quite a
few days in 1870. Apparently, Laderoute was not impressed with the guards vigilance:
He noticed that there was card playing in the basement of the house. In his view, this
was an indication that Many of our men did not feel like keeping up with the enterprise
they had started. The other card players included Joseph Genthon, Big Louison
Perrault dit Morin, Jean Baptiste Gouriotte/ Grouette, and others I dont remember their
names.
Jean Baptiste Comtois dit Morin, was born 1834, the son of Antoine Morin and
Therese Larocque. He married Nancy Delorme, the daughter of Joseph Delorme and
Isabelle Gourneau. Nancy Delorme was the sister of one of Riels Captains, Joseph Karyence Delorme, born 1838. Joseph was married to Angelique Gingras the daughter of St.
Josephs trader Antoine Gingras.
Ambroise Lepine (1840-1923) Ambroise was born in St. Vital, he was the son the son of
Jean Baptiste Berard dit Lepine and Julia Henry (Mtisse), he was the brother of Jean
Baptiste Lepine (b. 1824) and Maxime Lepine (b. 1837).
Jean Baptiste Laderoute reports that he, Le Grand Louison Lariviere and Ambroise
Lepine stopped Joseph Alfred Norbert Provencher and Captain D.R. Cameron from
William McDougalls party from proceeding past the barricade at La Salle.

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Jean Baptiste Comtois dit Morin, born 1834, the son of Antoine Morin and Therese Larocque. He married
Nancy Delorme, the daughter of Joseph Delorme and Isabelle Gourneau. Nancy Delorme was the sister of
one of Riels Captains, Joseph Kar-yence Delorme, born 1838. Joseph was married to Angelique Gingras
the daughter of St. Josephs trader Antoine Gingras.
12
Louis Morin, born 1837 at St. Boniface, the brother of Jean Baptiste Morin. Louis married Marguerite
Gosselin. In 1870 they were living in a tent in St. Norbert, he was a hunter and plains trader.
13
Jean Baptiste Perreault dit Morin and Charles Nolin were delegates from Ste. Anne des Chnes (Oak
Point) to the Convention of 24.
14
Jean Baptiste Grouette was born in 1829, the son of Antoine Grouette and Madeleine Nolin. Charles
Nolin (b. 1838) was his cousin. He was married to Julie Perreault dit Morin.

Laderoute then reports that Ambroise Lepine, Andre Nault and Philbert Laderoute
went to Pembina to stop William McDougall.
Ambroise married Cecile Marion (1842 - 1908) the daughter of Francois Marion and
Angelique Deschamps Moreau. Their children were Albert, James, Louis Gonzague,
Narcisse, Cleophine, Edmond (George), Marie, Marguerite and adopted son Pierre
Cadotte the son of Joseph Cadotte and Mariejean Emma (Cree). Cecile passed away on
22 May 1908 in Forget, Saskatchewan. Ambroise died on June 8, 1923 at St. Boniface.
From the beginning of the Red River Resistance, he was Louis Riels military
lieutenant and chief enforcer. He led the armed party that ordered Lieutenant Governor
McDougall out of the settlement in October 1869. He was prominent in the surrenders of
the Schultz Canadian party in December 1869 and of the Boulton party in February 1870.
His appearance in 1870 was described by Roderick MacBeath as: a man of
magnificent physique, standing fully six feet three and built in splendid proportion,
straight as an arrow, with hair of raven blackness, large aquiline nose and eyes of piercing
brilliance; a man of prodigious strength, a skilled roughrider. ...

Lpine was subsequently arrested and tried for the murder of Thomas Scott in 1874.
He was found guilty by a jury, but was granted an amnesty by the Governor-General of
Canada with the provision that he lose his civil rights (five years banishment from Her
Majesty's Dominions).

Later Ambroise worked as a freighter. Mr. John Grover from the Neepawa area
described a Red River cart train that he saw being loaded for a western trip in 1878:
"This train of carts was in charge of Ambrose Lepine, a big, burly, French Metis, who
had been one of Louis Riel's chief lieutenants in the fracas of 1870. There were about
fifteen carts, 800 lbs. being a load, and were hauled by an ox or Indian pony, and as
many more loose animals were taken along to replace the ones hitched up, when tired,
all in charge of three or four men on horse-back.... These carts were built entirely of
wood ... and as they were never greased you could hear them long before you could
see them.... The freight rate for these trains was one cent per mile per hundred pounds
so that a sack of flour selling in Winnipeg then at $2.00 would cost $3.00 at
Gladstone."15
Lepine died at the St. Boniface General Hospital on 8 June 1923. He is buried in the
churchyard of the St. Boniface Cathedral next to Riel. He is commemorated by Lepine
Avenue in Winnipeg.
Ambroise Lepine appeared in the 1889 Exposition Universelle (Paris Worlds Fair) with
Buffalo Bill Cody. Maxime Goulet, along with Maxime Lepine, Michel Dumas and Jules
Marion were presented as French-Canadien trappers with teams of Eskimo sled dogs.
Lepine left St. Boniface on March 30, 1889, with Maxime Goulet, Michel Dumas and
Jules Marion on the way to the Paris Worlds Fair to take part in the Wild West Show.
They took two Red River Carts, two trains of dogs and a buffalo gun. They built a Metis
log cabin at the Fair.
In the finale at the Wild West Show their log cabin was set on fire and they were
depicted as trappers under attack by Indians who are rescued by Buffalo Bill and his men.
The Wild West Show took two Metis dog teams, twenty buffalo and 200 horses with them
to Paris.
Andre Nault. Andr Nault was born on April 21, 1830 at Point Douglas, the son of
Amable Nault (b. 1798) and Josephte Lagimodiere. Andre was married to Anastasie
Landry, the daughter of Joseph Landry and Genevieve Lalonde. Amable Nault arrived at
Red River in 1825. Andre was present with Riel when he stopped Webbs surveyors on
October 11, 1869.
Andre Nault reports: Around the middle of the day Captain Cameron arrived and
wanted them to remove the barrier but Andr Neault and Benjamin Neault took the horse
by the bridle and Cameron had enough, fearful and shaking like a leaf he was taken to
Thophile Jett and kept in view. Joseph Delorme was the jail keeper. Louis Riel ordered
Lpine a troop of twenty men to take Provencher and Cameron south and to expel the
Lieutenant Governor who had settled at fort Pembina.

15

John Grover, "An Englishman Who Stayed," The Grain Growers' Guide, August 1, 1926, p.20.

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Laderoute then reports that Ambroise Lepine, Andre Nault and Philbert Laderoute
went to Pembina to stop William McDougall.
Laderoute reports that while occupying fort Garry they ran out of provisions. Louis
riel wrote on a piece of paper and passed it to me to go and read it to Dr. Corvair (Dr.
William Cowan, HBC Chief Trader). As I could not read I refused to go. He then took
two men, big Louis Lariviere and one of the Nault Boys to go to Dr. Corvair. They came
back and said nothing. They went to the storehouse of provisions took a log and broke it
open and helped themselves to the food.
When the men of Portage la Prairie were reportedly coming to take the fort
Laderoute says: Andre Nault being the Captain said Let us make war! Riel said, I beg
of you for mercy sake! They are only coming to scale the walls, just throw them down.
No bloodshed.
Benjamin Nault. Benjamin was born on June 24, 1832 at St. Boniface the son of Amable
Nault (b. 1798) and Josephte Lagimodiere. Benjamin married Isabelle Hamelin, the
daughter of Solomon Hamelin and Isabelle Vandal. Benjamin was present with Riel when
he stopped Webbs surveyors on October 11, 1869.
Romain Nault. Romain was born in 1838 in St. Boniface the son of Amable Nault (b.
1798) and Josephte Lagimodiere. Romain married Philomene Landry the daughter of
Joseph Landry and Genevieve Lalonde in 1859. Romain was present with Riel when he
stopped Webbs surveyors on October 11, 1869.
Prosper Nault. Prosper was present with Riel when he stopped Webbs surveyors on
October 11, 1869.
Benjamin Lagimodiere (Lagemodier, Lagimonire) Born January 15, 1811 at Fort
Pembina, the son of Jean Baptiste Lagimodiere and Marie Anne Gaboury. He married
Angelique Carriere (b. 1834), the daughter of Andre Carriere and Angelique Dion or
Lyon in 1834 at St. Boniface.
Jean Baptiste Laderoute says that he went with Benjamin Lagimodiere and others from
St. Norbert, St. Francois Xavier, and Ste. Anne des Chenes to occupy Upper Fort Garry
[on November 2, 1869]. When we arrived the doors were all opened.
Baptiste Berard was born circa 1825 at Fort des Prairies, the son of Louis Berard (b.
1794) and Catherine Hughes the Metis daughter of James Hughes and Nan-Touche
Corbeau. He married Helene Martin, the daughter of Pierre Martin dit Lavallee and Marie
Lambert. They had seven children between 1850 and 1863. He was a brother-in-law to
Paul Blondin another Resistance participant.
Laderoute says that after they took Upper Fort Garry Baptiste Berard was looking
after them, sharing his sugar and tea.

Paul Blondin (Blondeau), son of Paul Blondin/Blondeau and Esther Robillard, he


married Celestine Berard daughter of Jean Baptiste Berard and Helen Martin dit Lavallee.
He was a brother-in-law to Baptiste Berard [above].
Jean Baptiste dit Bidou Delorme (1832-1894) Baptiste was born at Norway House, the
son of Baptiste Delorme (b. 1781) and his wife Catherine. He married Marguerite Pepin,
daughter of Antoine Pepin and Marguerite Davis, on 8 January 1855 at Pembina. This
was a hunting family and moved a great deal. They lived at Pembina, St. Boniface, St.
Francois Xavier, Wood Mountain, Carlton, and Touchwood Hills.
Jean Laderoute reports that after Schultzs store was captured by the Metis a number
of men were sent to guard it; these were Chrysostome Laderoute, Bidaux Delorme and
Baptiste Arcand. As it was cold they started a fire. The stoves were not working and had
to be shaken. The pipes fell; they turned out to be filled with guns and ammunition. If the
stoves had worked they would have all been dead and the house destroyed. There was
enough powder found for that to happen.
Children:
Sara, married to a Vermette.
Jean, born October1856, died December 1856.
Marie, born December 24, 1857, married Francois Lariviere.
David, born February 16, 1861, married Auxille LaFrance.
Julienne, born June 30, 1863, married John William fiddler.
Marcel, born June 30, 1863, died August 1863.
Martial, born March 16, 1865, died November 1865.
Edouard, born September 30, 1866, died October 1866.
Francoise, born Ovtober 1, 1867, married Charles Lavallee then James
fiddler.
Roger, born April 13, 1870, married Helene Lavallee.
Adele, born May 20, 1872, married a Chabot.
Marguerite, born June 3, 1874, married Martin Bouthaux.
Elise, born May 9, 1874, married Andrew Stelia.
Joseph, born April 15, 1877.
Jean Baptiste Tourond (1838) Baptiste was born June 1, 1838 at St. Boniface, the son of
Joseph Tourond16 and Rosalie Pontbriand dit Laderoute (b. 1816). He married Anglique
Delorme (Metis), the daughter of Joseph Delorme and Brigitte Plouf dit Villebrun (Metis)
in 1861. They lived and farmed at St. Norbert on lot 42.
On October 11, 1869, Baptiste was part of Riels group who stopped Colonel
Dennis and crew from surveying on Metis land. Baptiste represented St. Norbert at the
Convention of November 1869, and the Convention of Forty January 26, 1870; he then
16

Joseph Tourond, according to family lore, had come with his brother from the neighbourhood of Castle
Tourond in France to homestead along the Red River near St. Boniface. He was first married to Charlotte
Gladu.

10

served on Riels Red River Council in 1870. Baptiste voted in favour of an armed force to
repulse the Fenian invasion and was elected second captain of troops from La Pointe
Coupe on October 7, 1871. Touronds wife Anglique died, and on October 21, 1889 he
married for a second time to Regina Allard, the daughter of Joseph Allard and Julie
Langevin.
Tourond was among those who, on 11 October 1869, stopped the Canadian survey
crew from trespassing on settlement land in St. Vital. He was one of the original members
of Le Comit National des Mtis de la Rivire Rouge, and, as a delegate of St. Norbert
parish, he attended the Convention of Twenty-four, which began on November 16 in the
Court House at Fort Garry. Tourond continued to represent St. Norbert in La Grande
Convention/Convention of Forty, and the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia. Almost
immediately after the formation of the province, Tourond was among the group organized
by Rev. Ritchot and Joseph Dubuc to lay claim to land along Rivire-aux-Rats for a new
parish to forestall any disallowance of such settlement expansion by anticipated
Canadian government surveys. The settlement proved successful, and later became
known as St-Pierre-Jolys.
Baptiste Normand was born circa 1811, the son of Francois Normand and Francoise
Belanger. He married Louise Carriere the daughter of Andre Carriere and Angelique Dion
dit Lyon. Baptiste and his younger brother Michel Normand lived in St. Norbert.
Laderoute reports that after Bishop Tache reported that a settlement was at hand there
was only Riel, Baptiste Normand and Josai Gagnon left at the Fort.
Old Josai Gagnon. Joseph Gagnon was born in 1814, the son of Joseph Gagnon and
Josephte Lapierre. He married Marie Pelletier, the daughter of Antoine Pelletier and
Marguerite (Saulteaux). They are enumerated at Pembina in the 1850 census as family #
120, he gives his occupation as hunter. He later married Suzanne Bourre at Lebret in
1874. Laderoute reports that after Bishop Tache returned to Red River and reported that
the delegates had reached a settlement and confederation was at hand there was only Riel,
Baptiste Normand and Josai Gagnon left at the Fort.
Andre Jerome dit St. Mathe, Andr Jerome was the grandson of Pierre Jerome and a
Chippewa Cree woman by the name of Virginia. Pierre was a Cree interpreter for the
North West Company at Fort Carlton, he died there in November 28, 1821. Andr
Jeromes father, Martin Jerome dit St. Matthe or l Pchi St. Matthe born in 1799, was
also a company interpreter. After his fathers death he moved to the Red River Settlement
and married there. He was a Pembina buffalo hunter then worked as a freighter in the
annual train of Red River carts from Winnipeg to St. Paul, Minnesota, during the years
1845 to 1870, the last year of the cart drive.
Laderoute says: A party of them returned with people of Pembina, such as the
Jeromes, Elzear Goulet came to offer their services to defend their right of their likes or
fellowmen.

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The deposition of Andre Nault, one of Riels lieutenants, suggests that Andre Jerome dit
St. Matte and Damase Harrison were guards of Thomas Scott in Upper Fort Garry and
that they insisted on a Council of War or court martial, because otherwise they would
shoot him themselves. After the court Martial Scott was shot by a Provisional
Government firing squad.
Andr Jerome was born on December 14, 1829 in St. Boniface, Manitoba, the son
of Martin Jerome and Angelique Letendr. He was one of seven brothers. His father later
remarried in 1831 to Elizabeth Wilkie the daughter of Alexandre Wilkie. Andre was
baptized on 15 Dec 1829 in St. Boniface, Manitoba. Andre married Marguerite Gosselin,
the daughter of Antoine Gosselin and Marie Roy and they had nine children. The family
appeared on both the 1850 and 1860 census in Pembina. He participated in
ODonoghues Fenian Raid in October of 1871, at the Hudson's Bay post north of
Pembina. He was arrested in November 1871 and was imprisoned in the Stone Fort
(Lower fort Garry).

He was subsequently acquitted of feloniously and unlawfully levying war against


Her Majesty, in the spring of 1872 in Winnipeg. He moved in 1872 to Kittson County,
Minnesota. He was recognized as the first settler in Kittson County. He appeared in the
census of both June 1880 and 1900 in Township 162, Kittson County, Minnesota. He
appeared in the census in Apr 1910 in Hill Township, Kittson County.
A Jerome family history records:

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Andr Jerome dit St. Mathe, though about 3/4 Cree and Ojibway and 1/4 French
Canadian, had blue eyesas recorded by Joseph Bouvette, editor of the Kittson
County Enterprise, who interviewed him in 1906. Moreover, photographs reveal
that unlike an Indian he had sufficient facial hair to wear a full beard and long
drooping mustache, which must have been striking in his elder years, when his
hair and beard were pure white against a dark complexion. He was listed on the
1850 census of Pembina, Minnesota Territory; the 1860 census of Pembina,
Dakota Territory; and on the 1870 Red River Census in Manitoba, that recorded
him and his family as living in the parish of Ste. Agathe, which comprehended
settlements on both sides of the border, such as Pembina and the later Emerson.
His baptismal name is sometimes translated as Andrew.
Elzear Goulet. Elzar Goulet was born on November 18, 1836 at St. Boniface, the son of
Alexis Goulet and Josephte Siveright. He married Hlne Jrme dit Saint-Matte, the
daughter of Jean Baptiste Jrme dit Saint-Matte and Josephte Courchene on March 8,
1859 at Pembina. Elzar and Hlne Goulet had six children. Goulet worked as a mail
carrier from Pembina to the Red River from 1860 to 1869 and became
an American citizen. Goulet joined Louis Riels forces at Upper fort Garry in 1869 and
became second-in-command of the Mtis militia under Ambroise-Didyme Lpine.
Laderoute: A party of them returned with people of Pembina, such as the
Jeromes, Elzear Goulet came to offer their services to defend their right of their likes or
fellowmen.
On September 13, 1870, Elzar Goulet was sitting in a Winnipeg saloon,
undoubtedly enjoying a drink after having finished some business on the Fort Garry side
of the Red River, when someone accused him of shooting Thomas Scott. A mle soon
broke out and Elzar somehow escaped from the hotel, a mob of angry men in hot
pursuit. They chased him for quite some time until Elzar, obviously fearing for his life,
plunged into the Red River, hoping to swim across it for the safety of St. Boniface. He
never made it. Conflicting accounts suggest he either succumbed to the river's current,
was stricken with a cramp, or what is most likely, the men who had given chase pelted
him with stones until one hit him in the head, knocking him unconscious and drowning
him.
Lieutenant Governor Adams G. Archibald did order an investigation into Goulets
murder and sent the investigators report dated September 27, 1870, to the federal
Secretary of State for the Provinces. 17 The report recommended that arrest warrants be
issued for three parties, two for feloniously causing Goulets death. However, a local
judge, Johnson, reviewed the investigation and recommended that the Lieutenant
Governor not issue warrants.
Antoine Marcelin (Ste. Agathe)
Laderoute reports : Ste Agathe was well represented. Antoine Marcelin one of
them said to me We will see if the doors of the Fort will be closed tonight. Their plan
17

Canada Sessional Papers (1871), 34 Victoria (No. 20), p. 1- 5, 52-54.

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has failed even if the doors of the Fort would be closed without having anything done and
the meeting left to the next day. Many who wanted the doors of the Fort to be closed,
didnt show up the next day. We then decided to have a meeting (with Donald Smith) to
make an agreement with Canada.
Antoine Marcelin est n en 1842 Pont-Chteau, dans le comt de Soulanges, au
sud-ouest de Montral. On ignore peu prs tout de son enfance, sauf qu'il a le got des
voyages et de l'aventure. Il vient tout juste d'avoir 18 ans quand il part pour la Californie.
Il y habite quelques annes, quoiqu'il soit impossible de prciser s'il y sjourne jusqu'
son tablissement Victoria en 1866. Le jeune homme s'y livre vraisemblement au
commerce. On le retrouve Saint-Albert, prs d'Edmonton, quelques annes plus tard, et
on sait de faon certaine qu'il vit l pendant trois ans. Puis, il se lance sur la piste Carlton
afin d'aller tenter fortune au Manitoba. La piste passe d'ailleurs peu de distance du lac
Muskeg, o il reviendra s'installer deux dcennies plus tard. Au Manitoba, il se rserve un
homestead, dont il obtient les lettres patentes en 1874 ou 1875. 18 la mi-janvier 1890,
Antoine Marcelin arrive Duck Lake avec son pouse, sa fille adoptive, Aldina, et deux
autres hommes. Aprs quelques semaines de repos, la petite troupe complte le voyage
vers la rserve indienne en dmocrate et en traneau.(2) Plus tard, Antoine Marcelin
tablit le village qui porte encore son nom, mais en 1890, il ouvre un magasin dans la
rserve du lac Muskeg et devient traiteur de fourrures.
Joseph McMullen (McMillan) was born on December 4, 1849 in St Boniface (d:
October 5, 1923 in St James). He was the son of William McMullen or McMillan born
1806 in the district of Fort Edmonton (d: September 29, 1903 in the home of his son
Patrice McMillan in St James) and Marguerite Margaret Dease (b. 1820 at Fort
Alexander) She was the daughter of John Warren Dease Sr. and Genevieve Jenny
Beignet.
JJean Baptiste Laderoute reports that it was Joseph McMillan that warned Riels men that
the people of Portage la Prairie were on their way to seize Upper Fort Garry.
JJoseph married Appoline Pauline Bruce (b: November 27, 1851 in St Boniface) on
February 21, 1870 in St Boniface. She was the daughter of Jean Baptiste Bruce and
Catherine Perreault, the sister of John Bruce the first President of the Metis Provisional
government in 1869.

Compiled by Lawrence Barkwell


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http://musee.societehisto.com/antoine-marcelin-n372-t270.html Musee virtuel francophone de la


Saskatchewan.

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Coordinator of Metis Heritage and History Research


Louis Riel Institute

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