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CANADIAN RED CROSS

Annual Review
20092010

Ontario Zone

Table of Contents
Message from the President and Director General
Ontario Council
Strategy 2015

3
4
5

HEALTH AND SOCIAL PROGRAMS


Supporting Independence in our Communities
Improving Health Across the World

12
12
13

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Crises and Disasters at Home
Crises and Disasters Beyond Our Borders

6
6
8

INJURY PREVENTION
First Aid and CPR
Water Safety

14
14
15

COMMUNITY RESILIENCE AND CAPACITY BUILDING


Our Work with First Nations
Helping Refugees
First Aid Saving Lives

9
9
9
10

VIOLENCE AND ABUSE PREVENTION


RespectED Reaches Record Numbers
Walking the Prevention Circle

16
16
16

HUMANITARIAN ISSUES
Pictures Talk

11
11

FINANCIAL HEALTH AND SUSTAINABILITY


Thanks to You, Red Cross is There

17
17

Facts at a Glance

18

MISSION
The Canadian Red Cross mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity
in Canada and around the world.
VISION
The Canadian Red Cross is the leading humanitarian organization through which people voluntarily
demonstrate their caring for others in need.
FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES
Humanity
Impartiality
Neutrality
Independence
Voluntary Service
Unity
Universality
2 ANNUAL REVIEW

Message from the President


and Director General
One Red Cross many ways to care
The past year was filled with challenges and new initiatives for the Canadian Red Cross in Ontario.
Throughout this annual review, you will see many examples of how the Red Cross worked with clients,
volunteers, financial supporters, various levels of government and partners to carry out our humanitarian
work. In working together, we were able to increase the reach and relevance of our programs to better
serve the people of Ontario.
Right here at home, we partnered with communities to provide assistance and training in areas such as
emergency response, humanitarian issues, first aid and water safety, violence and abuse prevention, and
home health care. Red Cross and our training partners delivered swimming lessons and first aid courses
that gave thousands of individuals the knowledge and skills they need to stay safe. Record numbers of
youth and adults across Ontario learned about violence issues through RespectED: Violence and Abuse
Prevention education. Following personal disasters such as house fires and the Vaughan tornado, Red
Cross assisted hundreds of individuals and families by providing urgently needed comfort and basic
necessities. Red Cross Community Health Services enabled thousands of Ontarians to remain living
independently in their homes with comfort and dignity.
Beyond our borders, thousands of people across Canada and around the world benefited from Red Cross
preparedness and response in the face of major disasters including the typhoons in the Philippines, and
earthquakes in Haiti and Chile.
All of this was possible because of the generosity of our Red Cross partners, volunteers, members,
financial supporters and staff. Together we will continue to improve the lives of people throughout Ontario,
Canada and around the world, and do what we do best, even better.
Thank you for your support.

Peter Zulauf
President

Ron Kelusky
Director General

ONTARIO ZONE 3

Canadian Red Cross


O N TA R I O C O U N C I L 2 0 0 9 2 0 1 0

Peter Zulauf
President

Barb Trant
President Eastern Region

Gwen Medcalf
Past President and Member

Jane Ann Newson


President, West Central Region

Lynn Greiner
Vice President / President, Central Lakes Region

Ron Quan
Representative- Central Lakes Region

Diane Girard
Vice President / President, Southwest Region

Jeff Eames
Leonard Murphy
Representatives Southwest Region

Lori Barnhart
Member
Alan Dean
Member

Philippe Geoffrion
Representative Eastern Region

Naomi Diestelkamp
Chelsea Hargreaves
Youth Councillors

Amanda Kennedy
Representative Toronto Region

Stphane Gallant
President- Northern Region

Ellen Oesterreich
Representative-West Central Region

Heather Wilson
President Toronto Region

4 ANNUAL REVIEW

Harvey Wyers
Representative Northern Region

Strategy 2015
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maximize efficiency, enhance accountability and increase success in our mission to prevent and alleviate
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Partnership and Networking. Strategy 2015 also identifies various criteria from which our successes can
be measured and evaluated in a tangible way as we work to achieve our strategic goals.
Strategy 2015 cements the commitment of the Canadian Red Cross to continuously earn the respect and
support of Canadians as we mobilize the power of humanity now and for the next 100 years in accordance
with our mission to improve the lives of vulnerable people in Canada and around the world. To read more
about Strategy 2015, our areas of excellence, strategic goals and the means to get there, visit our website
at www.redcross.ca.
ONTARIO ZONE 5

1 Disaster Management
In 2009,
Red Cross volunteers
responded to 510
disasters across
Ontario, ranging
from house fires to
extreme weather.

Crises and Disaster at Home


MEETING BASIC NEEDS
In 2009, volunteers responded to 510 disasters across Ontario, ranging from house fires to extreme weather.
Through the Personal Disaster Assistance program, the Red Cross provides shelter, food, clothing, personal
hygiene items and other support for 72 hours to help families get back on their feet following a disaster.
A PARTNERSHIP APPROACH
The Canadian Red Cross works alongside governments and other community agencies to most effectively
meet the needs of those affected by disaster in Ontario. In its second year, a memorandum of agreement
between the Red Cross and the Ministry of Community and Social Services supported increased capacity
for response through training for Red Cross disaster management volunteers and a strengthened working
relationship between Red Cross and the Ministry in times of emergency.
In June the Canadian Red Cross in Ontario hosted a round table on accessibility for people with disabilities
and special needs during emergencies. This discussion led to the formation of Inclusive Emergency
Preparedness Canada (IEPC), a partnership between March of Dimes Canada, Canadian Red Cross and the
Inclusive Preparedness Center. Through this partnership, IEPC will offer training materials for shelter staff
and volunteers to help them provide the necessary support and services for clients with disabilities in the
event of an emergency.
RED CROSS RESPONDS
One of the largest disasters in Ontario over the past year occurred August 20 when a tornado touched down
in Vaughan leaving a path of destruction in its wake. The Red Cross immediately responded, setting up
community reception centres, and organizing the initial distribution of materials to the owners of damaged
homes. Red Cross also staffed a call centre providing emergency relief information to Vaughan residents
and collected donations for those affected.
Hundreds of people visiting H1N1 immunization clinics in the fall were greeted by local Red Cross volunteers.
Volunteers assisted at several clinics across Ontario with non-medical support including registration
activities, greeting people as they arrived and providing information from public health authorities. This
support allowed clinic staff to serve the community quickly and efficiently.
In Northern and Eastern Ontario, volunteers and staff tirelessly responded to a high number of personal disasters.
In Ontarios northern communities, 177 disaster management volunteers logged 499 hours to provide for basic
immediate needs of those affected by house and building fires. There were 89 incidents in which 353 adults
and 134 children received services from Red Cross. In Ottawa, 147 volunteers gave more than 573 hours
of their time to assist 383 adults and 92 children who were forced from their homes by fire. Comfort kits
containing soap, toothpaste and other personal items, as well as stuffed animals, were distributed.

6 ANNUAL REVIEW

The biggest challenge for our teams this year was responding to multiple-unit fires resulting in larger
groups of people needing assistance, said George Dicker, disaster management coordinator for the Red
Cross in Ottawa. This past year saw a number of multi-unit dwellings torn down as a result of fires and our
teams were glad to be there to provide what comfort we could at a very difficult time.
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS ADDED TO CHILDRENS SAFETY VILLAGE
Niagara Regional Emergency Management invited Emergency Management Ontario and the Canadian Red
Cross to partner with them to deliver a new emergency preparedness education program for the Niagara
Region Childrens Safety Village.
The Safety Village is an education facility designed to teach children from senior kindergarten to
grade six about safety and injury prevention. Classes are provided in both English and French to all four
school boards in the Niagara Region. Last year, over 5,000 students visited the Safety Village.

The biggest challenge


for our teams this
year was responding
to multiple-unit fires
resulting in larger
groups of people
needing assistance.
George Dicker
Red Cross Disaster Management
Coordinator, Ottawa

In the fall, the Niagara Region Childrens Safety Village piloted the emergency preparedness program,
which was deemed a resounding success. This program includes both classroom instruction and hands-on
learning to educate children about personal emergency preparedness.

Debbie James

VOLUNTEER READY TO ASSIST WHEN


D I S A S T E R S T R I K E S I N OT TAWA

The first time Debbie James was on-call as a Red Cross disaster volunteer in Ottawa, she was in
high heels and a dress, attending a work function with her husband. Just as she arrived to the dinner
party her Red Cross pager went off, alerting her to a local emergency. She left immediately.
A familys farmhouse had burned down and Debbie helped them find accommodations for the night.
She says she felt a little silly arriving to an emergency in her fancy outfit. Since then Debbie keeps a
change of clothes and running shoes in her car at all times.
As the volunteer assistant leader to the Personal Disaster Assistance team, it is Debbies responsibility
to ensure people affected by emergencies get the immediate help they need, including personal items,
clothing and a place to sleep. Shes on-call for one week out of six and carries a pager. If the pager
goes off, it is policy that she respond within an hour. Regardless of where she is or what she is doing,
when Debbie gets that page, she immediately responds. Last year, I was on a golf course and it looked
like a birdie putt, but the pager went off and I had to leave.
Debbie also volunteers as co-leader for the Central Registry and Inquiry Bureau (CRIB), which helps
trace people who have been separated from loved ones in the event of a disaster.
ONTARIO ZONE 7

Disaster Management
contd

1
Volunteers are at the
forefront of all that we
do at the Canadian
Red Cross.

Disaster Beyond Our Borders


Throughout the year, the Canadian Red Cross responded to several major international disasters, including
typhoons in the Philippines and elsewhere in Asia, and earthquakes in Italy, Chile and Haiti.
When the earthquake struck Haiti on January 12, 2010, over 1.3 million people were displaced.
Across the province, our volunteers and staff mobilized quickly to help. Local branches were overwhelmed
with people dropping off donations and branch telephones rang non-stop with people wanting to support
Red Cross efforts in Haiti.
Volunteers also supported all levels of government in welcoming more than 4,000 Canadian earthquake
evacuees as they arrived in Montral and travelled to their final destinations across Canada. Red Cross
volunteers helped reconnect evacuees with their family and friends and addressed their immediate shelter,
food and clothing needs.

Christine Hwang

C A N A D I A N R E D C R O S S D E L E G AT E

In the weeks following the Haiti earthquake, Christine Hwang, a public health physician, was sent to
Haiti on a five-week mission as a Canadian Red Cross delegate.
While there she was seconded to a German Red Cross hospital the largest hospital in the area.
Among her many duties, she was tasked with finding ways to deliver health messages to children.
Recognizing that song and dance are especially important to Haitian culture, she taught the children
songs about malaria, drinking water, nutrition and hand-washing.
In her five weeks, Christine took on many tasks, including
statistics and reporting, disease surveillance, nutrition
counselling and acting as a liaison with Haitis Ministry of
Health. She also created childrens outreach programs and
helped arrange schooling for children. For the last week she
was there, Christine even took over the chefs role in the
kitchen because the chef was ill.

Christine Hwang, Canadian Red Cross Delegate

8 ANNUAL REVIEW

Christine was also a delegate to Haiti in 2008 when hurricanes


ripped through the country.

Community Resilience
and Capacity Building 2
O N TA R I O S C O M M I T M E N T TO W O R K I N G W I T H F I R S T N AT I O N S
The Canadian Red Cross in Ontario is committed to working with First Nations and Aboriginal communities.
The First Nations and Aboriginal Working Group, established in 2009, is now led by Melanie GoodchildSouthwind, senior manager of First Nations projects. The goal of the working group is to strengthen
relationships with First Nations and build capacity within communities to deliver Red Cross services, training
and education, thereby enhancing First Nations self-governance infrastructure in areas such as disaster
management, injury prevention, violence and abuse prevention and humanitarian issues.
F I R S T C O N TA C T, H E L P I N G R E F U G E E S
The First Contact program supports refugee claimants arriving in the Toronto area by providing information
on how to find shelter, health care, language and legal assistance. The program provides a toll-free number
that can be accessed 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Last year, our five volunteers logged 1,803 hours
and helped 1,781 clients.

Richard Sage

Volunteer Plays Important Role


at Red Cross Ottawa Branch

First aid courses are in session, phone calls are being answered and individuals walk in and out constantly:
this is a typical day at the Canadian Red Cross Ottawa branch.
But on Tuesdays and Thursdays, theres something else that characterizes the office: Richard Sage.
Or Richard Richard as everyone knows him.
On Tuesdays, he volunteers with the Health Equipment Loan Program (HELP), and on Thursdays, he helps
manage first aid courses. He has volunteered in the office since
July and has become an integral part of the team. He is always
bustling around the office in his wheelchair, assisting with one
task or another.
Volunteering with the Red Cross has given Richard the skills he
needs to take on other activities in his life. Not only has he gained
valuable work experience with computers, but he has also built
relationships and developed confidence which he can extend
to other aspects of his life. I feel like Im making an impact in a
small way, Richard says of his experience.
Dedicated volunteer Richard Sage is known
as Richard Richard at the Ottawa branch.

- Written by Meaghan Williams, Canadian Red Cross


youth volunteer

ONTARIO ZONE 9

Community Resilience
and Capacity Building
contd

2
Nick, McCartney and
Alex are heroes. Their
selfless acts saved the
lives of two people
and we are proud to
honour them with the
Canadian Red Cross
Rescuer Award.
Kris Tucker
Red Cross first aid master
instructor trainer

R E S C U E R A W A R D S F O R L O N D O N S I LV E R B A C K S
Three members of the London Silverbacks football team were recognized by the Red Cross on August 22
for their heroic actions that saved the lives of two teens earlier last year. Alex Myros, McCartney Sealey and
Nick Romain received Rescuer Awards during the teams home game at TD Waterhouse Stadium at the
University of Western Ontario.
Nick, McCartney and Alex are heroes. Their selfless acts saved the lives of two people and we are proud
to honour them with the Canadian Red Cross Rescuer Award, said Kris Tucker, a Red Cross first aid master
instructor trainer.
On June 21, the Silverbacks, an affiliate of the Toronto Argonauts in the Canadian Football League, were
travelling on a bus from Indiana following an away game. A SUV heading southbound blew a tire, lost control
and collided head-on with the bus, causing the SUV to burst into flames.
McCartney escaped through a window and ran to the burning vehicle. He was able to pull a 16-year-old girl
from the wreckage. Alex ran over to help bring the girl further away to safety. Hearing the girl screaming for
her brother, Nick ran to the SUV and pulled the 12-year-old boy out of the car. Unfortunately, the childrens
mother, who was also in the vehicle, did not survive the crash.
The Red Cross Rescuer Award is presented to non-professional or off-duty first responders who have
volunteered to save a life, prevented further injury or provided comfort to the injured.
YOUTH POWER
In October, 107 youth participants from across Ontario attended the Our World Your Move: Youth Taking
Action for Humanity leadership conference in Toronto. The three-day conference educated youth, ages 14
to 25, on key humanitarian issues and provided opportunities for them to develop leadership skills.
S U P P O RT I N G V U L N E R A B L E P O P U L AT I O N S I N TO R O N TO
The Canadian Red Cross in Toronto provides a variety of services to assist some of the citys most vulnerable
populations. The Mobile Food Bank delivers food bank items to clients who are not able to access their
local walk-in food banks due to medical or health issues. The Scarborough Drop-In Centre assists homeless
and under-housed individuals in accessing the basic necessities of shelter, food, clothing and health care,
and the Street Relief Hot Lunch Program provides nutritious lunches and breakfasts two days each week
to people who are struggling to overcome poverty, unemployment, isolation and mental health challenges.
These programs served more than 35,000 people over the past year.

10 ANNUAL REVIEW

Humanitarian Issues 3
P I C T U R E S TA L K
In 2009, the Canadian Red Cross presented Pictures Talk, an exhibition featuring a collection of photos
taken by child survivors of the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami. The exhibition offered a rare glimpse of posttsunami recovery through the eyes of children. The photo exhibition toured Ontario making stops in Windsor,
Sault Ste. Marie, London, Durham Region, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, Barrie, Peterborough, Ottawa
and Toronto.
By providing a glimpse into the lives of these children today, the exhibition offered a unique perspective
on how life returns for young survivors in disaster-affected communities. So many Canadians generously
donated to tsunami relief efforts and Pictures Talk provided supporters with the opportunity to see the
positive effects of their overwhelming support.
YO U T H I N A C T I O N F O R H U M A N I TA R I A N I S S U E S
The Canadian Red Cross Humanitarian Issues Program (HIP) promotes international
humanitarian law and values to government, the armed forces, media, youth and civil society.
In 2009, Red Cross in Ontario reached more than 6,500 people through HIP workshops.
Red Cross youth groups participating in HIP are involved with awareness and fundraising
campaigns such as the annual Sudan Week of Action in October and Canadian Landmines
Awareness Week in February.
PEEL REGION
The Peel Youth Action Council, consisting of 50 high school students, was actively involved in the Sudan
Week of Action campaign, Malaria Bites, and Afghanistan and Haiti campaigns, raising awareness about
the work of the Red Cross in those countries. Their annual gala, the Tick Tick Talent Show, to raise funds
for Malaria Bites, was held in March with more than 200 participants and 30 artists from all over the
Greater Toronto Area.
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, MISSISSAUGA CAMPUS
When a devastating earthquake struck Haiti, the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) Red Cross club
with 25 members mobilized the entire UTM community faculty, staff and students raising more than
$16,000 over a period of two weeks.
REGION OF YORK
In 2009, the York Region youth groups, with about 60 students, held a monthly Humanitarian Speaker
Series with Red Cross delegates who have worked around the world on various missions. In October, they
held a Social Justice & Diversity Conference enabling youth to learn about social justice and diversity issues
and how to get involved with Red Cross.
ONTARIO ZONE 11

4 Health and Social


Programs
Over the past year,
3,000 Red Cross
Community Support
Workers provided
3.5 million hours of
personal support and
homemaking service
to Ontarians.

Supporting Independence and Mobility in our Communities


Canadian Red Cross staff and volunteers work together to provide a multitude of services that help people
remain living independently in their homes with comfort and dignity, despite injury, illness and other
circumstances. Services include personal support and homemaking, transportation, health equipment
loans and Meals on Wheels.
C O M M U N I T Y H E A LT H S E R V I C E S A C H I E V E S A C C R E D I TAT I O N
Accreditation Canada awarded the Personal Support/Homemaking program full accreditation status in
2009. This is the highest level of accreditation and will lead the program through its next three-year cycle.
The Red Cross WorkSafe program, which provides training and standards to prevent workplace injuries for
Community Support Workers, was also recognized by Accreditation Canada as a leading practice. Over the
past year, 3,000 Red Cross Community Support Workers provided 3.5 million hours of personal support and
homemaking service to Ontarians.

Rick Neinhuis

S a r n i a Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n V o l u n t e e r
Provides Rides with Heart

For the past five years, Rick Neinhuis has helped many people in his community by simply giving them
a ride. For the time that he gives, he says he gets so much more in return.
Rick volunteers four days a week with the transportation program in Sarnia. The program provides rides to
elderly, frail or injured members of the community to medical appointments, dialysis treatment, shopping trips
or day programs.
Rick says the relationships that are created are more important
than the transportation itself. Within those 15 or 30 minutes
you become part of their life, you get to know them and their
stories, he says. Sometimes people just need to talk.

Rick Neinhuis, Sarnia transportation volunteer.

12 ANNUAL REVIEW

He has shared happy moments with his clients, and also sad ones.
He has even shed tears on one occasion. Once he asked a client
how he was doing. The client broke down and began to cry. His
wife had recently entered a long-term care facility. His health was
also starting to fade and he was feeling scared and overwhelmed.
I said I am so sorry and I comforted him, says Rick.

P I L OT P R O J E C T I N E A S T E R N O N TA R I O : H O M E F I R S T
In December, the Brockville Red Cross branch launched Home First, a pilot program aimed at providing
around-the-clock home care. After the first five months of the pilot, Red Cross Community Support Workers
had provided 1,000 hours of service weekly to 28 clients.
The program enables seniors who are waiting for space in a long-term care facility to go home, rather
than stay in hospital. Community Support Workers provide support in the home for up to 60 days while the
individuals and their families await an opening in a long-term care facility.
These situations can cause incredible stress within the family, said Arlene Atkinson, Red Cross manager. Home
First gives families the support they need to be able to safely and appropriately care for loved ones at home.

Home First gives


families the support
they need to be
able to safely and
appropriately care for
loved ones at home.
Arlene Atkinson
Red Cross Manager

Red Cross provides this service through a contract with the South East Community Care Access Centre,
which is funded and legislated by Ontarios Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.
EXPANDING PROGRAMMING IN THE NORTH
The Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) enabled the North Bay branch of the Red Cross to expand its
transportation program to the outlying areas of Nipissing District. The LHIN provided the branch with an
Aging at Home van, as well as base funding to further enhance the program, and a car was also purchased
to support the service. Through this program, individuals gain access to much needed medical and social
opportunities which reduces health deterioration and social isolation.

Improving Health Across the World


A CHILD DIES OF MALARIA EVERY 30 SECONDS
Malaria is a parasitic disease transmitted by mosquitoes at night. Although preventable and treatable,
malaria is the single leading cause of death for children under five in Africa. The most proven and costeffective way to save lives is with a $10 bed net. Insecticide-treated nets provide a protective barrier around
families, especially at night when malaria-carrying mosquitoes strike.
In April, the Canadian Red Cross coordinated a net distribution in Burundi, Africa. Over 521,000 nets were
delivered through door-to-door distribution by trained Burundi Red Cross volunteers, who visited homes before,
during and after the campaign to ensure proper net usage a key element to the success of malaria prevention.
The Canadian Red Cross also expanded its campaign to include health interventions and treatment options.
In addition to receiving a bed net, beneficiaries have access to lifesaving interventions such as rapid
diagnostic tests, malaria treatment, preventative medicine for pregnant mothers and clean drinking water.
Since 2003, the Canadian Red Cross has distributed over six million mosquito nets in Africa.
ONTARIO ZONE 13

5 Injury Prevention
More than 472,000
Canadians train
in first aid and CPR
with the Red Cross
every year.

First Aid and CPR


The Canadian Red Cross has been educating Canadians in first aid and CPR for more than 50 years and
remains one of the leading training providers across the country. More than 472,000 Canadians train with
the Red Cross every year. In Ontario the number of people trained by Red Cross in first aid continues to
grow over the past year training goals were exceeded by 7,000 participants.
TELUS SUPPORTS RED CROSS BABYSITTING PROGRAM
The TELUS Toronto and Ottawa Community Boards donated $33,050 to the Canadian Red Cross in support
of the babysitting program in Toronto and Ottawa this past year.
The funding allows the Red Cross to deliver the babysitting program to 950 at-risk youth. Participants will
learn how to care for children in a safe environment, how to handle emergency situations and prevent
injuries as well as gain valuable skills and experience.
The nature of the Red Cross Babysitting program resonates with us, says Johnnie-Mike Irving, interim
chair, TELUS Toronto Community Board. It highlights our youth component and has a sustainable factor to
it. The program trains leaders who will continue on - this initiative will have a life long after the initial training
is complete.
Over the next year, the four phases of this project will be completed: establishing partnerships in the target
communities, training babysitting facilitators, purchasing required first aid equipment to run the courses
and, finally, delivering the babysitting course to community youth.

Did you Know?


Over the past 60 years, the Red Cross has taught more than 30 million Canadians to swim and stay
safe around water. Another 21,000 people are certified as Water Safety Instructors every year, and
thousands more are reached through our public education campaigns.

14 ANNUAL REVIEW

Water Safety
This year, to complete the 10-year Drowning Trend Summary series, Red Cross published three drowning
trend reports: Module 3: Boating and Powerboats, Module 4: Unpowered Boating, and Module 5: Fishing.
In recognition of the Societys outstanding contribution to Canadian marine safety, the Canadian Red Cross
injury prevention program received Transport Canadas Marine Safety Award for 2009.
Drowning research enables the Canadian Red Cross to continue to develop high quality swimming and
water safety programs as well as public education resources aimed at reducing the number of water-related
injuries and deaths. To ensure continued excellence in drowning research, Red Cross plans to combine
media tracking and annual data collection with provincial and territorial coroners offices to provide current
statistics. These initiatives will help sustain water safety training and ensure Canadians have the skills and
knowledge to make safe choices, prevent injuries and respond in emergency situations.
S . P. L . A . S . H . E . S .
Red Cross and Ontario Parks teamed up in 2009 to help bring water safety programs to local parks. For this
project, it was especially important to provide resources created in multiple languages to meet the needs of
various ethnic groups. As a result, Injury Preventions S.P.L.A.S.H.E.S. summer safety handout was created
in French, Russian, Spanish, Punjabi and Traditional and Simplified Chinese.
B R I N G I N G WAT E R S A F E T Y TO F I R S T N AT I O N S C O M M U N I T I E S
A pilot program, launched to address a gap in water safety education within First Nations communities,
proved to be a tremendous success. Through Swimming and Injury Prevention for First Nations
Communities in Ontario, more than 100 children received swimming lessons and water safety education;
12 adults received Water Safety Instructor training; and 134 reserves received new water safety and injury
prevention resources.
The program focused on First Nations because incidents of drowning are 10 times higher in their
communities compared with the rest of the population. Even though many First Nation, Mtis and Inuit
communities are located close to rivers, lakes and oceans, their communities tend to have limited access
to swimming lessons and lifesaving training.

An illustration from new water


safety resources for First Nations
communities.

Ontario Zone formed an advisory committee and engaged First Nations communities in the process of
developing new, culturally effective water safety resources for children, teachers and parents.

ONTARIO ZONE 15

6 Violence and Abuse


Prevention
In 2009, Red Cross
in Ontario saw the
greatest number of
youth reached in
RespectED since
the program was
implemented more
than ten years
ago, reaching
42,000 youth

Violence is Preventable: Education is Key


The Canadian Red Cross aims to break the cycle of abuse, neglect, harassment and interpersonal violence
to ensure every childs right to live, play and learn in a safe environment. We teach children what to do if
abuse is happening to them or a friend, and we teach the adults in their lives to recognize the signs of abuse
and what to do when they see it. RespectED programming includes:
Workshops for children and youth which address personal safety, healthy relationships, and
bullying prevention
Recruitment and training of providers to deliver workshops
Design of curriculum and presentation materials
RESPECTED
In 2009, Red Cross in Ontario saw the greatest number of youth reached in RespectED since the program
was implemented more than ten years ago. We helped reach more than 42,000 youth - a 41 per cent
increase from the previous year. RespectED is a volunteer-driven program that aims to stop the hurt before it
starts. Our nationally recognized, award-winning programs teach kids and adults what a healthy relationship
is, how to recognize the signs of abuse, dating violence and harassment, and how to get help.
This past year, RespectED delivered several workshops on bullying and healthy dating relationships to
several high schools and the Ontario Association of Childrens Aid Societies.
WALKING THE PREVENTION CIRCLE
RespectED presented six simultaneous Walking the Prevention Circle workshops at the National Indian and
Inuit Community Conference which took place May 27-30, 2009, in Toronto. Walking the Prevention Circle
is a comprehensive three-day workshop, developed in close collaboration with Aboriginal communities.
It acknowledges the history, challenges and potential of Aboriginal individuals and communities as it
explores issues relating to abuse, neglect and interpersonal violence. Over 250 health representatives
attended the conference.

16 ANNUAL REVIEW

Financial Health and


Sustainability

Thanks to You, Red Cross is There


WALMART RAISES $2.45 MILLION FOR DISASTER PREPAREDNESS
In September 2009, Walmart Canada announced that its Canadian Red Cross campaign had exceeded its
$2.1 million goal with a record $2.45 million raised for disaster preparedness and response.
Walmart Canadas sponsorship helps Canadian Red Cross provide emergency supplies such as food,
clothing, shelter and hygiene kits, which include toothbrushes, soap and other toiletries. Including last
years record donation, Walmart Canada, its customers, associates and suppliers have raised more than $9
million for the Canadian Red Cross since 2003.

Walmart Canada is
proud to play a pivotal
role in providing
urgently needed relief
items during disasters
and beyond.
David Cheesewright
President and CEO of Walmart Canada

Walmart Canada is proud to play a pivotal role in providing urgently needed relief items during disasters
and beyond, said David Cheesewright, president and CEO of Walmart Canada. We want to thank our
customers and associates for their record levels of generosity, making this years campaign our best ever.
T H E O N TA R I O R E D C R O S S L OT T E RY W I N N E R S
The 2009 Ontario Red Cross Lottery had two big winners: Simcoe resident Catherine Willson, who won
$250,000, and Doug Isaac of Ancaster, who won $100,000.
Every year, the Canadian Red Cross Lottery offers an amazing assortment of prizes including cars, vacations,
cash and electronics. Proceeds from the Red Cross Lottery go directly to support the programs and services
offered by the Red Cross in communities across Ontario.
T H E S P R OT T F O U N D AT I O N M AT C H I N G G I F T C H A L L E N G E
A special luncheon was held to honour the past and present women of the Red Cross. Juliana Sprott, a strong
advocate, financial supporter and volunteer, in honour of the women of Red Cross, announced that the Sprott
Foundation, of which Juliana is president, will match any new gifts of $1,000 or more, up to $100,000.
A WINNING YEAR FOR THE NORTHERN RAFFLE
The Northern Raffle had its biggest year to date, raising more than $105,000. The grand prize winner
had the option to take home a Hyundai Santa Fe SUV or $25,000 cash. Second prize was a 2010 Polaris
Sportsman ATV and a $750 gift certificate. Other $1,000 prizes were also awarded. Raffle tickets were sold
by branches in Dryden, North Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, Thunder Bay and Timmins.
THE CIRCLE OF HUMANITY
The Circle of Humanity is a monthly giving program that provides stable, reliable and cost-effective financial support
to the humanitarian efforts of the Red Cross. Donors make monthly contributions that are deducted from their credit
cards or bank accounts, which add up to make a big difference in a measured and budgeted way.
Over the past year more than 15,000 new donors have joined The Circle of Humanity across Canada.
ONTARIO ZONE 17

Facts at a Glance
B Y T H E N U M B E R S - R E D C R O S S I N O N TA R I O

I3,169 people assisted by Red Cross disaster services


469 disaster responses
2,050 active disaster management volunteers in Ontario
30,125 pieces of health equipment lent to clients through our Health Equipment Loan Program
180,106 Ontarians received Red Cross first aid training
358,169 participants in Red Cross swimming and water safety training
42,000 Ontario youth reached through RespectED workshops
20,392 Ontarians educated by the Red Cross on international humanitarian issues
3.5 million hours of home support services delivered
298,098 meals delivered by Red Cross volunteers through Meals on Wheels program
233,283 transportation rides provided to clients
6,275 Red Cross volunteers in Ontario

18 ANNUAL REVIEW

Canadian Red Cross


Ontario Zone
5700 Cancross Court
Mississauga ON
L5R 3E9
Telephone:
905.890.1000
www.redcross.ca

All content copyright 2010


Canadian Red Cross