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INTRODUCTIONS OF THE FRUIT

JUICES

The term fruit has many different meanings depending on


context. In botany, a fruit is the ripened ovary together
with seeds of a flowering plant. In many species, the fruit
incorporates the ripened ovary and the surrounding
tissues. Fruits are the means by which flowering plants
disseminate seeds.
In cuisine, when discussing fruit as food, the term usually
refers to those plant fruits that are sweet and fleshy,
examples of which include plums, apples and oranges.
However, a great many common vegetables, as well as
nuts and grains, are the fruit of that plant species.
No single terminology really fits the enormous variety
that is found among plant fruits.
The cuisine terminology for fruits is inexact and will
remain so. The term false fruit (pseudo carp, accessory
fruit) is sometimes applied to a fruit like the fig (a
multiple-accessory fruit; see below) or to a plant structure
that resembles a fruit but is not derived from a flower or
flowers. Some gymnosperms, such as yew, have fleshy
arils that resemble fruits and some junipers have berry-
like, fleshy cones. The term "fruit" has also been
inaccurately applied to the seed-containing female cones
of many conifers.
With most fruits pollination is a vital part of fruit culture,
and the lack of knowledge of pollinators and pollenizers
can contribute to poor crops or poor quality crops. In a
few species, the fruit may develop in the absence of
pollination/fertilization, a process known as
parthenocarpy.

Such fruits are seedless. A plant that does not produce


fruit is known as acarpous, meaning "without fruit".
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

1.To find out the demand for the juices the


manufactured by beverage companies

2.To find out the consumers or interest


regarding the products(product categories)

3.Dealer satisfaction regarding product supply


and offerings of the Coca-Cola Company.

4.To know the sales in different locations and


finding or reasons for the same.

5.Competitive product performance of


Hindustan Coca-Cola pvt ltd Vis a Vis
competitors.
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
RESERCH PROBLEM

DEFINE THE PROBLEM AND RESEARCH OBJECTIVES


In a very sense, this step is the heart of the
research process. This is the first step, which calls
for the marketing manages and marketing
research.

RESEARCH PLAN DEVELOPMENT


The second calls for developing the most efficient
plan for gathering the needed information. Not to
forget the cost or values of research the marketing
manager must estimate process its approval,
Research plan calls for decision on

a) Data source
i. Primary data to be collected for a
specific purpose.
ii. Secondary data collected for another
purpose and already existing
somewhere.

1.Research Approaches: Primary data can be


collected in four ways :

1) Observational research
2) Focus group research
3) Survey research
4) Experimental research

2.Research Instruments: Marketing researchers


can use questionnaires in collecting of primary
data. Because of its flexibility, questionnaire is
by for the most common instrument used to
collect primary data.

3.Sampling Plan: This plan calls for three


aspects:-

a) Define the sampling unit.


b) Decide the sample size.
c)Decide the sampling procedure
whether to use probability or non-
probability sampling, methods.
4.Contract method: Once the sampling plan has
been determined, the research has to decide
how the subject should be contacted. The
choices are mail, telephone or research
interviews.

COLLECTION OF INFORMATION
Data collection phase is generally the most
expensive and the most phase to error. Carry out
the field work, collect data using the instruments,
adjust the problems of not at homes, replaced,
refusal to co-operate, biased or dishonest answers.

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS


The next to last step is to extract pertinent
findings from the collected data. The researcher
edits, code, tabulate the collected data.

PRESENTATION OF FINDINGS
As the last step in marketing research, the
researchers present the findings. The researchers
have to arrange the researched result according to
an approved reporting format, get the report typed
and bound, present the copies of the report to the
concerned authorities.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY/ DESIGN


The methodology adopted for eliciting the data
required for the study was survey method. It is the
overall pattern or framework of the project that
will dictate as to what information is to be
collected, from which sources and by what
procedures.

RESEARCH METHOD
Research methodology must be classified on the
basis of the major purpose of the investigation. In
this problem, description studies have been
undertaken, as the objective of the project is to
conduct the market share study to determine the
share of the market received by both the company
and its competitors.
DATA COLLETION
The information needed to further proceed in the
project had been collected through primary data
and secondary data.

PRIMARY DATA
Primary data consists of information collected for
the specific purpose at hand for the purpose of
collecting primary data, survey research was used
and all the retail outlets sellers using different
brands and their competitors were contacted.
Survey research is the approach best suited
gathering description.

CONTACT METHODS
The information was solicited by administrating
structured questionnaire to the retile sellers, (thus
getting to know directly from the soft sellers about
the form of the mix they are using) its storage
period, their level of satisfaction with the brand, in
their decision in selecting the brand etc..,

SECONDARY DATA
The secondary data consists of information that
already exist somewhere, having been collected for
another purpose. Any researcher begins the
research work by first going through the secondary
data. Secondary data includes the information
available with the company. It may be the findings
of research previously done in the field. Secondary
data can also be collected from magazines,
newspapers, other surveys conducted by known
research agencies etc..,

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
The respondents are the vendors who the selling
and their experience with that fruit juices. The
study is carried in the city of Hyderabad with the
sample size of 150. The survey was carried out
with the help of a structured questionnaire, which
helps in accomplishing the research objectives.
The respondents by means of personal interview
administer this structured ended questionnaire.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY:


The study is conducted on packed juices at “Hindustan Coca-Cola”.
The study is confined to the area of Hyderabad .The sample of the
respondents chosen for the study was retiling Shoppe’s, bakeries,
and at supermarkets.

The size of the sample was:


150
LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

LIMITATIONS
The present study is subjected to following
LIMITATIONS,

 Method of data collection was through


personal interview and therefore personal bias
becomes a major limitation.
 Due to the time constraints all the customers
were not covered.

 The sample was restricted to 150 respondents


(vendors), which may restrict the scope and
completion of study.
 The scope of study is restricted only to the
Hyderabad.
 Due to their busy schedule some vendors won’t
give answers to all the questions in the
questionnaire.
REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Competitor analysis
Competitor analysis in marketing and strategic
management is an assessment of the strengths
and weaknesses of current and potential
competitors . This analysis provides both an
offensive and defensive strategic context through
which to identify opportunities and threats.
Competitor profiling coalesces all of the relevant
sources of competitor analysis into one framework
in the support of efficient and effective strategy
formulation, implementation, monitoring and
adjustment.

Given that competitor analysis is an essential


component of corporate strategy, Porter (1980,
1998) argued that most firms do not conduct this
type of analysis systematically enough. Instead,
many enterprises operate on what he calls
“informal impressions, conjectures, and intuition
gained through the tidbits of information about
competitors every manager continually receives.”
As a result, traditional environmental scanning
places many firms risk of dangerous competitive
blind spots due to a lack of robust competitor
analysis.

Contents

1 COMPETITOR ARRAY

2 COMPETITOR PROFILING

3 MEDIA SCANNING

4 NEW COMPETITORS

5 SEE ALSO

6 REFERENCES

7 EXTERNAL LINKS
Competitors array

One common and useful technique is constructing


a competitor array. The steps include:
Define your industry - scope and nature of the
industry
Determine who your competitors are
Determine who your customers are and what
benefits they expect
Determine what the key success factors are in your
industry
Rank the key success factors by giving each one a
weighting - The sum of all the weightings must add
up to one.
Rate each competitor on each of the key success
factors
Multiply each cell in the matrix by the factor
weighting.

Sum columns for a weighted assessment of the


overall strength of each competitor relative to
each other.
This can best be displayed on a two dimensional
matrix - competitors along the top and key success
factors down the side. An example of a competitor
array follows:
Key
Competit Competit Competit Competit
Industry Weighti
or # 1 or #1 or #2 or #2
Success ng
rating weighted rating weighted
Factors

1-
Extensive
.4 6 2.4 3 1.2
distributi
on

2-
Customer .3 4 1.2 5 1.5
focus

3-
Economie .2 3 .6 3 .6
s of scale

4-
Product
.1 7 .7 4 .4
innovatio
n

Totals 1.0 20 4.9 18 3.7


Based on material presented in "Beat the
Competition: How to Use Competitive Intelligence
to Develop Winning Business Strategies", Ian
Gordon, Basil Blackwell Publishers, Oxford, UK,
1989.
In this example competitor #1 is rated higher than
competitor #2 on product innovation ability (7 out
of 10, compared to 4 out of 10) and distribution
networks (6 out of 10), but competitor #2 is rated
higher on customer focus (5 out of 10). Overall,
competitor #1 is rated slightly higher than
competitor #2 (20 out of 40 compared to 18 out of
40). When the success factors are weighted
according to their importance, competitor #1 gets
a far better rating (4.9 compared to 3.7).
Two additional columns can be added. In one
column you can rate your own company on each of
the key success factors (try to be objective and
honest). In another column you can list
benchmarks. They are the ideal standards of
comparisons on each of the factors. They reflect
the workings of a company using all the industry's
best practices.
Competitor profiling :

The strategic rationale of competitor profiling is


powerfully simple. Superior knowledge of rivals
offers a legitimate source of competitive
advantage. The raw material of competitive
advantage consists of offering superior customer
value in the firm’s chosen market. The definitive
characteristic of customer value is the adjective,
superior. Customer value is defined relative to rival
offerings making competitor knowledge an
intrinsic component of corporate strategy. Profiling
facilitates this strategic objective in three
important ways. First, profiling can reveal strategic
weaknesses in rivals that the firm may exploit.
Second, the proactive stance of competitor
profiling will allow the firm to anticipate the
strategic response of their rivals to the firm’s
planned strategies, the strategies of other
competing firms, and changes in the environment.
Third, this proactive knowledge will give the firms
strategic agility. Offensive strategy can be
implemented more quickly in order to exploit
opportunities and capitalize on strengths.
Similarly, defensive strategy can be employed
more deftly in order to counter the threat of rival
firms from exploiting the firm’s own weaknesses.
Clearly, those firms practicing systematic and
advanced competitor profiling have a significant
advantage. As such, a comprehensive profiling
capability is rapidly becoming a core competence
required for successful competition. An
appropriate analogy is to consider this advantage
as akin to having a good idea of the next move
that your opponent in a chess match will make. By
staying one move ahead, checkmate is one step
closer. Indeed, as in chess, a good offense is the
best defense in the game of business as well.
A common technique is to create detailed profiles
on each of your major competitors. These profiles
give an in-depth description of the competitor's
background, finances, products, markets, facilities,
personnel, and strategies. This involves:

Background
Location of offices, plants, and online presences
History - key personalities, dates, events, and
trends
Ownership, corporate governance, and
organizational structure
Financials
P-E ratios, dividend policy, and profitability various
financial ratios, liquidity, and cash flow
Profit growth profile; method of growth (organic or
acquisitive)

Products
Products offered, depth and breadth of product
line, and product portfolio balance
New products developed, new product success
rate, and R&D strengths
Brands, strength of brand portfolio, brand loyalty
and brand awareness
Patents and licenses

Quality control conformance

Reverse engineering:
Marketing
Segments served, market shares, customer base,
growth rate, and customer loyalty
Promotional mix, promotional budgets, advertising
themes, ad agency used, sales force success rate,
online promotional strategy.
Distribution channels used (direct & indirect),
exclusivity agreements, alliances, and
geographical coverage Pricing, discounts, and
allowances.
Facilities
Plant capacity, capacity utilization rate, age of
plant, plant efficiency, capital investment
Location, shipping logistics, and product mix by
plant

Personnel

Number of employees, key employees, and skill


sets
Strength of management, and management style
Compensation, benefits, and employee morale &
retention rates
Corporate and marketing strategies
Objectives, mission statement, growth plans,
acquisitions, and divestitures .

Marketing strategies
Media scanning :

message can reveal new product offerings, new


production processes, a new branding strategies a
new positioning strategies a new segmentation
strategy line extensions and contractions,
problems with previous positions, insights from
recent marketing or product research a new
strategic direction a new source of sustainable
competitive advantage or value migrations within
the industry. It might also indicate a new pricing
strategy such as penetration, price discrimination,
price skimming, product building, joint product
pricing, discounts, or loss leaders. It may also
indicate a new promotion strategy such as push,
pull, balanced, short term sales generation, long
term image creation, informational, comparative,
affective, reminder, new creative objectives, new
unique selling proposition, new creative concepts,
appeals, tone, and themes, or a new advertising
agency. It might also indicate a new distribution
strategy, new distribution partners, more
extensive distribution, more intensive distribution,
a change in geographical focus, or exclusive
distribution. Little of this intelligence is definitive:
additional information is needed before
conclusions should be drawn.
A competitor's media strategy reveals budget
allocation, segmentation and targeting strategy,
and selectivity and focus. From a tactical
perspective, it can also be used to help a manager
implement his own media plan. By knowing the
competitor's media buy, media selection,
frequency, reach, continuity, schedules, and
flights, the manager can arrange his own media
plan so that they do not coincide.
Other sources of corporate intelligence include
trade shows, patent filings, mutual customers,
annual reports, and trade associations.
Some firms hire competitor intelligence
professionals to obtain this information. The
society of competitive intelligence professionals
maintains a listing of individuals who provide these
services.

New competitors

In addition to analyzing current competitors, it is


necessary to estimate future competitive threats.
The most common sources of new competitors are:

Companies competing in a related product/market


Companies using related technologies
Companies already targeting your prime market
segment but with unrelated products
Companies from other geographical areas and with
similar products
New start-up companies organized by former
employees and/or managers of existing companies

Gaining a competitive advantage over existing


The entrance of new competitors is likely when:
There are high profit margins in the industry
There is unmet demand (insufficient supply) in the
industry
There are no major barriers to entry
There is future growth potential
Competitive rivalry is not intense
Firms is feasible

References
Craig S. Fleisher and Babette E. bensoussan:
"Business and Competitive Analysis: Effective
Application of New and Classic Methods." FT Press,
2007.

Craig S. Flesher and Babette E. bensoussan:


"Strategic and Competitive Analysis: Methods and
Techniques for Analyzing Business Competition."
Prentice Hall, 2003.

Ian Gordon: Beat the Competition. How to Use


Competitive Intelligence to Develop Winning
Business Strategies. Basil Blackwell Publishers,
Oxford/UK 1989.
Michael E. Porter: Competitive Strategy:
Techniques for Analyzing Industries and
Competitors 1998.
COMPETITOR ANALYSIS - A BRIEF GUIDE

THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF


COMPETITIVE
INTELLIGENCE

Introduction

No business is an island. For success, the business


will need to deal with customers, suppliers,
employees, and others. In almost all cases there
will also be other organizations offering similar
products to similar customers. These other
organizations are competitors.
And their objective is the same - to grow, make
money and succeed. Effectively, the businesses are
at war - fighting to gain the same resource and
territory: the customer.

And like in war, it is necessary to understand the


enemy:

How he thinks;
What his strengths are;
What his weaknesses are;
Where he is vulnerable;
Where he can be attacked;
Where the risk of attack is too great

And so on. And like in war, the competitor will


have secrets that can be the difference between
profit and loss, expansion or bankruptcy for the
business. Identifying these secrets is thus crucial
for business survival. But all this is not new..

Sun Tzu and the Art of War


Around the year 500 BC, the great Chinese military
strategist, Sun Tzu wrote a treatise on the Art of
War. From a 21st century perspective, many of Sun
Tzu's approaches would be viewed as barbaric
today. Nevertheless, his views on strategy are still
relevant today - for both military commanders and
business leaders looking at how to win against
competitors. For instance:
If you are ignorant of both your enemy and
yourself, then you are a fool and certain to be
defeated in every battle if you know yourself, but
not your enemy, for every battle won, you will
suffer a loss. If you know your enemy and yourself,
you will win every battle.

Who is a competitor in
business?

Business competitors are:


Other organizations offering the same product or
service now.
Other organizations offering similar products or
services now.
Organizations that could offer the same or similar
products or services in the future.
Organizations that could remove the need for a
product or service.

Why monitor
competitors?

By knowing our Competitors we may be able to


predict their next moves, exploit their weaknesses
and undermine their strengths.
Customers usually know the differences between
companies - their good points and bad points. They
know that company A is cheaper than company B
and that company C has a better after-sales
service. For a business to operate in a market and
not know the same, and more, is tantamount to
giving up the battle without even starting. As
Frederick the Great said.

So what is involved?

There are four stages in monitoring competitors -


the four "C"s:
Collecting the information (with a first stage -
deciding what to collect)
Converting information into intelligence (with
three steps: CIA -Collate and catalogue it,
Integrate it with other pieces of information and
Analyze and interpret it)

Communicating the intelligence.


Countering any adverse competitor actions - i.e.
using the intelligence
One mistake a lot of people make is to start by
collecting information without thinking how the
information will be used. There is no value in
information that will just sit on a shelf. If it cannot
be used to inform the business's strategic or
tactical decisions then the time, money, and effort
spent collecting it is wasted.
The business may be planning a new product - so
information on what competitors are doing in the
same area will help in the decision processes and
plans for this new product.
Alternatively, the business may be looking at how
the industry will develop over the next 5 or 10
years.

Or perhaps the board is looking at a potential


merger, acquisition or business partnership.

The information requirements for each of these


business decisions will be completely different and
so the information that should be sought will also
be different.
Thus before starting to search for information the
competitor analyst needs to sit back and define
what they are looking for and why. They need to
identify the key areas of concern for the business
decision makers requesting the information, and
aim to satisfy these.
Other information may be interesting, but unless it
helps the decision process it should be viewed as
superfluous, and stored for use at another time or
even ignored if it is unlikely to ever have value. (As
an example, it is generally not necessary to know
the name of the CEO's children to understand how
the CEO makes decisions.) Thus, rather than
collecting information in a random or haphazard
manner, the search needs to be focused and
planned, and aimed at answering the various
intelligence requirements of the business (often
termed key intelligence topics, or KITs).

Collecting competitor
information

Information will come from a variety of sources,


both within the organization and external to it.
Sales representatives deal on a daily basis with
customers - and will hear what the competitors
have been doing. They are the business foot
soldiers - with the ear to the ground who can
forewarn management about impending enemy
campaigns.
Research & Development may come across new
patents.
Purchasing may find out that a supplier is now also
supplying a competitor.
Market research can give feedback on the
customer's perspective
...but these are just examples of where information
can come from.
Information can also be found on the Internet itself
- most companies are now advertising their
services and some specialize in offering
information that can be used for competitor
research. Among the best are D&B (Dun &
Bradstreet)with a database of over 30 million
companies’ worldwide. If you need to know about
both private and quoted companies this is one of
the best sources. Few other companies offer the
same global scope - although some local
companies will give D&B a run for its money for
single country information. For public companies,
there is also the D&B subsidiary, Hoovers, which
holds considerable information - much of it free.
Patent information can be obtained from
companies such as Thomson Scientifics patent
service (formerly known as daren’t Information) or
from local patent offices. And global press
information is available from databases made
available by companies such as Dialog (also from
the Thomson group), Lexis-Nexis and Factiva.
There are numerous other web-sources -
discussion forums, web-logs (blogs), pod casts,
protest groups, customer and governmental sites
and so on. We include some of the web-sources we
use to search for competitor information on our CI
Sources links pages. You can also find information
at trade shows and conferences, and by
interviewing industry experts, your competitors'
customers and suppliers, ex-competitor employees
- or even the competitor although there are
ethical issues involved when obtaining information
from some of these sources.

From information to intelligence

Having scanned the press, searched the Internet,


spoken to the sales force, customers, suppliers,
Uncle Tom Cobbley and all, there should now be a
large pile of data on your competitors.

Unfortunately much of this data will be repetitious,


out of date, wrong or inaccurate, misleading, or
incomplete. However like a jigsaw, each piece can
help build up the compete picture. And even if
some pieces are missing, you can often get a good
idea of what the real picture actually is - even if
other pieces are damaged and not all remaining
pieces fit perfectly. For example, the company
report can give an idea of a company's health -
which will be enhanced by information from trade
suppliers, trade press articles, and credit
information agencies such as D&B; Patents give an
idea of R&D activity; Trade press gives an idea of
marketing activity. And of course there are
specialist organizations such as AWARE that have
the techniques to dig deeper and get information
that can lead to an idea of competitor strategy and
future trends.

All this information needs to be collated - with any


links and commonalities highlighted. The
information will need to be indexed and catalogued
- so that when new information comes along, it can
be quickly linked to similar information that had
previously been found. It may be stored in a
custom-built or dedicated competitor database
accessible via the company Intranet - although it
can also be stored in much less sophisticated
forms.

Finally, the relevance and importance of each piece


of information needs to be interpreted and
analyzed - on its own and in conjunction with other
information, the other pieces in the jigsaw. This is
where information starts to become intelligence.
Communicating the
intelligence

Many companies are overly secretive, protecting


information that all their customers and
competitors already know. Secrecy is important. It
can be extremely dangerous to let a competitor
know about the new product being developed.
However, letting the sales force attempt to sell
products without a full awareness of their
products' strengths and weaknesses relative to the
competition is like sending them out with one arm
tied behind their back. They will be unable to
answer objections and comparisons convincingly
and thus are less likely to make the sale. And if the
competitor product is that much better then
shouldn't marketing, or product development be
looking at ways of improving one's own product -
rather than hiding the damaging news ostrich like?

Competitor intelligence needs to be evaluated and


selectively communicated to all who need to make
decisions based on what customers, suppliers, or
other companies in the market are doing or are
likely to do. And in today's world, that usually
means everybody. The worker in the factory needs
to know why production processes have changed
from what was always done if he is to believe in
management. The Mushroom theory of
management (keep 'em in the dark!) has always
had its adherents but has not usually succeeded in
the long term.

Countering Competitor actions

Having identified what competitors are doing,


battle can be entered. Sometimes the battle will be
vicious - especially when two competitors have
been slogging it out for years. (Pepsi vs. Coca Cola;
Procter & Gamble vs. Unilever). Various military
strategies have been used to describe different
approaches to beating competitors - flanking
strategies, encirclement and siege strategies,
frontal attacks and even guerrilla marketing
tactics. However it should always be conducted
within the law. Although it is tempting to use
underhand ways of gaining an advantage, certain
activities may result in a prison sentence as well as
extremely damaging publicity, loss of goodwill and
loss of revenue.
Collecting Information on competitors can be
likened to prospecting for gold. Nuggets are a
rarity. The prospector will need to sift through a
lot of soil, to find the few grains of gold which
make the task worthwhile. Occasionally, the
prospector will even be tricked by iron pyrites - or
"Fool's gold"!

Similarly, some of what is collected on competitors


will turn out to be useless. Sometimes the
information may be completely wrong and lead the
unaware on the wrong path. However with
experience, this is less likely, as with the skilled
gold prospector and "Fool's gold".

This guide to competitor analysis is by its nature,


elementary and is a summary and precursor to a
more detailed article published in Business
Information Review in June 2002. (This can be
accessed from our CI Articles request form). There
are also many books on the subject - covering
everything from finding information on
competitors, to analyzing the information and
finally using it in business strategy. We list a
number of titles on our recommended books pages
- (for example the classic texts on strategy by
Michael Porter - Competitive Strategy and
Competitive Advantage). We can also help you in
most aspects of CI offering research and analysis
services, as well as training and CI workshops so
that you can learn how to do CI effectively
yourself. However, enough of the preamble....

THE COMPANY
Company profile

Dr. John stith Pemberton for the first time produced the
syrup for Coca- Cola on May 8, 1886
Introduction

Brings Back The Fizz To India Coca-Cola, the


corporate nourishing the global community with
the world’s largest selling soft drink concentrates
since 1886, returned to India in 1993 after a gap of
16 years giving a new thumbs up to the Indian Soft
Drink Market. In the same year, the Company took
over ownership of the nation's top soft-drink
brands and bottling network. No wonder, our
brands have assumed an iconic status in the minds
of the consumers.

A Healthy Growth To The Indian Economy Ever


Since, Coca-Cola India has made significant
investments to build and continually consolidate
its business in the country, including new
production facilities, waste water treatment
plants, distribution systems and marketing
channels.

Coca-Cola India is among the country’s top


international investors, having invested more than
US$ 1 billion in India within a decade of its
presence and further pledged another US$ 100
million in 2003 for its operations.
A Pure Commitment to the Indian Economy
the Company has not only shacked up the Indian
carbonated drinks market, and given consumers
the pleasure of world-class drinks to fill up their
hydration; refreshment & nutrition needs but has
also been instrumental in giving
an exponential growth to job
opportunities.

Creating Enormous Job Opportunities With


virtually all the goods and services required to
produce and market Coca-Cola being made in India,
the business system of the Company directly
employs approximately 6,000 people, and
indirectly creates employment for more than
125,000 people in related industries through our
vast procurement, supply and distribution system.

The vast Indian operations comprise 25 wholly


owned company owned bottling operations and
another 24 franchisee-owned bottling operations.
That apart, a network of 21 contract-packers also
manufactures a range of products for the
Company.
On the distribution front, 10-tonne trucks, open-
bay three-wheelers that can navigate the narrow
alleyways of Indian cities constantly keep our
brands available in every nook and corner of even
the country’s remotest areas.
These are only some of the facts that speak about
our commitment to the growth of the Indian
Economy.

The World’s largest beverage company


While much of the world has changed since 1886,
with the old giving way to the new at almost daily
strokes, what has withstood the test and taste of
time, binding the young and old to enjoy their
moments of simple pleasure and eternal joy is the
magic of Coca-Cola. And this year, consumers the
world over will reach for products of The Coca-Cola
Company more than a billion times every single
day. The world s largest beverage company has
come a long way since its modest beginnings more
than a century ago...

Coca-Cola Advertisements It’s the


Real Thing
Advertising has played an important role in the
success of our products since our first newspaper
ad in 1886, which read, "Coca-Cola. Delicious!
Refreshing! Exhilarating! Invigorating!" The
Company uses advertising to trigger desire as
often and in as many ways as possible. Throughout
the years, slogans for Coca-Cola have always been
memorable. Here are some highlights:

2000Coca-ColEnjoy
1993 - Always Coca-Cola
1990 - Can t Beat the Real Thing
1989 - Can t Beat the Feeling
1986 - Red, White and You
1982 - Coke Is It
1976 - Coke Adds Life
1971 - I d Like to Buy the World a Coke
1969 - It s the Real Thing
1963 - Things Go Better with Coke
1959- Be Really Refreshed
1944- Global High Sign
1942- It s the Real Thing
1936- It s the Refreshing Thing To Do
1929 - The Pause That Refreshes

Fine illustrations by noted artists, including


Norman Rockwell and N. C. Wyeth, were the
hallmark of early campaigns in premier magazines.
Artist Haddon Sundblom s portraits for holiday ads,
which began in the 1930s, helped mould the
national image of a red-suited Santa Claus. Fresh,
creative and tasteful, advertising images for Coca-
Cola have always set a high standard of quality for
other products around the world. The Company
recognizes that Coca-Cola belongs to the billion of
consumers in every corner of the globe who have
chosen it as their favorite soft drink. Our
advertising reflects that special relationship
between consumers and the simple moments of
pleasure they have come to associate with Coca-
Cola.

Indian Advertising Award


In India too, the Company’s thrust has always been
on reaching the core of the consumer’s heart
through advertising excellence. In fact, we have
produced some of the most memorable campaigns
of the times. Consequently, in early 2003, Coca-
Cola India collected Advertiser of the Year and
Campaign of the Year awards for the Thanda
Matlab Coca-Cola all-media campaign.

Born In a Kettle Charming the


World Forever

John Stith Pemberton first introduced the


refreshing taste of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Georgia. It
was May of 1886 when the pharmacist concocted
caramel-colored syrup in a three-legged brass
kettle in his backyard. He first "distributed" the
new product by carrying Coca-Cola in a jug down
the street to Jacobs Pharmacy. For five cents,
consumers could enjoy a glass of Coca-Cola at the
soda fountain. Whether by design or accident,
carbonated water was teamed with the new syrup,
producing a drink that was proclaimed "Delicious
and Refreshing." John Pemberton s partner and
bookkeeper, Frank M. Robinson, suggested the
name and penned "Coca-Cola" in the unique
flowing script that is famous worldwide today. Mr.
Robinson thought "the two Cs would look well in
advertising." In 1886, sales of Coca-Cola averaged
nine drinks per day.

The Growing Corporate With an Ever-


Refreshing Drink:

That first year, Pemberton sold 25 gallons of syrup,


shipped in bright red wooden kegs. Red has been a
distinctive color associated with the number one
soft drink brand ever since. For his efforts,
Pemberton grossed ------ $50 and spent----- $73.96
on advertising. By 1891, Atlanta entrepreneur Asa
G. Candler had acquired complete ownership of the
Coca-Cola business. Within four years, his
merchandising flair helped expand consumption of
Coca-Cola to every state and territory. In 1919, The
Coca-Cola Company was sold to a group of
investors for---- $25 million. Robert W. Woodruff
became president of the Coca-Cola Company in
1923, and his more than six decades of leadership
took the business to unrivaled heights of
commercial success, making Coca-Cola an
institution the world over.
Know About Our Global Bottling
System:
Today, our products reach consumers and
customers around the world through a vast
distribution network made up of local bottling
companies. These bottlers are located around the
world, and most are independent businesses.
Using syrups, concentrates and beverage bases
produced by The Coca-Cola Company, our global
bottling system packages and markets products,
then distributes them to more than 14 million
retail
The Coca-Cola Company is committed to assisting
its bottlers with the functions of an efficient
bottling operation and initiating quality systems to
ensure the highest quality products for our
consumers.

Know the Bottling History of Coca-


Cola:

Coca-Cola began as a fountain product, but candy


merchant Joseph A. Biedenharn of Mississippi was
looking for a way to serve this refreshing beverage
at picnics. He began offering bottled Coca-Cola,
using syrup shipped from Atlanta, during an
especially busy summer in 1894.
In 1899, large-scale bottling became possible when
Asa Candler granted exclusive bottling rights to
Joseph B. Whitehead and Benjamin F. Thomas of
Chattanooga, Tennessee. The contract marked the
beginning of The Coca-Cola Company s unique
independent bottling system that remains the
foundation of Company soft drink operations.

Coca-Cola Bottles As Memorable As


the Design

Back then, soda bottles were all very similar. And


Coca-Cola had many imitators, which consumers
would be unable to identify until they took a sip.
The answer was to create a distinct bottle for
Coca-Cola. As a result, the contour bottle for Coca-
Cola with the shape now known around the world
was developed in 1915 by the Root Glass Company.

Coca-Cola Gets the First Change of


Taste in 1886:
In 1985, a new cola emerged from laboratory
research. Through internal evaluations and
thousands of blind taste tests, consumers said
they preferred it over both Coca-Cola and its
primary competition. As a result, in April 1985, the
Company proudly introduced the new taste of Coke
- the first change in the secret formula since the
product was created proudly introduced the new
taste of Coke - the first change in the secret
formula since the product was created in 1886.

Trademark Registration of Coca-


Cola:
The trademark "Coca-Cola" was registered with
the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in 1893,
followed by "Coke" in 1945. The unique contour
bottle, familiar to consumers everywhere, was
granted registration as a trademark by the U.S.
Patent and Trademark Office in 1977; an honor
awarded very few packages.

Extension of the Most Cherished


Trademark
In 1982, The Coca-Cola Company introduced diet
Coke to U.S. consumers, marking the first
extension of the Company s most precious
trademark to another product. Later years saw the
introduction of additional products bearing the
Coca-Cola name, which now encompasses a
powerful line of cola products.

Coca-Cola Classic Ruling Since


1886

The launch of Coke with the new taste took place


in the United States and Canada. Consumers
responded with an unprecedented-and now
famous-outpouring of loyalty and affection for the
original formula. In July 1985, the original formula
of Coca-Cola returned as Coca-Cola classic. In 1986,
Coca-Cola classic became, and still remains, the
nation s top-selling soft drink.
Our Trademarks the World’s Most
Valuable Assets

Our most valuable assets happen to be the


trademarks we possess. For Coca-Cola, the
drunken soft drink on earth is one of the world s
best-known and most admired trademarks,
recognized by more than 90 percent of the world s
population.

Interestingly, the world that is touched by our


cherished drinks for every moment, the Coca-Cola
trademarks happen not only to be our most
valuable assets but of the entire earth.
Coca-Cola Company Profile

Introduction

The Coca-Cola Company is the world's largest


manufacturer, distributor and marketer of non-
alcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups.
Beverage products with the Coca-Cola brand name
have been sold in the U.S. since 1886. In May of
that year, Dr. John S. Pemberton invented Coca-
Cola. It was first sold at a soda fountain in Jacob's
Pharmacy in Atlanta, U.S. The company was
incorporated in September 1919 in Delaware and
now employs around 55,000 people. About 1.3
billion servings of Coca-Cola products are
consumed all over the world every day. For the
fiscal ending 2005, the company touched net
revenues of $23 billion.

Brands

Well-known beverage products from the Coca-Cola


Company include Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola Classic, Diet
Coke, Fanta brand soft drinks, Sprite, Tab, Fresca
brand soft drinks and Kinley. In many countries
(excluding the United States, among others), the
company's beverage products also include
Schweppes, Canada.

Location

With its global headquarters in Atlanta, U.S. the


Coca-Cola Company sells its products though
associate companies and business associates in
more than 200 countries.

Coca-Cola India in 2004: Marketing Strategy


In March 2003, a message from Coca-Cola's global
headquarters in Atlanta, United States, created a
lot of excitement in the Indian subsidiary. Coca-
Cola India (CCI), had been awarded the Woodruff
award for outperforming the dozen-odd emerging
markets of Coca-Cola worldwide in growth and
profitability during 2002. The comeback was
remarkable for the global cola major. In January
2000, the company had stated that its investment
in India had yielded disappointing returns.

The company had invested $800 million in its


Indian operations since its reentry in India. From
causing a dent in the parent's bottom line to
winning the prestigious Woodruff award, CCI
seemed to have come a long way.

CCI was also a major sourcing point for its global


operations. Apart from product brands, the
company was also a major supplier of commodities
and materials like sugar, coffee, PET bottles,
recycled glass bottles, crowns, labels and caps to
its global operations. It was only in India that Coca-
Cola had a mix of its own bottling facilities and
arrangements with independent bottlers. CCI had
27 owned units, 17 franchised units, and 22 co-
packers.
Coca-Cola, reentered India in 1993, after having
withdrawn from the country in the late 1970s, in
the wake of the Foreign Exchange Regulation Act
(FERA) of 1973. Coca-Cola's reentry was driven
both by competitive factors and the company's
own global plans. Global rival Pepsi had entered
India in 1990 and by 1993 had captured a 25%
market share. Coca-Cola could not stay

Coca-Cola's exit from the country in 1977, after a


25-year presence, had been discordant. Following
the introduction of FERA, the Reserve Bank of India
(RBI) asked multinationals operating in non-
strategic industries like consumer goods to reduce
their equity stake to 40% or below. Coca-Cola
offered to hold 40% equity in its bottling and
distribution units, but refused to dilute equity in
its technical and administrative unit. As the FERA
regulations did not permit more than a 40%
holding in all operations, the company decided to
wind up its Indian operations.

Keywords
Coke, Coca-Cola India, Marketing strategy,
Carbonated soft drinks, Non-carbonated soft
drinks, Packaged drinking water, Beverage market
in India, Coke advertisements in India, Vanilla
Coke, Sprite, Mirinda, Kinley, Pepsi, Fanta, Wakaw
dancers
DATA ANALYSIS &
PRESENTATION

1) Coca-cola product profile


Maaza

200Ml 250Mlglass(rs) 600Mlpetbottle(rs) 1200Mlpetbottle


tetra(rs)

12 10 25 43

Minute maid (pulpy orange)

400Ml pet bottle(rs) 1000Ml pet bottle (rs)

25 60

parle-G product profile


Frooti

200Ml 250Mlpet 500ml pet 1000Ml pet 1500Ml pet


Tetra(rs) bottle(rs) bottle(rs) bottle(rs) bottle(rs)

10 12 22 36 48

Appy

200Ml tetra(rs) 300Ml pet 500Mlpet 1000Ml pet


bottle(rs) bottle(rs) bottle(rs)

10 18 25 45

pearl beverages( Pepsi)


Slice
200Mltetra(rs) 250Ml glass 500Ml pet 1200Ml pet
bottle(rs) bottle(rs) bottle(rs)

10 10 22 45

Tropicana

200M 350Ml(or 1200Ml(o 1000Ml(o 1000Ml(a 1000Ml(pi 1000Ml(g


l a)(rs) ra)(rs) ra)(rs) pp)(rs) ne)(rs) ra)(rs)
Tetra
(rs)

22 78 70 82 75 82

Dabur foods
Real

200MlTet 600Ml(or 1200Ml(or 1000Mltetra( 1000MlTetr 1000MlTetr 1000Ml(


ra(rs) a)(rs) a)(rs) guava) a(ora) a(app) ma)

15 25 42 75 72 82 72

1.Do you sell packed juices?


YES NO
150 0

SELLING THE PACKED JUICES

160
140
120
100 YES

80
60 NO
40
20
0

Interpretation:
 Yes all the observed retile outlets are selling the
packed juices
 As I was observed 150 retile shops they all are selling
the packed juices
 Because all the observed retile shops are expecting
to sell the packed juices
 The customers are interested to purchase the packed
juices.
2.Which of the following juices do you sell?

MAAZ MINUTEMAI SLICE FROOT APPY REAL TOPICAN


A D I A
148 95 79 110 115 45 35

NAME OFTHE PACKED JUICES

160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
TI

NA
D

FR E

PI L
UT ZA

PY

EA
IC
AI

CA
AA

AP
O
EM

SL

R
M

O
TR
IN
M

Interpretation
 As I have taken 150 samples among them they all
are selling packed juices
 Maximum retile outlets are selling 3 or 4 packed
juices
 148outlets are selling the maaza product ,95outlets
are selling minute maid 79 out lets are Selling slice
products, 110 outlets are selling frooti products 115
outlets are selling appy, 45outlets are selling real, 35
outlets are selling Tropicana.

3.Which juice does your customer ask most for?

MAAZ MINUTEMAI SLICE FROOT APPY REAL TOPICAN


A D I A
148 95 79 110 115 45 35

MOST DEMANDINGPACKED JUICES

160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
TI

NA
D

PI L
UT ZA

PY

A
IC
AI

CA
TR RE
AA

AP
O
EM

SL

FR
M

O
IN
M

Interpretation

 Most of the customers are demanding the maaza


products
 Next preferred juices are appy, frooti minute maid,
slice, real and Tropicana
 148 outlets are displayed maaza products, in every
retile shops customer are mostly Preferred maaza
product, next appy, frooti, minute maid, slice, real
and Tropicana.

4.Which packs sell the most?

250ML( 200ML(T 300ML( 500ML( 400ML( 600ML( 1000ML( 1200ML(


G) ) P) P) P) P) P) P)
1518 1368 140 875 180 516 410 398

PRODUCT PROFILES

1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
T)
)

P)

P)

P)

P)

P)
P)
G

L(
L(

L(
L(

L(

L(

L(

L(
0M
0M

0M

0M

0M

0M

M
00

00
20
25

30

50

40

60

10

12

Interpretation
 Mostly 250mlglass bottles sold out, next 200ml tetra,
500mlpet bottles, 600mlpet bottle 1000mlpet bottle,
1200ml pet bottle, 400mlpetbottle and300mlpet
bottles
 Because 250ml glass bottle and 200ml tetra is
flexible to buy the customer.

5.Are you happy with the margins of Coca-Cola juices?

YES NO
100 50

SATISIFACTION OF COCA-COLA MARGINES

120

100

80
YES
60
NO
40

20

0
Interpretation

 67% of the sellers satisfying with the coca-cola


price margin

 Because the competitor are giving the good


margin.

6.How do you feel about response to minute maid?

EXLENT GOOD OK
10 58 27

RESPONCSE OF THE MINUTE MAID

70
60

50
40

30
20

10

0
EXLENT GOOD OK
Interpretation

 61% of the vendors giving the good response to


the pulpy orange.

 This product contains good flavors and due to


the company image in the market.

Does display of juices help in boosting


sales?

YES NO
150 0
JUICES HELPS TO BOOSTING THE SALES

160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
YES NO

Interpretation

 100% of the packed helps in increasing the sales


 Because these packed juices creating a good image
in the customer minds

8.Average sale of maaza products in a week?

250ML(T) 250ML(G) 600ML(P) 1000ML(P)


290 1109 351 262
MAAZA PRODUCT AVERAGE SALES IN A WEEK

1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
T)

)
P)
G

P
L(

L(

L(

L(
0M

0M

0M

M
00
25

25

60

10

Interpretation

 According to analysis the average sales of maaza in


a week is 250mlglass With highest sales of
1109cases the next is 600mlpetbottle with sale of
351 boxes, 200ml tetra with sale of 290 boxes, and
least sales with262 boxes Is 1200ml pet bottle.

9. Average sale of minute maid products in a week?


400ML(P) 1000ML(P)
191.5 155

MINUTE MAID AVERAGE SALES IN A WEEK

250

200

150

100

50

0
400ML(P) 1000ML(P)

Interpretation

 According to analysis the average sales of pulpy in a


week is 400 mlpet bottles with highest sales of
191.5boxes the next is 1000mlpetbottle with sale of
155 boxes.

10.Average sale of frooti products in a week?


200ML(T) 250ML(P) 500ML(P) 1000ML(P)

398 111 220 116

FROOTI AVERAGE SALES IN A WEEK

450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
T)

)
P)

P)
P
L(

L(
L(

L(
0M

0M

0M

M
00
20

25

50

10

Interpretation

 According to analysis the average sales of frooti in a


week is 200ml tetra With highest sales of 398boxes
the next is 500ml pet bottle with sale of 220 boxes,
1000ml pet bottles with sale of 116 boxes, and
250ml pet bottles least sales with 111boxes.

11.Average sale of appy products in a week?


200ML(T) 300ML(P) 500ML(P) 1000ML(P)

495 141 126 105

APPY AVERAGE SALE OF IN A WEEK

600
500
400

300
200
100
0
T)

)
P)

P
L(

L(
L(

L(
0M

0M

0M

0M
20

30

50

10

Interpretation

 According to analysis the average sales of appy in a


week is 200mltetraWith highest sales of 495cases
the next is 300mlpetbottle with sale of 141 boxes,
500ml pet bottles with sale of 126 boxes, and least
saleswith105Boxesin1000mlpetbottles.

12.Average sale of slice products in a week?


200ML(T) 250ML(G) 500ML(P) 1200ML(P)

131 495 170 104

SLICES SALES IN A WEEK

600
500
400
300
200
100
0
T)

P)

P)
G
L(

L(

L(

L(
0M

0M

0M

M
00
20

25

50

12

Interpretation

 According to analysis the average sales of slice in a


week is 250mlglass With highest sales of 495cases
the next is 500mlpetbottle with sale of 170 boxes,
200ml tetra with sale of 131 boxes, and least sales
with104boxe Is 1200ml pet bottle.
13.Average sale of Tropicana products in a week?

200ML(T) 350ML(P) 600ML(P) 1000ML(P 1200ML(P


) )
150 140 51 40 30

TROPICANA AVERAGE SALES IN A WEEK

160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
T)

P)
P

P
L(

L(

L(

L(

L(
0M

0M

0M

M
00

00
20

35

60

10

12

Interpretation

 According to analysis the average sales of Tropicana


in a week is 250mltetraWith highest sales of
150boxes the next is 350mlpetbottle with
saleof140boxes,600mlpet bottles with sale of
51boxes, 1000ml pet bottles sales 40boxes and
least sales with30boxes Is1200ml pet bottle.
14.Average sale of real products in a week?

200ML(T) 600ML(T) 1000ML(T) 1200ML(T)


105 98 40 30

REAL AVERAGE SALES IN A WEEK

120
100
80 Series1
60 Series2
40 Series3

20
0
T)
T)

T)

T)
L(
L(

L(

L(
0M

0M

M
00

00
20

60

10

12

Interpretation

 According to analysis the average sales of real in a


week is 200mltetraWith highest sales of 105 boxes
the next is 600mltetrawith sale of 198 boxes, 1000ml
tetra with sale of 40 boxes, and least sales with30
boxes Is 1200ml tetra.

FINDINGS
FINDINGS
 148outlets are selling the maaza product ,95outlets
are selling minute maid 79 out lets are Selling slice
products, 110 outlets are selling frooti products 115
outlets are selling appy, 45outlets are selling real, 35
outlets are selling Tropicana.
 Most of the customers are demanding the maaza
products.
 Next preferred juices are appy, frooti minute maid,
slice, real and Tropicana.
 Mostly 250mlglass bottles sold out, next 200ml tetra,
500mlpet bottles, 600mlpet bottle 1000mlpet bottle,
1200ml pet bottle, 400mlpetbottle and300mlpet
bottles.
 67% of the sellers satisfying with the coca-cola price
margin.
 100% of the packed helps in increasing the sales
 According to analysis the average sales of maaza in
a week is 250mlglass With highest sales of
1109cases the next is 600mlpetbottle with sale of
351 boxes, 200ml tetra with sale of 290 boxes, and
least sales with262 boxes Is 1200ml pet bottle.
 According to analysis the average sales of pulpy in a
week is 400 mlpet bottles With highest sales of
191.5boxes the next is 1000mlpetbottle with sale of
155 boxes.
 According to analysis the average sales of frooti in a
week is 200ml tetra With highest sales of 398boxes
the next is 500ml pet bottle with sale of 220 boxes,
1000ml pet bottles with sale of 116 boxes, and
250ml pet bottles least sales with 111 boxes.

 According to analysis the average sales of appy in a


week is 200mltetraWith highest sales of 495cases
the next is 300mlpetbottle with sale of 141 boxes,
500ml pet bottles with sale of 126 boxes, and least
sales with 105 Boxes in 1000mlpetbottles.
SUGESSITION

SUGGESTION

 Giving the more advertisements.

 Maaza tetra packets cost will be reduce because


when the price is decrease automatically sales will
be increases.
 Providing the better quality of services.

 Maintaining to give the good margin to the vendors.


SUMMARY&CONCLUSION

SUMMARY&CONCLUSION

I have visited 150 outlets all of them were selling


packed juices minimum verities maintained each
vendor were 3 or 4 packed juices. it can be
concluded from my research that there is a great
demand for maaza out of 150/148where displaying
this product from the sales point of view the maaza
product have good sales out of the other juices,
maaza 250ml (g) is in the 1st position followed by
the tetra and others response to the newly added
product minute maid (pulpy orange) is good .60%
of the vendors displaying this product.67% of the
vendors are happy with the margins. Displaying
this fruit juices is 100% increasing the sales of
other products.
BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Craig S. Fleisher and Babette E. Bensoussan:


"Business and Competitive Analysis: Effective
Application of New and Classic Methods." FT Press,
2007.
Craig S. Fleisher and Babette E. Bensoussan:
"Strategic and Competitive Analysis: Methods and
Techniques for Analyzing Business Competition."
Prentice Hall, 2003.
Ian Gordon: Beat the Competition. How to Use
Competitive Intelligence to Develop Winning
Business Strategies. Basil Blackwell Publishers,
Oxford/UK 1989.
Michael E. Porter: Competitive Strategy:
Techniques for Analyzing Industries and
Competitors 1998.

HINDUSTHAN COCA_COLABREVERAGES PVT LTD

Outlet name:
Owner name:
Address:
Telephone no:

1) Do you sell packed juices?

A) Yes B) no
2) Which of the following juices do you sell?

A) Maaza B) minute maid C) slice


D) Frooti E) appy F) real
G) Tropicana H) Others
3) Which juice does your customer ask most for?

A) Maaza B) minute maid C) slice


D) Frooti E) appy F) real
G) Tropicana H) Others

4) Which packs sell the most?

A) 200Tetra B) 250Ml C) 300Ml D) 500Ml E) 600Ml


F) 1000Ml G) 1200Ml H) 1500Ml

5) Are you happy with the margins of Coca-Cola juices?

A) Yes B) no

6) How do you feel about response to minute maid?

A) Excellent B) good C) ok

7) Does display of juices help in boosting sales?

A) Yes B) no

8) Average sale of maaza products in a week?

A) 200MlTetra B) 250Ml C) 600Ml D) 1200Ml

9) Average sale of minute maid products in a week?

A) 400Ml B) 1000Ml

10) Average sale of frooti products in a week?


A) 200MlTetra B) 250Ml C) 500Ml D) 1000Ml
E) 1500Ml
11) Average sale of appy products in a week?

A) 200MlTetra B) 300Ml C) 500Ml D) 1000Ml

12) Average sale of slice products in a week?

A) 200MlTetra B) 250Ml C) 500Ml D) 1200Ml

13) Average sale of Tropicana products in a week?

A) 200MlTetra B) 350Ml C) 600Ml D) 1000Ml


E) 1200Ml

14) Average sale of real products in a week?

A) 200MlTetra B) 600Ml C) 1000Ml D) 1200Ml