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Cognitive Science Majors!

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LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


COURSE NAME
CogSci 1 (Introduction to cognitive
science)

CS 61A (Structure and interpretation


of computer programs)
or

Engineering 7 (Introduction to
computer programming for scientists
and engineers)
MCB / Psych C61 (Brain, mind, and
behavior) [NOT A PREREQ TO
DECLARE] (or MCB 64)

Math 16A (Analytical geometry and


calculus)
or

PREREQUISITES DESCRIPTION
This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of cognitive science. Lectures and
readings will survey research from artificial intelligence, pyschology, linguistics,
philosophy, and neuroscience, and will cover topics such as the nature of knowledge,
thinking, remembering, vision, imagery, language, and consciousness. Sections will
demonstrate some of the major methodologies.
Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to
Prerequisites: Mathematics 1A
techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using
(may be taken concurrently);
programming experience
higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and messageequivalent to that gained in 3 or the passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based
Advanced Placement Computer
Science A course.... Optional CS languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of
implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are
10 (Consider Info 155 which is
several significant programming projects.
intro to Python)
Elements of procedural and object-oriented programming. Induction, iteration, and
recursion. Real functions and floating-point computations for engineering analysis.
Introduction to data structures. Representative examples are drawn from mathematics,
science, and engineering. The course uses the MATLAB programming language.
Mathematics 1B (maybe
Sponsoring departments: Civil and Environmental Engineering and Mechanical
taken concurrently)
Engineering.
Introduction to human brain mechanisms of sensation, movement, perception,
thinking, learning, memory, and emotion in terms of anatomy, physiology, and
chemistry of the nervous system in health and disease. Intended for students in the
humanities and social sciences and others not majoring in the biological sciences.
Prerequisites: Three years of
high school math, including
trigonometry, plus a
satisfactory grade in one of
the following: CEEB MAT
test, an AP test, the UC/CSU
math diagnostic exam, or 32. This sequence is intended for majors in the life and social sciences. Calculus of one
Consult the mathematics
variable; derivatives, definite integrals and applications, maxima and minima, and
department for details
applications of the exponential and logarithmic functions.

cogsci: you can go


a lot of ways with it.
including computer
science and music

Units
4

4
3

Math 1A (Calculus)

Math 55 (Discrete mathematics)


or

CS 70 (Discrete mathematics and


probability theory) [NOT A
PREREQ TO DECLARE]

Prerequisites: Three and onehalf years of high school


math, including trigonometry
and analytic geometry, plus a
satisfactory grade in one of
the following: CEEB MAT
test, an AP test, the UC/CSU
math diagnostic test, or 32.
Consult the mathematics
department for details.
Students with AP credit
should consider choosing a
course more advanced than
1A
Prerequisites: Mathematical
maturity appropriate to a
sophomore math class. 1A1B recommended
Credit Restrictions: Students
will receive no credit for 55
after taking Computer
Science 70.
Prerequisites: Sophomore
mathematical maturity, and
programming experience
equivalent to that gained in 3
or the Advanced Placement
Computer Science A course

This sequence is intended for majors in engineering and the physical sciences. An
introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, with
applications and an introduction to transcendental functions.

Logic, mathematical induction sets, relations, and functions. Introduction to graphs,


elementary number theory, combinatorics, algebraic structures, and discrete
probability theory.

Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage
problem. Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and
cryptography. Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation.
Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large
numbers; examples include load balancing, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.

UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


COURSE NAME

COURSE
PREREQUISITES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Units

1 course from each of the following 6 areas

Cognitive Neuroscience:
Introduction to comparative vertebrate brain anatomy, neural development, and
sensory-motor functions that are relevant to the study of human brain evolution and
Prerequisites: Upper division the evolution of uniquely human mental and behavioral capacities. Emphasis is on
undergraduate standing and understanding the processes of evolution that are responsible for species differences in
Anthropology 107 (Evolution of the Anthropology 1 or equivalent brain structure and function. Special attention will be given to animal communication,
Human Brain)
or consent of instructor
vocalization, neurolinguistics, and theories of language evolution.
This course will examine research investigating the neurological basis of cognition.
Material covered will include the study of brain-injured patients, neurophysiological
research in animals, and the study of normal cognitive processes in humans with noninvasive behavioral and physiological techniques such as functional Magnetic
Resonance Imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and transcranial magnetic
CogSci/Psychology C127 (Cognitive Prerequisites: 110 or 120A or stimulation (TMS). Topics to be covered include perception, attention, memory,
Neuroscience)
C120B, or Cog Sci C100
language, motor control, executive control, and emotion.

Psychology 117 (Human


Neuropsychology)

PSYCH 110

Psychology 133 (Psychology of


Sleep)

A survey of contemporary psychological approaches to problems of human disabilities


including mental disorders, behavior changes following human brain injury and
disease, and mental subnormality. Emphasis on nervous system models of these
problems and areas of potential application of basic research development.
his course has two primary goals: (1) to provide a basic introduction to the study of
sleep and an overview of sleep measurement, regulation, ontogeny, phylogeny,
physiology, and psychology; and (2) to provide a basic introduction to sleep disorders
including their classification, cause, and treatment.

3
3

Cognitive Psychology:
Theoretical foundations and current controversies in cognitive science will be
discussed. Basic issues in cognition--including perception, imagery, memory,
categorization, thinking, judgment, and development--will be considered from the
perspectives of philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology. Particular
emphasis will be placed on the nature, implications, and limitations of the
computational model of mind.

*CogSci C100/Psychology C120


(Basic Issues in Cognition)
CogSci C102/Psychology C129
(Scientific Approaches to
Consciousness)
CogSci/Psychology C124
(Psycholinguistics)
CogSci/Psychology C126
(Perception)

Psychology 122 (Introduction to


Human Learning and Memory)

Psychology C143/Ling C146


(Language Acquisition)

Psychology 164 (Social Cognition)

Prerequisites: 1 or Cognitive
Science C1; or 120A or
This course will examine the nature of human consciousness from the interdisciplinary
C120B or Cognitive Science perspective of cognitive science. It will cover topics from the philosophy of mind,
C100
cognitive linguistics, neuroscience, psychology, and computational models.

Prerequisites: Consent of
instructor. 101 recommended
Theoretical and experimental
analysis of human learning
and memory; short-term and
long-term memory; coding
and retrieval processes;
transfer and interference;
mechanisms of forgetting.

An introduction to principal theoretical constructs and experimental procedures in


visual and auditory perception. Topics will include psychophysics; perception of
color, space, shape, and motion; pattern recognition and perceptual attention.

Theoretical and experimental analysis of human learning and memory; short-term and
long-term memory; coding and retrieval processes; transfer and interference;
mechanisms of forgetting.
An overview of topics and theories in language acquisition: early development of
speech perception and production, word learning, generalizing linguistic structure, and
differences between first language acquisition, second language acquisition, and
bilingualism. We will also compare different theoretical approaches, and address the
classic "nature vs. nurture" question by examining both traditional generativist
approaches and more recent usage based models.
Surveys empirical and theoretical approaches to our understanding of perception,
memory, thought, and language concerning ourselves, other people, interpersonal
behavior, and the situations in which social interaction takes place. Emphasis is placed
Prerequisites: C120 or 150 or on the integration of problems in social, personality, and clinical psychology with the
160, or Cog Sci C100
concepts and principles employed in the study of nonsocial cognition.

3
3
3

Computational Modeling:

Prerequisites: Calculus,
Cog Sci 131 (Computational Models discrete mathematics, C1,
of Cognition)
Computer Science 61A, or
equivalents

This course will provide advanced students in cognitive science and computer science
with the skills to develop computational models of human cognition, giving insight
into how people solve challenging computational problems, as well as how to bring
computers closer to human performance. The course will explore three ways in which
researchers have attempted to formalize cognition -- symbolic approaches, neural
networks, and probability and statistics -- considering the strengths and weaknesses of
each.

CS 188 (Introduction to Artificial


Intelligence)

Prerequisites: Computer
Science 61A; Computer
Science 61B; Computer
Science 70

Ideas and techniques underlying the design of intelligent computer systems. Topics
include search, game playing, knowledge representation, inference, planning,
reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, robotics, perception, and language
understanding.

Linguistics:
An intensive introduction of linguistic analysis, including core areas such as phonetics
and phonology, morphology, and syntax and semantics, with data from a range of
*Linguistics 100 (Introduction to
languages. Argumentation and writing skills are developed through substantial weekly
Linguistic Science)
homework assignments.
Conceptual systems and language from the perspective of cognitive science. How
language gives insight into conceptual structure, reasoning, category-formation,
metaphorical understanding, and the framing of experience. Cognitive versus formal
*CogSci C101/Linguistics C105
linguistics. Implications from and for philosophy, anthropology, literature, artificial
(The Mind and Language)
intelligence, and politics.
This seminar explores the relation of language and thought. Is language uniquely
human, and if so, what does this reveal about the human mind? Does the particular
language you speak affect the way you think, or do human languages reflect a
universal conceptual repertoire? The goal of this class is to familiarize you with a set
CogSci/Linguistics C142 (Language
of classic arguments on these themes, together with current research that evaluates
and Thought)
these arguments, through weekly reading and discussion.
An introduction to experimental and theoretical research on language disorders,
particularly acquired aphasia in adults. Major course themes include the relationship
between normal and pathological language, and the usefulness of linguistic analysis
for empirical research. Topics include phonetic, phonological, morphological,
CogSci/Linguistics C147 (Language Prerequisites: Linguistics 100 semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic aspects of language disorders in mono- and
Disorders)
or consent of the instructor multilingual speakers of typologically diverse languages.

4
4

Philosophy:
Philosophy 122 (Theory of
Knowledge)
Philosophy 132 (Philosophy of
Mind)
Philosophy 133 (Philosophy of
Language)

Mind and matter; other minds; the concept "person."

Language as social behavior. Language compared to other sign systems. The


foundations of semantics, truth, meaning, reference. Issues of logical form in belief
Prerequisites: One course in sentences, indirect discourse, sentences about causality, events, actions. Relations
Philosophy 135 (Theory of Meaning) logic or consent of instructor between thought and language.
The philosophy of perception is a microcosm of the metaphysics of mind. Its central
problems - What is perception? What is the nature of perceptual consciousness? How
can one fit an account of perceptual experience into a broader account of the nature of
the mind and the world? - are problems at the heart of metaphysics. It is often
justifiably said that the theory of perception (and especially vision) is the area of
Prerequisites: One previous psychology and neuroscience that has made the greatest progress in recent years.
Philosophy 136 (Philosophy of
course in philosophy is
Despite this progress, or perhaps because of it, philosophical problems about
Perception)
recommended
perception retain a great urgency, both for philosophy and for science.

Society, Culture, and Cognition:

4
4
4
4

Anthropology 166 (Language,


Culture, and Society)

Prerequisites: 3 or consent of
instructor

CogSci C103/History C192/Media


Studies C104C/Info C103 (History of
Information)

CogSci/Linguistics C104 (The Mind,


Language, and Politics)

Economics 119 (Psychology and


Economics)

Prerequisites: 100A or 101A

Education 140AC (Literacy:


Individual and Societal
Development)
Linguistics 150 (Sociolinguistics)

100

Psychology 107 (Buddhist


Psychology)
Psychology 160 (Social Psychology)

Psychology 164 (Social Cognition)

Prerequisites: C120 or 150 or


160, or Cog Sci C100

This course examines the complex relationships between language, culture, and
society. The materials in the course draw on the fields of linguistic anthropology,
linguistics, sociolinguistics, philosophy of language, discourse analysis, and literary
criticism to explore theories about how language is shaped by, and in turn shapes, our
understandings about the world, social relations, identities, power, aesthetics, etc.
This course explores the history of information and associated technologies,
uncovering why we think of ours as "the information age." We will select moments in
the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to
the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we'll be
concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to
the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect
society and vice versa?
An analysis of contemporary liberal and conservative thought and language, in terms
of the basic mechanisms of mind: frames, prototypes, radial categories, contested
concepts, conceptual metaphor, metonymy, and blends. The framing of political
discourse. The logic of political thought. The purpose of the course is to provide
students interested in political and social issues with the tools to analyze the framing
of, and logic behind, contemporary political discourse
This course presents psychological and experimental economics research
demonstrating departures from perfect rationality, self-interest, and other classical
assumptions of economics and explores ways that these departures can be
mathematically modeled and incorporated into mainstream positive and normative
economics. The course will focus on the behavioral evidence itself, especially on
specific formal assumptions that capture the findings in a way that can be incorporated
into economics. The implications of these new assumptions for theoretical and
empirical economics will be explored.
This course combines theory and practice in the study of literacy and development. It
will introduce sociocultural educational theory and research focused especially on
literacy teaching and learning, and this literature will be examined in practice through
participation in computer-based after-school programs. In addition, the course will
contribute to understanding of race, culture, and ethnicity in the United States. We will
develop a view of literacy, not as a neutral skill, but as embedded within culture and as
depending for its meaning and its practice upon social institutions and conditions.
The principles and methods of sociolinguistics. Topics to be covered include linguistic
pragmatics, variation theory, social and regional dialectology, and oral styles.
Based on tradition of direct observation of working of ordinary mind in everyday life
situations. Provides contrasting perspective to present theories of cognition,
perception, motivation, emotion, social interaction, and neurosis.
Survey of social psychology including interaction processes, small groups, attitudes
and attitude change, and social problems.
Surveys empirical and theoretical approaches to our understanding of perception,
memory, thought, and language concerning ourselves, other people, interpersonal
behavior, and the situations in which social interaction takes place. Emphasis is placed
on the integration of problems in social, personality, and clinical psychology with the
concepts and principles employed in the study of nonsocial cognition.

3
3
3
3
3

Psychology 166AC (Cultural


Psychology)

Prerequisites: 1; 160 is
recommended

Sociology 150 (Social Psychology)

Prerequisites: 1 or 3 or 3AC or consent


of instructor

Sociology 150A (Social Psychology:


Self and Society)

The course will review research on culture, race, and ethnicity and will consider the
implications of these findings for our understanding of race, culture, and ethnicity in
American society. Mounting evidence suggests that psychological processes are
culture-specific, theory-driven, and context-dependent. This course will focus on the
effects that theories of mind, person, self, and social institutions have on human
cognition, motivation, emotion, and social interactions in American society. Students
will gain a better appreciation of the ways that cultural traditions and social practices
regulate and transform psychological functioning. Simply, the course is about how
culture affects psyche and how psyche affects culture.
This survey course examines many theoretical approaches to social psychology. The
approaches may include: symbolic interactionism, neo-behaviorism, psychodynamic
analyses, cognitive theories, interpersonal processes and theories of exchange.
This survey course provides tools from social psychology to help students develop a
better understanding of their own and others' behavior. Social psychology is a field
that bridges sociology and psychology and is primarily concerned with how
individuals view and interact with one another in everyday life. The class is organized
around a survey of the great ideas from the history of social psychology. We will
study research on a wide variety of topics including conformity, obedience, identity,
power, status, and interpersonal perception.

3
4

Electives (can also be used for concentrations)


COURSE NAME

COURSE
PREREQUISITES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Units

Cognitive Neuroscience:
CogSci C110 / CS C182 / Ling C109
(Neural Basis of Thought and
Language)
IB 245/245L (Functional
Neuroanatomy and Lab)

consent of instructor

MCB / Neuroscience C160


(Introduction to Neurobiology)

Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 1A and 1AL.


Prerequisite or co-requisite: PHYSICS
8B

MCB 163 (Mammalian


Neuroanatomy)

MCB 160L (Neurobiology Lab)


MCB 164 (Sensory and Integrative
Neurobiology)

Development, structural (gross and microscopic) and functional relationships of the


mammalian central nervous system. Histological examination of the human nervous
system; gross dissection of the human brain.
Comprehensive introductory survey of cellular and molecular neuroscience, including
cellular neurophysiology, ion channel function, synaptic function and plasticity,
sensory transduction, and brain development. Includes introduction to molecular basis
of neurological disease. Analysis from the level of molecules to cells to simple
circuits.

Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 1A.


BIOLOGY 1AL is not
Development, structure (gross and microscopic), and functional relationships of the
required
mammalian nervous system.
Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 1A, Experimental analyses of properties and interactions of nerve cells and systems,
1AL; PHYSICS 8A-8B,
illustrating principal features and current methods. Techniques employed include
Molecular and Cell Biology computer simulation of neuron properties, electrophysiological recording and
C100A/Chemistry C130 or stimulation of nerves and cells, digitally enhanced video imaging of outgrowth,
102; Molecular and Cell
fluorescence immunocytochemistry, analysis of sensory: CNS mapping, humanBiology 160; or equivalent evoked potential recording, sensory psychophysics.

2 and 2
4
4

The molecular, cellular, and neural circuit basis of neurological disease. Includes
neurochemistry and reward systems, neural development and its disorders, addiction,
Prerequisites: Molecular and neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Students will read and discuss
MCB 165 (Molecular Neurobiology) Cell Biology 160
primary papers from the research literature.
Electrochemistry and ion transport phenomena, equivalent circuits, excitability, action
potentials, voltage clamp and the Hodgkin-Huxley model. Biophysical properties of
ion channels. Statistical and electrophysiological models of synaptic transmission,
Quantitative models for dendritic structure and neuronal morphogenesis. Sensory
MCB 166 (Biophysical
transduction, cellular networks as computational devices, information processing and
Neurobiology)
transfer.
Prerequisites: 1 and
biological prerequisites for Survey of relations between behavioral and biological processes. Topics include
Psychology 110 (Biological
the major or consent of
sensory and perceptual processes, neural maturation, natural bases of motivation, and
Psychology)
instructor
learning.
Psychology 111 (Sensory Processes:
Vision)
A study of theoretical and experimental investigations of the biological substrates of
Psychology 114 (Biology of
Prerequisites: 110 or consent learning, memory and forms of neural plasticity related to the growth and maturation
Learning and Neural Plasticity)
of the instructor
of the nervous system.

3
3
3

Cognitive Psychology:

CogSci / Psychology C127


(Cognitive Neuroscience)
Psychology 107 (Buddhist
Psychology)
Psychology 111 (Sensory Processes:
Vision)

This course will examine research investigating the neurological basis of cognition.
Material covered will include the study of brain-injured patients, neurophysiological
research in animals, and the study of normal cognitive processes in humans with noninvasive behavioral and physiological techniques such as functional Magnetic
Resonance Imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and transcranial magnetic
Prerequisites: 110 or 120A or stimulation (TMS). Topics to be covered include perception, attention, memory,
C120B, or Cog Sci C100
language, motor control, executive control, and emotion.
Based on tradition of direct observation of working of ordinary mind in everyday life
situations. Provides contrasting perspective to present theories of cognition,
perception, motivation, emotion, social interaction, and neurosis.

Prerequisites: 115B or
Psychology 121 (Animal Cognition) consent of instructor
Psychology 133 (Psychology of
Sleep)

This course focuses on how animals process, organize, and retain information.
Specific topics include learning and memory, sensory processes, navigation and
migration, communication, and cross-species comparisons of behavior. Material will
be drawn from the ethological, behavioral/experimental, and, to a lesser extent, the
neurosciences literature.
This course has two primary goals: (1) to provide a basic introduction to the study of
sleep and an overview of sleep measurement, regulation, ontogeny, phylogeny,
physiology, and psychology; and (2) to provide a basic introduction to sleep disorders
including their classification, cause, and treatment.

3
3

3
3

Music 108 or 108M (Music


Perception and Cognition)

consent of instructor

Education 224A (Mathematical


Thinking and Problem Solving)

Education 229A (Problem Solving


and Understanding)

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

A review of the sensory, perceptual, and cognitive foundations of listening,


composing, and performing. Topics include relations among various acoustical and
perceptual characterizations of sound; perception of pitch, temporal relations, timbre,
stability conditions, and auditory space; auditory scene analysis and perceptual
grouping mechanisms; perceptual principles for melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic
organization; orchestration as spectral composition. A course research project is
required.
M: A review of the sensory, perceptual, and cognitive foundations of listening,
performing, and composing. Topics include relations among various acoustical and
perceptual characterizations of sound; perceptions of pitch, time, temporal relations,
timbre, stability conditions, and auditory space; auditory scene analysis and perceptual
grouping mechanisms; perceptual principles for melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic
organization; orchestration as spectral composition. The course research project
should involve the analysis of musical examples or perceptual and cognitive issues in
music theory or both.
This course explores contemporary research on mathematical cognition, with a
particular emphasis on "higher order thinking skills" and mathematical problem
solving. We discuss various frameworks for characterizing mathematical behavior and
various methodologies for examining it. As an "action oriented" course in the EMST
curricular sequence, this course includes a major course project. In their project,
students engage in research incorporating the main ideas studied in the course.
Students will examine problem solving in children and adults, from a predominantly
cognitive science perspective, beginning with an examination of thinking involved in
diverse problem types. Students will then analyze the literature concerning cognitive
issues that transcend problem types, including representation, "understanding," access
and availability of knowledge, access to one's own cognitive processing,
categorization, the architecture of knowledge, and the control of cognition.

4 and 4

Computational Modeling:
CogSci C110 / Ling C109 / CS C182
(Neural Basis of Thought and
Language)

CS 160 (User Interface Design and


Development)

Prerequisites: Computer
Science 61B or 61BL

CS 170 (Efficient Algorithms and


Intractable Problems)

Prerequisites: Computer
Science 61B and 70

CS 186 (Introduction to Database


Systems)

Prerequisites: 61B and 61C

The design, implementation, and evaluation of user interfaces. User-centered design


and task analysis. Conceptual models and interface metaphors. Usability inspection
and evaluation methods. Analysis of user study data. Input methods (keyboard,
pointing, touch, tangible) and input models. Visual design principles. Interface
prototyping and implementation methodologies and tools. Students will develop a user
interface for a specific task and target user group in teams.
Concept and basic techniques in the design and analysis of algorithms; models of
computation; lower bounds; algorithms for optimum search trees, balanced trees and
UNION-FIND algorithms; numerical and algebraic algorithms; combinatorial
algorithms. Turing machines, how to count steps, deterministic and nondeterministic
Turing machines, NP-completeness. Unsolvable and intractable problems.
Access methods and file systems to facilitate data access. Hierarchical, network,
relational, and object-oriented data models. Query languages for models. Embedding
query languages in programming languages. Database services including protection,
integrity control, and alternative views of data. High-level interfaces including
application generators, browsers, and report writers. Introduction to transaction
processing. Database system implementation to be done as term project.

4
4

Paradigms for computational vision. Relation to human visual perception.


Mathematical techniques for representing and reasoning, with curves, surfaces and
Prerequisites: Knowledge of volumes. Illumination and reflectance models. Color perception. Image segmentation
linear algebra and calculus. and aggregation. Methods for bottom-up three dimensional shape recovery: Line
CS / Vision Science C280 (Computer Mathematics 1A-1B, 53, 54 drawing analysis, stereo, shading, motion, texture. Use of object models for prediction
Vision)
or equivalent
and recognition.
Advanced topics related to current research in robotics. Planning and control issues for
realistic robot systems, taking into account: dynamic constraints, control and sensing
uncertainty, and non-holonomic motion constraints. Analysis of friction for assembly
and grasping tasks. Sensing systems for hands including tactile and force sensing.
Prerequisites: Electrical
Environmental perception from sparse sensors for dextrous hands. Grasp planning and
CS 287 (Advanced Robotics)
Engineering 125
manipulation.
Methods and models for the analysis of natural (human) language data. Topics
CS 288 (Artificial Intelligence
Prerequisites: CS188
include: language modeling, speech recognition, linguistic analysis (syntactic parsing,
Approach to Natural Language
required, CS170
semantic analysis, reference resolution, discourse modeling), machine translation,
Processing)
recommended
information extraction, question answering, and computational linguistics techniques.
Prerequisites: Calculus,
This course provides an introduction to the theory of neural computation. The goal is
differential equations, basic to familiarize students with the major theoretical frameworks and models used in
probability and statistics,
neuroscience and psychology, and to provide hands-on experience in using these
linear algebra, and familiarity models. Topics include neural network models, supervised and unsupervised learning
Vision Science 265 (Neural
with high level programming rules, associative memory models, probabilistic/graphical models, and models of
Computation)
languages such as Matlab
neural coding in the brain.

3
4

Linguistics:
CogSci / Linguistics C108 (The
Challenge of Cognitive Science to
Western Philosophy)
CogSci C110 / Linguistics C109 / CS
C182 (Neural Basis of Thought and
Language)
CogSci / Psychology C124
(Psycholinguistics)
CogSci C140 / Linguistics C160
Prerequisites: 100 or
(Quantitative Methods in Linguistics) graduate student standing

Linguistics 106 (Metaphor)

Prerequisites: Lower division


students must have instructor
approval

Linguistics 110 (Introduction to


Phonetics and Phonology)
Linguistics 115 (Phonology and
Morphology)
Linguistics 120 (Introduction to
Syntax and Semantics)

Prerequisites: 100

Linguistics 121 (Logical semantics)

Prerequisites: 120 or consent of


instructor

Linguistics 123 (Pragmatics)

100
100

100

An introduction to research using quantitative analysis in linguistics and cognitive


science. Students will learn how to use the R programming environment for statistical
analysis and data visualization.
The role of metaphor in structuring our everyday language, conceptual system, and
world view. Topics include cross-cultural differences, literary metaphor, sound
symbolism, and related theoretical issues in philosophy, linguistics, psychology and
anthropology.
Introduction to (1) phonetic transcription of speech using the International Phonetic
Alphabet, (2) acoustic analysis of speech, (3) physiological and cognitive aspects of
speech production and perception, and (4) phonological analysis of language sound
systems.
Introduction to important cross-linguistic phonological and morphological phenomena
as well as standard methods of description and analysis.
An introduction to the study of the structural properties of sentences and the
connections between sentence structure and sentence meaning.
Basic logical concepts. Truth, denotation, and their relation. Models and interpretation.
Translation from natural language into logical form and compositionality.
Quantification and scope. Intensionality, context-dependency, and presupposition.
The relation between language use and human actions. Some topics to be emphasized
are conversational logic, speech act theory, politeness, social role, psychological
perception of oneself and language, variation in language use.

4
4
4
4
4
4
3

Everyone gestures even when they might not realize it. This course seeks to uncover
what we can learn about cognition and culture through the lens of this integral aspect
of our communicative and cognitive selves. We will consider the relationship between
language and gesture including its role in language acquisition and in signed
languages, and study how gestures help us communicate and help us think. We will
also look at cross-cultural differences in gesture, the role of gesture in child
Linguistics 125 (Gesture, Cognition,
development, applications of gesture from education to politics, and unpack the
and Culture)
possibility of the gestural origins of human language.
An introduction to computational methods for linguists. No prior programming
experience required. Students will learn how to program, and will use that knowledge
Linguistics 158 (Computational
Prerequisites: 100 or consent to manipulate and analyze linguistic datasets, including corpora. The course will also
Methods)
of instructor
prepare students for further study in computational modeling.
Lectures and exercises in the description of word meanings, the organization of lexical
systems, the lexicalization of particular semantic domains (kinship, color, etc.), and
Linguistics 181 (Lexical Semantics) Prerequisites: 120
contrastive lexicology: lexicalization pattern differences across languages.
An overview of topics and theories in language acquisition: early development of
speech perception and production, word learning, generalizing linguistic structure, and
differences between first language acquisition, second language acquisition, and
bilingualism. We will also compare different theoretical approaches, and address the
Psychology 143 (Language
classic "nature vs. nurture" question by examining both traditional generativist
Acquisition)
approaches and more recent usage based models.

3
3
3

Philosophy:
CogSci / Linguistics C108 (The
Challenge of Cognitive Science to
Western Philosophy)
Philosophy 128 (Philosophy of
Science)
Philosophy 130 (Philosophy of
Social Science)
Philosophy 138 (Philosophy of
Society)

Philosophy 140A,B (Intermediate


Logic)
Philosophy 174 (Locke)

A survey of main topics in the logic of science and of other issues coming under the
general heading of philosophy of science.
This course deals with the ontology of society and thus provides a foundation for the
social sciences. The main questions discussed are: 1) What is the mode of existence of
social reality? 2) How does it relate to psychological and physical reality? 3) What
implications does social ontology have for social explanations?
Major concepts, results, and techniques of modern logic. Basic set theoretic tools.
Model theoretic treatment of propositional and first-order logic (completeness,
compactness, Lowenheim-Skolem). Philosophical implcations of these results.
Major concepts, results, and techniques of modern logic. Turing machines,
computability theory, undecidability of first-order logic, proof theory, Godel's first and
second inompleteness theorms. Philosophical implications of these results.

Philosophy 176 (Hume)


Philosophy 178 (Kant)
Philosophy 185 (Heidegger)
Philosophy 186 (Wittgenstein)

A close reading and extended discussion of central parts of Wittgenstein's


Philosophical Investigations.

Philosophy 188 (Phenomenology)

Backgrounds of phenomenology and existentialism. Husserl and Merleau-Ponty.

Society, Culture, and Cognition:

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4
4
4
4
4

In the contemporary world, different systems of knowledge, philosophies, and


techniques of the self, understandings of normality and pathology, illness and healing,
are increasingly engaged in a dialogue with each other in the lives, on the bodies, and
in the imagination of people. The terms of this dialogue are often unequal and painful,
yet they are also productive of new subjectivities and new voices. It is the task of a
renewed psychological anthropology to study and reflect on these processes. Topics to
be covered in this class include new forms of the subject and ethics at the intersection
of psychical/psychiatric, political, and religious processes and discources; ethnopsychiatry, psychoanalysis, the psychology of colonization and racism;
anthropological approaches to possession and altered states, emotion, culture, and the
imagination, madness and mental illness. The specific stress will be on the stakes of
Anthropology 149 (Psychological
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of anthropology of the psyche today, for an understanding of power and subjugation,
Anthropology)
instructor
delusion and the imagination, violence, and the possibility of new forms of life.
Anthropology 160AC (Forms of
Prerequisites: Upper division A world-wide survey of the major and minor forms of folklore with special emphasis
Folklore)
standing
upon proverbs, riddles, superstitions, games, songs, and narratives.
Anthropology 161 (Narrative
The study of folktales, myths, legends, and other forms of verbal art; methods and
Folklore)
theories of folklore.
Introduction to interdisciplinary study and design of New Media. Survey of theoretical
and practical foundations of New Media including theory and history; analysis and
reception; computational foundations; social implications; interaction, visual, physical,
Information 146 (Foundations of
and narrative design. Instruction combines lectures and project-based learning using
Prerequisites: No prior New Media
New Media)
case studies from everyday technology (e.g., telephone, camera, web).
production experience required
Linguistics 130 (Comparative and
Methods of reconstruction. Types and explanations of language change. Dialectology.
Historical Linguistics)
Prerequisites: 100
The establishment of language relationships and subgroupings.
Linguistic background and the general principles of language spread. Mechanisms of
language spread, including creolization-decreolization, language planning, and the role
of bilingualism. Case studies in language spread, including Austronesian, IndoLinguistics C139 / Slavic C139
European, Amerindian, Uralic, African, Sinitic, and Australian languages.
(Language Spread)
Relationship of language spread to immigration and culture spreads.
An overview of research over the past 30 years on the relationship between language
and gender: how women's use of language differs from men's, in U.S. and other
cultures; how men and women are spoken of differently; how women and men have
different amounts of access to power via public discourse; gender differences in
nondominant groups (e.g., lesbians and gays; African Americans); the role of
Linguistics 151 (Language and
stereotyping in linguistic differences between the sexes; role of gender in discourse
Gender)
genres.
In this course, students explore with a faculty member the history, structure, and
Linguistics 170 (History, Structure
sociolinguistics of a particular language. Generally, this is a language that is a research
and Sociolinguistics of a Particular Prerequisites: As particular interest of the professor. The language investigated changes with each offering of this
Language)
instructor requires
course.
A study of the philosophical and metaphysical aspects of Native American world
Native American Studies 151 (Native Prerequisites: 71 or consent views, with emphasis on systems of knowledge, explanations of natural phenomena,
American Philosophy)
of instructor
and relations of human beings to nature through ritual and ceremonial observances.
Philosophy 153 (Chinese
Philosophy)
Political Science 161 (Public
The nature of public opinion, attitude formation, electoral turnout and choice; political
Opinion, Voting and Participation)
cleavages; the role of the mass public.
Political Science 164A (Political
Personality factors in political behavior; psychological roots of decision-making;
Psychology and Involvement)
leadership; psychological sources of political belief; conflict theory.

4
4
4
3
4
3

3
3
4
4
4

Traditionally, research on prejudice and stereotyping has focused on the psychological


mechanisms that lead people to be biased against others. Recent research has begun to
shed light on the psychological legacy of prejudice and stereotyping for their targets.
This course will review the major contributions of each of these literatures, providing
students with a broad understanding of both classic and current issues in the field. The
Psychology 167AC (Stigma and
Prerequisites: 1 or consent of course will be divided into three sections: bias (i.e., the perpetrator's perspective),
Prejudice)
instructor
stigma (i.e., the target's perspective), and intergroup relations.
A broad consideration of the historical relationships between philosophy, literature,
and rhetoric, with special emphasis on selected themes of the classical and medieval
periods.
A
Rhetoric 103A or B (Approaches and
broad consideration of the historical relationship between philosophy, literature, and
Paradigms in the History of
Prerequisites: 10 or consent rhetoric, with special emphasis on selected themes within the early modern and
Rhetorical Theory)
of instructor
modern periods.
Consideration of the rhetoric of hermeneutics or biblical interpretation with special
Rhetoric 105 (Rhetorical Theory and
emphasis on the mythical, symbolic, and allegorical language as the bearer of
Practice in Historical Eras)
persuasive intention.
Study and practice of advanced techniques of argumentation for students with wellRhetoric 110 (Advanced
Any 1A-1B sequence or
developed writing skills. Ethical, logical and pathetic appeals; control of register and
Argumentative Writing)
upper division standing
tone; assessment of a wide variety of real audiences; genre studies.
Analysis of the ways in which political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists,
economists and psychologists establish the authoritativeness of their claims. Focus is
Rhetoric 170 (Rhetoric of Social
on the presentation of data as fact, the use of quantitative methods, and other
Science)
"strategies" through which social knowledge is transformed into objective information.
Rhetoric 174 (Rhetoric of Scientific
Discourse)
Rhetoric 175 (Rhetoric of
Philosophical Discourse)
Rhetoric 177 (Language, Truth, and
Dialogue)

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4
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4